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Title:
MODULAR COMPRESSION PLANT
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/044396
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A building structure for operating turbomachinery equipment is disclosed. The building structure includes a first pre-fabricated structure, a second pre-fabricated structure, and a connector attaching the first pre-fabricated substructure to the second pre-fabricated substructure. Each pre-fabricated substructure includes a rigid frame formed from a plurality of linear members. The plurality of linear members forms a first rectangular structure, a second rectangular structure, and connects the first rectangular structure to the second rectangular structure. Each pre-fabricated substructure also includes a noise attenuating sealing panel attached to one or more of the first rectangular structure and the second rectangular structure. The connector includes a spacer plate inserted between first and second pre-fabricated substructures and a fastener. The spacer plate includes an elongated opening extending through the spacer plate. The fastener is inserted through a linear member of each of the first and second pre-fabricated substructures and the elongated opening of the spacer plate. Ancillary systems to support the turbomachinery operation may be housed in the pre-fabricated structures to reduce site construction time and cost.

Inventors:
ANDERSON, Kevin, D. (31326 Alice Lane, Tomball, TX, 77375, US)
WARREN, Martin, L. (13434 Cameron Reach Drive, Tomball, TX, 77377, US)
VAN DER STOK, Marcel (170 W. Slatestone Circle, The Wodlands, TX, 77382, US)
JAFFURS, Jeffrey, J. (13526 Colmbia Key Drive, Tomball, TX, 77377, US)
Application Number:
US2017/041633
Publication Date:
March 08, 2018
Filing Date:
July 12, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SOLAR TURBINES INCORPORATED (2200 Pacific Highway, San Diego, CA, 92186-5376, US)
International Classes:
E04H5/02; E04B1/343
Foreign References:
US20150337527A12015-11-26
US8671625B22014-03-18
US20090077904A12009-03-26
US20130055671A12013-03-07
US20120102871A12012-05-03
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SMITH, James, R. et al. (Caterpillar Inc, 100 NE Adams Street - AH9510Peoria, IL, 61629-9510, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

1. A modular building structure (100) for operating turbomachinery equipment, the building (100) comprising:

a first pre-fabricated substructure (105, 110) including:

a first rigid frame (105, 110) formed from a plurality of linear members (120, 125,130), the plurality of linear members including: at least four linear members (120,125,130) forming a first rectangular structure (135,140), the first rectangular structure (135,140) having a first connector receiving point (170,177),

at least four linear members (120,125, 130) forming a second rectangular structure (135,140), and at least four linear members (120,125, 130) connecting the first rectangular (135, 140) structure to the second rectangular structure (135,140), and at least one noise attenuating sealing panel (1605-1620, 1705- 1720, 1805-1820,2005-2020,2105-2120,2205-2220,2305-2320) attached to one or more of the first rectangular structure (135,140) and the second rectangular structure (135,140);

a second pre-fabricated (105,110) substructure including:

a second rigid frame (105, 110) formed from a plurality of linear members (120, 125,130), the plurality of linear members including: at least four linear members (120,125, 130) forming a third rectangular structure (135,140), the third rectangular structure having a second connector receiving point (170, 177),

at least four linear members (120,125, 130) forming a fourth rectangular structure (135,140), and at least four linear members (120,125, 130) connecting the third rectangular structure (135,140) to the fourth rectangular structure (135,140), and at least one sealing panel (1605-1620,1705-1720, 1805-1820,2005- 2020,2105-2120,2205-2220,2305-2320) attached to one or more of the third rectangular structure (135, 140) and the fourth rectangular structure(135,140); and

a connector (205,605,805) attaching the first pre-fabricated substructure (105,110) to the second pre-fabricated substructure (105, 110), the connector (205,605,805) including:

a spacer plate (210,610,810) inserted between the first connector receiving point (170,177) and the second connector receiving point (170,177), the spacer plate (210,610,810) including at least one elongated opening (1110, 1210,1310, 1315) extending through the spacer plate (210,610,810), and

at least one fastener (215,217) inserted through:

one linear member (120, 125,130) of the plurality of linear members (120,125,130) of the first rectangular structure (135, 140) at the first connector receiving point

(170, 177),

one linear member (120, 125,130) of the plurality of linear members (120, 125,130) of the third rectangular structure (135, 140) at the second connector receiving point (170, 177), and

the elongated opening (1110, 1210,1310, 1315) of the spacer plate (210,610,810).

2. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first connector receiving point (170, 177) is located on at least one of: a lower surface of the first rectangular structure (135, 140), a side surface of the first rectangular structure (135, 140), and an end surface of the first rectangular structure

(135,140); and

the second connector receiving point (170,177) is located on at least one of : an upper surface of the third rectangular structure(135,140), and an end surface of the third rectangular structure (135, 140) such that the first prefabricated substructure (105, 110) is located in one of: a position on top of the second pre-fabricated substructure (105,110), a position orthogonal to the second pre-fabricated substructure (105, 110), and a position in linear alignment to the second pre-fabricated sub structure^ 05, 110).

3. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first pre-fabricated substructure (110) has a first length, and

the second pre-fabricated substructure (105) has a second length longer than the first length.

4. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, further comprising:

a third pre-fabricated structure (105,110) including:

A third rigid frame (105, 110) formed from a plurality of liner members (120, 125, 130), the plurality of linear members

(120,125, 130) including:

at least four linear members (120,125, 130) forming a fifth rectangular structure (135,140), the fifth rectangular structure (135,140) having a third connector receiving point (170,177),

at least four linear members (120,125,130) forming a

rectangular structure (135,140), and at least four linear members (120,125, 130) connecting the fifth rectangular structure (135,140) to the sixth rectangular structure (135,140), and at least one sealing panel (1605-1620,1705-1720, 1805-1820,2005- 2020,2105-2120,2205-2220,2305-2320) attached to one or more of the first rectangular structure (135,140) and the second rectangular structure (135,140); and a second connector (205,605,805) attaching the first pre-fabricated substructure to the second pre-fabricated substructure (105,110), the connector (205,605,805) including:

a spacer plate (210,610,810) inserted between the first connector receiving point (170,177) and the second connector receiving point (170, 177), the spacer plate (210,610,810) including at least one elongated opening (1110,1210, 1310,1315) extending through the space plate (210,610,810), and at least one fastener (215,217) inserted through:

one linear member (120, 125,130) of the plurality of linear members (120,125,130) of the fifth rectangular structure (135, 140) at the third connector receiving point

(170, 177),

one linear member (120, 125,130) of the plurality of linear members (120,125,130) of one of the first rectangular structure (135,140) and the second rectangular structure (135, 140) at the fourth connector receiving point (170, 177), and

the elongated opening (1110, 1210,1310, 1315) of the spacer plate (210,610,810).

