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Title:
A METHOD OF KNITTING A COMPRESSION BANDAGE, A COMPRESSION BANDAGE AND A KNITTING MACHINE FOR MANUFACTURING A COMPRESSION BANDAGE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2017/011849
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
There is provided a method of knitting a compression bandage, The method comprising knitting a first course of a first type of yarn; stitching a second course of a second type of yarn to the first course, the second type of yarn being able to stretch; and stitching a third course of the first type of yarn to the second course. Stitching the second course comprises stitching the second type of yarn under tension so as to stretch the second type of yarn; and inlaying a transverse elastic thread along the second course such that once stitched, the second type of yarn in the second course pulls the adjacent first and third courses together so as to hold the elastic thread substantially in place.

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Inventors:
ROWE, Bernard (C/- Patentec Patent Attorneys, Level 1165 York S, Sydney New South Wales 2000, 2000, AU)
Application Number:
AU2015/050536
Publication Date:
January 26, 2017
Filing Date:
September 10, 2015
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
ROWE, Bernard (C/- Patentec Patent Attorneys, Level 1165 York S, Sydney New South Wales 2000, 2000, AU)
International Classes:
D04B1/22; A61F13/00; D03D15/08; D04B1/18
Domestic Patent References:
WO2014098928A12014-06-26
Foreign References:
US20030213269A12003-11-20
AU2011226817B22013-10-31
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PATENTEC PATENT ATTORNEYS (Level 11, 65 York StSydney, New South Wales 2000, 2000, AU)
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Claims:
Claims

1. A method of knitting a compression bandage, the method comprising:

knitting a first course of a first type of yarn;

stitching a second course of a second type of yarn to the first course, the second type of yarn being able to stretch; and

stitching a third course of the first type of yarn to the second course, wherein stitching the second course comprises:

stitching the second type of yarn under tension so as to stretch the second type of yarn; and inlaying a transverse elastic thread along the second course such that once stitched, the second type of yarn in the second course pulls the adjacent first and third courses together so as to hold the elastic thread substantially in place.

2. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the second type of yarn comprises a stretchable material.

3. A method as claimed in claim 2, wherein the stretchable material comprises one of multifilament polyester, texturised yarn, air intermingled yarn and a covered yarn having an elastic core.

4. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the thickness of the second type of yarn is between 70 Denier and 900 Denier.

5. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the second type of yarn is one of single ply, double ply and multiple ply.

6. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the elastic thread is bare.

7. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the elastic thread comprises an elastic material.

8. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the thickness of the elastic thread is between 40 Denier and 1440 Denier.

9. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the method comprises feeding the elastic thread into the feeder tubes of a knitting machine in one of a single strand and multiple strands.

10. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the elastic thread comprises elastane fibre or elastomeric fibre.

11. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the stitching of the second course creates alternating forward and rearward thread pairs and wherein the transverse elastic thread is accommodated between the alternating forward and rearward thread pairs.

12. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first type of yarn comprises one of cotton, polycotton, viscose, rayon, bamboo, polyester and blended textile fibres.

13. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the thickness of the first type of yarn is in the range of 1/40 to 1/10 Nec (English Cotton Count), or their metric equivalents, in Denier or Tex.

14. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first type of yarn comprises one of single ply, double ply and multiple ply.

15. A method as claimed in claim 1, further comprising providing greater than 30 weft courses of yarn per 25 mm linear length of bandage

16. A method as claimed in claim 1, further comprising providing greater than 15 transverse inlaid courses of elastic yarn per 25 mm linear length of bandage

17. A compression bandage manufactured in accordance with a method as claimed in any one of claims 1 - 16.

18. A compression bandage as claimed in claim 17, wherein the compression bandage is a tubular compression bandage.

19. A compression bandage as claimed in claim 18, wherein the compression bandage is adapted to apply sub- bandage pressure to a limb or torso in the range of 2 - 65 mmHG.

20. A knitting machine adapted to knit in accordance with the method as claimed in of any one of claims 1 - 16.

Description:
A method of knitting a compression bandage, a compression bandage and a knitting machine for manufacturing a compression bandage

Field of the Invention

[1] The present invention relates generally to a method of knitting a compression bandage, a compression bandage and a knitting machine for manufacturing a compression bandage.

