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Title:
METHOD FOR PROCESSING BIOMATERIALS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2010/039523
Kind Code:
A2
Abstract:
Systems and methods for thermal preservation (sterilization) of heterogeneous and multiphase foods and biomaterials in order to achieve their shelf stability at ambient level temperatures. Flowing heterogeneous, multiphase foods and biomaterials are exposed to single or multiple stages of electromagnetic energy under continuous flow conditions within conduits passing through the electromagnetic energy exposure chambers.

Inventors:
SIMUNOVIC, Josip (410 N. Boylan Ave, Suite 96Raleigh, North Carolina, 27603, US)
CARTWRIGHT, Gary (410 N. Boylan Ave, Suite 96Raleigh, North Carolina, 27603, US)
DROZD, James, Michael (1614 Scales St, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27608, US)
Application Number:
US2009/057989
Publication Date:
April 08, 2010
Filing Date:
September 23, 2009
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SIMUNOVIC, Josip (410 N. Boylan Ave, Suite 96Raleigh, North Carolina, 27603, US)
CARTWRIGHT, Gary (410 N. Boylan Ave, Suite 96Raleigh, North Carolina, 27603, US)
DROZD, James, Michael (1614 Scales St, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27608, US)
ULTRASEPTICS, INC. (410 N. Boylan Ave, Suite 96Raleigh, NC, 27603, US)
International Classes:
A23B7/01; A23B4/01; A23L3/005
Foreign References:
KR930010449B11993-10-25
JPH04290410A1992-10-15
EP1570753A12005-09-07
Other References:
None
See also references of EP 2343983A4
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DROZD, Brian (430 Davis Dr, Suite 500Morrisville, North Carolina, 27560, US)
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Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method for thermal preservation of flowable heterogeneous biomaterials, comprising: continuously pumping heterogeneous materials through at least two applicators, wherein each of the at least two applicators comprise at least one port for entry and one port for exit of the heterogeneous materials and at least one port for entry and one port for exit of electromagnetic energy; and delivering electromagnetic energy to the at least two applicators while the heterogeneous materials are within at least one of the at least two applicators.

2. The method of Claim 1 , wherein the at least one entry port for the pumped material is at the same end of at least one of the applicators as the entry port for the electromagnetic energy.

3. The method of Claim 1 , wherein the at least one exit port for the pumped material is at the same end of at least one of the applicators as the exit port for the electromagnetic energy.

4. The method of Claim 1, wherein the direction of the heterogeneous materials is co- current with the direction of electromagnetic energy propagation in at least one of the applicators.

5. The method of Claim 1 , wherein the at least one entry port for the pumped material is at the opposite end of at least one of the applicators from the entry port for the electromagnetic energy.

6. The method of Claim 1. wherein at least one exit port for the pumped material is at the opposite end of at least one of the applicators from the exit port for the electromagnetic energy

7. Process according to Claim 1. wherein the direction of process material flow is counter-current compared to the direction of electromagnetic energy propagation in at least one of the applicators

8. The method of Claim 1, wherein the at least two applicators are supplied electromagnetic energy from an electromagnetic energy generator to provide electromagnetic energy exposure consecutively to the heterogeneous material.

9. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least two applicators are supplied electromagnetic energy from the same generator to provide electromagnetic energy exposure to the heterogeneous material non-consecutively.

10. The method of Claim 1, wherein the at least two applicators comprise substantially the same length, physical design and position of a conduit carrying the heterogeneous materials.

11. The method of Claim 1 , wherein the heterogeneous materials comprises a food material.

12. The method of Claim 11 , wherein the heterogeneous materials consist of at least two material phases.

13. The method of Claim 12, wherein one of the material phases is a solid.

14. The method of Claim 12. wherein the heterogeneous materials comprise at least one of fruits, vegetables and a material originating from an animal.

15. The method of Claim 12. wherein the at least two material phases comprises at least 5% of the heterogeneous process material.

