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Title:
LOW NOISE BROADBAND AMPLIFIER WITH RESISTIVE MATCHING
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/215502
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Various circuitry may benefit from appropriate matching. For example, certain low noise broadband amplifiers may benefit from resistive matching.

Inventors:
TERRY, Andrew (Suite 113 National Innovation Centre,,2-, Cornwallis Street 2015, 2015, AU)
Application Number:
IB2019/000518
Publication Date:
November 14, 2019
Filing Date:
May 02, 2019
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
MORSE MICRO PTY LTD (Suite 113, National Innovation Centre,2-4, Cornwallis Stree, Eveleigh 2015, 2015, AU)
International Classes:
H03F1/56; H03F1/26; H03F3/68
Download PDF:
Claims:
WE CLAIM:

1. A circuit, comprising:

an input port configured to receive a baseband signal;

an output port configured to provide an amplified version of the baseband signal; a plurality of parallel amplifiers connected to the input port, wherein a resistor is disposed between the input port and a first amplifier of the plurality of parallel amplifiers, wherein the resistor is configured to provide an input impedance that matches a source impedance; and

a summing circuit configured to sum outputs of the plurality of parallel amplifiers and provide the amplified version of the baseband signal to the output port.

2. The circuit of claim 1, wherein a plurality of distinct paths connect the input port to the output port, wherein the plurality of distinct paths comprise a first path and a second path, wherein the first amplifier is on the first path and a second amplifier of the plurality of parallel amplifiers is on the second path.

3. The circuit of claim 2, wherein the first path comprises a plurality of series connected operational amplifiers including the first amplifier.

4. The circuit of claim 2, wherein the second path comprises a plurality of series connected operational amplifiers including the second amplifier.

5. The circuit of claim 2, wherein the second path comprises a plurality of parallel connected operational amplifiers including the second amplifier. 6 The circuit of claim 1, wherein the circuit comprises a single-ended circuit.

7. The circuit of claim 1, wherein the circuit comprises a differential circuit.

8. The circuit of claim 1, wherein the circuit comprises a multi -phase circuit.

9. The circuit of claim 1, wherein a value of the resistor is configured to cancel a noise current otherwise provided to the circuit by the resistor.

10. The circuit of claim 9, wherein a gain of the second amplifier is configured to cancel the noise.

11. The circuit of claim 1, wherein the summing circuit comprises a summing amplifier.

12. The circuit of claim 1, wherein the summing circuit comprises an analog to digital converter.

13. The circuit of claim 1, wherein the circuit comprises a single-phase circuit.

14. The circuit of claim 8, wherein each phase of the multi-phase circuit can be selectively switched out.

15. The circuit of claim 14, further comprising a plurality of capacitors configured to create frequency dependent transfer functions.

16. A circuit, comprising:

an input port configured to receive a baseband signal;

an output port configured to provide an amplified version of the baseband signal; a plurality of parallel amplifiers connected to the input port;

a circuit input node, disposed between the input port and the plurality of parallel amplifiers;

a plurality of distinct paths comprising at least a first path and a second path, wherein the first path comprises a first resistor configured to provide an input impedance at the input port, a first amplifier disposed after the first resistor, wherein the first amplifier is one of the plurality of parallel amplifiers, wherein the first path is in-phase to a noise generated by the first resistor and in-phase to the circuit input node, wherein the second path comprises a second amplifier of the plurality of parallel amplifiers, and wherein the second path is anti-phase to the noise generated by the first resistor and in-phase to the circuit input node; and

a summing circuit configured to sum outputs of the plurality of parallel amplifiers and provide the amplified version of the baseband signal to the output port.

17. The circuit according to claim 16, wherein the circuit is configured to down convert RF to baseband and the circuit further comprises:

a passive mixer comprising an RF side, wherein the plurality of parallel amplifiers connected in a single-phase circuit to the input port, wherein the passive mixer is connected in front of the first amplifier, and the input impedance is configured to match an impedance of the RF side of the passive mixer.

18. The circuit of claim 16, further comprising: a second resistor, wherein the second resistor comprises a second resistance and is connected in parallel to the first amplifier;

a third resistor, wherein the third resistor comprises a third resistance and is connected after the first amplifier; and

wherein a product of a first resistance of the first resistor and a gain of the second amplifier is equal to a ratio of the second resistance to the third resistance.

Description:
LOW NOISE BROADBAND AMPLIFIER WITH RESISTIVE MATCHING

BACKGROUND:

Field:

Various circuitry may benefit from appropriate matching. For example, certain low noise broadband amplifiers may benefit from resistive matching.

Description of the Related Art:

A traditional radio frequency (RF) receiver signal chain uses an RF amplifier first. This amplifier is typically a low noise amplifier (LNA). The input impedance is matched to the antenna using inductors.

Brief Description of the Drawings:

For proper understanding of the invention, reference should be made to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 illustrates a circuit diagram of a circuit according to certain embodiments. Figure 2 illustrates an example of a differential implementation, according to certain embodiments.

Figure 3 illustrates an example of a multiple phase implementation, according to certain embodiments.

Detailed Description:

Certain embodiments of the present invention provide a passive mixer and noise cancelling baseband amplifier. The amplifier arrangement of certain embodiments may provide a reduced area and higher linearity compared with previous approaches.

Certain embodiments of an amplifier may be used in a variety of applications. For example, the amplifier according to certain embodiments may be used in RF receiver signal chains, but also may be used in other implementations, such as in sensor amplifiers, such as microphones, accelerometers, and the like.

Figure 1 illustrates a circuit diagram of a circuit according to certain embodiments. The diagram of Figure 1 provides an example of one implementation of certain embodiments, but as will be discussed below, other implementations are also possible.

