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Title:
OUTDOOR CABLE PATHWAY SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/177956
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An outdoor cable pathway system comprises a distribution cable comprising at least one strength member. The system further comprises a distribution cabling tape, comprising a resilient polymeric base sheet having a first major surface and a second major surface, an adhesive layer disposed on at least a portion of the first major surface, the adhesive layer capable of adhering to a concrete or asphalt surface, and a continuous lengthwise channel configured to receive the distribution cable. The system further includes a cable securing clip formed from a resilient material and having a substantially U-shaped or V-shaped cross section, wherein the cable securing clip is insertable in a mini- or micro-trench that retains the distribution cable within the mini- or micro-trench.

Inventors:
DUPUIS, David Montalion (1905 Discovery Blvd, Cedar Park, Texas, 78613, US)
KIPKE, Cary A. (8600 N FM 620 Unit 2333, Austin, Texas, 78726, US)
LARSON, Donald Kent (2724 Zambia Drive, Cedar Park, Texas, 78613, US)
ALLEN, William George (13409 Lois Ln, Austin, Texas, 78750, US)
Application Number:
US2019/021591
Publication Date:
September 19, 2019
Filing Date:
March 11, 2019
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
CORNING RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (One Riverfront Plaza, Corning, New York, 14831, US)
International Classes:
H02G3/04; H02G3/30; H02G9/02
Foreign References:
US20040115004A12004-06-17
US20180017750A12018-01-18
US20030123935A12003-07-03
US20010019764A12001-09-06
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DOYLE, William D. (Corning Optical Communications LLC, Intellectual Property Department SP-TI-03-1Corning, New York, 14831, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
We Claim:

1. An outdoor cable pathway system, comprising:

a distribution cable comprising at least one strength member;

a distribution cabling tape, comprising

a resilient polymeric base sheet having a first major surface and a second major surface,

an adhesive layer disposed on at least a portion of the first major surface, the adhesive layer capable of adhering to a concrete or asphalt surface, and

a continuous lengthwise channel configured to receive the at least one distribution cable; and

a cable securing clip formed from a resilient material and having a substantially U- shaped or V-shaped cross section, wherein the cable securing clip is insertable in a mini- or micro-trench that retains the distribution cable within the mini- or micro-trench.

2. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1, wherein the continuous lengthwise channel is formed in at least one of the adhesive layer and a first portion of the first major surface of the resilient polymeric sheet.

3. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1, wherein the distribution cabling tape includes first and second spacer layers arranged in a spaced apart configuration on the adhesive layer to form the continuous lengthwise channel, each of the first and second spacer layers comprising a second adhesive layer disposed thereon, the second adhesive capable of adhering to a concrete or asphalt surface.

4. The outdoor cable pathway system of claims 1 to 3, wherein the cable securing clip comprises a cable cradle to secure at least one distribution cable therein.

5. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 4, wherein the cable cradle is configured to secure at least one distribution cable in a horizontal cross section orientation.

6. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 4, wherein the cable cradle is configured to secure at least one distribution cable in a vertical cross section orientation.

7. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1, wherein the cable securing clip is force fittable within the mini- or micro-trench and is configured to secure at least two distribution cables in a horizontal cross section orientation.

8. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1, wherein the cable securing clip is force fittable within the mini- or micro-trench and is configured to secure at least two distribution cables in a vertical cross section orientation.

9. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1, wherein the cable securing clip further includes flattened surface portions disposed on an end of each wing.

10. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1, wherein the second major surface comprises a patterned surface having a plurality of raised structures.

11. The outdoor cable pathway system of claims 1 to 10, wherein the distribution cable comprises an optical fiber

12. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1, wherein the distribution cable comprises an optical fiber bundle.

13. The outdoor cable pathway system of any preceding claim, wherein the adhesive layer provides a substantially permanent bond to the concrete or asphalt surface.

