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Title:
OSCILLATING TOOL DRYWALL BLADE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/152408
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An oscillating blade for cutting or shaping sheet materials such as drywall, with a blade, a sharing portion, a depth gauge for determining depth of cut, a caliper portion for premarking sheet materials for a standard dimension cut, and a reverse direction blade.

Inventors:
CHURCHILL, Gregory C. (422 West Cook Street, Portage, Wisconsin, 53901, US)
Application Number:
US2019/015656
Publication Date:
August 08, 2019
Filing Date:
January 29, 2019
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
IMPERIAL BLADES (450 Progress Way, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin, 53590, US)
International Classes:
B26B7/00; B23Q16/00
Foreign References:
EP3213847A12017-09-06
EP1857223A12007-11-21
EP0532913A11993-03-24
US0607107A1898-07-12
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SMITH, Jeffry W. (Smith Law Office, 8517 Excelsior DriveSuite 40, Madison Wisconsin, 53717, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. An oscillating blade comprising:

a shank having a tool mounting end and a blade end;

a blade joined to the blade end and the blade has a predetermined width; and

a depth gauge formed in the shank between the tool mounting end and the blade end, and the depth gauge is substantially registered with the blade to define depth-of-cut measurements.

2. The oscillating blade of claim 1, wherein the depth gauge includes a plurality of notches.

3. The oscillating blade of claim 1, wherein the depth gauge further comprises:

reference numerals on the shank.

4. The oscillating blade of claim 1, wherein the shank defines a first axis and a second axis disposed at an angle to the first axis, and the blade is substantially perpendicular to the second axis.

5. The oscillating blade of claim 1, wherein the shank includes a first shank portion defining a first axis and a second shank portion defining a second axis, and the blade is joined to the second portion and disposed substantially perpendicular to the second axis, and the oscillating blade second portion includes the depth gauge.

6. The oscillating blade of claim 1, wherein the blade includes a plurality of teeth, and is dimensioned to mate with a predetermined junction box opening when in an oscillating motion. 7. The oscillating blade of claim 1 , wherein the blade is arcuate in shape.

8. The oscillating blade of claim 1, wherein the shank includes a first portion and a second portion, and the blade is wider than the first portion.

9. The oscillating blade of claim 1 , wherein the shank includes a laterally outwardly extending shank extension.

10. The oscillating blade of claim 1 , wherein the shank includes a laterally outwardly extending shank extension and the shank extension is narrower than the shank.

11. The oscillating blade of claim 1, wherein the shank includes a first portion and a second portion, and includes a laterally outwardly extending shank extension joined to the second portion to define a piercing tip.

12. The oscillating blade of claim 1, wherein the shank includes a first portion and a second portion, and a shank extension extends laterally outwardly from the second portion to define a laterally extending piercing tip.

13. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a fixed caliper gauge joined to the shank.

14. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a first marking tip joined to the shank; and

a second marking tip jointed to the shank, and spaced part from the first marking tip to define a fixed caliper gauge.

15. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a first caliper tip joined to the shank adjacent to the blade; and

a second caliper tip joined to the shank tool mounting end, and spaced apart from the first caliper tip to define a marking caliper.

16. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a first caliper tip joined to the shank adjacent to the blade; and

a second caliper tip joined to the shank tool mounting end, and spaced apart from the first caliper tip to define a marking caliper, the second caliper tip comprises:

a piercing tip, and

an extreme marking edge spaced apart from the piercing tip.

17. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a first caliper tip joined to and extending laterally outwardly from a shank extension; and a second caliper end joined to and extending outwardly from the tool mounting end.

18. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a first marking tip joined to the shank; and

a second marking end portion joined to the shank and extending outwardly from the shank, and including a second marking end joined to the second marking end portion, and the second marking end is spaced apart from the first marking end to define a marking caliper.

19. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a reverse direction blade joined to the shank.

20. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a dagger blade joined to and extending laterally outwardly from the shank.

21. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a dagger blade shank joined to the blade shank;

a dagger tip joined to the dagger blade shank; and

a reverse direction blade defining a plurality of saw teeth joined to the dagger blade shank.