5. The modular building structure (100) of claim 6, wherein the first connector receiving point (170, 177) is located on a lower surface of the first rectangular structure (135, 140); and

the second connector receiving point (170,177) is located on an upper surface of the third rectangular structure (135, 140) such that the first prefabricated substructure (105,110) is located on top of the second pre-fabricated substructure (105,110); and

wherein third connector receiving point (170,177) is located on a side surface of the fifth rectangular structure (135,140) and the fourth connector receiving point (105,110) is located on a end surface of the third rectangular structure (135, 140) such that the third pre-fabricated structure (105,110) is positioned orthogonal to second pre-fabricated substructure (105,110).

6. The modular building structure (100) of claim 6, wherein the first connector receiving point (170, 177) is located on an end surface of the first rectangular structure (135, 140); and

the second connector receiving point (170,177) is located on an end surface of the third rectangular structure (135, 140) such that the first prefabricated substructure (105,110) is positioned orthogonal to the second pre- fabricated substructure (105,110); and

wherein third connector receiving point (170,177) is located on a side surface of the fifth rectangular structure (135,140) and the fourth connector receiving portion (170, 177) is located on an end surface of the third rectangular structure (135, 140) such that the third pre-fabricated structure (105,110) is positioned orthogonal to second pre-fabricated substructure^ 05, 110).

7. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first connector receiving point (170, 177) includes a first window (225) formed in the one linear member (120,125, 130) of the first rectangular structure (135, 140) through which the fastener (215,217) is inserted; and

the second connector receiving point (170,177) includes a second window (225) formed in the one linear member (120,125, 130) of the third rectangular structure (135, 140) through which the fastener (215,217) is inserted.

8. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein spacer plate (210,610,810) includes two elongated holes ( 1110, 1210, 1310, 1315) extending through the spacer plate (210,610,810);

wherein a pair of fasteners (215,217) are inserted through the first rectangular structure (135, 140), the third rectangular structure (135,140), and the elongated openings of the spacer plate (1110, 1210,1310, 1315).

9. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, further comprising a bridge crane (1400) mounted on the first pre-fabricated substructure (105,110) and the second pre-fabricated substructure (105,110), the bridge crane (1400) comprising:

a support frame (1415) mounted to the first rectangular structure

(135,140) and the third rectangular structure (135, 140);

a lift mechanism (1420) attached to the support frame (1415); and a lift attachment device coupled to the lift mechanism (1420) and configured to be lifted by the lift mechanism (1420).

10. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first pre-fabricated substructure (105, 110) further includes piping and cable trays (1905) for industrial equipment attached to the first rigid frame (105, 110).

11. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first pre-fabricated substructure (105, 110) further includes at least one of supply fans (1635,1640, 1645), exhaust louvers (1635, 1640,1645), and dampers (1635, 1640, 1645) attached to the first rigid frame (105,110).

12. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first pre-fabricated substructure (105,110) may include a back-up electrical generator (2415) attached to the first rigid frame (105,110).

13. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first pre-fabricated substructure (105,110) may include a coalescing filter (2035) and an electric heater (2040) for at least one of fuel-gas treatment and compressor seal gas treatment attached the first rigid frame (105, 110).

14. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first pre-fabricated substructure (105,110) may include an office work space (1730) and physical document storage (1735, 1740) attached to the first rigid frame (105,110).

15. The modular building structure (100) of claim 1, wherein the first pre-fabricated substructure (105, 110) may include a sealed, pressurized local equipment room (1500, 2100) for electrical equipment attached to the first rigid frame (105).

Description:
Description

MODULAR COMPRESSION PLANT

Technical Field

The present disclosure generally pertains to industrial plants, and is more particularly directed toward a modular construction and deployment of an industrial plant housing turbo machinery.

Background

Industrial plants housing turbomachinery, such as natural gas compression plants, or oil pumping stations, transport hydrocarbons from one location to another location. Industrial plants housing turbomachinery may also generate electricity. Such industrial plants are frequently constructed in remote locations. Construction of these plants may require a substantial amount of labor and time, especially in certain regions of the world. Modular construction and deployment of a plant can reduce startup delays, save on labor costs, and ensure optimum operability.

U.S. Patent No. 9, 115,504, to Wallance, et al, discloses a construction system for erecting building structures comprise a plurality of prefabricated interconnectable modular building units. Each unit includes framing members and a plurality of nodes, each node situated for selective interconnection with other units. The nodes and the exterior dimensions of the frame conforming to ISO shipping standards such that each unit is transportable using the ISO intermodal transportation system, and such that when the units are interconnected, a building structure is formed. The modular units are assembled at a remote location to a semi-finished state. The semi-finished modular units are transported from the remote location to the job site, where they are secured to form the structure being erected, and the semi-finished modular units are thereafter constructed to a finished state. The present disclosure is directed toward overcoming one or more of the problems discovered by the inventors.

Summary of the Disclosure

In one embodiment of the present application, a modular building structure for operating turbomachinery equipment is disclosed. The building structure includes a first pre-fabricated substructure, a second pre-fabricated substructure, and a connector attaching the first pre-fabricated substructure to the second pre-fabricated substructure. The first pre-fabricated substructure includes a first rigid frame formed from a plurality of linear members. The plurality of linear members includes at least four linear members forming a first rectangular structure, the first rectangular structure having a first connector receiving point, at least four linear members forming a second rectangular structure, and at least four linear members connecting the first rectangular structure to the second

rectangular structure. The first pre-fabricated substructure also includes at least one sealing panel attached to one or more of the first rectangular structure and the second rectangular structure. The second pre-fabricated substructure includes a second rigid frame formed from a plurality of linear members. The plurality of linear members includes at least four linear members forming a third rectangular structure, the third rectangular structure having a second connector receiving point, at least four linear members forming a fourth rectangular structure, and at least four linear members connecting the third rectangular structure to the fourth rectangular structure. The second pre-fabricated substructure also includes at least one sealing panel attached to one or more of the third rectangular structure and the fourth rectangular structure. Sealing panels attached to the outside members of the substructures are noise attenuating and join together to form the walls of the modular building. The connector includes a spacer plate inserted between first and second pre-fabricated substructures and a fastener. The spacer plate includes an elongated opening extending through the spacer plate. The fastener is inserted through a linear member of each of the first and second prefabricated substructures and the elongated opening of the spacer plate.

