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Title:
MAGNETICALLY ATTRACTED LIQUID CIRCULATOR
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2015/187192
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A machine has first, second and third reservoirs, first and second assemblies, and a generator. The first assembly includes permanent magnetics and magnetic force sufficient to lift a magnetically attracted liquid against the force of gravity through an entrance and towards an exit of the second reservoir. The second assembly has variable second magnetic force sufficient to be increased to attract the magnetically attracted liquid into the third reservoir from the exit of the second reservoir and decreased to allow the magnetically attracted liquid to fall under the influence of gravity into an entrance of a third reservoir without a substantial quantity thereof being magnetically attracted by the first magnetic force into the exit of the second reservoir. The generator produces electricity from the movement under the influence of gravity of the magnetically attracted liquid through the third reservoir for return to the first reservoir.

Inventors:
CALVANO, Nicholas, David (25 Red Rock Cove Drive, Sedona, AZ, 86351, US)
Application Number:
US2014/064771
Publication Date:
December 10, 2015
Filing Date:
November 10, 2014
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
CALVANO, Nicholas, David (25 Red Rock Cove Drive, Sedona, AZ, 86351, US)
International Classes:
B65G15/58; B65G47/04; F04B9/107; F04F10/02
Foreign References:
US20060110262A12006-05-25
US6011334A2000-01-04
US20090236856A12009-09-24
JP2006246572A2006-09-14
US20030151258A12003-08-14
US4366857A1983-01-04
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DESANDRO, Bradley, K. (Desandro Law Group PLLC, P.O. Box 26262Phoenix, AZ, 85068, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed is:

1. A machine comprising:

a first reservoir, in fluid communication with a third reservoir, for containing a magnetically attracted liquid;

a second reservoir, having an entrance and exit, in fluid communication with, and being located above, the first reservoir;

a first assembly, including one more permanent magnetics, having a first magnetic force sufficient to lift the magnetically attracted liquid against the force of gravity through the entrance and towards the exit of the second reservoir;

a second assembly having a variable second magnetic force sufficient to be:

increased so as to attract the magnetically attracted liquid into the third reservoir from the exit of the second reservoir; and

decreased so as to allow the magnetically attracted liquid to fall under the influence of gravity into an entrance of a third reservoir without a substantial quantity thereof being magnetically attracted by the first magnetic force into the exit of the second reservoir;

and

a generator producing electricity from the movement under the influence of gravity of the magnetically attracted liquid through the third reservoir for return to the first reservoir.

2. The machine as defined in Claim 1 , wherein the generator comprises:

a turbine rotated by the movement under the influence of gravity of the magnetically attracted liquid through the third reservoir;

a first component having magnetic field that is rotated with the rotation of the turbine; a second component having an electrical conductor, located within the magnetic field of the first component, in which an electrical current is generated by the rotation of the magnetic field of the first component.

3. The machine as defined in Claim 3, wherein the generator further comprises a respective plurality of said turbines and first and second components.

4. The machine as defined in Claim 1 , wherein:

the magnetically attracted liquid is electrically conductive; and

the generator comprises a third assembly, including one more permanent magnets, having one or more magnetic fields thiough which the magnetically attracted liquid moves under the force of gravity through the third reservoir such that an electrical current is generated in the magnetically attracted liquid.

5. The machine as defined in Claim 1 , wherein the magnetically attracted liquid is selected from the group consisting of a liquid metal, a metal alloy that is liquid at room temperature, a smart fluid, a carrier fluid having in suspension undissolved nanometer sized magnetic particles, a smart fluid whose viscosity is changed by applying a magnetic field, a colloidal liquid made of nanoscale ferromagnetic particles, and a ferrofluid.

6. The machine as defined in Claim 1, further comprising a third assembly, including one more permanent magnetics, having a third magnetic force sufficient to substantially wet a part of an inside surface with a portion of the magnetically attracted liquid above the part of the inside surface without preventing the other remaining portion of the magnetically attracted liquid above the part of the inside surface from moving away from the part of the inside surface, wherein the part of the inside surface is selected from the group consisting of:

a part of the an inside surface of the first reservoir;

a part of the an inside surface of the second reservoir;

a part of the an inside surface of the third reservoir; and

a combination of the forgoing.

7. The machine as defined in Claim 1, wherein:

the second assembly further comprises a component to vary second magnetic force for said increase and said decrease;

the component of the second assembly is selected from the group consisting of:

selected from the group consisting of: a control for electrical current supplied to an electromagnet generating the variable second magnetic force; and

a device moving one or more permanent magnetics towards and away from the exit of the second reservoir to respectively increase and decease the variable second magnetic force.

8. A method comprising:

moving a magnetically attracted liquid with a permanent magnet component having a first magnetic force greater than the force of gravity from a first location at a first height to a second location at a second height higher than the first height;

moving the magnetically attracted liquid from the second location to a third location at a third height with a second magnetic force greater than the first magnetic force;

reducing the second magnetic force on the magnetically attracted liquid at the third location such that the magnetically attracted liquid is moved under the force of gravity away from the third location at the third height towards a fourth location at a fourth height lower than the third height, wherein the first and second magnetic forces and the second and third second locations are configured such that the magnetically attracted liquid at the third location is not moved to the second location when the second magnetic force is reduced; and

moving the magnetically attracted liquid from the third location to the fourth location under the force of gravity through an assembly that generates electricity from the movement of the magnetically attracted liquid for return to the first location.

9. The method as defined in Claim 8, wherein the assembly that generates electricity from the movement of the magnetically attracted liquid comprises:

a turbine rotated by the movement under the influence of gravity of the magnetically attracted liquid;

a first component having magnetic field that is rotated with the rotation of the turbine: a second component having an electrical conductor, located within the magnetic field of the first component, in which an electrical current is generated by the rotation of the magnetic field of the first component.