[2] Specifically, present invention relates to the manufacture of a tubular elastic compression bandage comprising at least three different types of yarns combined with a specific knitting technique to provide a compression bandage comprising advantages including being more comfortable for a person to wear as compared to prior art arrangements.

[3] The invention has been developed primarily for use with tubular elastic compression bandages and will be described hereinafter with reference to this application. However, it will be appreciated that the invention is not limited to this particular field of use.

Background of the Invention

[4] Compression bandages, especially tubular elastic compression bandages, are used in the treatment and management of injury, illness or disease in humans. This type of bandage is most commonly used for the treatment, management and prevention of the sprains, strains, soft tissue injuries, oedema, varicose vein conditions, leg ulcers, keloid scarring, rib cage injuries and post mastectomy surgery. Tubular elastic compression bandages may also be used for keeping wound dressings in place, as well as for padding and protection of limbs when participating in sporting activities. Tubular elastic compression bandages may also be used in vetinery clinics.

[5] Now, GB840523 (Dl) discloses a compression bandage construction in accordance with the prior art as is shown in figure 1 wherein each alternate course comprises an elastic thread 3, which is inlaid into the fabric.

[6] However, these prior art tubular elastic compression bandages are generally uncomfortable to wear and their design and composition has not changed substantially since they were invented in the 1950's. The discomfort of these conventional tubular bandages is due to the strong elastic threads that are incorporated in the bandage, which are spaced far apart.

[7] Specifically, referring again to Dl the elastic element used is 886 denier white rubber filament. This is a covered, wrapped or sheathed elastic yarn. Specifically, a wrapped or sheathed elastic yarn is utilised for at least the reason that a bare elastic yarn would slip from the construction creating unwanted extraneous protruding loops of elastic yarn material. As such, these prior art arrangements incorporate wrapped or sheathed elastic yarns so as to hold the elastic yarn in place within the construction. [8] However, such wrapped or sheathed elastic yarn has a greater diameter and must therefore be spaced further apart. The wide spacing between the elastic yarns and the greater diameter of the elastic yarn itself results in uneven pressure being exerted on the limb by the bandage, where the direct pressure under the elastic threads is exerted in the range of 20 to 30% of the surface of the limb. In addition, the coarse cotton yarns incorporated in the bandage result in the bandage feeling itchy when in contact with the skin.

[9] As such, the present invention seeks to provide a method of knitting a compression bandage, a compression bandage and a knitting machine for manufacturing a compression bandage, which will overcome or substantially ameliorate at least some of the deficiencies of the prior art, or to at least provide an alternative.

[10] It is to be understood that, if any prior art information is referred to herein, such reference does not constitute an admission that the information forms part of the common general knowledge in the art, in Australia or any other country.

Summary of the Disclosure

[11] The present invention comprises a construction incorporating elastic threads being spaced closer together and having a smaller diameter when compared to conventional arrangements. Specifically, in accordance with a preferred embodiment as is described in further detail below, the elastic threads of the present invention may be bare (not wrapped or sheathed) so as to allow for the closer spacing of the elastic threads and for elastic threads comprising smaller diameters as compared to conventional arrangements.

[12] As such, the present invention results in pressure being exerted more evenly over the limb or torso.

[13] As such, there is provided a method of knitting a compression bandage, the method comprising stitching a first course of a first type of yarn; stitching a second course of a second type of yarn to the first course, the second type of yarn being able to stretch more than the first type of yarn; and stitching a third course of the first type of yarn to the second course, wherein stitching the second course may comprise stitching the second type of yarn under tension so as to stretch the second type of yarn; and inlaying a transverse elastic thread between the stitches of the second course such that once stitched, the second type of yarn pulls the adjacent first and third courses together so as to hold the elastic thread substantially in place.

[14] The second type of yarn may comprise a stretchable material.

[15] The stretchable material may comprise one of multifilament polyester, texturised yarn, air intermingled yarn and a covered yarn having an elastic core. [16] The thickness of the second type of yarn may be between 70 Denier and 900 Denier.