14. The outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1, wherein the cable securing clip comprises a substantially U-shaped cross section and having a convex indentation disposed between two wing portions.

15. A network comprising the outdoor cable pathway system of claim 1.

Description:
OUTDOOR CABLE PATHWAY SYSTEM

PRIORITY APPLICATION

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/643,293, filed on March 15, 2018, the content of which is relied upon and incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIELD

[0002] The present invention is directed to an outdoor cable pathway system for distributing communications cabling, such as optical fiber cabling, to an area or neighborhood with a plurality of users or potential users.

BACKGROUND

[0003] Communications service providers are faced with increasing demands to deliver faster and better service to their customers. Service providers can meet these needs for greater bandwidth by incorporating fiber optics in the access network, the communication connection to the end subscriber. Service providers have announced gigabit service offerings.

[0004] With many players competing in the industry, speed to build new networks is critical. However, the process to deploy traditional fiber optic networks often requires time consuming civil engineering work both in planning, verifying existing infrastructure location and construction. The access network can be the most burdensome in that individual fibers must connect each subscriber’s living unit. In the case of single family home neighborhoods, that means a single fiber to each home.

[0005] For aerial deployments (telephone poles), deploying the fiber optic cable is relatively straight forward. Lashing the new fiber optic distribution cable to existing telephone cabling or stringing a new messenger wire in which to lash the new fiber optic cable is done relatively quickly (about a day to install the distribution cable for a serving area of 200 - 500 homes). However, for new entrants for fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) service, gaining access to the telephone poles from the pole owner (often incumbent telephone company) can be a time consuming and litigious process. [0006] For below grade deployments (conduit below grade in which to pull the distribution cable) deployment can involve many construction machines and operators for weeks for a serving area of 200 - 500 homes. One of the most time consuming operations is directional drilling to place the conduit below grade. The cost of directional drilling is approximately $40/foot making below grade fiber access network deployment cost much more than aerial deployments.

[0007] Therefore, need exists for an alternative to traditional aerial and below grade installations that can eliminate the need to share telephone poles and avoid the time consuming and costly directional drilling for conduit placement.

SUMMARY

[0008] According to one embodiment of the present invention, an outdoor cable pathway system comprises a distribution cable comprising at least one strength member. The system further comprises a distribution cabling tape, comprising a resilient polymeric base sheet having a first major surface and a second major surface, an adhesive layer disposed on at least a portion of the first major surface, the adhesive layer capable of adhering to a concrete or asphalt surface, and a continuous lengthwise channel configured to receive the distribution cable. The system further includes a cable securing clip formed from a resilient material and having a substantially U-shaped or V-shaped cross section, wherein the cable securing clip is insertable in a mini- or micro-trench that retains the distribution cable within the mini- or micro-trench.

[0009] The above summary of the present invention is not intended to describe each illustrated embodiment or every implementation of the present invention. The figures and the detailed description that follows more particularly exemplify these embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0010] The present invention will be further described with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

[0011] Fig. 1A is an exemplary neighborhood deployment of an outdoor fiber pathway according to an embodiment of the present invention.

[0012] Fig. 1B is a top view of a portion of an outdoor fiber pathway according to an embodiment of the present invention. [0013] Fig. 1C is an isometric view of an exemplary distribution cabling tape that is part of an outdoor fiber pathway according to an embodiment of the present invention.

[0014] Fig. 2 A is an isometric view of a cable securing clip according to another embodiment of the present invention.

[0015] Figs. 2B and 2C are isometric views of a distribution cable being secured to a cable securing clip according to another embodiment of the present invention.

[0016] Figs. 3A - 3C are isometric views of alternative cable securing clips according to alternative embodiments of the invention.