10. The method as defined in Claim 9, wherein the assembly further comprises a respective plurality of said turbines and first and second components.

11. The method as defined in Claim 8, wherein:

the magnetically attracted liquid is electrically conductive; and

the assembly that generates electricity from the movement of the magnetically attracted hquid further comprises an assembly, including one more permanent magnets, having one or more magnetic fields through which the magnetically attracted liquid moves under the force of gravity such that an electrical current is generated in the magnetically attracted liquid.

12. The method as defined in Claim 8, wherein the magnetically attracted liquid is selected from the group consisting of a liquid metal, a metal alloy that is liquid at room temperature, a smart fluid, a carrier fluid having in suspension undissolved nanometer sized magnetic particles, a smart fluid whose viscosity is changed by applying a magnetic field, a colloidal liquid made of nanoscale ferromagnetic particles, and a ferro fluid.

13. The method as defined in Claim 8, further comprising:

applying a magnetic force, generated by one more permanent magnetics, sufficient to substantially wet a part of an inside surface with a portion of the magnetically attracted liquid above the part of the inside surface without preventing the other remaining portion of the magnetically attracted liquid above the part of the inside surface from moving away from the pail of the inside surface, wherein the part of the inside surface is selected from the group consisting of:

a part of the an inside surface of the first location;

a part of the an inside surface of the second location;

a part of the an inside surface of the third location;

a part of the an inside surface of the fourth location; and

a combination of the forgoing. 14. The method as defined in Claim 8, wherein reducing the second magnetic force on the magnetically attracted liquid at the third location comprises: controlling an electrical current supplied to an electromagnet generating the second magnetic force; and

moving one or more permanent magnetics towards and away from the third location. 15. A machine comprising:

a first reservoir, in fluid communication with a third reservoir, for containing a magnetically attracted liquid;

a second reservoir, having an entrance and exit, in fluid communication with, and being located above, the first reservoir;

a first assembly, including one more permanent magnetics, having a first magnetic force sufficient to lift the magnetically attracted hquid against the force of gravity through the entrance and towards the exit of the second reservoir;

a second assembly a having a variable second magnetic force sufficient to be:

increased so as to attract the magnetically attracted liquid into the third reservoir from the exit of the second reservoir; and

decreased so as to allow the magnetically attracted liquid to fall under the influence of gravity into an entrance of a third reserv oir without a substantial quantity thereof being magnetically attracted by the first magnetic force into the exit of the second reservoir;

and

a generator producing electricity from the movement under the influence of gravity of the magnetically attracted liquid through the third reservoir for return to the first reservoir and comprising a plurality of rotor-stator assemblies each including:

a turbine rotated by the movement under the influence of gravity of the magnetically attracted liquid through the third reservoir;

a first component having magnetic field that is rotated with the rotation of the turbine;

a second component having an electrical conductor, located within the magnetic field of the first component, in which an electrical current is generated by the rotation of the magnetic field of the first component.

16. The machine as defined in Claim 15, wherein the magnetically attracted liquid is selected from the group consisting of a liquid metal, a metal alloy that is liquid at room temperature, a smart fluid, a carrier fluid having in suspension undissolved nanometer sized magnetic particles, a smart fluid whose viscosity is changed by applying a magnetic field, a colloidal liquid made of nanoscale ferromagnetic particles, and a ferrofluid.

17. The machine as defined in Claim 05, further comprising a third assembly, including one more permanent magnetics, having a third magnetic force sufficient to substantially wet a part of an inside surface with a portion of the magnetically attracted liquid above the part of the inside surface without preventing the other remaining portion of the magnetically attracted liquid above the part of the inside surface from moving away from the part of the inside surface, wherein the part of the inside surface is selected from the group consisting of:

a part of the an inside surface of the first reservoir;

a part of the an inside surface of the second reservoir;

a part of the an inside surface of the third reservoir; and

a combination of the forgoing.

18. The machine as defined in Claim 15, wherein:

the second assembly further comprises a component to vary second magnetic fori said increase and said decrease;

the component of the second assembly is selected from the group consisting of:

selected from the group consisting of:

a control for electrical current supplied to an electromagnet generating the variable second magnetic force; and

a device moving one or more permanent magnetics towards and away from the exit of the second reservoir to respectively increase and decease the variable second magnetic force.

19. The machine as defined in Claim 15, further comprising an electrical storage device for storing electricity produced by the generator.

20. The machine as defined in Claim 18, further comprising an electrical storage device for storing electricity produced by the generator, wherein the electrical storage device supplies power to:

the electromagnet generating the variable second magnetic force; and

the device moving the one or more permanent magnetics towards and away from the exit of the second reservoir.

Description:
MAGNETICALLY ATTRACTED LIQUID CIRCULATOR

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 62,070,337, filed August 22, 2014, titled "Magnetic Siphon Electric Generator," to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61,998, 182, filed June 23, 2014, titled "Magnetic Siphon Electric Generator," to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 62,070,773, filed August 28, 2014, titled "Magnetic Siphon Electric Generator," to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61,997,555, filed June 4, 2014, titled "Magnetic Siphon Electric Generator," to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61,997,799, filed June 1 1, 2014, titled "Magnetic Siphon Electric Generator," to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61/998,266, filed June 2, 2014, titled " Magnetic Siphon Electric Generator", and to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 62/077,205, filed November 8, 2014, titled " Magnetic Siphon Electric Generator", wherein each of the foregoing is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD

This invention relates to a liquid circulator, more particularly relates to a magnetically attracted liquid circulator, and most particularly relates to a ferrofluid circulator.

BACKGROUND

Energy is required to circulate a magnetically attracted liquid, particularly when the circulation is against the force of gravity. It would be an advance in the liquid circulation arts to provide methods and machines to circulate a magnetically attracted liquid which may use energy at least in part generated from the circulation of the liquid.

