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Title:
NESTED STOVE AND CONFIGURATIONS THEREOF
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2017/197410
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
In one general aspect, an apparatus can include an outer stove having an opening and an inner surface.The apparatus can include an inner stove having an outer surface and disposed within the outer stove where the outer surface of the inner stove and the inner surface of the outer stove define a channel therebetween.

Inventors:
DESPAIN, Steven S. (FIREBOX OUTDOORS LLP, 4730 E. Hwy 116Moroni, Utah, 84646, US)
Application Number:
US2017/032754
Publication Date:
November 16, 2017
Filing Date:
May 15, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
FIREBOX OUTDOORS LLP (4730 E. Hwy 116, Moroni, Utah, 84646, US)
International Classes:
F24B3/00; A47J33/00; A47J37/00; A47J37/07; F24B1/20; F24C1/16; F24C5/20
Foreign References:
US20120204852A12012-08-16
US3109420A1963-11-05
US20040250807A12004-12-16
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BENNETT, Daniel M. et al. (BRAKE HUGHES BELLERMANN LLP, c/o CPA GLOBAL900 2nd Ave South, Suite 60, Minneapolis Minnesota, 55402, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:

1. An apparatus, comprising:

an outer stove having an opening and an inner surface;

an inner stove having an outer surface and disposed within the outer stove, the outer surface of the inner stove and the inner surface of the outer stove defining a channel therebetween.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the opening is a first opening of the outer stove, the outer stove having a second opening opposite the first opening,

the inner stove has a first opening and a second opening at opposite ends of the inner stove.

3. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the outer stove includes at least two panels and the inner stove includes at least two panels.

4. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the channel has a width less than a height of the outer stove or a height of the inner stove.

5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the outer stove includes a first panel and a second panel and the inner stove includes a first panel and a second panel,

the channel is a first channel disposed between the first panel of the outer stove and the first panel of the inner stove,

the apparatus further comprising:

a second channel disposed between the second panel of the outer stove and the second panel of the inner stove.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein the first channel is in fluid communication with the second channel.

7. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein the first channel is aligned orthogonal to the second channel.

8. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the inner stove includes a tab in contact with the inner surface of the inner stove.

9. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the inner stove includes a first panel and a second panel, the inner stove further including a tab, the first panel being removable coupled to the second panel via the tab.

10. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the outer stove includes a first panel and a second panel, the first panel and the second panel of the outer stove define an obtuse angle.

11. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the outer stove includes a first panel orthogonal to a second panel.

12. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the inner stove includes a first panel coupled to a second panel via a slot included in a tab.

13. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the inner stove includes a first panel and a second panel, the first panel has a plurality of tabs and the second panel has a plurality of tabs, the first panel and the second panel being removably coupled via interlocking of the plurality of tabs of the first panel and the plurality of tabs of the second panel.

14. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the inner stove includes a first panel and a second panel, the first panel has a main portion and a tab extending from the main portion of the first panel, the second panel has a main portion and a tab extending from the main portion of the second panel, the first panel and the second panel being removably coupled such that the tab of the first panel contacts the main portion of the second panel and the tab of the second panel contacts the main portion of the first panel.

15. A nested stove, comprising:

an outer stove portion having a combustion chamber;

an inner stove portion having a combustion chamber and being disposed within the combustion chamber of the outer stove portion; and

a channel disposed between the outer stove and the inner stove.

16. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the outer stove includes at least two panels and the inner stove includes at least two panels.

17. The apparatus of claim 1 , wherein the channel has a width less than a height of the outer stove or a height of the inner stove.

18. The apparatus of claim 1 , further comprising:

a diversion plate having a portion disposed above at least a portion of the channel.

19. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising:

The inner stove having a height that is less than a height of the outer stove.

20. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the outer stove includes a panel corresponding to a panel of the inner stove, the panel of the outer stove having a hole pattern different than a hole pattern of the panel of the inner stove.

Description:
NESTED STOVE AND CONFIGURATIONS THEREOF

RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001 ] This Application claims priority to and the benefit of U.S. Provisional

Application No. 62/336,145, filed on May 13, 2016 and claims priority to and the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/466,510, filed on March 3, 2017, both of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.

BACKGROUND

[0002] Portable stoves and other devices that allow the preparation and containment of a fire or other manner of combustion are often used when camping or during times of an emergency. Such devices are useful for cooking, water purification, heat, and other numerous uses.

SUMMARY

[0003] Accordingly, the present disclosure provides collapsible combustion container devices that are capable of utilizing a variety of fuels (e.g., solid fuels) and producing a significant heat output from a relatively small chamber size or area. Such devices are typically light weight, and capable of collapsing into a small (i.e. nearly flat) configuration for storage and portability.

[0004] In one general aspect, an apparatus can include an outer stove having an opening and an inner surface. The apparatus can include an inner stove having an outer surface and disposed within the outer stove where the outer surface of the inner stove and the inner surface of the outer stove define a channel therebetween.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0005] FIGS. 1A through 1C illustrate various aspects of a nested stove.

[0006] FIG. 2A illustrates components of a nested stove as well as inner and outer stoves.

[0007] FIG. 2B illustrates top view perspectives of an outer stove and an inner stove.

[0008] FIG. 3 illustrates the outer stove and the inner stove shown in FIG. 2B in use.

[0009] FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate top view perspectives of the inner stove being inserted into the outer stove.