16. The method of Claim 1 , wherein an increase average material temperature in the heterogeneous materials that is achieved by exposure to electromagnetic energy in each of the at least two applicators is substantially non-identical, and wherein the average material temperature increase achieved by exposure to electromagnetic energy in at least one of the at least two applicators is at least 50% higher than the average material temperature increase achieved by exposure to electromagnetic energy in at least one other applicator.

17. A method for applying pressurization within an electromagnetic energy process comprising:

(a) allowing conveyance of fiowable materials from a electromagnetic system; (b) providing a device to provide resistance to flow of material resulting in increased material pressure;

(c) arranging the device where material pressure exceeds pressure required to prevent vapor formation due to superheated conditions; and

(d) arranging the device such that the material pressure is reduced to prevent superheating of the materials.

18. The method of claim 17 further comprising arranging one or more static mixers within the cooling zones in a design to induce turbulence to increase surface area friction to provide resistance to flow.

19. The method of claim 17, further comprising arranging a piping of a diameter that is smaller than a diameter of adj acent conduit, the piping diameter being smaller within a n area where the material is substantially not being heated to provide resistance to flow of material;

20. The method of claim 17, further comprising a flow control device, thereby providing resistance to flow of material located after an end of thermal hold zone and before termination of continuous flow of the materials.

21. A method for applying pressurization within a continuous flow, electromagnetic energy process system containing discrete solids or particulate materials :

(a) utilizing static mixers within the cooling zones in a design to maximize clearances for decreased particulate degradation while providing resistance to flow; and

(b) utilizing the device for controlling flow of process materials to provide back pressurization while allowing particulate material pass to lower pressure zone with minimal damage.

Description:
METHOD FOR PROCESSING BIOMATERIALS CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims benefit of priority under 35 U.S. C. ยง 119(e) to the filing date of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/099,434, as filed on October 23, 2008, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

[0002] There is need for thermal preservation (sterilization) of heterogeneous and multiphase foods and biomaterials in order to achieve long shelf stability at ambient level temperatures. Methods are needed to effectively heat flowing heterogeneous and multiphase foods and biomaterials.

SUMMARY

[0003] In one embodiment, a method for thermal preservation of flowable heterogeneous biomaterials, comprises continuously pumping heterogeneous materials through at least two applicators, wherein each of the at least two applicators comprise at least one port for entry and one port for exit of the heterogeneous materials and at least one port for entry and one port for exit of electromagnetic energy; and delivering electromagnetic energy to the at least two applicators while the heterogeneous materials are within at least one of the at least two applicators.

[0004] In another embodiment, a method for applying pressurization within an electromagnetic energy process comprises allowing conveyance of flowable materials from a electromagnetic system; providing a device to provide resistance to flow of material resulting in increased material pressure; arranging the device where material pressure exceeds pressure required to prevent vapor formation due to superheated conditions; and arranging the device such that the material pressure is reduced to prevent superheating of the materials.

[0005] In another embodiment, a method for applying pressurization within a continuous flow, electromagnetic energy process system containing discrete solids or particulate materials comprises utilizing static mixers within the cooling zones in a design to maximize clearances for decreased particulate degradation while providing resistance to flow; and utilizing the device for controlling flow of process materials to provide back pressurization while allowing particulate material pass to lower pressure zone with minimal damage.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0006] In order that the advantages of the invention will be readily understood, a more particular description of the invention briefly described above will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments that are illustrated in the appended drawings. Understanding that these drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are not therefore to be considered to be limiting of its scope, embodiments of the invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings, in which:

[0007] Figure 1 illustrates a block diagram of a method for thermal preservation of heterogeneous foods andbiomaterials according to one embodiment of the present invention.

[0008] Figure 2 illustrates a system for thermal preservation of heterogeneous foods and biomaterials according to one embodiment of the present invention.

[0009] Figure 3 illustrates a system for thermal preservation of heterogeneous foods and biomaterials according to another embodiment of the present invention.

[0010] Figure 4 illustrates a system for thermal preservation of heterogeneous foods and biomaterials according to another embodiment of the present invention.

[0011] Figures 5-7 illustrates a solid particle flow distribution according to some embodiments of the present invention.