SUMMARY

In one implementation, there is provided a machine having first, second and third reservoirs, first and second assemblies, and a generator. The first assembly includes one more permanent magnetics and a first magnetic force sufficient to lift a magnetically attracted liquid against the force of gravity through an entrance and towards an exit of the second reservoir. The second assembly has variable second magnetic force sufficient to be increased so as to attract the magnetically attracted liquid into the third reservoir from the exit of the second reservoir and decreased so as to allow the magnetically attracted liquid to fall under the influence of gravity into an entrance of a third reservoir without a substantial quantity thereof being magnetically attracted by the first magnetic force into the exit of the second reservoir. The generator produces electricity from the movement under the influence of gravity of the magnetically attracted liquid through the third reservoir for return to the first reservoir. Generated electricity can be used to circulate the magnetically attracted liquid, such as by powering a device that increases and decreases the variable second magnetic force.

In another implementation, there is provided a method having steps that include moving a magnetically attracted liquid with a permanent magnet component having a first magnetic force greater than the force of gravity from a first location at a first height to a second location at a second height higher than the first height. Another step includes moving the magnetically attracted liquid from the second location to a third location at a third height with a second magnetic force greater than the first magnetic force. Yet another step includes reducing the second magnetic force on the magnetically attracted liquid at the third location such that the magnetically attracted liquid is moved under the force of gravity away from the third location at the third height towards a fourth location at a fourth height lower than the third height, wherein the first and second magnetic forces and the second and third second locations are configured such that the magnetically attracted liquid at the third location is not moved to the second location when the second magnetic force is reduced. Still another step includes moving the magnetically attracted liquid from the third location to the fourth location under the force of gravity through an assembly that generates electricity from the movement of the magnetically attracted liquid for return to the first location. Generated electricity can be used to circulate the magnetically attracted liquid, such as by powering a device that reduces the second magnetic force on the magnetically attracted liquid at the third location.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Advantages, features and characteristics of the present invention, as well as methods, operation and functions of related elements, will become apparent upon consideration of the following description and claims with reference to the accompanying drawing, all of which form a part of the specification. The invention is illustrated in the figures of the accompanying drawings which are meant to be exemplary and not limiting.

FIG. 1 is a flow chart illustrating an exemplary method for circulating a magnetically attracted liquid through a passage having a plurality of sections that include a Bottom Well Section, a Magnetic Lift Section, a Staging Section, a Control Gate Section, a Penstock Section, and a Dynamo Section according to non-limiting implementations;

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of system for circulating a magnetically attracted liquid through a passage having a plurality of sections that include a Bottom Well Section, a Magnetic Lift Section, a Staging Section, a Control Gate Section, a Penstock Section, and a Dynamo Section according to non-limiting implementations;

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of machine for circulating a magnetically attracted liquid through a passage having a plurality of sections that include a Bottom Well Section, a Magnetic Lift Section, a Staging Section, a Control Gate Section, a Penstock Section, and a Dynamo Section according to non-limiting implementations;

FIG. 4 illustrates a partial top planar view of a plurality of magnetic fields from a linear configuration of a plurality of round permanent magnets, which configuration can be used in the Magnetic Lift Section in accordance with non-limiting implementations of FIGS. 2-3, and further illustrating a partial top planar view of a magnetic field of one such round permanent magnet;

FIG. 5 is a cross section, cutaway view of the Magnetic Lift Sections in accordance with non-limiting implementations of FIGS. 2-3;

FIG. 6 is a cross section, cutaway view of the Magnetic Lift Sections in accordance with non-limiting implementations of FIGS. 2-3;

FIG. 7 is a cross section, cutaway view of the intersection of the bottom well and Magnetic Lift Sections in accordance with non-limiting implementations of FIGS. 2-3;

FIG. 8 is a cross section, cutaway view of the intersection of the lift and staging sections, a cross section, cutaway view the staging section, a cross section, cutaway view of the intersection of the Staging and Control Gate Sections, and a cross section, cutaway view of the Penstock Section in accordance with non-limiting implementations of FIGS. 2-3;

FIG. 9a is a front elevational cross section view of a rotor and stator assembly that can be used in the Dynamo Section in accordance with non-limiting implementations of FIGS. 2-3;

FIG. 9b is a top view of a turbine rotated by liquid moving under the influence of gravity through a passage, where the rotation of the turbine rotates dual shafts, each shaft rotating a rotor and stator assembly to generate electricity, and where the turbine can be used in the Dynamo Section in accordance with non-limiting implementations of FIGS. 2-3; and

FIG. 10 is a cross section, cutaway view of an electrically conductive liquid flowing under the influence of gravity in a passage way, where the electrically conductive liquid moves through a plurality of magnetic fields to generate electricity, where the passage way can be used in the Dynamo Section in accordance with non-limiting implementations of FIGS. 2-3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A flow chart shown in FIG. 1 illustrates a flow diagram of a method 100 according to a non-limiting implementation. The flow chart in Figure 1 may be implemented, for example, by systems as are shown in FIGS. 2-3. Method 100 illustrates steps for circulating a Magnetically Attracted Liquid (MAL). The MAL can comprise a liquid metal, a metal alloy that is liquid at room temperature such as liquid mercury, gallium, or an alloy that contains gallium, indium, and tin.

Alternatively, the MAL can be a carrier fluid for undissolved magnetic particles in suspension, where the particles are preferably nanometer sized. When the MAL is exposed to a magnetic field, the magnetized particles produce a body force.

Still further, the MAL can be a colloidal liquid that is made of nanoscale ferromagnetic particles suspended by Brownian motion such that the particles do not settle under normal conditions In this implementation. When this type of MAL is exposed to a magnetic field, the bulk of the liquid becomes magnetized and its surface acquires a shape to minimize the energy of the system. Each particle is coated with a surfactant to inhibit clumping. Preferably, the force of magnetic attraction of the nanoparticles will be stronger that the surfactant's Van der Waals force so as to prevent magnetic clumping or agglomeration.