[0010] FIG. 5 illustrates the inner stove disposed within the outer stove.

[0011 ] FIG. 6 illustrates a top view perspective of the inner stove disposed in the outer stove.

[0012] FIGS. 7 A and 7B illustrate a top view perspective of the inner stove disposed in the outer stove with a diversion plate.

[0013] FIGS. 8 A and 8B illustrate a top view perspective of the nested stove with the inner stove disposed in the outer stove with the diversion plate.

[0014] FIGS. 9A through 15 are diagrams that illustrate various implementations of nested stoves (or portions thereof) having a non-square profile.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0015] FIG. 1A is a diagram that illustrates a nested stove 100. The nested stove 100 includes an outer stove 110 and inner stove 120. In some implementations, the outer stove 110 can be referred to as an outer stove portion, and the inner stove 120 can be referred to as an inner stove portion. The inner stove 120 can have an outer surface 121 and the outer stove 110 can have an inner surface 122. As shown, the inner stove 120 is disposed within at least a portion of the outer stove 110. In some implementations, the inner stove 120 and the outer stove 110 can be part of a kit. In some implementations, the nested stoves described herein may exclude a hinge.

[0016] As shown, the inner stove 120 can have a top opening 122 and can have a bottom opening 123. The outer stove 110 can have a top opening 112 and can have a bottom opening 113. The inner stove 120 can be inserted into the outer stove 110 via the top opening 112 or via the bottom opening 113. The inner stove 120 can be disposed within a chamber (e.g., combustion chamber) or cavity defined by the outer stove 110. The top opening 122 and the bottom opening 123 of the inner stove 120 are at opposite ends of the inner stove 120. The top opening 122 and the bottom opening 123 of the outer stove 120 are at opposite ends of the outer stove 120.

[0017] As shown in FIG. 1 A, the nested stove 100 can have a combustion chamber 160 (can also be referred to as a bum chamber). In this implementation, the combustion chamber 160 is disposed within the inner stove 120 and is disposed inside of (e.g., concentrically within) the channel 130. A variety of fuels can be combusted within the combustion chamber 160 such as a solid fuel, a liquid fuel, and/or so forth. In some implementations, a wood fuel, a gas fuel, and/or so forth can be combusted within the combustion chamber 160.

[0018] FIG. IB illustrates the outer stove 110 and FIG. 1C illustrates the inner stove 120. The inner stove 120 can have a combustion chamber 165, and can be used as a stand-alone stove separate from the outer stove 110. The outer stove 110 can have a combustion chamber 164, and can be used as a stand-alone stove separate from the inner stove 120. [0019] Although not shown FIGS. 1 A through 1C, in some implementations, the inner stove 120 can have one or more openings (also can be referred to as holes) through which combustion air (e.g., combustion openings) can be flow and/or through which exhaust gases (e.g., ventilation openings) can be ventilated after combustion of a fuel. In some

implementations, the openings (or opening pattern) in the inner stove 120 can be the same as or can correspond with the openings (or opening pattern) in the outer stove 110. In some implementations, the openings (or opening pattern) in the inner stove 120 can be different from the openings (or opening pattern) in the outer stove 110.

[0020] As shown in FIG. 1 A, the outer surface 121 of the inner stove 120 and the inner surface 111 of the outer stove 110 can define a channel 130. The channel 130 can be disposed between the inner stove 120 and the outer stove 110.

[0021 ] As shown in FIG. 1A, the inner stove 120 and the outer stove 110 are each defined by a single wall. For example, the outer surface 121 of the inner stove 120 is defined by a single wall (e.g., circular wall) or panel. Similarly, the inner surface 111 of the outer stove 120 can be defined a single wall (e.g., circular wall) or panel.

[0022] In some implementations, a height (e.g., a vertical height or distance) (e.g., height HI, height H2) and/or a width Wl (e.g., a width between the outer surface 121 of the inner stove 120 and the inner surface 111 of the outer stove 110) of the channel 130 can depend on other dimensions such as the height of outer stove 110 and/or inner stove 120. In some implementations, if the nested stove 100 has a relatively tall outer stove 110, the width of the channel 130 can be increased to facilitate air flow within the channel 130. In some

implementations, if the nested stove 100 has a relatively tall inner stove 110, the width of the channel 130 can be increased to facilitate air flow within the channel 130. In some

implementations, if the width of the channel 130 is increased to be too great, convection (e.g., airflow as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7B) can be decreased through the channel 130.

[0023] In some implementations, the height HI of the inner stove 120 and/or the H2 of the outer stove 110 can be larger (e.g., significantly larger) than the width Wl of the channel 130. In some implementations, the height HI and/or the height H2 can be at least 2 times (e.g., 2.5 times, 3 times, 4 times, 5 times, 10 times) larger than the width Wl of the channel 130.

[0024] In some implementations, the height HI of the inner stove 120 can be greater (e.g., at least 2 times greater) than a width (e.g., diameter) (not labeled) of the top opening 122 and/or the bottom opening 123. In some implementations, the height H2 of the outer stove 120 can be greater (e.g., at least 2 times greater) than a width (e.g., diameter) (not labeled) of the top opening 122 and/or the bottom opening 123. The Wl of the channel can be less than the width (e.g., diameter) of the inner stove 120 and/or the width (e.g., diameter) of the outer stove 110).