In another embodiment of the present application, a pre-fabricated substructure for a modular building structure for operating turbomachinery equipment is disclosed. The pre-fabricated substructure includes a rigid frame formed from a plurality of linear members. The plurality of linear members includes at least four linear members forming a first rectangular structure, the first rectangular structure having a first connector receiving point, at least four linear members forming a second rectangular structure, and at least four linear members connecting the first rectangular structure to the second rectangular structure. The pre-fabricated substructure also includes at least one sealing panel attached to one or more of the first rectangular structure and the second rectangular structure. Sealing panels attached to the outside members of the substructures are noise attenuating and join together to form the walls of the modular building. The pre-fabricated substructure also a connector configured for attaching the pre-fabricated substructure to a second pre-fabricated substructure. The connector includes a spacer plate and a fastener. The spacer plate includes an elongated opening extending through the spacer plate. The fastener is inserted through a linear member of the pre-fabricated substructure and the elongated opening of the spacer plate.

Brief Description of the Drawings

FIG. 1 is a front view of an exemplary modular gas compression plant.

FIG. 2 is a side view of the exemplary modular gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of an upper level of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of a first type of connection between substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1. FIG. 5 is a bottom view of connector receiving portions of two substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged view of a second type of connection between substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a bottom view of connector receiving portions of a substructure of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged view of a third type of connection between substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 9 is another enlarged view, orthogonal to FIG. 8, of the third type of connection between substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 10 a bottom view of connector receiving portions of two adjacent substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 11 is a top view of a spacer plate used in the first type of connection between substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 12 is a top view of a spacer plate used in the second type of connection between substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 13 is a top view of a spacer plate used in the third type of connection between substructures of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 14 illustrates an example interior of the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 15 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a local equipment room module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 16 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a heating and ventilation module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 17 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a temporary workspace module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 18 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a Piping and Cable Distribution Module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1. FIG. 19 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a Seal Gas Treatment Module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 20 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a Fuel Gas Treatment Module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 21 illustrates an alternative example implementation of a substructure used as a local equipment room module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 22 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a Compressed Air Module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 23 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a Warehousing Module in the gas compression plant of FIG. 1.

FIG. 24 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure used as a forming a Backup Diesel Generator Module 2400 in the gas

compression plant of FIG. 1. Detailed Description

The systems and methods disclosed herein include a building structure for operating turbomachinery equipment. Such buildings might include a gas compression plant for delivering natural gas through a pipeline, a natural gas burning power generation facility for generating electricity, a pumping station for delivering oil or gasoline through a pipeline, or any other facility that might be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art. The building structure may include a first prefabricated substructure, a second pre-fabricated substructure, and a connector attaching the first pre-fabricated substructure and the second prefabricated substructure. Each pre-fabricated substructure includes a rigid frame formed from a plurality of linear members, the plurality of linear members forming a pair of rectangular structures connected together by linear members, and at least one sealing panel attached to one or more of the pair of rectangular structures. The connector includes a spacer plate inserted between the rectangular structures of the first and second pre-fabricated substructures and a fastener inserted through a linear member of a rectangular structure of the first and second pre-fabricated substructures and the elongated opening of the spacer plate. Some of the substructures may include turbomachinery ancillary equipment installed within the rigid frame. Each of the substructures may be transported on a single transportation apparatus. Other equipment and components may be shipped to and assembled at a designated site.

FIG. 1 is a front view and FIG. 2 is a side view of an exemplary modular gas compression plant 100 (sometimes hereinafter referred to as gas compression facility). Though a gas compression plant is used for explanatory purposes, example implementations are not limited to a gas compression plant and may alternatively include other types of facilities that might be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art. For example, other implementations might include a natural gas burning power generation facility for generating electricity, a pumping station for delivering oil or gasoline through a pipeline or any other facility that might be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art. Some of the surfaces have been left out or exaggerated (here and in other figures) for clarity and ease of explanation.

The gas compression plant 100 may include a plurality of substructures (105, 110) and components. Each substructure (105, 110) may be formed from a plurality of linear members 120, 125, 130 arrange to form rigid frames to support sealing panels, which may be noise or sound attenuating panels in some example implementations. For ease of illustration, the sealing panels have been omitted in FIGS. 1 and 2. The plurality of linear members 120, 125, 130 include vertical members 120, horizontal members 125, and angled members 130. In some example implementations, each substructure may be formed from a pair of rectangular structures 135, 140. Each rectangular structure 135, 140 may be formed from vertical members 120 and horizontal members 125 arranged in a rectangular configuration. Additionally, the pair of rectangular structures 135, 140 may be connected to each other by other horizontal member 125. Additionally, the angled members 130 may be positioned to reinforce the horizontal members 125 and vertical members 120 of each rectangular structure 135, 140. The vertical, horizontal and angled members 120/125/130 may be formed from steel or other iron alloy to provide sufficient strength and rigidity to allow construction of substructure 105/1 10 as a well as stacking and shipping of the substructures as discussed below.

The substructures (105, 110) can be arranged and stacked in numerous configurations, which allows flexibility to scale the gas compression facility with the size of the equipment and to allow Balance of Plant (BOP) scope. Some of the substructures (105, 110) may incorporate turbomachinery support systems such as fuel gas treatment, seal gas treatment, compressor piping, unit and surge valves as required, utility air compressors, backup generator, electrical equipment, as well as all utility distribution systems for air, lube oil, vents, and drains.