22. The oscillating blade of claim 1, and further comprising:

a dagger blade shank joined to the blade shank;

a dagger tip joined to the dagger blade shank; and

a reverse direction blade defining a plurality of saw teeth and joined to the dagger blade shank, and wherein the saw teeth are directed in a direction that is substantially different from a cutting direction of the blade.

23. An oscillating blade comprising:

a shank having a tool mounting end and a blade end;

a blade joined to the blade end and the blade has a predetermined width; and

wherein the blade includes a plurality of teeth, and is dimensioned to mate with a predetermined junction box opening when in an oscillating motion.

24. The oscillating blade of claim 23, and further comprising a depth gauge formed on the shank, and the depth gauge includes a plurality of notches.

25. The oscillating blade of claim 23, and further comprising:

a depth gauge formed in the shank between the tool mounting end and the blade end, and the depth gauge is substantially registered with the blade to define depth-of-cut measurements.

26. The oscillating blade of claim 23, wherein the shank defines a first axis and a second axis disposed at an angle to the first axis, and the blade is substantially perpendicular to the second axis.

27. The oscillating blade of claim 23, wherein the shank includes a first shank portion defining a first axis and a second shank portion defining a second axis, and the blade is joined to the second portion and disposed substantially perpendicular to the second axis, and the oscillating blade second portion includes the depth gauge.

28. The oscillating blade of claim 23, wherein the shank includes a laterally outwardly extending shank extension.

29. The oscillating blade of claim 23, wherein the shank includes a first portion and a second portion, and includes a laterally outwardly extending shank extension joined to the second portion to define a piercing tip.

30. The oscillating blade of claim 23, and further comprising:

a fixed caliper gauge joined to the shank.

31. The oscillating blade of claim 23, and further comprising:

a first marking tip joined to the shank; and

a second marking tip jointed to the shank, and spaced part from the first marking tip to define a fixed caliper gauge.

32. An oscillating blade comprising:

a shank having a tool mounting end and a blade end;

a blade joined to the blade end and the blade has a predetermined width; and

a fixed caliper gauge joined to the shank.

33. The oscillating blade of claim 32, and further comprising:

a first marking tip joined to the shank; and

a second marking tip jointed to the shank, and spaced part from the first marking tip to define the fixed caliper gauge.

34. The oscillating blade of claim 32, and further comprising:

a first caliper tip joined to the shank adjacent to the blade; and

a second caliper tip joined to the shank tool mounting end, and spaced apart from the first caliper tip to define the fixed caliper gauge.

35. The oscillating blade of claim 32, and further comprising:

a first caliper tip joined to the shank adjacent to the blade; and

a second caliper tip joined to the shank tool mounting end, and spaced apart from the first caliper tip to define a marking caliper corresponding to the fixed caliper gauge, and the second caliper tip comprises:

a piercing tip, and

an extreme marking edge spaced apart from the piercing tip.

36. The oscillating blade of claim 32, and further comprising:

a first caliper tip joined to and extending laterally outwardly from a shank extension; and a second caliper end joined to and extending outwardly from the tool mounting end.

37. The oscillating blade of claim 32, and further comprising:

a first marking tip joined to the shank; and

a second marking end portion joined to the shank and extending outwardly from the shank, and including a second marking end joined to the second marking end portion, and the second marking end is spaced apart from the first marking end to define a marking caliper corresponding to the fixed caliper gauge.

38. The oscillating blade of claim 32, and further comprising:

a reverse direction blade joined to the shank.

39. The oscillating blade of claim 32, and further comprising:

a dagger blade joined to and extending laterally outwardly from the shank.

40. The oscillating blade of claim 32, and further comprising:

a dagger blade shank joined to the blade shank;

a dagger tip joined to the dagger blade shank; and

a reverse direction blade defining a plurality of saw teeth and joined to the dagger blade shank, and wherein the saw teeth are directed in a direction that is substantially different from a cutting direction of the blade.

41. The oscillating blade of claim 32, wherein the blade includes a plurality of teeth, and is dimensioned to mate with a predetermined junction box opening when in an oscillating motion.