[0025] In some implementations, rather than being centered within the nested stove 100, the inner stove 120 can be offset from a center of the outer stove 120. Accordingly, in such implementations, the channel 130 can have a first width on a first side of the nested stove 100 that is different than a second width on a second side of the nested stove 100.

[0026] As shown in FIG. 1 A, the height HI of the inner stove 120 is the same as the height H2 of the outer stove 110. In some implementations, the height HI of the inner stove 120 (or a portion thereof) can be different than the height H2 of the outer stove 110 (or a portion thereof). For example, the height HI of the inner stove 120 (or a portion thereof) can less than the height H2 of the outer stove 110 (or a portion thereof).

[0027] FIG. 2A illustrates components for 2 stoves (outer stove 210 and inner stove 220), which can be combined into a nested stove 200 (e.g., a woodgas type stove). In some implementations only part of the nested stove 200 is described, however, similar or mirrored may have the same functionality.

[0028] The nested configuration of the stove (nested stove 200) is shown in, for example, FIGS. 5, 8A, 8B, and 9. As shown in FIG. 2A, the parts of the outer stove 210 and the inner stove 220 are shown as dis-assembled flat parts that can be assembled into the individual stoves (210, 220) and nested stove 200. Accordingly, the outer stove 210, the inner stove 220, and/or the nested stove 200 can be folded or stacked flat.

[0029] The outer stove 210 and the inner stove 220 as stand-alone stoves (in an assembled configuration) are shown in FIG. 2B. Specifically, FIG. 2B illustrates top view perspectives of the outer stove 210 and the inner stove 220 in an assembled configuration. The outer stove 210 and the inner stove 220 are illustrated as two separate stand-alone stoves that can be fuel (e.g., stick) burning type stoves.

[0030] FIG. 2A illustrates that outer stove 210 includes panels 215A through 215D (which can collectively be referred to as panels 215). In this implementation, the outer stove 210 includes 4 panels. In this implementation, each of the panels included in the outer stove 210 are the same (e.g., have the same dimensions). Specifically, each of the panels 215 has the same hole (or opening) pattern. In this implementation, columns (e.g., 2 columns) of parallel holes 217 are lined vertically (vertically when in the assembled configuration as shown in FIG. 2B) along each of the panels 215. In some implementations, the holes 217 may not be aligned vertically, but may have a different pattern.

[0031 ] Like the outer stove 210, the inner stove 220 includes panels 225A through 225D (which can collectively be referred to as panels 225). In this implementation, the inner stove 220 includes four (4) panels. In this implementation, each of the panels 220 included in the outer stove 210 are the same (e.g., have the same dimensions). Specifically, each of the panels 225 has the same hole partem. In this implementation, a line of holes 227 is lined horizontally (horizontally when in the assembled configuration as shown in FIG. 2B) along each of the panels 225. In some implementations, the holes 227 may not be aligned horizontally and may have a different pattern. The holes 227 are larger (e.g., larger area) than the holes 217. In some implementations, the holes 217 can be for pins 212 and the holes 227 can be for ventilation or combustion airflow.

[0032] Because each of the panels 215, 225 for the stoves 210, 220, respectively, are the same (e.g., have the same dimensions), each of the stoves defines a square profile (e.g., shape, perimeter) with orthogonally oriented panels (when viewed from above). For example, each of the panels 215 of the outer stove 210 are the same. Accordingly, the outer stove 210, when assembled, defines a square profile (when viewed from above) because each of the panels 215 has the same length.

[0033] In some implementations, one or more of the panels 215 can be different (e.g., different dimensions, different heights, thicknesses, widths, and/or so forth) than the other of the panels 215. In some implementations, one or more of the panels 225 can be different (e.g., different dimensions, different heights, thicknesses, widths, and/or so forth) than the other of the panels 225.

[0034] In some implementations, one or more of the panels 215, 225, can have a different length than other of the panels 215, 225. For example, a first pair of the panels 215 can have a different shape than a second pair of the panels 215. Accordingly, the profile of the outer stove 210, when assembled, can have a rectangular profile. In some implementations, one or more of the stoves 210, 220 can have a different profile such as a trapezoidal profile, and/or so forth.

[0035] In some implementations, more or less than 4 panels can be included in one or more of the stoves 210, 220. More details related to a stove having more than 4 panels or less than 4 panels are below.

[0036] In this implementation, each of the panels 215, 225 includes at least one tab and slot. Specifically, in this implementation, each of the panels 215, 225 includes four tabs and four slots. Each of the tabs is associated with a slot. The tabs and slots of the panels 215, 225 can be used to removably couple the panels 215, 225 to one another so that they can be assembled to form the respective outer stove 210 and the inner stove 220. The tabs of the outer stove 210 and the inner stove 220 can collectively be referred to, respectively, as tabs 213 and 223.

[0037] For example, panel 225D includes a tab 223D-1 and a slot 224D-1. The slot 224D-1 is associated with tab 223D-1. As another example, panel 225C includes a tab 223C-2 and a slot 224C-2. The panel 225D can be coupled (at least in part) to the panel 225C using the tab 223D-1 and a slot 224D-1 (of panel 225D) as well as using the tab 223C-2 and a slot 224C- 2 (of panel 225C). Specifically, the slot 224D-1 can be engaged with (e.g., slidably inserted into) slot 224C-2. Accordingly, tab 223C-2 can be engaged with tab 223D-1 (and can contact the main portion (an example of a main portion is described below) of panel 225D). Similarly, tab 223D-1 can be engaged with tab 223C-2 (and can contact the main portion of panel 225C). The engagement of the tab 223D-1 and a slot 224D-1 (of panel 225D) and the tab 223C-2 and a slot 224C-2 (of panel 225C) in an assembled configuration as inner stove 220 is shown in FIG. 2B.