As can be seen in Figure 1, a resistor Rl can be provided between the circuit input, labelled as node a, and a baseband amplifier Al. The baseband amplifier Al can be configured to receive current input and provide current output. This amplifier can have a low impedance input. The gain of this amplifier can be defined by the ratio of the resistors R2 and R3, such that Gain = - R2/R3.

In parallel with the series connection of resistor Rl and baseband amplifier Al, the circuit can also include a voltage to current amplifier A2 with high input impedance. The gain of this amplifier may be -G2.

The circuit can also include a summing transimpedance amplifier A3. This amplifier can sum currents ii, which is the current from amplifier Al, and i ¾ which is the current from amplifier A2. The input port can be modelled as a source having a source voltage Vsrc and a source resistance Rsrc, which can provide a voltage V a at node a.

In operation, this circuit can process input signals from the input port and provide a corresponding amplified signal at the output port. More particularly, a voltage signal on node a can result in current h at the output of amplifier Al . The value of this current may be as follows:

-R2 V n

ti = - X -

R3 Rl

The same voltage signal V a can also result in a current i 2 at the output of amplifier 2. The value of this current may be as follows:

k— G2 x V a

Thus, for voltage signal V a , the sum of the output currents currents ii and i 2 can be as follows:

-R2 Ik

h + h — + (-G 2

R3 X Rl x V a )

When

R 2

— = Rl x G2

R3

Then the sum can be simplified as follows:

h + i 2 = ( ~ G2 x V a ) + (-G2 x V a )

i± i 2 = — 2 x G2 x V a

Nevertheless, as noted in Figure 1, there may be some noise current i mi from resistor Rl. The noise current i mi from resistor Rl can result in a contribution to output current ii, as follows: That same noise current, i mi , can generate a noise voltage Vna on node a, as follows:

Vna Rl x (— i nrl )

This noise voltage Vna can result in a contribution to output current 12, as follows:

i 2 =—G2 x Rl x (—i n n)

The sum of these contributions to output currents h and 12 is as follows:

When

R 2

— = Rl x G2

R3

Then the sum can be simplified as follows:

i + i 2 = (— Rl X G2 x i ny ) T (— G2 x Rl x (— i nri ))

i + i 2 = i nri (— Rl x G2) + i nr -^ (G2 x +R1) i + i 2 =— fi ri (^2 x Rl) + i nr -^ (G2 x +R1)

h + h — 0

Thus, in the case where the ratio of resistors R2 and R3 is selected to be equal to the product of Rl and gain G2, then the signal path gain from Va is twice that of G2, while the noise gain from Rl is 0.

The impedance seen looking into node a can be determined by resistor Rl. Thus, with appropriate selection of resistor values, the circuit can prevent the noise from this resistor from appearing at the circuit’s output.

There can be various modifications to the above embodiments. For example, as shown Figure 1, there can be a plurality of distinct paths connecting the input port to the output port. The plurality of distinct paths can include a first path and a second path. A first amplifier, namely amplifier Al, can be on the first path and a second amplifier, namely amplifier A2, can be on the second path.

The first path can include a plurality of series connected operational amplifiers. This could be a modification to the circuit shown in Figure 1. For example, in addition to amplifier Al there could be additional amplifiers connected in series to Al, optionally between amplifier Al and the summing amplifier, A3.

The second path can also include a plurality of series connected operational amplifiers. This could be a modification to the circuit shown in Figure 1. For example, in addition to amplifier A2 there could be additional amplifiers connected in series to A2, optionally between amplifier A2 and the summing amplifier, A3. The second path can also include a plurality of parallel connected operational amplifiers. This could be a modification to the circuit shown in Figure 1. For example, in addition to amplifier A2 there could be additional amplifiers connected in parallel to A2, between node a and the summing amplifier, A3.

The above modifications can be applied in combination with one another. For example, the first path can include multiple series-connected operational amplifiers and the second path can include multiple series-connected operational amplifiers and multiple parallel-connected operational amplifiers.

Both single-ended and differential implementations are possible. Figure 1 illustrates an example of a single-ended implementation. Figure 2 illustrates an example of a differential implementation, according to certain embodiments. Figure 2 shows how an input port can include a differential line instead of a single-ended approach with a ground.

Both single-phase and multiple phase implementations are possible. Figure 1 illustrates an example of a single-phase implementation. Figure 3 illustrates an example of a multiple phase implementation, according to certain embodiments. As shown in Figure 3, the circuit can included multiple phases. Figure 3 illustrates two phases, but other numbers of phases are also possible. Figure 3 illustrates that each of the phases can be selectively switched out. Alternatively, each phase could be provided with a single-phase implementation.

In certain embodiments, capacitors can be used to create frequency dependent transfer functions.

Figure 1 shows a summing circuit that it is a summing amplifier. There are other possible summing circuits, such as an input stage of an analog to digital converter (ADC) circuit. Likewise, while Figure 1 illustrates amplifiers Al and A2 as operational amplifiers (op-amps), other kinds of amplifiers are also permitted.

Certain embodiments can be used for an RF receiver, where a passive mixer is placed in front of the amplifier. The baseband amplifier’s input impedance is used for RF impedance matching on the RF side of the passive mixer.

One having ordinary skill in the art will readily understand that the invention as discussed above may be practiced with steps in a different order, and/or with hardware elements in configurations which are different than those which are disclosed. Therefore, although the invention has been described based upon these preferred embodiments, it would be apparent to those of skill in the art that certain modifications, variations, and alternative constructions would be apparent, while remaining within the spirit and scope of the invention.