Description:
OSCILLATING TOOL DRYWALL BLADE

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of United States Application No. 15/887,570, filed February 2, 2018, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.

FIELD AND BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to oscillating tool blades, and more specifically to oscillating tool blades with blade features and measuring devices for accurately cutting and shaping sheet goods such as drywall.

Oscillating tools are hand-held, electrically or pneumatically powered, devices that transfer torque to an oscillating blade mounted on the tool. Oscillating blades are manufactured with various types of cutting edges to cut, abrade, or shape materials. Oscillating blades have also been manufactured with shanks that are bent to enable a cutting edge to be brought into contact with material at a desired angle.

Typically, oscillating blades have a single cutting edge intended to perform a specific task on a specific material. The cutting edges may be knife edge, saw teeth, or abrasive material. Blades are easily changed by a quick-connecting mount on the oscillating tool, so that any number of tasks can be performed using the oscillating tool by simply changing blades.

Drywall, cement board, gypsum board, and other types of sheet goods, including fiber board, particle board, and plywood (collectively referred to herein as“drywall”) can be cut using oscillating blades, as well as by various other tools. Knives, routers, saws (both hand and powered) can be used for cutting sheets down to size or to make plunge cuts to create openings away from the edges of the board for access to electrical junction/gang boxes, plumbing, and structural features, for example. Cutting openings in drywall for access to electrical junction/gang boxes requires precision because drywall openings that do not closely match the location or size of the junction/gang box require costly repairs or wasted materials. Various power tools have been developed to simplify the task. For example, a sheet of drywall installed on a wall will completely cover a junction/gang box, but by knowing the general location of the box, an installer can use a drywall router with a bit having an edge guide bearing against the junction/gang box to route an opening that closely matches the junction/gang box. A similar process can be done by hand.

One downside of this router process is that junction/gang boxes typically already contain wires or other sensitive components. Routing into and around junction/gang boxes can, therefore, risk damaging whatever is in or adjacent to the junction/gang box. Various types of protective covers can be installed over wires in the junction/gang boxes prior to drywall installation, but they require additional time and expense.

Another method requires cutting openings before the drywall is installed by accurately marking and cutting a hole or opening and installing the drywall. This method requires measuring the location of the mounted junction/gang box and transferring that measurement to the drywall. Once the location is marked on the drywall, the dimensions of the junction/gang box are used to mark and cut the opening. Accurate measuring and cutting with this method are critical, and difficult for the inexperienced drywall installer.

Oscillating tools can also be used to cut openings in drywall, and oscillating blades with saw teeth are less likely to damage wires because the degree of movement in an oscillating blade is only about two to five degrees, so they have a short stroke that is less likely to damage wires. Nonetheless, it is preferred to limit contact between power tools and wiring or other electrical and communication components installed in junction/gang boxes. Further, using an oscillating blade is not as accurate because oscillating blades do not bear against junction/gang boxes edges like router bits do. Thus, although useful, oscillating blades are not always as accurate as router bits, for example.

One oscillating blade developed for this purpose is a QBIT™ part no. 5Q1000, which is a box shaped blade having four walls and accurate saw teeth for cutting into the dry wall. The box shaped blade matches the size of a single junction/gang box, so the opening need not be premeasured. Nonetheless, the oscillating motion of the blade does not align with all of the saw teeth, and the cut is not clean.

Another drywall blade is called DREMEL™ Multi-Max - Drywall Jab Saw, which has a rearwardly directed saw blade and a rounded shank. The tip of the saw blade is used to jab drywall for an initial opening and then the saw blade is used to cut the opening, as previously marked on the drywall. This type of blade cuts drywall, but measuring and layout of the junction/gang box measurements is necessary, and the tool itself.

Thus, there is a need for an oscillating tool blade that quickly and easily cuts accurate holes in drywall.

SEfMMARY OF THE INVENTION

To address shortcomings in prior oscillating blades used to cut drywall, the present invention is directed to an oscillating blade having a shank with a tool mounting end and a blade end; a blade joined to the blade end and the blade has a predetermined width; and a depth gauge formed in the shank between the tool mounting end and the blade end, and the depth gauge is substantially registered with the blade to define depth-of-cut measurements.