[0038] In some implementations, the slot can be referred to as being included in the tab. As shown in, for example, FIG. 2A, the slot 224D-1 is disposed between the tab 223D-1 and a main portion 229D (illustrated with a dashed line) of the panel 225D. In some

implementations, the tab 223D-1 can be referred to as extending from the main portion 229D of the panel 225D. The tab 223D-1 is also aligned within a plane of the main portion 229D of the panel. The main portion 229D of the panel is disposed inside of the slots. In some

implementations, one or more of the tabs of the panel 225D can be aligned on a plane that is different from (e.g., at an obtuse angle with respect to) a plane within which the main portion 229D of the panel is aligned.

[0039] As shown in FIG. 2A, a notch 226D is disposed between tab 223D-2 and tab 223D-1. This will allow for a portion of another of the panels (e.g., panel 225C) to be coupled to with panel 225D. For example, tab 223C-2 can be removably coupled to tab 223D-1 by being inserted into the slot 226D. Panel 225D can be moved (e.g., slidably moved) in a direction opposite panel 225 C so that slot 224D-1 can engaged with slot 224C-2.

[0040] In some implementations, the slot has a length that is less than a length of the tab. For example, the slot 224D-1 has a length that is less than a length of the tab 223D-1. In some implementations, the slot can have a length that is half a length of the tab. In some

implementations, the slot can have a length that is more than half or less than half the length of the tab.

[0041 ] In some implementations, the slot can have width is approximately equal to (or slightly larger than) a thickness of a panel. The width can be defined so that a tab and slot of a first panel can engage with a tab and slot of a second panel. For example, the slot 224D-1 can have a width that is approximately equal to a width of the panel 225C so that a portion of panel 225C can be slidably moved into the slot 224D-1. In some implementations, a slot in a first panel can have a relatively wide width so that a second panel may be moved at various angles (e.g., acute angle, obtuse angle) with respect to the first panel. In such implementations, more than four panels (e.g., 6 panels) can be coupled to define a stove.

[0042] As shown in FIG. 2 A (and FIG. 2B), each of the stoves 210, 220 includes a combustion chamber base 218, 228, respectively. The combustion chamber bases 218, 228 in this implementation are made of a mesh material. In some implementations, one or more of the combustion chamber bases 218, 228 can be made of a solid metallic material and can have openings (or holes) therethrough.

[0043] As shown in FIG. 2 A, one or more of the pins 212 can be disposed within one or more of the holes included in the panels 215, 225. In some implementations, at least a pair of the pins 212 can be used to support one or more of the combustion chamber bases 218, 228. For example, as shown in FIG. 2B, a pair of the pins 212 can be inserted into the holes 217 to support the combustion chamber base 218 within the outer stove 210. As shown in FIG. 2B, the pair of pins can be places at various heights within the holes 217 along panels 225B and 225D. The pair of pins could also be places in holes 217 within panels 225A and 225C (or in holes within any combination of panels). Similarly, although not shown in FIG. 2B, a pair of the pins 212 can be inserted into one or more holes (e.g., pairs of holes in opposite panels) (not shown) to support the combustion chamber base 228 within the inner stove 220. Although not shown, in some implementations, vertical holes (similar to vertical holes 217) can be included in one or more of the panels 225 of the inner stove 220.

[0044] In some implementations, a fuel can be placed on one or more of the combustion chamber bases 218, 228 during operation of the stoves 210, 220 (e.g., as assembled as shown in FIG. 2B). In some implementations, one or more of the combustion chamber bases 218, 228 can be placed within the respective stoves 210, 220 to allow for air flow. For example, combustion chamber base 218 can be spaced away from a bottom of the outer stove 210 to allow for combustion air to flow below a fuel disposed on the combustion chamber base 218 during operation of the outer stove 210. The outer stove 210 can define a combustion chamber 264, and the inner stove 220 can define a combustion chamber 265.

[0045] As shown in FIG. 2A, a diversion plate 250 can be associated with the outer stove 210 and/or the inner stove 220. In some implementations, the diversion plate 250 can be used when the outer stove 210 and the inner stove 220 are assembled as the nested stove 200. The diversion plate 250 can be used to divert (e.g., deflect) combustion air and/or ventilation gases. More details related to the diversion plate 250 are described in connection with at least FIGS. 7A and 7B. In some implementations, the outer stove 210, the inner stove 220, and the diversion plate 250 can be included in a kit.

[0046] As shown in FIG. 2B, two tabs and two slots are engaged on each corner of each of the stoves 210, 220. In some implementations, less than two tabs and less than two slots can be engaged on one or more of the corners on one or more of the stoves 210, 220 and/or more than two tabs and more than two slots can be engaged on one or more of the corners on one or more of the stoves 210, 220.