[0012] Figure 8 illustrates a block diagram of a method for thermal preservation of heterogeneous foods and biomaterials according to some embodiments of the present invention.

[0013] Figure 9 illustrates a cutaway view of static mixer design that may be implemented into the thermal processing system according to some embodiments of the present invention. [0014] Figure 10 illustrates a cutaway view of another static mixer design that may be implemented into the thermal processing system according to other embodiments of the present invention.

[0015] Figure 11 illustrates a system for thermal preservation of heterogeneous foods and biomaterials according to another embodiment of the present invention

[0016] Figure 12 a system for thermal preservation of heterogeneous foods and biomaterials according to another embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0013] Reference throughout this specification to "one embodiment," "an embodiment," or similar language means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the present invention. Thus, appearances of the phrases "in one embodiment," "in an embodiment," and similar language throughout this specification may, but do not necessarily, all refer to the same embodiment.

[0014] Figure 1 illustrates a sequence of operations for thermal preservation of heterogeneous and multiphase foods using single or multi-stage exposure to electromagnetic energy under continuous flow conditions. The process may begin with ingredients andpre- treatments of the ingredients in making food materials and other biomaterials. The biomaterials may be heterogeneous materials, or materials which include materials of varying densities. As illustrated a tank is pre-heated. The materials are loaded to a microwave system in order to heat or treat the materials loaded therein. Such heating may occur in several stages. These heating stages are illustrated and elaborated below regarding Figures 2 through 6.

[0015] Figure 2 is a schematic outline of one of the embodiments of a heating stage of the process for thermal preservation of flowable heterogenous materials (foods or biomaterials) by exposure of the process material to electromagnetic energy under continuous flow conditions. Process materials enter the first applicator through process material entry port 1 with an average temperature of TlAVG, maximum temperature TlMAX, and a minimum temperature of TlMIN. Concurrently, electromagnetic energy is introduced into Applicator 1 through electromagnetic energy entry port 1. Process material flows through a substantially horizontal conduit made of material or combination of materials transparent to electromagnetic energy. The horizontal flow is relative to ground or earth.

[0016] Typical materials for fabrication of these conduits are ceramics (typically Alumina ceramic), glass (typically Borosilicate glass) and/or a variety of plastic polymers (Teflon, polypropylene, polysulfone, polyetheretherketone (PEEK), and polyetherimide (Ultem)

[0017] During the flow through the transparent conduit within the first applicator the first increment of temperature increase of the process material is realized. By the time process material exits the first applicator its average temperature has increased to T2AVG, its minimum temperature to T2MIN and its maximum temperature to T2MAX. Concurrently, part of the electromagnetic energy which has entered Applicator 1 is absorbed by the process material and converted to heat. Energy field density of electromagnetic energy exiting the first applicator (at electromagnetic energy exit port 1) and entering the second applicator has been reduced by the amount of energy absorbed by the process material. Following exit from Applicator 1 , process material is conveyed through a segment of conduit placed outside of the of electromagnetic field exposure. This segment can be modified in conduit profile, diameter, geometry or equipped with static or active in-line mixing devices to improve the rate and extent of temperature equalization. Optionally, this segment can also be insulated or heated conventionally (tube in tube heat exchanger). Following temperature equalization outside of electromagnetic energy exposure region, process material enters the second applicator with and average temperature of T3AVG, maximum temperature of T3MAX and minimum temperature of T3MIN, wherein the difference (T3MAX-T3MIN) is substantially lower than the difference (T2MAX-T2MIN). Concurrently, electromagnetic energy exiting from applicator 1 via electromagnetic energy exit port 1 is conveyed via a connecting waveguide into applicator 2 via electromagnetic energy entry port 2. Energy density / intensity level entering applicator 2 is lower than energy level originally delivered from the generator into Applicator 1 through energy entry port 1.

[0018] Process material is further heated during conveyance through the second applicator - following material entry through material entry port 2. Electromagnetic energy continues to be absorbed while the process material is exposed to its field while traveling through the second conduit constructed from a single or combination of multiple electromagnetic-energy transparent materials.