The depth gauge may include a plurality of notches and/or reference numerals on the shank. In one embodiment, the shank defines a first axis and a second axis disposed at an angle to the first axis, and the blade orientation is substantially perpendicular to the second axis. The blade may be joined to the second portion and disposed substantially perpendicular to the second axis, and the oscillating blade second portion may include the depth gauge for efficiency of space.

The blade preferably includes a plurality of teeth and is arcuate in shape, but other arrangements and blade types can be used in the present invention.

The oscillating blade shank may include a laterally outwardly extending shank extension to support the blade and the shank extension may be narrower than the shank, and the shank extension may include a piercing tip.

The shank may optionally include a first portion and a second portion, and a shank extension that extends laterally outwardly from the second portion to define a laterally extending piercing tip.

The oscillating blade may further include a fixed caliper gauge and the caliper gauge may have a first marking tip joined to the shank; and a second marking tip jointed to the shank and spaced part from the first marking tip to define the fixed caliper gauge. The first caliper tip may be joined to the shank adjacent to the blade; and the second caliper tip may be joined to the shank tool mounting end, and spaced apart from the first caliper tip to define the marking caliper having a dimension that matches the height of a gang box or the width of a double gang box. The second caliper tip may include a piercing tip, and an extreme marking edge spaced apart from the piercing tip to provide accurate indentation marking on soft materials.

The oscillating blade may further include a reverse direction blade joined to the shank, and the reverse direction blade may include a dagger blade joined to and extending laterally outwardly from the shank. The dagger blade shank may be joined to the blade shank and include a dagger tip joined to the dagger blade shank, and the reverse direction blade may define a plurality of saw teeth joined to the dagger blade shank. Alternatively, rather than simply being arranged in a reverse direction, the saw teeth can be directed in a direction that is substantially different from a cutting direction of the blade.

BRIEF DESCPRITION OF THE DRAWINGS

Fig. 1 is a front view of an oscillating tool drywall blade in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the oscillating tool drywall blade of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a side view of the oscillating tool drywall blade of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of standard electrical junction/gang boxes juxtaposed with an oscillating tool drywall blade in accordance with the present invention; and

Fig. 5 is a detailed view of a caliper point in accordance with the present invention.

DETAIFED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the following detailed description of drawings, the same reference numeral will be used to identify the same or similar item in each of the figures.

As seen in Figs. 1 through 3, there is depicted an oscillating tool blade 20 for use in cutting or otherwise shaping drywall, cement board, gypsum board, plywood, particle board, and other similar sheet materials (referred to generically herein as“drywall”) through which holes must be cut to access electrical junction/gang boxes, window frames, plumbing, telephone boxes, and other similar building components. The illustrated oscillating tool blade 20 includes: a shank 22 having a tool mounting end 24; a blade end 26; a blade 28; a depth gauge 30; a caliper portion 32; and a reverse direction blade 34. The shank 22 is preferably planar and made of any suitable material including high carbon steel, spring steel, and bi-metal composites, for example, although it can be made of any suitable material and of any shape, including having reinforcing ribs formed in it, for example. The shank 22 tool mounting end 24 is shaped, and perforated to be received into a mating oscillating tool mount. The term“end” as used to describe portions of the oscillating tool blade 20, includes a portion (not just the edge) of the shank 22 that is engaged with the oscillating tool or the blade 28 or any other feature described herein. Further, the shape and design of the tool mounting end 24 can vary within the scope of this invention to accommodate any oscillating tool mount design, of which there are many. Thus, the illustrated tool mounting end 24 is a generic version for purposes of illustration only. Similarly, the blade“end” 26 is a term used to reference a portion of the shank 22 which supports the blade 28, and the tool mounting end 24 and the blade end 26 can overlap or be the same portion of the oscillating tool blade 20.