[17] The second type of yarn may be one of single ply, double ply and multiple ply.

[18] The elastic thread may be bare.

[19] The elastic thread may comprise an elastic material.

[20] The thickness of the elastic thread may be between 40 Denier and 1440 Denier.

[21] The method may comprise feeding the elastic thread into the feeder tubes on the knitting machine in one of a single strand or multiple strands.

[22] The elastic thread may comprise any type of elastane fibre or elastomeric fibre.

[23] The transverse elastic thread may be accommodated between the alternating forward and rearward thread pairs.

[24] The first type of yarn may comprise one of cotton, polycotton, viscose, rayon, bamboo, polyester and blended yarns.

[25] The thickness of the first type of yarn may be in the range of 1/40 to 1/10 Nec (English Cotton Count), or their metric equivalents, in Denier or Tex.

[26] The first type of yarn may comprise one of single ply, double ply and multiple ply.

[27] The method may further comprise providing greater than 30 weft courses of yarn per 25 mm linear length of bandage.

[28] The method may further comprise providing greater than 15 transverse inlaid courses of elastic yarn per 25 mm linear length of bandage

[29] According to another aspect, there is provided a compression bandage manufactured in accordance with a method as described herein.

[30] The compression bandage may be a tubular compression bandage.

[31] The compression bandage may be adapted to apply sub-bandage pressure to a limb or torso in the range of 2 - 65 mmHG. Having a sub-bandage pressure of substantially 2 mmHG allows the bandage to also be used for wound dressing retention, such as if very thin elastic threads were used.

[32] According to another aspect, there is provided a knitting machine adapted to knit in accordance with the method as described herein.

[33] Other aspects of the invention are also disclosed.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[34] Notwithstanding any other forms which may fall within the scope of the present invention, a preferred embodiments of the disclosure will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

[35] Figure 1 shows a compression bandages in accordance of the prior art; [36] Figure 2 shows the compression bandage construction in accordance with a preferred embodiment where, as can be seen, the alternating courses comprising stretchable yarn is stretched; and

[37] Figure 3 shows the compression bandage construction of Figure 2 in accordance with the preferred embodiment wherein, as can be seen, the stretchable yarn of the alternating courses has shrunk so as to pull the adjacent courses together so as to hold a transverse elastic thread substantially in place.

Description of Embodiments

[38] For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles in accordance with the disclosure, reference will now be made to the embodiments illustrated in the drawings and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the disclosure is thereby intended. Any alterations and further modifications of the inventive features illustrated herein, and any additional applications of the principles of the disclosure as illustrated herein, which would normally occur to one skilled in the relevant art and having possession of this disclosure, are to be considered within the scope of the disclosure.

[39] Before the structures, systems and associated methods relating to the method of knitting a compression bandage, a compression bandage and a knitting machine for manufacturing a compression bandage are disclosed and described, it is to be understood that this disclosure is not limited to the particular configurations, process steps, and materials disclosed herein as such may vary somewhat. It is also to be understood that the terminology employed herein is used for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting since the scope of the disclosure will be limited only by the claims and equivalents thereof.

[40] In describing and claiming the subject matter of the disclosure, the following terminology will be used in accordance with the definitions set out below.

[41] It must be noted that, as used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms "a," "an," and "the" include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise.

[42] As used herein, the terms "comprising," "including," "containing," "characterised by," and grammatical equivalents thereof are inclusive or open-ended terms that do not exclude additional, unrecited elements or method steps.

[43] It should be noted in the following description that like or the same reference numerals in different embodiments denote the same or similar features. The construction 1 under tension during manufacture

[44] Turning now to Figure 2, there is shown the construction 1 of the stitching for a compression bandage in accordance with the embodiments described herein. Specifically, as will become apparent from the below description, the construction 1 allows for compression bandages and the like to have advantages over the above-described existing arrangements including in providing more uniform compression pressure.