[0019] Optionally, transparent conduit placed within the second applicator can have a different material structure and composition, design, cross-sectional profile or diameter. Exiting from the second applicator, process material temperatures are characterized by T4AVG, T4MIN and T4MAX temperature values wherein temperature differences T4AVG- T3AVG, T4MAX-T3MAX and T4MIN-T3MIN are preferably lower than respective temperature differences T2AVG-T1AVG, T2MAX-T1MAX and T2MIN-T IMIN.

[0020] Electromagnetic energy exits the second applicator with further reduced energy density level and is optionally conveyed into the next entry port of another Applicator or terminated with a water load.

[0021 ] Temperature levels and temperature ranges in all segments within the process material exiting the final applicator stage are sufficiently high to achieve a pre-determined level of thermal preservation (pasteurization requiring subsequent refrigeration or sterilization resulting in long-term shelf stability at ambient temperatures of storage and distribution) in the least thermally treated segment of the material after being subjected to a sufficient hold treatment.

[0022] The hold treatment is typically implemented by flowing the process material through a segment of non-heating cylindrical profile conduit segment long enough to achieve the predetermined level of product preservation. Optionally, additional treatments and devices can be implemented between the process material exit from the final applicator exit port and entry into the hold segment - such as static or active agitating devices in order to accelerate the equalization of temperatures in the process material stream. [0023] Figure 3 illustrates the 3-stage of heating for thermal preservation and / or sterilization of heterogeneous (particle containing) foods by heating under continuous flow exposure to electromagnetic energy.

[0024] Figure 4 illustrates the concept of heating for thermal preservation and / or sterilization of heterogeneous (particle containing) foods by heating under continuous flow exposure to electromagnetic energy.

[0025] Process material (particle-containing food or biomaterial) is introduced into the electromagnetic energy exposure chamber via material entry port 1 and conveyed under continuous flow conditions through a microwave-transparent conduit C, fabricated from a single or combination of materials from a group of ceramics, glass and polymer materials with high temperature-resistant, high pressure-resistant characteristics.

[0026] During the passage through the microwave-transparent conduit C, heterogeneous / particulate material is exposed to electromagnetic energy which is absorbed by product constituents to varying levels. Electromagnetic energy is introduced through port A, propagates through a metal-walled series of waveguides and single or multiple exposure chambers to terminate in a water load. The electromagnetic exposure chamber in Figure 4 can be considered to represent a single or multiple chambers required to achieve the desired temperature levels throughout the heterogeneous process material components.

[0027] Electromagnetic energy absorption and subsequent conversion to heat result in the increase of temperature of process material. The electromagnetic energy exposure chamber D, or a series of similar exposure chambers are designed to allow for sufficient time and level of exposure of process material to enable the lowest heated element in the material to achieve the condition of commercial sterility (shelf stability under ambient storage conditions) in the processed heterogeneous (particle-containing) food or biomaterial. Exposure within the single or multiple chambers is used to achieve predetermined temperature levels in the process material, sufficient to impart commercial sterility to process material. These temperatures can range from approximately 70 C to approximately 105 C for high acid foods and biomaterials (e.g. fruits and products such as pickled vegetables, tomato dices and acidified salsa), and from approximately 110 C to approximately 145 C for low acid foods and biomaterials (chunky soups, stews, cheese sauces with particles etc). Upon exit from the final electromagnetic exposure chamber, process material will be passed through a tube segment sufficiently long to enable maintenance of the process material at or above the predetermined temperature level for a predetermined amount of time under continuous flow conditions. This tube segment is referred to herein as ahold tube. Typically, the lower the temperature at the exit of the hold tube, the longer the hold tube will need to be, since the sterilization treatment to achieve commercial sterility is a thermal process implementing a predetermined temperature level treatment for a predetermined minimum amount of time. This combination of time and temperature treatment is required to thermally inactivate microorganisms which could potentially endanger health of consumers and / or spoilage of the product under typical conditions of storage and distribution.