[0017] While the invention is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specifics thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and will be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the intention is not to limit the invention to the particular embodiments described. On the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0018] In the following Detailed Description, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, which form a part hereof, and in which is shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. In this regard, directional terminology, such as“top,” “bottom,”“front,”“back,”“leading,”“forward ,”“trailing,” etc., is used with reference to the orientation of the Figure(s) being described. Because components of embodiments of the present invention can be positioned in a number of different orientations, the directional terminology is used for purposes of illustration and is in no way limiting. It is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and structural or logical changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.

[0019] The present invention is directed to an outdoor fiber pathway system and method for distributing communication cabling, which can include optical fiber or other communications or electrical media, to an area or neighborhood with a plurality of users or potential users. One component of the system is a durable, protective distribution cabling tape that includes or covers a channel for receiving a distribution cable, such as fiber optic network cable. The distribution cabling tape is configured to adhere to an asphalt or concrete surface, such as a road, curb, walkway, bridge support, building base or other foundation. In one aspect, the distribution cabling tape includes a channel that is configured to receive at least a portion of a distribution cable, which can include copper wire(s) and/or optical fiber(s). Typically, such distribution cable includes a durable protective jacket and one or more strength members. In addition, the outdoor fiber pathway system includes one or more cable securing clips that are insertable and retain a distribution cable in a channel formed in a roadway surface, curb, or sidewalk, referred to herein as a mini-or micro-trench, which can be used to guide a distribution cable to or from a subscriber site or location. Various securing clip designs are provided below.

[0020] Figs. 1 A - 1C are illustrative of an exemplary outdoor fiber pathway system according to a first aspect of the invention. The outdoor pathway system 10 includes a distribution cable 150 comprising at least one strength member. For means of clarity, a flat cable (in cross section view, such as shown in Fig. 1C) has a width greater than its height and is said to lay flat (or horizontal) when the width of the cable is in contact with the ground or road. A cable is said to be in a vertical position when the cable is rotated 90 degrees relative to the plane of the ground or road.

[0021] In addition, the outdoor pathway system 10 includes distribution cabling tape 100. In one aspect, the distribution cabling tape 100 can comprise a resilient polymeric base sheet having a first major surface and a second major surface. The tape 100 also includes an adhesive layer capable of adhering to a concrete or asphalt surface disposed on at least a portion of the major surface. In some cases, the first major surface includes a continuous lengthwise channel formed in a first portion thereof. In other cases, the continuous lengthwise channel is formed on the surface of the adhesive layer. In addition, the continuous lengthwise channel is configured to receive at least one distribution cable 150.

[0022] Fig. 1C shows an exemplary distribution cabling tape system 100 that includes a distribution cable 150 disposed in a lengthwise channel. In this aspect, the distribution cable 150 includes one or more electrical lines or optical fibers 155. In some aspects, cable 150 can include one or more strength members such as is present in commercially available cable, such as OFS Toneable Mini LT Flat Drop Fiber Optic Cable (available from OFS Fitel, LLC, Norcross, GA), 3M™ Clear Fiber Drop Cable (available from 3M Company, St. Paul MN), or ROC™ Drop Dielectric Cable (available from Coming Inc., Flickory NC). Other suitable cables include CampusLink™ Indoor/Outdoor cable (available from Prysmian Group, Lexington, SC). Alternatively, in some aspects, the distribution cable 150 can comprise a conventional ribbon fiber having multiple fibers or a series of parallel optical fibers disposed on a filament tape to allow straightforward access to separate individual fibers by peeling away one or more fibers or peeling off a portion of the filament tape. As such, the distribution cable 150 can have a circular, oval, or rectangular cross section profile. In other alternative embodiments, the lengthwise channel can be configured to accommodate more than one distribution cable.

[0023] The distribution cabling tape 100 includes a resilient polymeric base sheet that can be formed from a single material, or, alternatively, different materials. For example, a first portion of the polymeric base sheet can be formed from a first material, such as a toughened or semi rigid polymer material and other portions can be formed from a different material, such as a more flexible elastomeric (lower modulus) material. Such a composite base sheet can be formed by coextruding the two different polymers, as would be apparent to one of skill in the art given the present description.