The substructures (105, 110) may also be equipped with building support systems, including material handling, heating and ventilation, lighting, storage, and fire and gas detection systems. Each substructure (105, 110) may be transported complete with the associated piping and electrical and controls interfaces to facilitate rapid site integration. The substructures (105, 110) may be configured for installation on a concrete foundation, or, on pilings using a skidded sub-base.

As illustrated, the substructures (105, 110) may be stacked in two or more levels and Additionally, a series of roof support trusses 115 may be mounted on the substructures (105, 110) to support a roof over the compression plant 100.

To ensure alignment and to re-enforce gas compression facility 100, connections 145-155 between the substructures (105, 110) may be formed at different locations within the gas compression facility 100. For example, connection 145 may be at locations within the gas compression facility 100 where the corners of four substructures 105 meet. Further, connection 150 may be used at locations within the gas compression facility 100 where corners of only two substructures 105 meet, such as building corners. Additionally, connection 155 may be used at locations within the gas compression facility 100 to connect an end of one substructure 110 to a region of another substructure 105 located separate from the end. The connections 145-155 are discussed in greater detail below with respect FIGS. 4-10.

In some example implementations, the largest size of any substructure (105, 110) may be patterned after the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) freight container standards, but may not meet ISO required dimensions. For example, the width of each substructure (105,110) might be is limited to 2.28 m (7F , 6in.), so that after application of acoustic sealing wall panels the ISO container width of 2.4 m (8Ft.) is not exceeded. Additionally, the height might be limited to 4.1 m (13F , 6in.).

In some example implementations, the substructures (105, 110) may have different lengths. For example, each substructure 105 may have a length of 13.7m (45 Ft.), a width of 2.28 m (7F , 6in.), and a height of 4.1 m (13F , 6in.). Alternatively, substructure 110 may be shorter than substructure 105 and have a length of 6.1m (20 Ft.), a width of 2.28 m (7F , 6in.), and a height of 4.1 m (13F , 6in.). Example implementations of the substructures (105, 110) may have other dimensions as may be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art.

The difference in length between the substructure 105 and the substructure 110 may be used to form an access opening 175 to gas compression plant 100 by placing the shorter substructure 110 below the longer substructure 105. The opening 175 may be formed at the end of shorter substructure 110 as illustrated.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of an upper level of the gas compression plant 100. As illustrated, the gas compression plant 100 may be formed from two levels of six substructures. The upper level is formed entirely of the longer substructures 105, arranges in a rectangle 2 substructures 105 long by 1 substructure 105 wide. As illustrated with broken lines, the lower level may include one of the shorter substructures 110 at one end, with five of the longer substructures 105 forming the remainder of the lower level. An opening 175 is located at one end of the shorter substructure 110. The substructures 105, 110 form a perimeter around the internal area 180 that can house the turbomachinery equipment assembled on site.

FIG. 4 illustrates an enlarged view of the connection 145 used at locations where four corners of the substructures 105 meet. At the corner of each of the substructures 105, a connector receiving point 170 is formed where two horizontal members 125 and a vertical member 120 of each substructure 105 meet. The structure of the connector receiving point 170 at connection 150 is discussed in greater detail below. At the connection 145, the connector 205 connects the connector receiving points 170 of the four substructures 105 together. The connector 205 includes a spacer plate 210 installed between the connector receiving points 170 of the four substructures. The spacer plate 210 is discussed in greater detail below with respect to FIG. 11.

The connector 205 also includes fasteners 215 inserted through the connector receiving point 170 of one substructure 105, the spacer plate 210, and the connector receiving point 170 of an adjacent substructure 105. In some example implementations, the fastener 215 may be a bolt or threaded shaft that is held in place by a nut 220 at one or both ends. In other example

implementations, other fasteners such as screws, nails, welds, or rivets may be used. Additionally, at the connector receiving point 170, a window 225 may be formed in each vertical member 120 to assist with installation and placement of the fastener 215, and nuts 220.

FIG. 5 illustrates a bottom view of connector receiving points 170 of two substructures 105 at the connection 145. As illustrated, the connector receiving points 170 may include a pair of holes 185 formed through the joining point of two horizontal members 125 of each substructure 105. The placement of the holes 185 within the joining point of the two horizontal members 125 is not particularly limited. Example implementations are not limited to two holes, but may include more or less than two holes. The fasteners 215 of the connector 205 may be inserted through the holes 185.

FIG. 6 illustrates an enlarged view of the connection 150 used at locations where two corners of the substructures 105 meet. As discussed above with respect to FIGS. 4 and 5, at the corner of each of the substructures 105 a connector receiving point 170 is formed where two horizontal members 125 and a vertical member 120 of each substructure 105 meet. The structure of the connector receiving point 170 at connection 150 is discussed in greater detail below. At the connection 150, the connector 605 connects the connector receiving points 170 of the two substructures 105 together. The connector 605 includes a spacer plate 610 installed between the connector receiving points 170 of the two substructures. The spacer plate 610 is discussed in greater detail below with respect to FIG. 12.

The connector 605 also includes fasteners 215 inserted through the connector receiving point 170 of one substructure 105, the spacer plate 210, and the connector receiving point 170 of the adjacent substructure 105. In some example implementations, the fastener 215 may be a bolt or threaded shaft that is held in place by a nut 220 at one or both ends. In other example

implementations, other fasteners such as screws, nails, welds, or rivets may be used. Additionally, at the connector receiving point 170, a window 225 may be formed in each vertical member 120 to assist with installation and placement of the fastener 215, and nuts 220.

FIG. 7 illustrates a bottom view of connector receiving points 170 of one of the substructures 105 at the connection 150. As illustrated, the connector receiving points 170 may include a pair of holes 185 formed through -l i

the joining point of two horizontal members 125 of the substructures 105. The placement of the holes 185 within the joining point of the two horizontal members 125 is not particularly limited. Example implementations are not limited to two holes, but may include more or less than two holes. The fasteners 215 of the connector 205 may be inserted through the holes 185.

FIGS. 8 illustrates an enlarged view of the connection 155 used at locations where a corners of a pair substructures 105, 105 meets a horizontal section of two other substructures 105 meet. As discussed above with respect to FIGS. 4-7, at the corner of each of the substructures 105, a connector receiving point 170 is formed where two horizontal members 125 and a vertical member 120 of each substructure 105 meet. The structure of the connector receiving point 170 at connection 155 is discussed in greater detail below. The connection 155 may also include a connector receiving point 177 formed at a portion along the length of the horizontal member 125.