[0028] Figure 5 is an illustration of microwave transparent tube with heterogeneous product, i.e. carrier fluid and individual particulate components with different density ranges continuously flowing through a substantially horizontal tube under the regime of uniform heating of the carrier fluid.

[0029] Any heterogeneous biomaterial, and especially foods containing particles (e.g., fluid with chucks), will contain solid pieces with a range of density values. This is true even when there is a single solid component within the product (e.g. tomato dices in tomato juice or blueberries in blueberry juice) and more so with multiple solid components present (e. g. fruit salad in syrup or minestrone soup). At lower flow rates (laminar flow conditions) particles that are at least 0.5% denser than the carrier fluid will tend to flow along the bottom segment of the tube (D), particles that are nearly identical in density to the carrier fluid are called neutral or neutrally buoyant (N) and tend to flow at locations throughout the tube cross section - bottom, top and center. Particles which have density at least 0.5% lower than the carrier fluid will tend to flow along the top of the tube and are marked as buoyant (B). As flow rates increase, flow conditions become more turbulent and locations of flow for greater range of particle densities become more distributed - i.e. denser particles tend to be lifted off the bottom and carried in the fluid stream and buoyant particles will also get mixed into other locations along the flow lines. Horizontal upward flow regime therefore tends to equalize residence time solid particles (single or multiple types) spend within a specific tube segment. Under other flow regimes (vertical upward or vertical downward) it would be impossible to maintain this equalization over a range of densities.

[0030] Figure 5B is a depiction of a process while heating a product containing dense, neutral and buoyant particle phases where the carrier fluid is being heated under continuous flow condition. A typical instance of this type of heating would be tube in tube heat exchangers or volumetric heating wherein the carrier fluid has properties that allow it to be heated preferentially (dielectric properties and thermo-physical properties such as low heat capacity and high heat diffusivity). As the product flows from entry port, through the tube and out of the exit port (from right to left in Figure 5 A), temperature of carrier fluid increases which is accompanied by a decrease in its density. Since the solid particles carried within the fluid do not heat as rapidly, neither their temperature nor their density changes significantly for some time. The gradual reduction of density of the carrier fluid caused by heating without the concurrent reduction of density of particles can lead to the situation shown in the left-hand side of Figure 5B, i.e. all contained solid components (initially dense, neutral and buoyant) can end up flowing along the bottom of the tube due to having higher densities than the carrier fluid in some segments of process during heating.

[0031] Figure 6 - Stage 1 through Stage 3. Stage 1 depicted by Figure 6 is the early stage of heating - with buoyant particles flowing along the top of the tube, neutral particles occupying random locations along the cross section of the tube and dense particles flowing along the bottom. Stage 2 of Figure 6 - is the second stage of heating where the temperature of the carrier fluid has been raised enough and its density has been reduced enough to cause settling out (flow along the bottom) of the initially neutral particles while the density of initially buoyant particles still remains below the density of the carrier fluid and therefore they continue to flow predominately along the top segment of the tube. [0032] Finally Stage 3 depicted by Figure 6 is a stage where the carrier fluid temperature has been raised high enough for its density to fall below the density of the initially buoyant particles, causing this product component (B) to also fall out of suspension and flow along the bottom of the tube. Within the population of initially dense (D), initially neutral (N) and initially buoyant (B) particles, the flow will become stratified - dense particles (D) will flow slower (and have longer residence times) than initially neutral particles (N) which will in turn flow slower than the initially buoyant particles (B), provided the rate of change of their density values with temperature is equal or similar.

[0033] When such stratified product flow is subjected to heating, and especially volumetric heating using electromagnetic energy under continuous flow conditions, this can result in wide differences in residence times within the heating segments of the process (i.e. energy exposure chamber), resulting in significantly different extents of time and temperature exposure for different solid components. With the fastest moving component the risk is to have it under-processed due to insufficient residence time spent within the energy exposure segments of the process - and have a potential health hazard to the consumer. With the slowest moving component the risk is to over-heat and therefore over-process that component resulting in excessive quality reduction and loss caused by thermal over- treatment.