In a further implementation, the MAL can be a smart fluid whose properties, for example the viscosity, can be changed by applying a magnetic field.

In a still further implementation, the MAL can be a ferrofluid. By way of example, and not by way of limitation the ferrofluid can have a density of about 1.42 kg/1, a mass per ounce of approximately 0.042 kg, an average individual particle dimension of approximately 10 nm.

Method 100 begins in step 102 at which there is introduced a MAL into a Well Section. The Well Section is in fluid communication with both a Magnetic Lifting Section and a Dynamo Section.

Although both the Magnetic Lifting Dynamo Sections may include a magnetic field to which the MAL is attracted, the force of the magnetic field in the Magnetic Lifting Section is significantly stronger than that of the Dynamo Section such that the MAL in the Well Section is correspondingly attracted from the Well Section towards the Magnetic Lifting Section rather than from the Well Section to the Dynamo Section. The attraction of the MAL by the magnetic field of the Magnetic Lifting Section is sufficient to cause the MAL in the Well Section to be progressively withdrawn upward and out of the Well Section, against the force of gravity, into the Magnetic Lifting Section. Preferably, the Magnetic Lifting Section will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Well Section.

The Magnetic Lifting Section is in fluid communication with a Staging Section. The

Staging Section includes a magnetic field to which the MAL is attracted. The attraction of the MAL to the magnetic field in the Staging Section is sufficient to cause the MAL to be progressively withdrawn from the Magnetic Lifting Section into the Staging Section. Preferably, the Staging Section will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Magnetic Lifting Section.

The Staging Section is in fluid communication with a Control Gate Section. The Control Gate Section includes a magnetic field to which the MAL is attracted. The magnetic field in the Control Gate Section has a variable force that can substantially exceed that of the force of the magnetic field in the Staging Section such that the MAL is attracted from and out of the Staging Section into the Control Gate Section.

The force of the magnetic field in the Control Gate Section can be varied both below and above the force of the magnetic field in the Staging Section. When the force of the magnetic field in the Control Gate Section exceeds the force of the magnetic field in the Staging Section by a first predetermined threshold, then the MAL within the Staging Section will be drawn out of the Staging Section and into the Control Gate Section to a distance that is within a second predetermined threshold. When the MAL within the Control Gate Section is separated from the Staging Section at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field within the Control Gate Section will be substantially reduced. This reduction can be accomplished mechanically, electrically, or both, in methods and implementations that are well known. When the force is substantially reduced by a third predetermined threshold, then the MAL within the Control Gate Section will fall under the force of gravity into the Penstock Section with which the Control Gate Section is in fluid communication. Also, when the MAL within the Control Gate Section is separated from the Staging Section at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold simultaneously when the force of the magnetic field within the Control Gate Section is substantially reduced by the third predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field within the Staging Section is not sufficient to cause a substantial quantity of the MAL to return to the Staging Section from the Control Gate Section. Preferably, the Penstock Section will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a lower altitude than, the Control Gate Section.

The Penstock Section is in fluid communication with the Dynamo Section. The Dynamo Section is preferably equipped with a component enabling the generation electricity by the movement of the MAL through the Dynamo Section. One such component includes an assembly which provides a rotor assembly having a turbine assembly that is rotated by movement of the MAL through the Dynamo Section. The rotation of the turbine assembly causes a stator assembly to generate electricity by way of a magnetic assembly that moves within another magnetic field as will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the relevant arts. Another component that can enable the generation electricity is a component that includes an assembly providing a magnetic field proximal to the Dynamo Section, where movement of the MAL through the magnetic field in the Dynamo Section produces electricity when the MAL is capable of conducting electricity as will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the relevant arts.

The Dynamo Section is in fluid communication with, and preferably substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Well Section. The MAL exiting the Dynamo is returned to the Well Section. Preferably, the Well Section will be generally being the lowest altitude of the other Sections. When returned to the Well Section, the MAL is available for further circulation out of the Well Section into the Magnetic Lifting Section as described above.

Referring again to FIG. 1, at step 104 of method 100, following the introduction of the

MAL into the Well Section at step 102, a determination is made as whether the quantity of the MAL is within the Well Section is within a predetermined threshold. If not, then method 100 returns to step 102 for the introduction of more MAL into the Well Section. Otherwise, method 100 moved to step 106.

The predetermined threshold assessed at step 104 can be a range of quantities of the

MAL that is measured in weight and/or volume. The range of quantities will preferably be sufficient to provide a flow of the MAL into the Magnetic Lift Section from the Well Section, to provide a flow of the MAL through the Magnetic Lift Section, and to provide a flow of the MAL into the Staging Section.

At step 106 of method 100, a determination is made as whether the quantity of the MAL is within the Staging Section is within a predetermined threshold. If not, then method 100 repeats step 106 until the quantity of the MAL within the Staging Section has accumulated so as to be within the predetermined threshold. Otherwise, method 100 moved to step 108.

A step 108, magnetic force in Control Gate Section is increased so as to be greater than that of Staging Section. When the force of the magnetic field in the Control Gate Section exceeds the force of the magnetic field in the Staging Section by a first predetermined threshold, then the MAL within the Staging Section will be drawn out of the Staging Section and into the Control Gate Section to a distance that is within a second predetermined threshold as determined at step 1 10 of method 100. If the determination is not affirmative, then method 100 repeats step 108 until the determination is affirmative. Otherwise, method 100 moved to step 1 12.