[0047] As shown in FIG. 2B, a space SI, S2 (also can be referred to as a gap) is disposed between at least one of the panels and a bottom of the stoves 210, 220, respectively. In other words, a first pair of panels is vertically offset from a second pair of panels of each of the stoves 210, 220. In some implementations, the spaces S I, S2 can be defined to allow for air flow (e.g., combustion air) to flow into the combustion chambers 264, 265 of the respective stoves 210, 220. Spaces S3 (corresponding to SI), S4 (corresponding to S2) are included at the top portions of each of the stoves 210, 220. In some implementations, the magnitude of the spaces SI, S2 (and S3, S4) can be defined by the lengths of the slots, and/or the tabs of the panels. In some implementations, SI (and/or S3) can be greater than S2 (and/or S4). In some implementations, S I (and/or S3) can be equal to or less than S2 (and/or S4).

[0048] In some implementations, the holes 227 in the inner stove 220 can allow for flow of air for combustion purposes. As shown in FIG. 2B, the holes 227 are oriented along a bottom portion of each of panels 225B, 225D, and along a top portion of each of panels 225A, 225C. In some implementations, holes (e.g., horizontal holes) can be included in one or more of the panels 225 A through 225D so that airflow can occur in a different fashion. For example, horizontal holes can be included in both the top and bottom portions of a panel. Although excluded in this implementation, in some implementations, horizontal holes (similar to horizontal holes 227) can be included in one or more of the panels 215 of the outer stove 210 and can allow for flow of air for combustion purposes.

[0049] FIG. 3 illustrates the outer stove 210 and the inner stove 220 shown in FIG. 2B each in an assembled configuration and in use. As shown in FIG. 3, the inner stove 220 has a height Tl that is less than a height T2 of the outer stove 210. The inner stove 220 has a width PI that is less than a width P2 of the outer stove 210. The heights and/or widths of the stoves 210, 220 can be configured so that the inner stove 220 can be inserted into and disposed within the outer stove 210. The heights and/or widths of the stoves 210, 220 can be configured to support different size cooking accessories as shown in FIG. 3. [0050] FIGS. 4 A and 4B illustrate top view perspectives of the inner stove 220 being inserted into (e.g., moved into, slidably moved into) the outer stove 210. The inner stove 220 is advanced further into the combustion chamber 264 of the outer stove 210 in FIG. 4B. FIG. 5 illustrates the inner stove 220 disposed (e.g., entirely disposed) within the outer stove 210. The alignment of the stoves 210, 220 is shown. When viewed from above, the inner stove 220 can be concentrically disposed within the outer stove 210.

[0051 ] As shown in FIGS. 4A, 4B, and 5, tabs 223 of the inner stove 220 help to define, at least in part, at least one channel 230 (e.g., airflow channel, four airflow channels). The channels (which can be collectively referred to as channels 230 (individual channels can be, for example, 230A, 230B, 230C)) are defined between outer surfaces of the panels 225 of the inner stove 220 and the inner surfaces of the panels 215 of outer stove 210. The panels can be removably coupled so that the tabs 223 of the panels 225 of the inner stove 220 contact the main portions of the panels 215 of the outer stove 210. For example, the tab 223 C-l of (extending from) the panel 225C can contact the main portion of the panel 215D. In some implementations, one or more of the tabs 223 of the inner stove 220 may not contact one or more of the inner sidewalls (main portions) of the panels 215 of the outer stove 210.

[0052] In some implementations, the widths of the channels 230 are defined by the widths of the tabs 225. For example, the width CI of one of the channels (channel 230D between panel 215D and panel 225D) is defined by the width El of the tab 223C-1 of panel 225C. In some implementations, one or more of the widths of the tabs 225 of the inner stove 220 may be different. Accordingly, the widths of the channels 230 may also be different. For example, a first width of a first channel (e.g., channel 230C) between panel 215C and 225C can be different than a second width of a second channel (e.g., channel 230B) between panel 215B and 225B.

[0053] In some implementations, a distance or width of one or more of the channel(s) 230 can be defined on other dimensions such as the height of outer stove 210 and/or inner stove 220. In some implementations, the taller the outer stove 210, the width of one or more of the channel(s) 230 can be increased by design. In some implementations, if the width of the channels is increased to be too great, convection (e.g., airflow as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7B) can be decreased through the channels.

[0054] As shown in FIG. 5, two or more of channels 230 can be aligned along different directions. Two or more of channels 230 can be in fluid communication. Two or more of channels 230 can be disposed between (or defined by) adjacent pairs of panels.

[0055] For example, the channel 230D can be in fluid communication with channel 230C. The channel 230D can be defined by pair of panels 225D, 215D and pair of panels 225C, 215C (which are adjacent to pair of panels 225D, 215D) can define channel 230C. The channel 230D is aligned orthogonal to channel 230C. Both the channel 230D and the channel 230C have a vertical alignment component along the heights of the parallel panels 225D and 215D. For stoves having less or more than four panels, the channels may not be orthogonally aligned.

[0056] In this implementation, the inner stove 220 is disposed on the combustion chamber base 218 of the outer stove 210. In some implementations, the inner stove 220 can be disposed on one or more pins 212 (which can be removably coupled to the outer stove 210). In some implementations, the inner stove 220 can also include the combustion chamber base 228 and/or can be disposed on one or more of the pins 212. In some implementations, the inner stove 220 can include the combustion chamber base 228 and can be disposed within the outer stove 210 without the combustion chamber base 218 of the outer stove 210.