[0034] Figure 7 depicts stages 1 through 8 of heating of heterogeneous and multiphase materials during flow through a substantially horizontal microwave -transparent conduit under exposure to electromagnetic energy, with increased energy exposure and increased heating rates in the bottom segments of the conduit.

[0035] Embodiments of the present invention provides a means to address the problem of density-base settling out of solid particulate food or biomaterial components in thermal processing of heterogeneous foods and biomaterials using electromagnetic energy heating under continuous flow conditions by application of electromagnetic energy. The key element of the invention is maintaining the preferential heating of process material along the bottom segment of the flow-through, microwave transparent conduit. This can be achieved by ensuring the electromagnetic energy field remains stronger in the bottom segment of the flow-through tube throughout its exposure to the field. This arrangement enables a self- regulating process of dynamic density changes for carrier fluid and solid components carried within it throughout the heating stages. This process of density change is elaborated in detail in Figure 7 - Stage 1 through Figure 7 - Stage 9.

[0036] Stage 1 of Figure 7 shows the initial stage of heating - dense particles (D) flowing along the bottom, neutral particles (N) throughout the tube and buoyant particles (B) along the top of the tube. Process material enters the energy exposure chamber and preferential heating of the bottom segment of the flow is initiated, causing the reduction of carrier fluid density along the tube bottom.

[0037] Stage 2 of Figure 7 - Carrier fluid temperature has been raised sufficiently and its density reduced sufficiently to fall below the density of the neutral particles (N), causing them to settle to the bottom segment of the tube during flow.

[0038] Stage 3 of Figure 7 - Due to exposure to higher temperatures of the carrier fluid and higher energy field, initially dense (D) particle components are heated and their density reduced until it falls below the density of the carrier fluid and preferably below density of other solid / particulate components of the product.

[0039] Stage 4 of Figure 7 - Due to its reduction in density caused by heating, initially dense (D) particle population moves upward through the carrier fluid and other solid components to be lifted to the top, colder regions of the tube, and pushes the initially neutral (N) and initially buoyant (B) particle populations toward the center and bottom of the tube respectively. This causes mixing between the particles and carrier fluid and contributes to equalization of both residence time and thermal exposure of all product components.

[0040] Stage 5 of Figure 7 - Initially neutral particles (N) flowing along the bottom segment of the tube get preferentially heated, reducing their density and causing their move back through the middle and to the top of the flow profile - as depicted by Stage 6 of Figure 7. [0041 ] Stage 6 of Figure 7 - Density of initially neutral particles, due to distribution of energy and temperature increase has been reduced sufficiently to cause their movement towards to top of the flow region.

[0042] Stage 7 of Figure 7 - Initially neutral particles (N) move to the top while the initially dense segment starts losing some of the heat to the carrier fluid surrounding it in the top, colder, less heated region of the tube - resulting in the relative increase of their density compared to the carrier fluid component. Meanwhile, initially buoyant particle population segment flowing along the tube bottom is heated by carrier fluid and surrounding electromagnetic energy field and its density is decreased.

[0043] Stage 8 of Figure 7 - Initially buoyant (B) solid component after heating at the bottom resulting in reduced density starts moving upward carried by the difference in density between it and the carrier fluid, while the initially dense (D) population starts falling out of the suspension towards the bottom of the flow due to higher density compared to the carrier fluid.

[0044] Finally the process starts over again with Stage 1 of Figure 7 where new materials are introduced into the tube and density - based spatial flow distribution is reconstituted - with the initial flow distribution of buoyant particles (B) flowing mostly along the top, neutral particles (N) flowing throughout the tube and dense particles (D) flowing along the bottom of the tube is reestablished. Both horizontal (caused by pumping) and vertical (top to bottom and bottom to top) flow during thermal exposure serve to equalize residence times and thermal exposure of all components contained within the product. Stage 1 of Figure 7 also re-establishes conditions for the described process to be restarted and reiterated at a higher temperature level. In this manner, preferential heating along the tube bottom serves to not only equalize the treatment throughout the product but causes movement of all particles which in a heterogeneous product serve as miniature mixing devices assisting with this equalization.