At step 112 of method 100, the MAL within the Control Gate Section is separated from the Staging Section at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold. Then, the force of the magnetic field within the Control Gate Section will be substantially reduced. When the force is substantially reduced by a third predetermined threshold, then the MAL within the Control Gate Section will fall under the force of gravity into the Penstock Section with which the Control Gate Section is in fluid communication. Also, when the force of the magnetic field within the Control Gate Section is substantially reduced by the third predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field within the Staging Section is not sufficient to cause a substantial quantity of the MAL to return to the Staging Section from the Control Gate Section. Also, when the MAL within the Control Gate Section is separated from the Staging Section at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold simultaneously when the force of the magnetic field within the Control Gate Section is substantially reduced by the third predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field within the Staging Section is not sufficient to cause a substantial quantity of the MAL to return to the Staging Section from the Control Gate Section. Preferably, the Penstock Section will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Control Gate Section.

Fluid falling under the force of gravity through the Penstock Section will enter the Dynamo Section with which the Penstock Section is in fluid communication at step 1 12 of method 100 shown in FIG. 1. As the MAL moves through Dynamo Section to be returned to the Well Section, electricity is generated by a component of the Dynamo Section. When returned the Well Section, the MAL is available for further circulation out of the Well Section into the Magnetic Lifting Section, as shown by the connector from step 1 12 to step 104 of method 100 in FIG. 1. Referring to FIG. 2, a system 200 is shown for circulating a MAL 214 through a passageway having a plurality of sections that include a Bottom Well Section 202a, a Magnetic Lift Section 202b, a Staging Section 202c, a Control Gate Section 202d, a Penstock Section 202e, and a Dynamo Section 202f. The Well Section 202a is in fluid communication with both the Magnetic Lifting Section 202b and the Dynamo Section 202f.

Although both the Magnetic Lifting and Dynamo Sections 202b, 202f and may include a magnetic field to which the MAL is attracted, the force of the magnetic field 206a in the Magnetic Lifting Section 202b is significantly stronger than the force of the magnetic field 222 of the Dynamo Section 202f such that the MAL in the Well Section 202b is correspondingly attracted from the Well Section 202a towards the Magnetic Lifting Section 202b rather than from the Well Section 202a to the Dynamo Section 202f. The attraction of the MAL by the magnetic field 206a of the Magnetic Lifting Section 202b is sufficient to cause the MAL in the Well Section 202b to be progressively withdrawn upward and out of the Well Section 202a, against the force of gravity, into the Magnetic Lifting Section 202b. Preferably, the Magnetic Lifting Section 202b will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Well Section 202b.

The Magnetic Lifting Section 202b is in fluid communication with a Staging Section 202c. The Staging Section 202c includes a magnetic field 206c to which the MAL is attracted. The attraction of the MAL to the magnetic field 206b in the Staging Section is sufficient to cause the MAL to be progressively withdrawn from the Magnetic Lifting Section into the Staging Section. Preferably, the Staging Section will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Magnetic Lifting Section.

The Staging Section 202c is in fluid communication with a Control Gate Section 202d. The Control Gate Section 202d includes a magnetic field 206c to which the MAL is attracted. The magnetic field 206c in the Control Gate Section 202d has a variable force that can substantially exceed that of the force of the magnetic field 206b in the Staging Section 202c such that the MAL is attracted from and out of the Staging Section 202c into the Control Gate Section 202d.

The force of the magnetic field 206c in the Control Gate Section 202d can be varied both below and above the force of the magnetic field in the Staging Section 202c. When the force of the magnetic field 206c in the Control Gate Section exceeds the force of the magnetic field 206b in the Staging Section 202c by a first predetermined threshold, then the MAL within the Staging Section 202c will be drawn out of the Staging Section 202c and into the Control Gate Section 202d to a distance that is within a second predetermined threshold. When the MAL within the Control Gate Section 202d is separated from the Staging Section 202c at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field 206c within the Control Gate Section 202d will be substantially reduced. This reduction can be accomplished mechanically, electrically, or both, by methods and implementations that are well known. When the force is substantially reduced by a third predetermined threshold, then the MAL within the Control Gate Section 202d will fall under the force of gravity into the Penstock Section 202f with which the Control Gate Section 202d is in fluid communication. Also, when the MAL within the Control Gate Section 202d is separated from the Staging Section 202c at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold simultaneously when the force of the magnetic field 206c within the Control Gate Section 202d is substantially reduced by the third predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field 206c within the Staging Section 202c is not sufficient to cause a substantial quantity of the MAL to return to the Staging Section 202c from the Control Gate Section 202d. Preferably, the Penstock Section 202e will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a lower altitude than, the Control Gate Section 206c.

The Penstock Section 202e is in fluid communication with the Dynamo Section 202f. The Dynamo Section 202f is preferably equipped with a component 222 enabling the generation electricity by the movement of the MAL through the Dynamo Section 202f. Electricity so generated may be stored in an electrical storage device 220, used to power the alternating force of the magnetic field 206c of the Control Gate Section 202d, or both.

One such component 222 enabling the generation of electricity includes an assembly which provides a rotor assembly having a turbine assembly that is rotated by movement of the MAL through the Dynamo Section, such as in illustrated in FIGS. 9a-9b and discussed below. The rotation of the turbine assembly causes a stator assembly to generate electricity by way of a magnetic assembly that moves within another magnetic field as will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the relevant arts.

Another component 222 enabling the generation of electricity is a component that includes an assembly providing a magnetic field proximal to the Dynamo Section 202f, such as in illustrated in FIG. 10 and discussed below. Movement of the MAL through the magnetic field in the Dynamo Section 202f produces electricity when the MAL is capable of conducting electricity as will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the relevant arts. The Dynamo Section 202f is in fluid communication with, and preferably substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Well Section 202a. The MAL exiting the Dynamo Section 202f is returned to the Well Section 202a. Preferably, the Well Section 202a will be generally the lowest altitude of the other Sections. When returned to the Well Section 202a, the MAL is available for further circulation out of the Well Section 202a into the Magnetic Lifting Section 202b as described above.