At the connection 155, the connector 805 connects the connector receiving points 170 of the two substructures 105 and the connector receiving points 177 of the other two substructures 105 together. The connector 805 includes a spacer plate 810 installed between the connector receiving points 170 of the two substructures 105 and the connector receiving points 177 of the other two substructures 105. The spacer plate 810 is discussed in greater detail below with respect to FIG. 13.

The connector 805 also includes fasteners 215 inserted through the connector receiving point 170 of one substructure 105, the spacer plate 810, and the connector receiving point 170 of the adjacent substructure 105. In some example implementations, the fastener 215 may be a bolt or threaded shaft that is held in place by a nut 220 at one or both ends. In other example

implementations, other fasteners such as screws, nails, welds, or rivets may be used. Additionally, at the connector receiving point 170, a window 225 may be formed in each vertical member 120 to assist with installation and placement of the fastener 215, and nuts 220.

FIG. 9 illustrates another enlarged view of the connection 155 orthogonal to the view illustrated in FIG. 8. As illustrated, the connector 805 also includes fasteners 217 inserted through the connector receiving point 177 of one substructure 105, the spacer plate 810, and the connector receiving point 177 of the adjacent substructure 105. In some example implementations, the fastener 217 may be a bolt or threaded shaft that is held in place by a nut 222 at one or both ends. In other example implementations, other fasteners such as screws, nails, welds, or rivets may be used.

FIG. 10 illustrates a bottom view of connector receiving points 170 and 177 of two adjacent substructures 105 at the connection 155. As illustrated, the connector receiving points 170 may include a pair of holes 185 formed through the joining point of two horizontal members 125 of the substructures 105. The placement of the holes 185 within thejoining point of the two horizontal members 125 is not particularly limited. Example

implementations are not limited to two holes, but may include more or less than two holes. The fasteners 215 of the connector 205 may be inserted through the holes 185.

Additionally, the connector receiving points 177 may include a pair of holes 187 formed a horizontal member 125 of the substructure 105. The placement of the holes 187 within the horizontal member is not particularly limited. Example implementations are not limited to two holes, but may include more or less than two holes. The fasteners 217 of the connector 205 may be inserted through the holes 185.

FIG. 11 illustrates a top view of the spacer plate 210 used in the connection 145 of FIG. 4. As illustrated the spacer plate includes a plate body 1105. In some example implementations, the plate body 1105 may have a generally rectangular shape. However, example implementations are not limited to this configuration and may have other configurations that may be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art.

The spacer plate 210 may be formed from steel or other iron alloy to provide sufficient strength and rigidity to allow construction of substructure 105/110 as a well as stacking and shipping of the substructures 105/110.

Additionally, the spacer plate 210 may also include a plurality of elongated openings 1110 configured to receive the fasteners 215. As illustrated, the spacer plate 210 includes four elongated openings 1110, but example implementations may have more or less than four elongated openings 1110. The elongated openings 1110 may provide flexibility in aligning the four

substructures 105 being connected by the connection 145.

FIG. 12 illustrates a top view of the spacer plate 610 used in the connection 150 of FIG. 6. As illustrated the spacer plate includes a plate body 1205. In some example implementations, the plate body 1205 may have a generally rectangular shape. However, example implementations are not limited to this configuration and may have other configurations that may be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art.

The spacer plate 610 may be formed from steel or other iron alloy to provide sufficient strength and rigidity to allow construction of substructure 105/110 as a well as stacking and shipping of the substructures 105/110.

Additionally, the spacer plate 610 may also include a plurality of elongated openings 1210 configured to receive the fasteners 215. As illustrated, the spacer plate 610 includes two elongated openings 1210, but example implementations may have more or less than two elongated openings 1210. The elongated openings 1210 may provide flexibility in aligning the two substructures 105 being connected by the connection 150.

FIG. 13 illustrates a top view of the spacer plate 810 used in the connection 155 of FIG. 8. As illustrated the spacer plate includes a plate body 1305. In some example implementations, the plate body 1305 may have a generally rectangular shape. However, example implementations are not limited to this configuration and may have other configurations that may be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art.

The spacer plate 810 may be formed from steel or other iron alloy to provide sufficient strength and rigidity to allow construction of substructure 105/110 as a well as stacking and shipping of the substructures 105/110.

Additionally, the spacer plate 810 may also include a plurality of elongated openings 1310 configured to receive the fasteners 215 and 217. As illustrated, the spacer plate 810 includes four elongated openings 1310, 1315, but example implementations may have more or less than four elongated openings 1310, 1315. The elongated openings 1310, 1315 may provide flexibility in aligning the four substructures 105 being connected by the connection 145. As illustrated, some of the elongated openings 1315 may be oriented orthogonal to the other elongated openings 1310.

FIG. 14 illustrates an example interior of a gas compression plant 100 according to an example implementation of the present application. As illustrated, several systems may be attached to the interior structure of the gas compression plant 100 and could be shared between the substructures 105 on the upper level. For example, an overhead bridge crane 1400 may be installed by mounting runways 1405 to substructures 105 on either side of the gas

compression plant 100. The runways 1405 may be supported by haunches 1410 that are attached to the vertical members 125. A bridge beam 1415 or other crane support frame may be mounted between the runways 1405. A trolley 1420 or other lift mechanism may mounted on the bridge beam 1415 a coupled to a hook or other lift attachment mechanism to connect to equipment that may require lifting or movement within the gas compression plant 100. The runways 1405, bridge beam 1415 and trolley 1420 may be shipped loose for assembly at site.

Lighting fixtures 1425 may also be installed within one or more of the substructures 105 and wired to an external power supply such as a generator on site. Additionally, fire or gas detectors 1430 may also be installed within one or more of the substructures 105 and wired to an external power supply such as a generator on site.