[0045] The thermal food processing process utilizes electromagnetic energy as the primary source of process material heating while maintaining continuous flow of process material from the initiation of the process until process termination requires innovative design components. The efficiency of this innovative thermal processing system causes the process material being pumped through the system to heat so rapidly that the total length has been significantly shortened. This shortening of the system length causes a reduction in natural back pressures inherently present within conventional thermal processes. The loss of this internal process pressure due to shortened length coupled with the process material being heated above IOOC (boiling at standard atmospheric pressure)creates a situation where process material may "flash" or boil within the system piping. The superheated temperatures are required to achieve the process goals, thus higher pressures within the superheated zones are required to prevent flashing of the liquid phase to vapor. Innovative design considerations must be utilized to establish a stable, controllable and predictable system.

[0046] Figure 8 illustrates the general flow of the system with components and functions described as:

A. Material to be Processed. Material is pumpable or capable of moving through the system components in a controllable, consistent manner. Material to be processed may be homogeneous or heterogeneous, liquid, semi-solid or solid and may contain or be absent of discrete particles. Material may be in a completely natural, raw or non-processed state or may be processed or pre -treated to any degree.

B. Continuous Flow Pump or Motive Device. Material to be processed receives applied forces to establish continuous flow at a relatively constant rate throughout the entire system until termination of system flow requirements. Flow maybe sufficiently consistent to maintain control within the operational parameters of the system as defined by the application. Flow may be established through the use of positive displacement pumps or pressurized systems with metered flow control. Multiple motive devices may be placed in series at determined intervals between the beginning and termination of flow to provide for staged or designed pressurization within the material conveyance system. The positive pumping characteristics or pressure -based force establishes an operational condition where downstream resistance to flow, whether artificial or natural to the system design, increases the process material pressure within the hermetic piping system. This internal pressure is highest at the discharge of the pump or pressure-based device and decreases as material flows toward the termination of the system.

C. Electromagnetic Energy Heating Zone. Material to be processed enters the Electromagnetic Energy Heating Zone where energy is applied and absorbed by the process material. Energy is converted to heat within the material creating the potential for superheated zones where temperature with insufficient pressure will result in "flashing" or the sudden conversion of liquid (i.e. water) to vapor (i.e. steam). These vapor "pockets" result in a loss of system control and predictability including, l)increased volume of material thus reducing designed residence time within system components, 2)deposition of residue onto system surfaces, 3)physical changes or damage to process material, 4) undesirable cooling of process material, 5) loss of function of system components (i.e. -pumps or back pressure devices). Process material shall be at a predetermined temperature upon exiting the heating zone.

D. Thermal Hold Zone. The Thermal Hold Zone is a designed component of the process system, typically tubular, with a predetermined length and volume that yields a specific residence time for every particle of the process material at a given flow rate. The hold zone cannot be designed to contribute additional heating to the process material thus the temperature at the end of the hold zone shall be the same or lower than the temperature at the beginning of the hold zone. Temperatures within the hold zone may be of a superheated nature and thus, require sufficient pressure to remain in a non-vapor state as referenced in (C) above. The designed residence time and "end of hold" temperature serve as the legal thermal process of the system.

E. Cooling Device. Once the process material exits the Thermal Hold Zone, the desired thermal process has been delivered and it is typically desirable to cool the process material quickly. The process material enters the cooling device but is still in a superheated state thus, continues to require sufficient pressure to remain in a non-vapor state. Multiple design and device components may be integrated within the cooling device to satisfy the system pressure requirements. Process materials may be formulated to change rheological properties such as thickening upon cooling thus providing resistance to flow and increasing up-stream system pressure. Flow restrictors may be designed in the cooling zone or non- cooling conveyance piping to provide friction drag for up-stream pressure creation. These devices may strictly be designed for resistance to flow or may be multifunctional such as creating turbulence within the cooling device for increased cooling efficiency.