Referring to FIG. 3, a system 300 is shown for circulating a MAL thorough a passageway having a plurality of sections that include a Bottom Well Section 302a, a Magnetic Lift Section 302b, a Staging Section 302c, a Control Gate Section 302d, a Penstock Section 302e, and a Dynamo Section 302f. The Well Section 302a is in fluid communication with both the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b and the Dynamo Section 302f.

Although both the Magnetic Lifting and Dynamo Sections 302b, 302f may each include a magnetic field to which the MAL is attracted, the force of the magnetic field 304 in the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b is significantly stronger than the force of the magnetic field of the Dynamo Section 302f such that the MAL in the Well Section 302b is correspondingly attracted from the Well Section 302a towards the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b rather than from the Well Section 302a to the Dynamo Section 302f. The attraction of the MAL by the magnetic field 304 of the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b is sufficient to cause the MAL in the Well Section 302b to be progressively withdrawn upward and out of the Well Section 302a, against the force of gravity, into the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b. Preferably, the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Well Section 302b.

The Magnetic Lifting Section 302b is in fluid communication with a Staging Section 302c. The Staging Section 302c includes a magnetic field 306 to which the MAL is attracted. The attraction of the MAL to the magnetic field 306 in the Staging Section is sufficient to cause the MAL to be progressively withdrawn from the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b into the Staging Section 302c. Preferably, the Staging Section 302c will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b. The force of the magnetic field 304 can vary in various locations along the Magnetic Lift Section 202b, such as shown at each reference numerals 304; in FIG. 3.

The Staging Section 302c is in fluid communication with a Control Gate Section 302d. The Control Gate Section 302d includes a magnetic field 308 to which the MAL is attracted. The magnetic field 3068 in the Control Gate Section 302d has a variable force that can substantially exceed that of the force of the magnetic field 306 in the Staging Section 302c such that the MAL is attracted from and out of the Staging Section 302c into the Control Gate Section 302d.

The force of the magnetic field 308 in the Control Gate Section 302d can be varied both below and above the force of the magnetic field 306 in the Staging Section 302c. When the force of the magnetic field 308 in the Control Gate Section exceeds the force of the magnetic field 306 in the Staging Section 302c by a first predetermined threshold, then the MAL within the Staging Section 302c will be drawn out of the Staging Section 302c and into the Control Gate Section 302d to a distance that is within a second predetermined threshold. When the MAL within the Control Gate Section 302d is separated from the Staging Section 302c at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field 308 within the Control Gate Section 302d will be substantially reduced. This reduction can be accomplished mechanically, electrically, or both, by a component 338 seen in FIG. 3 by methods and implementations that are well known.

When the force of magnetic field 308 in the Control Gate Section 202d is substantially reduced by a third predetermined threshold, then the MAL within the Control Gate Section 302d will fall under the force of gravity into the Penstock Section 302f with which the Control Gate Section 302d is in fluid communication. Also, when the MAL within the Control Gate Section 302d is separated from the Staging Section 302c at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold simultaneously when the force of the magnetic field 308 within the Control Gate Section 302d is substantially reduced by the third predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field 306 within the Staging Section 302c is not sufficient to cause a substantial quantity of the MAL to return to the Staging Section 302c from the Control Gate Section 302d. Preferably, the Penstock Section 302e will be substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a lower altitude than, the Control Gate Section 306c.

The Penstock Section 302e is in fluid communication with the Dynamo Section 302f. The Dynamo Section 302f is preferably equipped with a component 310 enabling the generation electricity by the movement of the MAL through the Dynamo Section 302f. Electricity so generated may be stored in an electrical storage device (not shown), used to power the alternating force of the magnetic field 308 of the Control Gate Section 302d, or both. One such component 310 enabling the generation of electricity includes a plurality of assemblies. Each assembly provides a rotor assembly 314 q having a turbine assembly 310 p that is rotated by movement of the MAL through the Dynamo Section 202f, such as in illustrated in FIGS. 9a-9b and discussed below. The rotation of the turbine assembly 310 p causes a stator assembly 314 r to generate electricity by way of a magnetic assembly that moves within another magnetic field as will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the relevant arts. As shown in FIG. 3, 'q' is integer from 1 through Q, 'r' is integer from 1 through R, and 'z' is integer from 1 through Z.

The Dynamo Section 302f is in fluid communication with, and preferably substantially perpendicular to, or at least generally at a higher altitude than, the Well Section 302a. The MAL exiting the Dynamo Section 302f is returned to the Well Section 302a. Preferably, the Well Section 302a will be generally the lowest altitude of the other Sections 302b-302f. When returned to the Well Section 302a, the MAL is available for further circulation out of the Well Section 302a into the Magnetic Lifting Section 302b as described above.

The Penstock Section 302e and the Dynamo Section 302f can include portions that have various and different dimensions, properties, and enhancements. By way of example, a component 312 z providing a magnetic field can be used to attract the MAL so as to substantially wet the inside surface of the passageway in the Penstock and Dynamo Sections 302e, 302f. Preferably, the force of the magnetic field provided by component 312 z will be less than that force of gravity, where 'z' is an integer from 1 to Z. When the inside surface of the passageway is substantially wet by the magnetic field's attraction of the MAL, then the inside surface will have less attraction to, and surface tension on, the surplus MAL flowing into and through the Penstock and Dynamo Sections 302e, 302f. Additionally, static and/or kinetic friction between the inner surface of the passageway and the surplus MAL is substantially reduced. By substantially wetting the inside surface, the velocity of the surplus MAL falling under the influence of gravity into and through the Penstock and Dynamo Sections 302e, 302f will increase. With the increase in velocity will be a corresponding increase in the production of electricity from the movement of the surplus MAL falling under the influence of gravity into and through the Dynamo Section 302f as described above and as understood by those of ordinate skill in the relevant arts. Note that each of the Magnetic Lift, Staging, and Control Gate Sections 302b-304 can also be provided with a component (not shown) having similar functionality to that of component 312 z to thereby similarly substantially wet the corresponding inside surfaces thereof, thereby lowering the surface tension, kinetic and static friction of the surplus MAL flowing there through.