[0024] At least a portion of the base sheet can be covered by an adhesive layer. The adhesive layer comprises a composition that is capable of adhering to a concrete or asphalt surface, such as a road, curb, or walkway surface. In one aspect, a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is designed to adhere to a common road, curb, or walkway surface, such as concrete and asphalt surfaces, and to withstand the wide temperature variations, weather and chemicals present. For example, acceptable PSA formulations are described in US 5,906,889 and US 5,453,320, each of which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. In another aspect, the adhesive can comprise a heat activated adhesive. In addition, other types of adhesives can be used, depending on the duration of the intended deployment of the distribution cabling tape.

[0025] A second or top layer of the base sheet may be a flat surface or it may have a raised pattern surface of raised structures (such as is shown in Fig. 1C). The base sheet can be any color so that the tape can stand out (such as including white or yellow coloring) or it can blend into the surface upon which it is mounted (such as including gray or black coloring) or it can be covered with conventional road surfacing or resurfacing materials. Retroreflective elements, glass and/or ceramic beads, can be embedded directly on the second surface as is described in US 4,388,359, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety. Alternatively, the second surface can be coated with either a thermoplastic or thermosetting layer. For flat markings, an example of a thermoplastic material is described in US 4,117,192, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety, and for thermosetting an example material is described in US 5,077,117, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety. For base sheets having a plurality of raised protuberances, example materials are described in US 4,988,541, US 5,683,746, US 5,593,246, US 6,479,132, US 5,928,761, US 5,227,221, and US 5,763,000, each of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety. Additionally, other patterns and designs of raised protuberances are described in US 4,388,359, US 4,988,541, US 5,683,746, and US 4,681,401, each of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety. For applications where roads may be subject to snow and ice accumulation, exemplary base sheets designed to resist the action of snowplow blades are described in US 4,129,673, US 4,685,824, and US 6,431,788, each of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety. Exemplary commercially available pavement marking tapes include those sold under the Stamark™ brand, including 380 IES and 380 AW models, available from 3M Company, St. Paul Minnesota.

[0026] Acceptable methods of forming a tape structure using the exemplary base sheets and adhesives described herein can include hot embossing, double sided embossing, patterned nip rolls, doctor blading (for adhesives), and pattern coating techniques. For example, patterned embossing rolls can be brought into contact with opposing sides of a web of the base sheet material to generate the desired patterns on each side of the base sheet (e.g., diamonds on the air side (e.g., top surface) and continuous channel on the road side). Doctor blades or pattern coating can be used to apply adhesives in non-channel areas.

[0027] It is noted that while structure 100 is referred to herein as a“tape,” this term is not meant to exclude other types of adhesive-coated structures, such as adhesive-coated road patches, panels or markers that can provide a protective conduit or other type of pathway for cables. In addition, the distribution cabling tape can also provide a protective pathway for electrical or power lines that are to be distributed through a neighborhood, or across a road, curb, street, parking lot or sidewalk, or for cabling repairs and/or splices. Moreover, the adhesive can be selected to provide either a temporary or more permanent type of bond to the road, curb, or walkway, thus providing a distribution cabling solution for short term events (such as concerts, sporting events, festivals, and the like), or for more longer duration deployment situations (such as subdivisions in development). In one example, tape 100 can include a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) layer, having a thickness of from about 3 to 16 mil, preferably about 6 - 12 mil. [0028] In addition, while the tape embodiments described herein are often used in road, curb, sidewalk, or street applications, in alternative embodiments, the distribution cabling tape can be used to distribute cabling along other surfaces, such as along or up the side of a building, tower, bridge, or other structures. Further, while distribution cable 150 is described herein as a distribution cable, tape 100 can be used to route and/or protect many different types of cables, including communication cables, power cables (such as low voltage power cables), sensor wires, co-axial cables, signal cables, and other conventional cables, or other types of equipment, such as sensors, RFID tags, embedded antennas, antenna feeds, and location markers.