F. Back Pressure Device. Upon exiting the cooling device, the process material is no longer superheated to the level of requiring sufficient pressure to prevent "flashing;" however, a minimal pressure differential above the pressures external to the system is required in commercially aseptic processing. This nominal positive pressure differential is necessary to ensure that conditions for egress of internal process material exist and not ingress of external contamination into the system. Multiple types of Back Pressure Devices may be mounted after the exit of the cooling device to ensure all superheated areas within the cooling device are protected. These devices have a common characteristic of possessing a restrictive component to process material flow that is adjustable through spring tension, air pressure, hydraulic pressure, positioning device or other resistive force application. Once the process material passes the back pressure device, the resulting pressure is controlled by the filler system, receiving surge tanks or a system exit valve, marking the end of the continuous process.

G. Filler and/or Surge Tanks. The final components of the continuous process system will be a filler(s), storage or surge tank(s) or a combination of the two functions. The termination of the continuous process system may be fillers only with any material not filled exiting the system though a final device that acts as the back pressure device for the lower (filling) pressure zone. Surge tanks may be located before the filler systems or after the fillers as the termination point at the end of continuous flow. One single surge tank shall be maintained at the lower (filling) pressure allowing product to freely flow from the process system supply or to the filling systems. However, multiple surge tank systems can be utilized as controlling devices for both high and low pressure zones by isolating one tank and pressurizing to the higher level and acting as a receiver tank. At a predetermined point, another tank may act as the receiver tank and the initial tank pressure is lowered to filling pressure and dedicated to filling only.

[0047] Figure 12 depicts one embodiment of the utilization of an existing apparatus, where a static mixer is placed within the described continuous flow electromagnetic thermal processing system (Figure HB) to attain desired back pressure within the process. Examples of static mixers are illustrated in Figures 9 and 10. An increase in frictional pressure caused by the use of a static mixer within a flowing system should be minimized. The utilization of static mixers are often reduced or avoided completely due to the addition frictional drag to the system. However, the unique characteristic of the electromagnetic thermal process system where the length has been dramatically shortened due to more efficient heating creates an absence of natural system pressurization as compared to conventional thermal systems. This loss of pressurization when coupled with superheated zones of process material allows vaporization of liquids to gasses, thus rendering the process uncontrollable. The addition of static mixers creates significant and quantifiable pressure increases upstream of their location. These devices may provide secondary process improvements through the creation of forced turbulence within the fluid flow on the continuous system or the devices may only benefit the process through added back pressure. It should be noted that "back pressure" refers to applying a force to the materials in a direction that is opposite of the flow of the material. The insertion of one or more static mixers after the end of the Thermal Hold (ref. Figure 12) and within the cooling device or any point before the filler and/or surge tank portion of the process will provide additional back pressure within the system to maintain control of the fluid phase material in the superheated zones. A conscious design must be applied to quantify the pressure increase considering flow rate, process material physical characteristics, temperature, device type and length, process equipment dimensions and location.

[0048] The utilization within the cooling device provides secondary benefits of induced turbulence resulting in a reduced boundary layer at the cooling surface, thus improving the efficiency of cooling. Use of the static mixers allows for larger clearances within the cooling device, thus creating conditions that are induce less shear and mechanical stresses to the process material.

[0049] Figure 13 depicts the utilization of smaller diameter piping within the described continuous flow electromagnetic thermal processing system (Figure 11C) to attain desired back pressure within the process. The smaller piping creates more friction drag thus resulting in an increased back pressure within the system. The device may be placed after the cooling zone or may be designed to be within the cooling zone.

[0050] Figure 1 ID depicts the utilization of an existing apparatus, a Back Pressure Valve, within the described continuous flow electromagnetic thermal processing system to attain desired back pressure within the process. The Back Pressure Valve should be located after the cooling device due to its nature of design.

[0051] Embodiments of the present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from its spirit or essential characteristics. The described embodiments are to be considered in all respects only as illustrative and not restrictive. The scope of the invention is, therefore, indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description. All changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be embraced within their scope.