FIG. 15 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 that can be used as a local equipment room module 1500 external to the gas compression plant and connected by electrical conduit and other supply connections 1505. The electrical equipment and battery systems associated with the compression equipment and BOP may be located in the local equipment room module 1500. When the local equipment room module 1500 is separately located it may be placed in a non-hazardous area to avoid ignition of flammable gas associated with the gas compression plant. Though the local equipment room module 1500 is illustrated external to the gas compression plant in FIG. 15, the local equipment room module 1500 could also be incorporated as one of the substructures 105 within the gas compression plant 100 of FIG. 1. If the local equipment room module 1500 is incorporated into the gas compression plant 100, it may be fabricated to be air-tight and have a pressurization system to guarantee no ingress of flammable gases.

FIG. 16 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 that can be used as a heating and ventilation module 1600. As illustrated, the vertical members 120, horizontal members 125, and angled members 130 form the substructure 105 framework. Additionally, sealing panels 1605, 1610, 1615, 1620 are mounted on the vertical members 120 and horizontal members 125. In some example implementations, the sealing panels 1605, 1610, 1615, 1620 may be noise or sound attenuating panels. Sealing panel 1605 may be an end panel mount on an end of the substructure 105 and may include a door opening 1625. Sealing panels 1615 and 1620 may be ceiling and floor panels mounted on the upper and lower parts of the substructure 105. Sealing panel 1610 may be a side panel mounted on the side of the substructure 105. The sealing panel 1610 may have openings 1630 for heating and ventilation system components 1635, 1640. The heating and ventilation system components 1635, 1640 may utilizes supply fans 1645 on one component 1635 in a heating and ventilation module 1600 located on one end of the gas compression plant 100 (shown in FIGS. 1-3), and a component 1640 of a heating and ventilation module 1600 with exhaust louvers and dampers on the other end of the gas compression plant 100 (shown in FIGS. 1-3). A heating system may be integrated into the supply fan modules 1635 and is located in the same heating and ventilation module 1600. The heating and ventilation system components 1635, 1640 will be installed in the heating and ventilation module 1600 prior to shipment to a job site. Power cables, rain hoods, and piping connecting the heating and ventilation module 1600 to the remainder of the gas compression plant 100 (shown in FIGS. 1-3) may be installed on site.

FIG. 17 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 that can be used as a temporary workspace module 1700. As illustrated, the vertical members 120, horizontal members 125, and angled members 130 form the substructure 105 framework. Additionally, sealing panels 1705, 1710, 1715, 1720 are mounted on the vertical members 120 and horizontal members 125. In some example implementations, the sealing panels 1705, 1710, 1715, 1720 may be noise or sound attenuating panels. The sealing panels 1705 may be an end panel mount on an end of the substructure 105 and may include a door opening 1725. Sealing panels 1715 and 1720 may be ceiling and floor panels mounted on the upper and lower parts of the substructure 105. Sealing panel 1710 may be a side panel mounted on the side of the substructure 105.

The temporary workspace module 1700 may include a standing desk 1730, paper/record storage such as bookcases 1735 and file cabinets 1740, or any other supplies that the user may want to store at the gas compression plant. The sealing panels 1705, 1710, 1715, 1720 of the temporary workspace module 1700 can be lined with sound attenuation material.

The standing desk 1730, paper/record storage such as bookcases 1735 and file cabinets 1740 may be installed in the temporary workspace module 1700 prior to shipment a job site. Power cables and piping connecting temporary workspace module 1700 to the remainder of the gas compression plant 100 (shown in FIGS. 1-3) may be installed on site.

FIG. 18 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 that can be used as a Piping and Cable Distribution Module 1800. As illustrated, the vertical members 120, horizontal members 125, and angled members 130 form the substructure 105 framework. Additionally, sealing panels 1805, 1810, 1815, 1820 are mounted on the vertical members 120 and horizontal members 125. In some example implementations, the sealing panels 1805, 1810, 1815, 1820 may be noise or sound attenuating panels. The sealing panels 1805 may be an end panel mount on an end of the substructure 105. Sealing panels 1815 and 1820 may be ceiling and floor panels mounted on the upper and lower parts of the substructure 105. Sealing panel 1810 may be a side panel mounted on the side of the substructure 105.

The piping and cable distribution module 1800 may include auxiliary systems for the compressor train such as lube oil separating equipment 1825. These systems may require pipe and cable to be routed through the substructure 105. Building systems such as glycol heating also require piping to be routed through the substructure 105. The modules, such as the piping and cable distribution module 1800 that make up the gas compression plant (shown in FIGS. 1-3) may be fabricated with pre-defined routes for piping and cable tray, allowing for pre-assembly and seamless integration at the Customer site.

FIG. 19 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 that can be used as a Seal Gas Treatment Module 1900. As illustrated, the vertical members 120, horizontal members 125, and angled members 130 form the substructure 105 framework.

The Seal Gas Treatment Module 1900 may be used to coalesce liquids and filter the gas, and raise the temperature to at least 50F above the hydrocarbon dew point, before it is delivered to a compressor skid. Additionally, the Seal Gas Treatment Module 1900 may be used whenever the available seal gas has components that could condense in the dry gas seals, or particles above the limits stated in performance standards for equipment used in the gas compression plant 100 (shown in FIGS. 1-3).

Like the piping and cable distribution module 1800, the Seal Gas Treatment Module 1900 may include pipe 1905 and/or cable routed through the substructure 105. The Seal Gas Treatment Module 1900 may also include seal gas treatment equipment 1910 integrated within the substructure 105. The seal gas treatment equipment 1910 may include: a coalescing filter, an electric heater; and any necessary valves, drain and venting piping.

For example, a dual coalescing filter stage may be used to separate the liquid/solid phase/particles from the gaseous phase inside the gas stream. The coalescing filter stage may be designed for automatic draining of the liquid phase. The coalescing filter stage may include continuous pressure differential monitoring and pressure safety valves will be provided to protect the equipment from over pressurization.

Additionally, a single electric gas heater may increase and control the temperature of the gas in order to avoid condensation inside the dry gas seals. The heater and its control may be designed to follow all normal and emergency operating conditions during GT operation. A pressure safety valve may be provided with the gas heater to protect the equipment from over pressurization. Additionally, a heater bypass may be included to allow for short term continued operation during heater maintenance. Dual electric heaters may also be used when superheating or elemental Sulphur may be encountered.

Further, the seal gas treatment equipment 1910 may also include automatic isolation (e.g., Shut down valve (SDV)) or purge valves if required by fire or building codes or desired by plant operator.