[0057] As shown in FIG. 5, the outer stove 210 includes panels that have different patterns of holes than corresponding panels included in the inner stove 210. For example, the panel 225C of the inner stove 220 has a hole pattern different than a hole pattern of the panel 215C of outer stove 210 corresponding to (e.g., on the same side as, adjacent to) the panel 225C. Similarly, the panel 225D of the inner stove 220 has a hole pattern different than a hole pattern of the panel 215D of outer stove 210 corresponding to the panel 225D.

[0058] FIG. 6 illustrates a top view perspective of the inner stove 220 disposed in the outer stove 210. Air flow can be drawn up (along direction U) the channels 230A, 230B, and 230D shown in FIG. 6. In some implementations, the air flow in the channel 230A, for example, can be drawn through space SI . In some implementations, air flow into the combustion chamber 265 of the inner stove 220 can be drawn through space S2 (and space SI).

[0059] As shown in FIG. 6, both the inner stove 220 and the outer stove 210 can have at least a bottom surface aligned within a plane 240. In some implementations, both the inner stove 220 and the outer stove 210 can have at least a portion of a bottom surface contacting or resting on the ground. This can assist with alignment between the inner stove 220 and the outer stove 210.

[0060] FIGS. 7 A and 7B illustrate a top view perspective of the inner stove 220 disposed in the outer stove 210 with a diversion plate 250. As shown in FIG. 7A the diversion plate 250 is slidably moved within portions of the outer stove 220 and over at least a portion of the inner stove 210. As shown in FIG. 7B the diversion plate 250 is slidably moved into a useable position within the outer stove 220 when in a nested stove 200 configuration. The diversion plate 250 can have a portion disposed above at least a portion of one or more of the channels 230. For example the diversion plate 250 can have a first portion (or side) disposed above channel 230D. The diversion plate 250 can have a second portion (or side) disposed above channel 230C.

[0061 ] When in use, in some implementations, the diversion plate 250 can facilitate movement of combustion air into the combustion chamber 265 of the inner stove 220 from at least one side (e.g., from 4 sides) (the four sides are illustrated by arrows). For example, combustion air can travel upward (shown by a dashed part of arrow Z) along the channel 230D contact the diversion plate 250 (shown by part of arrow Z) and be directed downward (shown by part of arrow Z) into the combustion chamber 265 of the inner stove 220.

[0062] FIGS. 8 A and 8B illustrate a top view perspective of a nested stove 200 with the inner stove 220 disposed in the outer stove 210 with the diversion plate 250.

[0063] As discussed above, the inner stove 210, the outer stove 220, and the nested stove 200 can have any shape or profile. For example, one or more of the panels can have a trapezoidal shape, a square shape, a triangular shape, etc. A profile or shape (when viewed from above) of the inner stove 210, the outer stove 220, and the nested stove 200 such as a tubular shape, a pentagonal shape, a hexagonal shape, a triangular shape, etc. (where the inner stove 210 and outer stove 220 are concentrically oriented with respect to one another). Each of these sides can have panels with the same length or non-equal lengths. In such

implementations, the number of channels can be greater than or less than, for example, four. The inner stove 210 (panels or top view) can have a different shape or profile than the outer stove 220. The inner stove 210 and/or the outer stove 220 may not have panels (e.g., may be made of unitary pieces).

[0064] FIGS. 9A through 15 are diagrams that illustrate various implementations of the nested stoves shown above (e.g., nested stove 100, nested stove 200) (or portions thereof) having a non-square profile or shape when viewed from above. Although the diagrams illustrate a single stove profile, the implementations can be an inner stove (e.g., inner stove 110) and/or an outer stove (e.g., outer stove 120). In addition, the implementations can include any of the features described above including, for example, a diversion plate, tabs, slots, holes, hole patterns, spaces, gaps, channels, pins, etc.

[0065] FIGS. 9 A and 9B illustrate a perspective view and top view of a stove 1000 having a hexagonal profile (e.g., shape). As shown in FIG. 9B, each of the panels 1025A through 1025F (collectively panels 1025) has an equal width (e.g., width W), but in some implementations, two or more of the panels 1025 could have a different width. For example, a first panel (e.g., panel 1025 A) can have a width different than a width of a second panel (e.g., panel 1025B). In some implementations, a third panel (e.g., panel 1025C) can have a width different than the width of the first panel or the width of the second panel.

[0066] As shown in FIG. 9A, in this implementation, at least some of the panels 1025 are vertically offset from other of the panels. Such an offset (e.g., offset O) can provide for an opening between a bottom of at least one of the panels and a surface on which the stove 1000 is placed such that an ambient environment, such as combustion air, can be moved into an inner portion of the stove. In some implementations, one or more of the panels 1025 can have one or more openings (not shown) (e.g., holes 217 and/or holes 227 shown in FIGS. 2 A and 2B) for combustion air, ventilation, fuel movement, and/or so forth.

[0067] Although as shown in FIG. 9 A, each of the panels 1025 has an equal length (vertically from top to bottom), in some implementations, two or more of the panels 1025 could have a different lengths (e.g., length L). For example, a first panel can have a length different than a length of a second panel. In some implementations, a third panel can have a length different than the length of the first panel or the length of the second panel.

[0068] Although as shown in FIG. 9A, each of the panels has an equal surface area, in some implementations, two or more of the panels 1025 could have a different surface area. For example, a first panel can have a surface area different than a surface area of a second panel. In some implementations, a third panel can have a surface area different than the surface area of the first panel or the surface area of the second panel.