Reference numeral 402 in FIG. 4 illustrates a view of a magnetic field of a round permanent magnet, and reference numeral 404 in FIG. 4 illustrates a view of magnetic fields of an end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets M;, where 'i' is an integer from 1 to I, where the poles of round permanent magnets M are aligned, and where the force of the magnetic fields in the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi is less than the force of gravity. Implementations of the magnetic fields in the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi seen at reference numeral 404 can be used in the Magnetic Lift Section 102b, 202b, and 302b in FIGS. 1-3, respectively, and in the Staging Lift Section 102c, 202c, and 302c in FIGS. 1-3, respectively, as described above.

By way of example, and by way of limitation, each round permanent magnets can be a rare earth neodymium N52 disc magnet having an 8 lb. pull force with a diameter of 0.0127m, a height of 0003175m, and a weight of 3 approximately grams.

The attraction of the MAL by the magnetic fields in the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi seen at reference numeral 404 is sufficient to cause the MAL in the Well Section 102a, 202a, and 302a in FIGS. 1-3, respectively, to be progressively withdrawn upward and out of the Well Section 102a, 202a, and 302a in FIGS. 1-3, respectively, against the force of gravity, into the Magnetic Lifting Section 102b, 202b, and 302b in FIGS. 1-3, respectively, and into the Staging Section 102c, 202c, and 302c in FIGS. 1-3, respectively.

Reference numeral 500 in FIG. 5 shows an implementation of a Magnetic Lifting Section 502b having an outer surface 502, an inside passage 508 through which the MAL 514 flows under magnetic attraction of the force 506 of the magnetic fields from the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi 510 each of which is secured stationary relative to inside passage 508 by a circumscribing retainer 504. Similar to component 312 z seen in FIG. 3, a component 512 z seen in FIG. 5 can provide a magnetic field used to attract the MAL 514 so as to substantially wet the inside surface of the passageway 508 of Magnetic Lift Section 502b.

In an alternative to the embodiment of the Magnetic Lifting Section shown in FIG. 5, reference numeral 600 in FIG. 6 shows a Magnetic Lifting Section 602b having an outer surface 602, an inside passage 608 through which the MAL 614 flows under magnetic attraction of the force of the magnetic fields from the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets 610 each of which is secured to outer surface 602 by a circumscribing retainer 604. However, each round permanent magnet 610 has a component 612 that allows the magnet 610 to rotate about the center thereof, where the range of rotation of each magnet 610 is controlled by the component 612. The control of the range of the rotation of the magnet 610 by the component 612, in some implementations, can increase the direction and force of the magnetic fields from the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets 610 to thereby increase the flow rate of the MAL 614 through the Magnetic Lift Section 602b. Similar to component 312 z seen in FIG. 3, a component 612 z seen in FIG. 6 can provide a magnetic field used to attract the MAL 614 so as to substantially wet the inside surface of the passageway 608 of Magnetic Lift Section 602b.

The magnetic fields in the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi seen at reference numeral 404 are sufficient to cause the MAL in the Staging Section 102c, 202c, and 302c in FIGS. 1-3, respectively, to be progressively withdrawn from the Staging Section 102c, 202c, and 302c in FIGS. 1-3, respectively, towards the Control Gate Section 102d, 202d, and 302d in FIGS. 1-3, respectively.

Referring to FIG. 7, reference numeral 700 shows a partial cutaway view of an implementation of an intersection of the Bottom Well Section 702a and the Magnetic Lift Section 702b. The MAL 714 flows under magnetic attraction of the force 706 of the magnetic fields from the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi 710 each of which is secured stationary relative to inside passage 708 by a circumscribing retainer 704. Similar to component 312 z seen in FIG. 3, a component 712 z seen in FIG. 7 can provide a magnetic field used to attract the MAL 714 so as to substantially wet the inside surface of the passageway 708 of Magnetic Lift Section 702b. The force 706 of the magnetic fields from the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi 710 in the Magnetic Lifting Section 702b is greater than the force of gravity such that the MAL 714 in the Well Section 702b is progressively attracted against the force of gravity out of the Well Section 702a towards and up into the Magnetic Lifting Section 702b.

Referring to FIG. 8, reference numeral 800 shows a partial cutaway view of an implementation of an intersection of the Magnetic Lift Section 802b and the Staging Section 802c, as well as an implementation of an intersection of the Staging Section 802c and the Control Gate Section 802d. At reference numeral 802e there is shown a partial cutaway view of an implementation the Penstock Section 802e. The MAL 814 flows under magnetic attraction of the force 806 of the magnetic fields from the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets 810 each of which is secured stationary relative to inside passage 808 by a circumscribing retainer 804. Similar to component 312 z seen in FIG. 3, a component 812 z seen in FIG. 8 can provide a magnetic field used to attract the MAL 814 so as to substantially wet the inside surface of each passageway 808 within Sections 802b-802e. The force 816 of the magnetic fields from the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi 810 in the Magnetic Lifting Section 802b is greater than the force of gravity such that the MAL 814 in the Well Section 802b is progressively attracted against the force of gravity out of the Well Section 802a towards and up into the Magnetic Lifting Section 802b towards Staging Section 802c.

The Magnetic Lifting Section 802b is in fluid communication with Staging Section 802c. The Staging Section 802c includes magnetic fields having a force 806 from the end-to-end arrangement of round permanent magnets Mi 810 in the Staging Section 802c. The force 806 attracts the MAL 814 progressively into and through the Staging Section 802 towards the Control Gate Section 802d to which the Staging Section 802c is in fluid communication. The Control Gate Section 802d includes a magnetic field 812 to which the MAL is attracted. The magnetic field 816 in the Control Gate Section 802d has a variable force that can substantially exceed that of the force 806 of the magnetic fields in the Staging Section 802c such that the MAL 814 is attracted from and out of the Staging Section 802c into the Control Gate Section 802d.