The seal gas treatment equipment 1910 may be installed in Seal Gas Treatment Module 1900 prior to shipment to a job site. Power cables and piping connecting Seal Gas Treatment Module 1900 to the remainder of the gas compression plant 100 (shown in FIGS. 1-3) may be installed on site.

FIG. 20 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 that can be used as a Fuel Gas Treatment Module 2000. As illustrated, the vertical members 120, horizontal members 125, and angled members 130 form the substructure 105 framework. Additionally, sealing panels 2005, 2010, 2015, 2020 are mounted on the vertical members 120 and horizontal members 125. In some example implementations, the sealing panels 2005, 2010, 2015, 2020 may be noise or sound attenuating panels. The sealing panel 2005 may be an end panel mount on an end of the substructure 105. Sealing panels 2015 and 2020 may be ceiling and floor panels mounted on the upper and lower parts of the substructure 105. Sealing panel 2010 may be a side panel mounted on the side of the substructure 105 and may include a door opening 2025. The sealing panels 2005, 2010, 2015, 2020 may be opaque in some example implementations to provide privacy to occupants as illustrated in FIG. 20. In other example implementations, the sealing panels 2005, 2010, 2015, 2020 may be transparent as illustrated in other figures.

Fuel Gas Treatment Module 2000 may be used in the gas compression plant 100 (shown in FIGS. 1-3) when the available fuel has components that could condense in the fuel system or particles above the limits stated in equipment standards. For example, the Fuel Gas Treatment Module 2000 may be used to coalesce liquids and filter the gas, and raise the temperature to at least 50F above the hydrocarbon dew point, before it is delivered to a Gas Turbine.

Like the Seal Gas Treatment Module 1900, the Fuel Gas

Treatment Module 2000 may include pipe and/or cable routed through the substructure 105. The Fuel Gas Treatment Module 2000 may also include fuel seal gas treatment equipment 2030 integrated within the substructure 105. The fuel seal gas treatment equipment 2030 may include: a Single Horizontal Coalescing filter 2035, a Single Electric heater 2040, a Glycol heat exchanger, Inlet SDV and Blow Down Valve (BDV) (as required by code to enable fuel gas system isolation and depressurization), inlet regulator, pre-filter and preheating equipment, and as well as valves, drain and venting pipes.

For example, a horizontal coalescing filter 2035 may be used to allow the vessel to be the smallest diameter, and placed flat against the sealing panel 2020 of the Fuel Gas Treatment Module 2000. Additionally, filter replacement may be easier if horizontal, rather than the vertical as in certain instances the substructure 105 height may limits vertical filter replacement headroom. Alternatively, vertical filter replacement may require overhead tackle or access.

In some example implementations, the coalescing filter 2035 may be a dual coalescing filter stage that may separate the liquid/solid phase/particles from the gaseous phase inside the gas stream. The coalescing filter 2035 will be designed for automatic draining of the liquid phase. The coalescing filter 2035 may be provided with continuous pressure differential monitoring. Further, pressure safety valves will be provided to protect the coalescing filter 2035 from over pressurization.

Further, the electric heater 2040 may also be horizontal as this allows for easy bundle replacement in some example implementations. In other example implementations, vertical placement may be used if bundle replacement is made possible. In some example implementations, electric heater 2040 may be by-passable to allow for short term continued operation during heater

maintenance. The electric gas heater 2040 may increase and control the temperature of the gas in order to avoid condensation inside the fuel gas lines up to the injector nozzle based on equipment standard and gas line design temperature requirements. The electric gas heater 2040 and its control may be designed to follow all normal and emergency operating conditions during Gas turbine operation. In some example implementations, a pressure safety valve may be provided to protect the equipment from over pressurization.

Additionally, a glycol heat exchanger with bypass control may be incorporated in place of the electric heater. The glycol heat exchanger might have a pipe in pipe configuration, or may have a shell and tube configuration depending on the heater size.

FIG. 21 illustrates an alternative example implementation of a substructure 105 forming a local equipment room module 2100 incorporated into the gas compression plant 100. As illustrated, the substructure 105 is formed by vertical members 120, and horizontal members 125. Though, not illustrated in FIG. 21, angled members may also be incorporated in the substructure 105 framework. Additionally, sealing panels 2105, 2110, 2115, 2120 are mounted on the vertical members 120 and horizontal members 125. In some example implementations, the sealing panels 2105, 2110, 2115, 2120 may be noise or sound attenuating panels. The sealing panel 2105 may be an end panel mount on an end of the substructure 105. Sealing panels 2115 and 2120 may be ceiling and floor panels mounted on the upper and lower parts of the substructure 105.

Sealing panel 2110 may be a side panel mounted on the side of the substructure 105 and may include a door opening 2125.

The electrical equipment 2130 and battery systems associated with the compression equipment and BOP may be located in the local equipment room module 2100. When the local equipment room module 2100 is incorporated into the gas compression plant 100 as illustrated, the local equipment room module 2100 may be fabricated to be air-tight and have a pressurization system to guarantee no ingress of flammable gases.

FIG. 22 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 forming a Compressed Air Module 2200 incorporated into the gas compression plant 100. As illustrated, the substructure 105 is formed by vertical members 120, and horizontal members 125. Though, not illustrated in FIG. 22, angled members may also be incorporated in the substructure 105 framework. Additionally, sealing panels 2205, 2210, 2215, 2220 are mounted on the vertical members 120 and horizontal members 125. In some example implementations, the sealing panels 2205, 2210, 2215, 2220 may be noise or sound attenuating panels. The sealing panel 2205 may be an end panel mount on an end of the substructure 105. Sealing panels 2215 and 2220 may be ceiling and floor panels mounted on the upper and lower parts of the substructure 105. Sealing panel 2210 may be a side panel mounted on the side of the substructure 105 and may include door openings 2225.

The Compressed Air Module 2200 may also include a compressed air system 2230. The compressed air system may the compressed air for a Gas turbine package when there is no compressed air supply available at a site. The compressed air system 2230 may be configured for the combinations as required for: a Gaseous fueled Gas Turbine, Combustion air filter self-cleaning,

Separation air for dry gas seals and BOP shutdown and control valves.