[0069] As noted above, in some implementations, the stove 1000 can have fewer (e.g., 5 panels, 3 panels) or more panels (e.g., 7 panels, 8 panels, 9 panels). In some implementations, the profile, when viewed from above can have different angles between pairs of the panels 1025. For example, an angle (e.g., angle Z) between a first pair of panels (when assembled) can be different than an angle between a second pair of panels (e.g., angle between panel 1025C and panel 1025D). In some implementations, the profile of the stove 1000 can be asymmetrical when viewed from above. In some implementations, the angle Z between pairs of the panels 1025 can be obtuse.

[0070] Although the stove 1000 has panels 1025 that are vertically aligned when assembled, in some implementations, the stove 1000 may have one or more panels that is not vertically aligned when assembled. For example, the stove 1000 can have one more panels with a trapezoidal shape such that at least one of the panels 1025 slopes downward or upward (e.g., non-parallel with other panels) when assembled.

[0071 ] An example of a panel 910 that is not vertically aligned is shown in FIG. 10. As shown in FIG. 10, the panel 910 tapers from a wider top portion 911 to a narrower bottom portion 912.

[0072] FIG. 11 illustrates a nested stove configuration with an inner stove Ql having a first profile (when viewed from above) and an outer stove Q2 having a second profile (when viewed from above). In some implementations, the stoves Ql, Q2 can be configured so that one or more portions of the inner stove Ql contact(s) the outer stove Q2.

[0073] FIGS. 12A through 12D are diagrams that illustrate panels that can be used to define one or more of the stoves (e.g., inner stove, outer stove) above. FIG. 12A illustrates a first side of a panel 1200, FIG. 12B illustrates a second side of the panel 1200, and FIG. 12C illustrates a view of the panel from a bottom side (i.e., direction B) of FIG. 12A. FIG. 12D illustrates panel 1200 stacked with several other panels identical to (or similar to) panel 1200.

[0074] As shown in FIG. 12A, the panel 1200 includes tabs 1210 on a first side of a main portion 1201 of the panel 1200 and tabs 1220 on a second side (opposite the first side) of the main portion 1201 of the panel 1200. As shown in FIG. 12C, the tabs 1210, 1220 are each at an angle (e.g., an angle greater than 90°) with respect to a primary plane (and/or main portion) of the panel 1200. The tabs 12010 on the first side of the panel 1200 are offset (e.g., vertically offset) from the tabs 1220 on the second side of the panel 1200.

[0075] As shown in FIG. 12D, the panel 1200 can be stacked with several other panels. Specifically, the panels 1200 can be packed between the tabs 1210, 1220 do not interfere with the tabs of the other panels. The main portion of one of the panels can be in contact with a main portion of another of the panels. In some implementations, panels can be stackable when the panels are configured to define a stove having at least 5 sides. A stove with less panels than 5 (where the panels have tabs) may not be stackable.

[0076] Although FIGS. 12A through 12D illustrate that the panel 1200 has an equal number (i.e., 4) of tabs on each side of the panel 1200. In some implementations, the number of tabs 1210 can be different than the number of tabs 1220. For example, the number of tabs on a first side of a panel can be odd and the number of tabs on a second side of the panel can be even. In some implementations, a panel can have less than 4 tabs, or more than 4 tabs on one or more sides.

[0077] As shown in FIGS. 12A and 12B, the tabs 1210 on one side of the panel are vertically offset from the tabs 1220 on the other side of the panel. For example, a tab (or a center portion of the tab) on a first side of the panel 1200 is horizontally aligned with a space (or a central portion of a space or gap between tabs) on the second side of the panel 1200 rather than another tab. In some implementations, the tabs 1210, 1220 (on each side of the panel 1200) of one or more panels in a stove may not be vertically offset. For example, a tab (or a center portion of the tab) on a first side of the panel 1200 can be horizontally aligned with a tab (or a central portion of a tab between spaces or gaps) on the second side of the panel 1200.

[0078] The tabs (e.g., tabs 1210, 1220, tabs 123) disclosed herein can have a variety of shapes. For example, one or more of the tabs can have a triangular shape, a square shape, a rectangular shape, and/or so forth. In some implementations, a space (or distance) between a pair of tabs (e.g., space H) is approximately the same width and/or height (e.g., width or height I) as at least one of the tabs. In some implementations, a space (or distance) between a pair of tabs is different than the width and/or the height as at least one of the tabs.

[0079] In some implementations, the spacing (or distance) between the tabs can be uniform such as shown in FIGS. 12A and 12B. In some implementations, the spacing (or distance) between tabs can vary. For example, a space (or distance) between a first pair of tabs can be different than a space (or distance) between a second pair of tabs.

[0080] In some implementations, the width of tabs can be uniform such as shown in FIGS. 12A and 12B. In some implementations, the width of tabs can vary. For example, a width of a first tab can be different than a width of second tab.

[0081 ] A spacing between one or more pairs of tabs, a shape of one or more of the tabs, and/or so forth can be configured so that a pair of panels may be coupled together in only one orientation (with respect to one another). A spacing between one or more pairs of tabs, a shape of one or more of the tabs, and/or so forth can be configured so that a pair of panels may be coupled together in a specified number of orientations.