[0029] Further details regarding the construction of exemplary distribution cabling tape can be found in PCT Pub. No. WO 2018/017475 and US Prov. Patent App. No. 62/567,516, each incorporated by reference herein in their entirety.

[0030] The outdoor pathway system 10 further includes one or more cable securing devices or clips 170 formed from a resilient material and having a substantially U-shaped or V-shaped cross section. As explained in further detail herein, the cable securing clip 170 is insertable in a mini- or micro-trench that retains the distribution cable within the mini- or micro-trench (see e.g., trench 108 shown in Figs. 2B and 2C).

[0031] The mini- or micro-trench can be formed with a conventional road surface grinding tool, such as are available from Smith Manufacturing (Pompano Beach, FL) and Ditch Witch Company (Perry, OK).

[0032] FTTFI implementation may require that a single fiber be routed to a subscriber. For example, as shown in Fig. 1B, a distribution cabling tape 100 is disposed in an orientation along a street running substantially parallel to a curb 106. The deployment of the distribution cable to a particular location (e.g., homesite) involves a substantially 90° turn from the main pathway direction towards the customer location. To secure its position, the distribution cable 150 is disposed in mini- or micro-trench 108.

[0033] ln this example, the distribution cable that is disposed within the channel of the distribution cabling tape is maintained in a flat or horizontal orientation along the road surface lf placed in a“vertical” orientation within the distribution cabling tape, the cable profile can make it more difficult to conceal. Because of the distribution cable construction, with parallel strength members disposed on either side of the communication media/fiber, it may not be practical to maintain this flat orientation during a substantially 90° transition or lateral bend. As such, during deployment, one or more cable securing clips 170 can be used to maintain the cable 150 within its trench 108 position, as the rigidity of the cable, in combination with the rotational twisting of the cable during the 90° turn, can lead to the distribution cable being forced out of its trench position.

[0034] In addition, in another aspect, some roadway chip out (i.e., the removal of additional road material) may be necessary at the position 109 of the 90° transition. The chip-out feature of the transition provides for the cable to twist 90 degrees into a vertical position.

[0035] In one example implementation, a 36” long, shallow (1-2” deep) cut is made along the roadway cable path, and a T-cut is made for the lateral pathway extending through the curb 106 (see Fig. 1B) at a substantially 90° angle from the roadway cable path. An 18” cut can be made extending from the ends of the distribution cabling tape to provide sufficient length for the distribution cable to transition from being disposed on the roadway surface to the trench position. As stated above, a cable securing clip 170 can be utilized to keep the distribution cable 150 in the trench 108 as it is rotated from a horizontal orientation into a vertical orientation. The chip-out feature of the transition provides space for the distribution cable 150 to twist 90° into a vertical position and to bend 90° towards the curb. In the curb pathway, another cable securing clip 170 can be used to secure the vertical orientation of the distribution cable 150. Securing the distribution cable in this manner can be advantageous when applying a backfill material into the chip-out portion to reinstate the road integrity. In this case, both the distribution cable 150 and the cable securing clip 170 can be covered by and contained within the backfill material.

[0036] An exemplary cable securing clip l70a is shown in further detail in Fig. 2A. Cable securing clip l70a is a U-shaped or V-shaped structure having opposing wings 171 and 172 formed from a resilient material, such that when pressed inward, the clip exerts a resisting outward force. As such, the cable securing clip l70a is force fittable within the mini- or micro trench. Projecting rib features or barbs 176 can also help maintain clip l70a within the trench during cable deployment. In this embodiment, cable securing clip l70a further includes a cable cradle 175. In this particular example, the cable cradle 175 includes two opposing inner wings 177 configured to receive a distribution cable 150 in a vertical cross-sectional orientation (where the distribution cable runs parallel with the road surface and one strength member is disposed above the other, with the communication lines disposed in between). In addition, the cable securing clip l70a can further include flattened surface portions 178 disposed on an end of each wing. The flattened surface portions provide adequate surface area to receive a downward applied force (such as from a hammer or other tool) used to press clip l70a into trench 108.