[45] The method for knitting the construction 1 comprises stitching a first course 2 of a first type of yarn 8 (shown in grey), stitching a second course 3 (shown in white) of a second type of yarn 9 to the first course 2 and stitching a third course 4 (shown in grey again) of the first type of yarn 8 to the second course 3 and so on to the number of desired courses. In the embodiment shown in Figure 2, 5 courses are provided wherein, as can be appreciated, the alternating courses 3, 5 et cetera comprise the second type of yarn 9. Of course, during the manufacture process, any number of courses may be provided.

[46] Now, the method further entails inlaying a transverse elastic thread 7 between the alternating courses 2, 4, and which is encased by course 3. As alluded to above, the construction 1 may be used in applications for manufacturing tubular compression bandages. As such, the transverse elastic threads 7, being perpendicular to the elongate axis along the length of the tubular compression bandage, provide the compressive force.

[47] In the preferred embodiment shown in Figure 2, the elastic thread 7 is substantially straight in and not having to weave between or around the courses.

[48] As such, in a preferred embodiment, the construction 1 is knitted by the knitting machine in a circular manner so as to produce a tubular construction. However, in other embodiments, the bandage may be manufactured in sheets (which may be seamed at the edges to hold the courses and elastic threads 7 in place) which may be stitched into different forms as is required.

[49] Now, the second type of yarn 9 is able to be stretched.

[50] As such, during the knitting process, the method may comprise knitting the second type of yarn 9 under tension so as to stretch the second type of yarn 9 such that once stitched, the second type of yarn 9 shrinks so as to hold the elastic 7 substantially in place.

[51] In embodiments, the first type of yarn 8 may be inelastic whereas the second type of yarn 9 may be elastic. However, different types of yarn material may be utilised within the purposive scope of the embodiments described herein wherein the alternate courses of the second type of yarn 9 are able to shrink post manufacture to entrap and/or substantially hold the transverse elastic thread 7 in place. The construction 1 post manufacture

[52] Specifically, as can be seen in Figure 3, there is shown the construction 1 postproduction wherein, as can be seen, the second type of yarn 9 has shrunk to have pulled the adjacent first 2 and third 4 courses together so as to hold the elastic thread 7 substantially in place.

[53] Specifically, during the manufacture process, the construction 1 may roll down from the fabric take up rollers of the knitting machine wherein the alternate courses 3, 5 of the second type of yarn 9 is able to shrink to entrap and substantially hold the transverse elastic threads 7 in place.

[54] Now, in a preferred embodiment, the elastic thread 7 is a bare elastic thread manufactured from a polymer, such as polyurethane, spandex and the like. The elastic thread 7 being bare means that the elastic thread 7 need not be wrapped with a covering sheath.

[55] Specifically, the transverse elastic thread 7 of prior art arrangements was required to be wrapped or sheathed so as to provide a frictional engagement between the yarn and the elastic thread 7 such that the elastic thread 7 was held substantially in place by frictional engagement. If the elastic thread of the prior art arrangements were bare (unwrapped or unsheathed), during the manufacture process, the resultant bandage would comprise unwanted outwardly protruding loops of elastic thread 7 being ejected from the bandage on account of a combination of the post manufacture shrinking of the bandage construction and the low friction surface of the elastic threads allowing the slipping of the elastic threads between the yarn of the courses.

[56] For at least this reason, the elastic thread of prior art arrangements was wrapped or sheathed so as to frictionally engage the yarn so as to prevent unwanted protrusions post manufacture.

[57] However, the disadvantage of such an arrangement is that the wrapping or sheathing of the elastic thread increases the diameter of the elastic thread requiring the elastic thread to be spaced far apart, generally in the range of 5mm to 6mm apart, resulting in uneven pressure distribution on the limb or torso. Furthermore, the larger diameter elastic thread creates pressure lines on the skin of the wearer resulting in the pressure bandage feeling itchy and otherwise uncomfortable.

[58] Conversely, the transverse elastic thread 7 of the present embodiments may be unsheathed or unwrapped so as to allow the elastic threads 7 to be located closer together. Specifically, in a preferred embodiment, the construction 1 allows for greater than 15 transverse courses of inlaid elastic thread per 25 mm linear length of bandage, being in the range of order 1mm to 2mm apart.