The force of the magnetic field 812 in the Control Gate Section 802d can be varied both below and above the force of the magnetic field 806 in the Staging Section 802c. When the force of the magnetic field 812 in the Control Gate Section exceeds the force of the magnetic field 806 in the Staging Section 802c by a first predetermined threshold, then the MAL 814 within the Staging Section 802c will be drawn out of the Staging Section 802c and into the Control Gate Section 802d to a distance that is within a second predetermined threshold. When the MAL 814 within the Control Gate Section 802d is separated from the Staging Section 802c at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold, the force of the magnetic field 821 within the Control Gate Section 802d will be substantially reduced. This reduction can be accomplished mechanically, electrically, or both, by a component 818 seen in FIG. 8 by methods and implementations that are well known.

When the force of magnetic field 806 in the Control Gate Section 802d is substantially reduced by a third predetermined threshold, then the MAL 814 within the Control Gate Section 802d will fall under the force of gravity 818 into the Penstock Section 802e with which the Control Gate Section 802d is in fluid communication. Also, when the MAL 814 within the Control Gate Section 802d is separated from the Staging Section 802c at least a distance within the second predetermined threshold simultaneously when the force of the magnetic field 812 within the Control Gate Section 802d is substantially reduced by the third predetermined threshold, the force 806 of the magnetic field within the Staging Section 802c is not sufficient to cause a substantial quantity of the MAL 814 to return to the Staging Section 802c from the Control Gate Section 802d.

The Penstock Section 802e shown in FIG. 8 is in fluid communication with the Dynamo Section (not shown), an implementation of which is shown in partial cross section views at reference numerals 900a-900b in FIGS. 9a-9b, respectively. The Dynamo Section 902f seen in FIGS. 9a-9b is equipped with a plurality of components each enabling the generation electricity by the movement of MAL through Dynamo Section 902f. Electricity so generated may be stored in an electrical storage device 920, used to power the alternating force of the magnetic field of the Control Gate Section (not shown), or both.

Each such component enabling the generation of electricity includes a rotor assembly 914 q having a turbine assembly 910 p that is rotated by movement of the MAL making contact with each of a plurality of turbine blades 916 on the turbine assembly 910 p as the MAL moves through the Dynamo Section 902f. Preferably, there will a plurality of turbine assemblies 910 p that are being rotated as the MAL moves through the Dynamo Section 902f.

The rotation of the turbine assembly 910 p causes the rotation of two (2) opposing rotors of the rotor assembly 914 q . Each rotating rotor in turn rotates corresponding components of the stator assembly 914 r to generate electricity by way of a corresponding rotation of a plurality of magnets 918 on the peripheral circular surface of a plurality of disks 908, where each disk 908 is rotated by the rotation of a corresponding rotor of the rotor assembly 914q.

Each disk 908 rotates inside a substantially circularly arranged plurality of electrically conductive wire segments 906. Each electrically conductive wire segment 906 is wound around an end of a member 904 radially projecting inward from the inside surface of a wheel 910 z , where 'z' is an integer from 1 to Z. The magnetic field of each magnet 918 on each as the MAL moves through the Dynamo Section 902f disk 908 induces electrical current to flow in each electrically conductive wire segment 906. The electricity so generated in the electrically conductive wire segments 906 may be stored in an electrical storage device 920, used to power the alternating force of the magnetic field of the Control Gate Section (not shown), or both. The Dynamo Section 902f can be provided with a component (not shown) having similar functionality to that of component 312 z to thereby similarly substantially wet the corresponding inside surfaces thereof, thereby lowering the surface tension, kinetic and static friction of the surplus MAL flowing there through.

The Penstock Section 802e shown in FIG. 8 is in fluid communication with the Dynamo

Section (not shown), another implementation of which is shown in a partial cross section cutaway view at reference numeral 1000 in FIG. 10. The Dynamo Section 1002f seen in FIG. 10 is equipped with a plurality of components each enabling the generation electricity by the movement of MAL through Dynamo Section 1002f. Electricity so generated may be stored in an electrical storage device 1020, used to power the alternating force of the magnetic field of the Control Gate Section (not shown), or both. Each such component enabling the generation of electricity from the movement of MAL through Dynamo Section 1002f includes an assembly providing a magnetic field 1018 x proximal to the Dynamo Section 1002f. Movement of the MAL through the plurality of magnetic fields 1018 X proximal to the Dynamo Section 1002f produces an electrical current in Electrically Conductive Magnetically Attracted Liquid (ECMAL) as the ECMAL moves through the Dynamo Section 1002f. The assembly that provides a magnetic field 1018 x proximal to the Dynamo Section 1002f can be any suitably functioning assembly as will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the relevant arts. By way of example, and not by way of limitation, the assembly that provides a magnetic field 1018 x can be a permanent or electromagnetic arranged so as to be proximal to the Dynamo Section 1002f.

The Dynamo Section 1002f can be provided with a component 1012 z having similar functionality to that of component 312 z to thereby similarly substantially wet the corresponding inside surfaces thereof, thereby lowering the surface tension, kinetic and static friction of the surplus MAL flowing there through.

The various steps or acts in a method or process may be performed in the order shown, or may be performed in another order. Additionally, one or more process or method steps may be omitted or one or more process or method steps may be added to the methods and processes. An additional step, block, or action may be added in the beginning, end, or intervening existing elements of the methods and processes. Based on the disclosure and teachings provided herein, a person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate other ways and/or methods for various implements. It is further understood that the examples and implementations described herein are for illustrative purposes only and that various modifications or changes in light thereof will be suggested to persons skilled in the art and are to be included within the spirit and purview of this application and scope of the appended claims.