[0082] In some implementations, an angle (e.g., angle M) between one of the tabs (e.g., one of tabs 1210) and a main portion of a panel (e.g., main portion 1201 of panel 1200) can be different than an angle between a second of the tabs and a main portion of a panel. In some implementations, at least one of the tabs included in a panel may not be bent (e.g., may be within the same plane as the main panel).

[0083] FIGS. 13A through 13C illustrate a panel 1310 coupled to a panel 1320. FIG. 13 A illustrates a view of the panels 1310, 1320 from a first side and FIG. 13B illustrates a view of the panels 1310, 1320 from a second side. FIG. 13B illustrates a bottom view of the panels 1310, 1320. The panels 1310, 1320 are removably coupled together.

[0084] The tabs 131 OA are interleaved with the tabs 1320 A as shown in FIG. 13B. When coupled together, the tabs 1310A of panel 1310 are in contact with a main portion of the panel 1320, and the tabs 1320A of panel 1320 are in contact with a main portion of the panel 1310. In other words, the panel 1310 has tabs 131 OA and the panel 1320 has tabs 1320A where the panel 1310 and the panel 1320 are removably coupled via interlocking of the tabs 1310A and the tabs 1320A.

[0085] Given the configuration of the tabs 131 OA, 1320A, the panel 1310 and the panel 1320 can be coupled together in a variety of positions. Some of those positions are illustrated in FIG. 14A and 14B. FIG. 14A illustrates that the panel 1310 is vertically higher than panel 1320 when panel 1310 is coupled to panel 1320. Other panels (not shown) can be combined in a variety of configurations (e.g., vertical high offsets (e.g., vertically offset by 50% of the length, vertically offset by 30% of the length)) with panel 1310 and/or panel 1320. FIG. 14B illustrates that the panel 1310 is vertically higher than panel 1320 as compared with FIG. 14A.

[0086] Although not illustrated, panel 1310 (shown in FIG. 13B) can be coupled to panel 1320 so that tabs 1310B can be interlocking (e.g., interleaved) with tabs 1320A. In other words, panel 1310 can be decoupled from panel 1320. Panel 1310 can be rotated and coupled to panel 1320.

[0087] Although not shown, in some implementations, tabs can be disposed on both sides of a main portion of a panel when coupled together. For example, a first tab of a first panel can be disposed on a first side of a main portion of a second panel, and a second tab of the first panel can be disposed on a second side of the main portion of the second panel.

[0088] When multiple panels are coupled together to define a shape such as the stove 1000 in FIGS. 9A and 9B, as an example, tension between the panels can maintain the structural integrity of the stove 1000. For example, an angle (e.g., angle M shown in FIG. 12C) between a tab and a main portion of a first panel can be defined so that when the first panel is coupled with a second panel, tension between the tab and a main portion of a second panel can maintain a relatively tight coupling between the first panel and the second panel.

[0089] As a specific example, an interior angle between a pair panels in a stove having a hexagonal shape can be 120°. However, an angle between a tab of a first of the pair of panels and a main portion of the first of the pair of panels can be less than 120°. Accordingly, the tab of the first pair of panels can be press fit against a main portion of a second of the pair of panels would the pair of panels is coupled together.

[0090] As shown in, for example, FIG. 13B, the panels 1310, 1320 are coupled together without a gap between sides (of the main portions excluding the tabs) of the panels 1310, 1320. In some implementations, panels (e.g., panels 1310, 1320) can be configured so that a gap can be between the sides of the panels. FIG. 15 illustrates such an example with a gap (or opening) 1550 between tabs 1521 (part of panel 1520 and shown with cross-hatching), 1511 (part of panel 1510 and shown with horizontal lines) such that sides 1512, 1522 of panels 1510, 1520 are not in contact. Other tabs are not shown in this example figure.

[0091] It will also be understood that when an element, such as a layer, a region, or a substrate, is referred to as being on, connected to, electrically connected to, coupled to, or electrically coupled to another element, it may be directly on, connected or coupled to the other element, or one or more intervening elements may be present. In contrast, when an element is referred to as being directly on, directly connected to or directly coupled to another element or layer, there are no intervening elements or layers present. Although the terms directly on, directly connected to, or directly coupled to may not be used throughout the detailed description, elements that are shown as being directly on, directly connected or directly coupled can be referred to as such. The claims of the application may be amended to recite exemplary relationships described in the specification or shown in the figures.

[0092] As used in this specification, a singular form may, unless definitely indicating a particular case in terms of the context, include a plural form. Spatially relative terms (e.g., over, above, upper, under, beneath, below, lower, and so forth) are intended to encompass different orientations of the device in use or operation in addition to the orientation depicted in the figures. In some implementations, the relative terms above and below can, respectively, include vertically above and vertically below. In some implementations, the term adjacent can include laterally adjacent to or horizontally adjacent to.

[0093] While certain features of the described implementations have been illustrated as described herein, many modifications, substitutions, changes and equivalents will now occur to those skilled in the art. It is, therefore, to be understood that the appended claims are intended to cover all such modifications and changes as fall within the scope of the implementations. It should be understood that they have been presented by way of example only, not limitation, and various changes in form and details may be made. Any portion of the apparatus and/or methods described herein may be combined in any combination, except mutually exclusive

combinations. The implementations described herein can include various combinations and/or sub-combinations of the functions, components and/or features of the different implementations described.