[59] Furthermore, the unwrapped or unsheathed elastic threads 7 comprises a smaller diameter which eliminates or reduces localised pressure on the skin of the wearer, and spreads the sub- bandage pressure more evenly over the skin. [60] In a preferred embodiment, the stitching of the alternate courses 3, 5 comprises adjacent alternating forward and rearward thread pairs creating a transverse accommodation for accommodating the elastic thread 7. As such, the elastic thread 7 may be substantially straight and furthermore shielded from making contact with the skin of the wearer. In this manner, the transverse elastic thread 7 may even be manufactured from substances such as elastodeine containing latex on account of being substantially shielded by the ultimate adjacent forward and rearward thread pairs from touching the skin of the wearer.

[61] In the embodiment shown in figures 2 and 3, the alternating courses 3, 5 comprise the second type of yarn 9. However, should be appreciated that in other embodiments every third or greater course may comprise the second type of yarn 9.

Interpretation

Embodiments:

[62] Reference throughout this specification to "one embodiment" or "an embodiment" means that a particular feature, structure or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the present invention. Thus, appearances of the phrases "in one embodiment" or "in an embodiment" in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment, but may. Furthermore, the particular features, structures or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner, as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art from this disclosure, in one or more embodiments.

[63] Similarly it should be appreciated that in the above description of example embodiments of the invention, various features of the invention are sometimes grouped together in a single embodiment, figure, or description thereof for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure and aiding in the understanding of one or more of the various inventive aspects. This method of disclosure, however, is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the claimed invention requires more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, as the following claims reflect, inventive aspects lie in less than all features of a single foregoing disclosed embodiment. Thus, the claims following the Detailed Description of Specific Embodiments are hereby expressly incorporated into this Detailed Description of Specific Embodiments, with each claim standing on its own as a separate embodiment of this invention.

[64] Furthermore, while some embodiments described herein include some but not other features included in other embodiments, combinations of features of different embodiments are meant to be within the scope of the invention, and form different embodiments, as would be understood by those in the art. For example, in the following claims, any of the claimed embodiments can be used in any combination.

Different Instances of Objects

[65] As used herein, unless otherwise specified the use of the ordinal adjectives "first", "second", "third", etc., to describe a common object, merely indicate that different instances of like objects are being referred to, and are not intended to imply that the objects so described must be in a given sequence, either temporally, spatially, in ranking, or in any other manner.

Specific Details

[66] In the description provided herein, numerous specific details are set forth. However, it is understood that embodiments of the invention may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known methods, structures and techniques have not been shown in detail in order not to obscure an understanding of this description. Terminology

[67] In describing the preferred embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings, specific terminology will be resorted to for the sake of clarity. However, the invention is not intended to be limited to the specific terms so selected, and it is to be understood that each specific term includes all technical equivalents which operate in a similar manner to accomplish a similar technical purpose. Terms such as "forward", "rearward", "radially", "peripherally", "upwardly", "downwardly", and the like are used as words of convenience to provide reference points and are not to be construed as limiting terms.

Comprising and Including

[68] In the claims which follow and in the preceding description of the invention, except where the context requires otherwise due to express language or necessary implication, the word "comprise" or variations such as "comprises" or "comprising" are used in an inclusive sense, i.e. to specify the presence of the stated features but not to preclude the presence or addition of further features in various embodiments of the invention.

[69] Any one of the terms: including or which includes or that includes as used herein is also an open term that also means including at least the elements/features that follow the term, but not excluding others. Thus, including is synonymous with and means comprising.

Scope of Invention

[70] Thus, while there has been described what are believed to be the preferred embodiments of the invention, those skilled in the art will recognize that other and further modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention, and it is intended to claim all such changes and modifications as fall within the scope of the invention. For example, any formulas given above are merely representative of procedures that may be used. Functionality may be added or deleted from the block diagrams and operations may be interchanged among functional blocks. Steps may be added or deleted to methods described within the scope of the present invention.

[71] Although the invention has been described with reference to specific examples, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the invention may be embodied in many other forms.

I ndustria l Applicability

[72] It is apparent from the above, that the arrangements described are applicable to the medical textile industries.