[0037] For example, in Figs. 2B and 2C, a distribution cable 150 is being secured within cable securing clip l70a in a vertical cross-section orientation, where the clip l70a will be subsequently inserted in trench 108.

[0038] The cable securing clips 170 can be formed using a resilient, durable material such as a plastic or metal. In one example, a polycarbonate/PBT blend such as Xenoy X48201 can be formed using a standard injection molding process. Cable securing clip l70a contains multiple barbs on each wing which help grip the trench wall of the roadway. In this example, in an open position, the cable securing clip can be from about 0.7 to about 0.9” wide, allowing the clip to grip the sidewalls of trenches of variable width from about 0.4” to about 0.8”.

[0039] Some of the cable securing clips described herein have the property of holding a cable and possess elasticity to adapt to roadway cuts of various widths. The cable securing clips contain barbs that impart friction to the vertical walled roadway cut, thus contributing to a reliable securement. A cable channel holds the cable in precise location relative to the roadway cut. Some advantages of this system and method include: (1) the cable 150 is quickly and securely positioned and anchored in the trench, (2) the clip 170 has the ability to flex and accommodate trenches of variable width, (3) clips formed from polymer materials will not be harmful to automobile traffic in the case they become dislodged, (4) the clips offer a permanent anchor to restrain the drop cable, reducing the structural demands on the filler material, and (5) the securement technique negates the need for manual securing of the cable during the backfill process. Subsequent to the backfill process, a distribution cabling tape can be used to cover the trench and backfill area.

[0040] Figs. 3A-3C show alternative cable securing clips. For example, in Fig. 3A, a cable securing clip l70b is configured to secure two distribution cables l50a, l50b in a horizontal (cross section) orientation. Cable securing clip l70b is a U-shaped or V-shaped structure having opposing wings 171 and 172 formed from a resilient material, such that when pressed inward, the clip exerts a resisting outward force. As such, the cable securing clip l70b is force fittable within the mini- or micro-trench. Projecting rib features or barbs 176 can also help maintain clip l70b within the trench during cable deployment. In this embodiment, cable securing clip l70a further includes a cable cradle 175. In this particular example, the cable cradle 175 includes two opposing inner ribs 179 configured to receive at least two distribution cables l50a, l50b in a horizontal cross-sectional orientation. In addition, the cable securing clip l70b can further include flattened surface portions 178 disposed on an end of each wing. The flattened surface portions provide adequate surface area to receive a downward applied force (such as from a hammer or other tool) used to press clip l70b into trench 108.

[0041] Another alternative cable securing clip is shown in Fig. 3B, where a cable securing clip l70c is configured to secure two distribution cables l50a, l50b in a vertical (cross section) orientation. Cable securing clip l70c is a U-shaped or V-shaped structure having opposing wings 171 and 172 formed from a resilient material, such that when pressed inward, the clip exerts a resisting outward force. As such, the cable securing clip l70c is force fittable within the mini- or micro-trench. Projecting rib features or barbs 176 can also help maintain clip l70c within the trench during cable deployment. In this embodiment, cable securing clip l70c further includes a cable cradle 175. In this particular example, the cable cradle 175 includes two opposing inner ribs 179 configured to receive at least two distribution cables l50a, l50b in a vertical cross-sectional orientation. In addition, the cable securing clip l70c can further include flattened surface portions 178 disposed on an end of each wing. The flattened surface portions provide adequate surface area to receive a downward applied force (such as from a hammer or other tool) used to press clip l70c into trench 108.