The shank 22 tool mounting end 24 in the illustrated embodiment defines a first shank axis 40, and the blade end 26 defines a second blade axis 42 that is preferably disposed at an angle to the first shank axis 40, and more preferably at an angle of about 11.1 degrees for the illustrated embodiment. Further, the overall length and width of the shank 22 is determined from considerations including: tool-to-material clearance, mass balance of the oscillating tool blade 20; and projected depth of cut, as examples.

Preferably, the blade 28 is substantially perpendicular to the second axis. Such a configuration provides improved balance and stability of the blade as it is oscillating, and also improved visibility of the blade 28 during operation, as well as improved access to a sheet of drywall for the reverse direction blade 34, as described in more detail below. The shank 22 shape can be changed to accommodate other arrangements of the blade 28 and the reverse direction blade 34, material clearance, and mass balance for minimizing vibration.

The blade 28 is illustrated as a row of saw teeth in a arcuate pattern, but other blade types, such as knife edges and abrasives, can be used. Further, the illustrated arcuate pattern of the blade 28 is preferred, but a straight pattern or even stacked rows of teeth or other cutting arrangements can be provided, including v-shaped patterns, for example.

The blade 28 is illustrated as being wider than most of the shank 22, but other relative blade 28 widths and shapes can be used in accordance with the present invention. The shank 22 is illustrated having a shank extension 29 extending outwardly (and to the left), but this specific arrangement is not critical. Nonetheless, by providing a shank extension 29, the blade 28 can be used to cut smaller holes and even round holes, and with precise control.

In a preferred embodiment, the dimension of the blade 28 from end-to-end is about 2.15 inches, which is a dimension preselected to match the size of a standard electric junction/gang box 70 plus an approximate motion range of a typical oscillating tool. (See Fig. 4.) Thus, in operation, the blade 28 will match width 31 (or length dimension 74, if desired) of a standard electric junction/gang box 70 when it is oscillating in an oscillating tool. Of course, other blade dimensions can be used, but matching a width of a standard electric junction/gang box 70 simplifies operation and improves accuracy without requiring an operator to perform calculations or guess about where the standard electric junction/gang box 70 walls are located because of the blade dimension and caliper feature described below.

The shank 22 further includes the depth gauge 30, so that an operator can see a depth to which the blade 28 has penetrated the dry wall in a plunge cut. The depth gauge 30 is registered from a leading edge of the blade 28, so that an operator can readily determine a depth (or approximate depth) into the drywall to which the blade 28 has penetrated. The plunge depth would preferably match the drywall thickness, so that once the blade 28 has penetrated a full thickness of the drywall, the operator can withdraw the blade 28. This can be helpful when a hole is being cut after the drywall has been installed to protect wiring, telephone and communications lines, plumbing, and other items installed behind the drywall, for example.

The depth gauge 30 can be created using various indicators such as markings 48 on the shank 22 face, but preferably notches 50 are formed in one or both sides of the shank 22 are used to provide a visual indicator when a desired plunge depth has been reached. Color coded depth marks or raised blade shank 22 portions can also be provided, for example, and multiple indicators can be used. The formed notches 50 are particularly helpful when other markings are covered by dust. Further, the notches 50 are illustrated as being aligned with the markings 48 and disposed between the tapered points 46 for efficiency, but the depth gauge 30 and the shaving edge 44 can be spaced apart.

The illustrated oscillating tool blade 20 further includes a pair of shaving edges 44 to make relatively minor or fine adjustments to an edge or opening in drywall. The shaving edges 44 in the illustrated embodiment include tapered points 46 extending at least partially along lateral edges of the blade shank 22. The shaving edges 44 can be used to make minor changes to drywall openings or edges for more precise fitment and alignment with structural features, concealed electrical/gang boxes or other items.

The shaving edges 44 are illustrated on opposite sides of the shank 22, but only one shaving edge 44 is necessary for this feature, and the shaving edge 44 can be any desired length, and each shaving edge preferably extends outwardly about .078 inches in length. Further, the tapered points 46 can be other shapes, have other spacings, or even be formed on other blade shank 22 edges to fine-tune drywall edges and openings. Also, the shaving edge 44 is illustrated as spaced apart tapered points 46, but knives, abrasives, or other types of edges can be used in accordance with this invention. Further, as with any blade or cutting edge on the oscillating tool blade 20, the thickness of the shank 22 or blades can be tapered to provide a slightly shaper or more aggressive cutting edge.

