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Title:
METHOD OF PRODUCTION OF THIN-WALLED, SELF-SUPPORTED STONE ROSETTES OR ANY FLAT, SELF-SUPPORTED THIN-WALLED STONE STRUCTURES MADE BY CUTTING FROM STONE SLABS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/156581
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The production procedure of thin-walled, self-supported stone rosettes (2), i.e. any other thin-walled flat self-supported stone structure obtained by cutting out of natural stone slabs, shall allow that they remain self-supported even in horizontal position and bear a calculated useful load with point supports (1) or with linear peripheral supports. The production procedure comprises the realisation of the groove (5) in the stone slab, pouring of glue in the groove, inserting, in that groove filled with glue, a previously calculated steel flat bar (6), that aligns the axes of elements of the future thin-walled structure (2), a rosette, and ulterior cutting of the desired stone structure out of the prepared stone slab. Cutting lines (2a) (2b) are just a few millimetres away from the left and right sides of the cross-section of the steel flat bar supporting structure (6).

Inventors:
PETROVIC, Nenad (Visokog Stevana 27/42, Belgrade, 11158, RS)
Application Number:
RS2019/000007
Publication Date:
August 15, 2019
Filing Date:
February 04, 2019
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
PETROVIC, Nenad (Visokog Stevana 27/42, Belgrade, 11158, RS)
International Classes:
B28D1/00; B28D1/22; B28D1/30
Foreign References:
CN103590521A2014-02-19
US20120317913A12012-12-20
CA2120957A11995-10-12
FR2707914A11995-01-27
Other References:
None
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Claims:
CLAIMS

1. The production procedure of thin-walled, self-supported stone rosettes (2), i.e. any other thin-walled flat self-supported stone structure obtained by cutting out of natural stone slabs, so that they remain self-supported in horizontal position with point supports (1) or with linear peripheral supports, is marked by the following:

- Realisation of the groove (5) (whose width and depth depend on the necessary cross-section (7) (8) of the steel flat bar) in the stone slab aligning the axes of elements of the future thin-walled structure (2). - Pouring of a suitable glue into the so-realised groove

- The steel flat bar supporting structure (6) shall be put into the groove filled with glue immediately, before the glue begins to bond. (The steel flat bar supporting structure has a shape of the groove, previously realised in the stone slab, and shall actually take over the entire foreseen stone structure load.)

- Once the glue bonding process is completed, the desired stone

structure shall be cut out of the reinforced stone slab (2). Cutting lines (2a) (2b) are just a few millimetres away from the left and right sides of the cross-section of the steel flat bar supporting structure (6). The consequence thereof are very small widths (3) of stone structure cross-sections, that at the end of the procedure, amount to: a few millimetres of stone +lmm of glue + required width of the steel flat bar (7) + 1mm of glue + a few millimetres of stone.

Description:
METHOD OF PRODUCTION OF THIN-WALLED, SELF- SUPPORTED STONE ROSETTES OR ANY FLAT, SELF- SUPPORTED THIN-WALLED STONE STRUCTURES MADE

BY CUTTING FROM STONE SLABS

Technical Field that the Invention Refers to The invention specifically refers to stonework.

Technical Issues

Given the mechanical properties of stone, i.e. bearing in mind a very low or inexistent ultimate tensile strength of natural stone, how can we realise a self- supported thin-walled, stone lace structure, a rosette cut out of a stone slab that shall be put either horizontally and vertically, or diagonally and shall be leaning only against the edge or against a few edge points and carry its own weight and possibly a calculated useful load? Technical Status

Stone rosettes that have supports only at their periphery, today have more massive sections and are generally placed in a vertical position, due to the mechanical properties of the stone itself.

When stone rosettes are made or cut out of stone slabs and placed horizontally, at an angle, or vertically, they in fact, lean, i.e. stick with their entire surface to a solid base.

The attached process of making stone rosettes, thin-walled stone structures (with a small section width) shall enable designers and stonecutters to make a richer offer. Expose of the Essence of the Invention

The essence of the invention in the process of obtaining a self-supported thin- walled stone structure is reflected in the prior reinforcing of the stone slab with the support structure made of the steel flat bar so that it lies in the axis of the desired future thin-walled stone structure. Only after the stone slab has been reinforced, the desired shape shall be cut so that the cutting lines are only a few millimetres away from the left and right sides of the cross-section of the supporting steel flat bar structure.

Short Description of the Drawings Figure 1 - a form of a designed thin-walled stone structure with point supports Figure 2 - a section of a thin-walled stone structure Detailed Description of the Invention

In order that the rosette, (Figure 1), i.e. any other thin-walled flat stone structure (2), (hereinafter referred to as "stone structure"), obtained by cutting out of natural stone slabs, could have thin walls, i.e. that the profile section of stone structure elements could have a small width (3) (Figure 2), and could visually appear as lace whilst being self-supported even in the horizontal position with point supports ( 1) or with linear peripheral supports, it is necessary to reinforce such a stone structure. In this case, the stone structure shall be reinforced by using of steel flat bars (6). As steel flat bars shall take over the entire stone structure load, while the natural stone shall actually be a mere casing of the steel flat bar, it convenes to calculate all necessary dimensions beforehand such as height (8) and width (7) of the flat bar (6) (Figure 2) depending on supports and loads that the stone structure shall bear. On the back of the natural stone slab whose thickness (4) depends on the calculated height of the steel flat bar, a groove shall be made (5), whose width and depth shall be slightly higher than the calculated thickness of the necessary steel flat bar. The groove axis shall follow all element axes of the future stone structure (2), and shall therefore have the same shape as the future stone structure. A suitable glue shall be poured into the so-formed groove (5) in the natural stone slab, and immediately, before the glue begins to bond, the steel flat bar supporting structure, that was previously cut or bended in the form of the realised groove in the stone slab, shall be inserted (6) so that it partially or completely sinks into the realised groove in the stone slab. In that way, the steel flat bar can either remain visible from the underside of the stone structure (Figure 2) or completely invisible if the steel flat bar sinks into the previously realised groove that shall be closed from the underside by a mixture of the stone powder and glue.

Once the glue bonding process is completed, i.e. after the stone and the steel flat bar shall have been bonded, the desired engravings of the future structure can be made on the face of the stone slab and the stone slab can then be cut into the designed shape of the stone structure (2), whereby the steel flat bar supporting structure shall remain in its axis (6). Once the cutting is completed (and we wish to point out again that cutting lines (2a) (2b) are just a few millimetres away from the left and right sides of the cross-section of the steel flat bar supporting structure) we shall obtain the desired shape of the thin- walled stone structure (2), that can be further processed.

This method of production allows that the stone structure walls, left and right from the steel flat bar, be reduced to very small values, i.e. to a few millimetres, depending on the structure of the natural stone itself. This means that the width (3) of the cross-section of stone structure elements amounts to: a few millimetres of stone +

lmm of glue +

required width of the steel flat bar (7) + lmm of glue +

a few millimetres of stone