[0042] Another alternative cable securing clip is shown in Fig. 3C, where a cable securing clip l70d is configured to be placed over one or more distribution cables 150 in a horizontal (cross section) orientation. Cable securing clip l70d is a substantially U-shaped structure having opposing wings 171 and 172 formed from a resilient material, such that when pressed inward, the clip exerts a resisting outward force. As such, the cable securing clip l70d is force fittable within the mini- or micro-trench. Projecting rib features or barbs 176 can also help maintain clip l70d within the trench during cable deployment. In this embodiment, cable securing clip l70d can optionally further include a convex indentation portion 174 disposed between wings 171, 172 that can fit over a distribution cable 150 that is disposed within a trench (as shown in Fig. 3C, in a horizontal cross section orientation. This configuration may be desirable for situations in which the distribution cable is entering into or exiting from a trench slot 108 in a horizontal geometry to mate with the road surface. Although not shown, in a further alternative configuration, the convex indentation portion may be shaped to cover a distribution cable oriented in a vertical cross section position. In addition, the cable securing clip l70d can further include flattened surface portions 178 disposed on an end of each wing. The flattened surface portions provide adequate surface area to receive a downward applied force (such as from a hammer or other tool) used to press clip l70d into trench 108.

[0043] ln one exemplary deployment, using Fig. 1B as a reference, a distribution cabling tape 100 having distribution cable 150 is applied to the roadway surface near curb 106 in a manner consistent with the application methods described in PCT Pub. No. WO 2018/017475 and US Prov. Patent App. No. 62/567,516, each incorporated by reference herein in their entirety. The tape portion can be removed and a distribution cable 150 having a horizontal cross section orientation enters into trench portion l08a. The distribution cable 150 may be secured therein using a cable securing clip shaped like clip l70d shown in Fig. 3C. As the distribution cable 150 is bent in a 90° direction, it is twisted in a vertical cross section orientation at trench bend/chip out portion 109. The distribution cable can be maintained in its vertical orientation within trench portion l08b using a cable securing clip such as clip l70a (Fig. 2A), clip l70c (Fig. 3B), or, alternatively, by placing any cable securing clip over the vertically oriented distribution cable within the trench. When deployed to a home site, such as to home l5b in Fig. 1A, the distribution cable 150 may be looped at the home (e.g., with a drop fiber removed for home connection) and then returned along trench portion l08b in a vertical orientation, where cable securing clip l70c can be utilized to secure the departing and returning portions of distribution cable 150. The return cable can then be re-oriented into a horizontal cross section position, held in its horizontal orientation within trench portion l08c using another cable securing clip 170 (e.g., shaped like clip l70d shown in Fig. 3C), and deployed with continuing distribution cabling tape 100. After the distribution cable deployment within the trench portions, the trenches can be back-filled using a conventional backfill material, such as a polyurethane sealant.

[0044] As such, according to one aspect of the invention, different types of cable securing clips can be used in a single or multiple home deployment. Also, cable routing deployment (in a neighborhood or other venue) can use any number of combinations of the distribution cabling tapes and cable securing clips described herein. Further, the continuous channels formed in the tapes and road surfaces need not be formed as straight lines. Additionally, the distribution cabling tape or road surface may include a loop shaped channel or trench configured to accommodate slack storage for future repairs.

[0045] The outdoor fiber pathway system thus allows a service provider the opportunity to quickly connect a sufficient number of customers in a neighborhood or building before making a large infrastructure investment. In this manner, each of the houses in this area of the neighborhood can be rapidly accessed without having to utilize directional drilling or other massive road destruction and repair procedures.

[0046] While a preferred application of the outdoor fiber pathway system is for telecommunication applications, as mentioned previously, other applications can include pathways for power, sensors or sensing or electronics for smart road applications.

[0047] Various modifications, equivalent processes, as well as numerous structures to which the present invention may be applicable will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art to which the present invention is directed upon review of the present specification.