The caliper portion 32 includes a first marking tip 54 joined directly or indirectly to the shank 22. In the illustrated embodiment, the first marking tip 54 is disposed adjacent to the blade 28 or on the shank extension 29 to enable cutting smaller holes or accurate shapes. The first marking tip 54 can also be used as a piercing tip to penetrate drywall by pushing the tip into the drywall.

A second marking tip 58 is spaced apart from the first marking tip 54 to define a predetermined caliper dimension, which preferably matches a height dimension of a junction/gang box that is hidden behind or will be exposed through a hole in a sheet of drywall (See Fig. 4.)

The second marking tip 58 is preferably mounted on a rear shank extension 61 can be used to pierce a paper cladding on the drywall as a visual indicator of one end of a predetermined cutting dimension. Nonetheless, when piercing the paper cladding, a marking tip of any kind can pierce into the underlying gypsum material, and result in a tapered portion 59 of the second marking tip 58 to widen the visual marking 75 in the paper, which can obscure the exact point of the predetermined dimension of the caliper portion 32. The present invention, therefore, uses the second marking tip 58 only to pierce the paper cladding and further pressure forces the tapered portion 59 into the drywall to widen the paper opening until an extreme edge 60 is pressed into the paper cladding. It is the paper opening caused by the extreme edge 60 that indicates one of the end points of the predetermined dimension of the caliper portion 32. To accomplish this task, the second marking tip 58 is spaced inwardly along the caliper portion 32 a length dimension 74 to provide a relatively simple and accurate dimension mark on the dry wall. The length dimension 74 is preferably 3.75 inches, but the exact length dimension 74 can vary so long as it serves the function of spacing the second marking tip 58 and the extreme edge 60 apart for precise marking in soft materials. In addition, the length dimension 74 approximately matches the width of a double wide electric junction/gang box, so after marking the width with the caliper portion 32, the blade 28 can be used to cut the entire width of the electric junction/gang box with two plunge cuts, for example.

The caliper portion 32 is preferably used when the oscillating tool is not operating, so that an accurate location of the junction/gang box can be marked on the dry wall using the first marking tip 54 and the second marking tip 58. Once marked, the drywall can be accurately cut with the blade 28 in both position and size.

At times, it is preferred or desirable to use an oscillating blade in a pull stroke. Accordingly, the reverse direction blade 34 is provided as a lateral extension from the shank 22 on a dagger blade shank 72. Preferably, the reverse direction blade 34 includes a row of saw teeth, but other blade types, including knives and abrasives, are possible. The reverse direction blade 34 also preferably includes a dagger tip 62 to be used to puncture the drywall for inserting the reverse direction blade 34 and cutting drywall with a pull stroke. It is preferred that the dagger tip 62 be sharp enough to initiate a cut, but robust enough to avoid damage from contacting other building materials. This feature is also desirable in the tips described above. A reverse blade length of about an inch is long enough to cut through most thicknesses of drywall and provide clearance from an oscillating tool head. It is also desirable to provide the reverse direction blade 34 with the relatively narrow dagger blade shank 72 for cutting smaller and/or curved openings, such as for pipes or conduits. When such a blade is desired, the blade can be oriented in any desired direction, including forward, angled, and reverse (as illustrated).

The arrangement of the oscillating tool blade 20 elements as described above provides balance and minimized extraneous vibration during use. If one or more of the elements is changed or omitted, or another element is added, the sizes, shapes, and orientations of other elements can be changed accordingly.

Also, as stated above, the term“drywall” is to be understood herein to include drywall, sheet rock, gypsum board, cement board, particle board, fiber board, plywood, and any sheet-like material, including doors and other wooden panels. Thus, the term“drywall” is not intended to be limiting and, conversely, is intended to include and identify other materials, the names of which can be used interchangeably with“drywall.”

The foregoing detailed description is provided for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations therefrom should be read into the following claims.