FIG. 23 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 forming a Warehousing Module 2300 incorporated into the gas compression plant 100. As illustrated, the substructure 105 is formed by vertical members 120, and horizontal members 125. Though, not illustrated in FIG. 23, angled members may also be incorporated in the substructure 105 framework.

Additionally, sealing panels 2305, 2310, 2315, 2320 are mounted on the vertical members 120 and horizontal members 125. In some example implementations, the sealing panels 2305, 2310, 2315, 2320 may be noise or sound attenuating panels. The sealing panel 2305 may be an end panel mount on an end of the substructure 105. Sealing panels 2315 and 2320 may be ceiling and floor panels mounted on the upper and lower parts of the substructure 105. Sealing panel 2310 may be a side panel mounted on the side of the substructure 105 and may include door openings 2325. The Warehousing Module 2300 may provide storage space for spare parts storage, tools and calibration equipment, or other supplies that the plant operator at the gas compression plant 100. A single, full Warehousing Module 2300 may provide approximately 360 sq. ft. of floor space, and the walls can be furnished with shelves or cabinets 2330.

FIG. 24 illustrates an example implementation of a substructure 105 forming a Backup Diesel Generator Module 2400. As illustrated, the substructure 105 is formed by vertical members 120, and horizontal members 125. Though, not illustrated in FIG. 23, angled members may also be incorporated in the substructure 105 framework. Within the Backup Diesel

Generator Module 2400, a diesel generator system 2405 including a diesel motor 2410, a generator 2415 connected to the diesel motor by a crankshaft 2420 and a heat dissipation radiator 2425 may be bolted to the vertical and horizontal members 125. In alternative embodiments, the diesel motor 2410 may be replaced with another type of fuel drive motor, such as a gasoline motor, or any other motor that may be apparent.

The diesel generator system 2405 may be installed in the Backup Diesel Generator Module 2400 prior to shipment to a job site. Power cables and piping connecting the Backup Diesel Generator Module 2400 to the remainder of the gas compression plant 100 (shown in FIGS. 1-3) may be installed on site.

Though a variety of modules have been described relating to the operation of a gas compression plant, example implementations are not limited to a gas compression plant and may alternatively include other types of facilities that might be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art. For example, other implementations might include a natural gas burning power generation facility for generating electricity, a pumping station for delivering oil or gasoline through a pipeline, or any other facility that might be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art. Similar modules may be used and customized to the intended operation of the building constructed. Industrial Applicability

Plants for operating turbomachinery equipment have a variety of uses. Such buildings might include a gas compression plant for delivering natural gas through a pipeline, a natural gas burning power generation facility for generating electricity, a pumping station for delivering oil or gasoline through a pipeline, or any other facility that might be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art. These plants may be in very remote locations. For example, gas compression plants may be used for transporting fuel from natural gas deposits through a pipeline. Frequently, natural gas deposits are located in remote areas of the planet.

Constructing and deploying a gas compression plant or other turbomachinery equipment plant at such a remote area may be difficult and expensive. For instance, transporting individual panels, pipes, and other construction materials may require a large amount of delivery trucks. Assembly of the gas compression plant or other turbo machinery equipment from the individual construction materials may take a substantial amount of manpower and time. Additionally, laborers may have to travel to the remote area and sleep in special lodging facilities just to build and test the gas compression plant. These factors may lengthen the construction time for a remotely located gas

compression plant.

Using a modular construction system made up of substructures or modules such as those illustrated in the above discussed embodiments of the invention may yield significant advantages. For example, constructing an operations building that houses turbomachinery equipment in separate

substructures can allow for efficient delivery and deployment. Each of the substructures is fabricated in sizes largely similar to ISO containers, which may reduce transportation costs. Other large structures such as a gas processing structure may also be constructed of individual substructures. By constructing the substructures at a fabrication facility, laborers do not need to travel and stay extended periods of time at the remotely located site in order to construct the gas compression plant. All substructures may be standardized and customizable depending on the size of the gas compression plant and/or the size of the turbomachinery equipment. This can save on equipment and construction costs.

Large structures such as the operations building may be placed on a variety of different foundations. For example, the operations building may be placed on a concrete slab. In other instances, the operations building may be placed on a plurality of pilings. The pilings may be tubular members composed of metal or wood. The pilings may be installed in the ground and extend a certain height upwards from the ground. The plurality of pilings may generally be positioned in a rectangular grid like format. In certain instances, the plurality of pilings may allow greater vibrational forces to resonate through the operations building caused by the turbomachinery equipment.

In addition, all components of the modular gas compression plant may be tested at the fabrication facility for functional operation. This can save time later where problems that may occur during initial testing of the fully assembled turbomachinery plant at the remote location are instead found at the fabrication facility. All substructures and components of the modular turbomachinery plant may be efficiently delivered to the remote site, deployed quickly, and seamlessly integrated together.

Further, the substructures 105/110 or modules of the building construction system may include connection receiving points 170 that receive specifically designed connectors 205/605/805 located at corners and along edges of the substructures 105/110 to allow more efficient alignment of the

substructures with respect to each other. These connection receiving points 170 may include windows 225 within the vertical and horizontal support members 120 to allow insertion of fasteners 215 through connection receiving points 170 after substructures 105/110 have been placed onsite. The structure of the connectors 205/605/805 may include one or more spacer plates 210/610/810 inserted between adjacent substructures 105/110 to reinforce and support the connections between adjacent substructures 105/110.

Additionally, the strength of the connectors 205/605/805 may be sufficient in some example implementations to allow stacking of the

substructures 105/110 in two or more levels and the mounting of a bridge crane from upper levels of the stacked substructures.

The preceding detailed description is merely exemplary in nature and is not intended to limit the invention or the application and uses of the invention. The above description of the disclosed embodiments is provided to enable any person skilled in the art to make or use the invention. Various modifications to these embodiments will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the generic principles described herein can be applied to other embodiments without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Thus, it is to be understood that the description and drawings presented herein represent a presently preferred embodiment of the invention and are therefore representative of the subject matter which is broadly contemplated by the present invention. It is further understood that the scope of the present invention fully encompasses other embodiments that may become obvious to those skilled in the art and that the scope of the present invention is accordingly limited by nothing other than the appended claims.