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Title:
PARTIAL HELICAL STRAKE SYSTEM FOR VORTEX-INDUCED-VIBRATION SUPPRESSION
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2000/068514
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A partial helical strake system (10) for suppressing vortex induced vibration in a cylindrical structure deployed in a marine application is provided. The system comprises a base (12) connected to the cylindrical structure (11), and at least one helical strake projection (14) from the base for a part of the circumference of the cylindrical structure.

Inventors:
Allen, Donald Wayne (1806 Hillgreen Drive Houston, TX, 77494, US)
Haws, Joe Henry (2307 Promrose Court Richmond, TX, 77459, US)
Henning, Dean Leroy (3205 Hartledge Road Needville, TX, 77461, US)
Application Number:
PCT/EP2000/004202
Publication Date:
November 16, 2000
Filing Date:
May 02, 2000
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SHELL INTERNATIONALE RESEARCH MAATSCHAPPIJ B.V. (Carel van Bylandtlaan 30 HR The Hague, NL-2596, NL)
International Classes:
B63B21/50; B63B39/00; E02B17/00; E21B17/01; E21B17/22; F16L1/12; (IPC1-7): E02B17/00; B63B39/00
Domestic Patent References:
WO1995027101A11995-10-12
Foreign References:
FR2367148A11978-05-05
EP0169949A11986-02-05
Other References:
PATENT ABSTRACTS OF JAPAN vol. 1997, no. 12 25 December 1997 (1997-12-25)
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Claims:
C L A I M S
1. A partial helical strake system for suppressing vortex induced vibration in a cylindrical structure deployed in a marine application, the system comprising: a base connected to the cylindrical structure; and at least one helical strake projection from the base for a part of the circumference of the cylindrical structure.
2. The partial helical strake system of claim 1, wherein each helical strake projects from the base for about half or less of the circumference of the cylindrical structure.
3. The partial helical strake system of claim 1 or 2, comprising an array of said helical strakes.
4. The partial helical strake system of any one of claims 13, wherein each helical strake projects from the base for 2050 percent of the circumference of the cylindrical structure.
5. The partial helical strake system of any one of claims 14, wherein the base is integrally formed with the cylindrical structure.
6. The partial helical strake system of any one of claims 15, wherein the cylindrical structure is a subsea pipeline and the base is a half pipe configuration, each end of the base being provided with a clamp attached to the end of the base, the clamp comprising a ushaped clamp housing attached to each end of the base and being oriented with the opening thereof to the open side of the base, arms extending out from the ushaped clamp housing, and retaining latches mounted to the arms for engaging the cylindrical structure.
7. The partial helical strake system of claim 6, wherein each retaining latch comprises a dog pivotally mounted within the arm configured to retract so as to pass over the subsea pipeline and to drop into place when the base is in position against the subsea pipeline, a bolt block on the arm, a lock bolt threadingly engaging the bolt block, and a shoulder on the dog receiving the lock bolt to secure the dog in position engaging the clamp about the subsea pipeline.
8. The partial helical strake system of claim 6 or 7, further comprising reinforcing gussets in the clamp housing, a pad eye connected to the apex of the clamp housing, and a guide edge on the end of the arm.
9. The partial helical strake system of any of claims 18, wherein the base is arranged to be connected to the cylindrical structure with a hinge and latch system.
10. The helical strake system substantially as described hereinbefore with reference to the drawings.
Description:
PARTIAL HELICAL STRAKE SYSTEM FOR VORTEX-INDUCED-VIBRATION SUPPRESSION The present invention relates to a system for reducing vortex-induced-vibrations ("VIV") in marine environments by the use of one or more helical strakes.

Production of oil and gas from offshore fields has created many unique engineering challenges. One of these challenges is dealing with effects of currents on fixed cylindrical marine elements. Such marine elements are employed in a variety of applications, including, e. g., subsea pipelines, drilling, production, import and export risers, tendons for tension leg platforms, legs for traditional fixed and for compliant platforms, other mooring elements for deepwater platforms, and, although not conventionally thought of as such, the hull structure of spar type structures. These currents cause vortexes to shed from the sides of the marine elements, inducing vibrations that can lead to the failure of the marine elements or their supports.

For short cylindrical elements that are adjacent convenient means for secure mounting, the marine elements and their supports can be made strong enough to resist significant movement by the forces created by vortex shedding. Alternatively, the marine element could be braced to change the frequency at which the element would be excited by vortex shedding.

However, strengthening or bracing becomes impractical when the application requires that the unsupported segments of marine element extend for long runs. Deepwater production risers, drilling risers, platform export risers, import risers bringing in production from satellite wells, tendons for tension leg platforms, and other conduits for produced fluids and deepwater mooring

elements formed from tubular goods are typical of such applications. These pipes and tubular goods serve as marine elements in applications that are difficult or impossible to brace sufficiently to satisfactorily control vibration induced by vortex shedding. Subsea pipelines traversing valleys on the ocean floor for extended, unsupported lengths and spar hulls moored at the end of long tethers and/or mooring lines provide additional examples.

Some applications, e. g., unsupported spans of subsea pipelines, present additional challenges to deployment with onshore fabrication or topside deployment of devices for VIV suppression. In such applications it may be desirable to install the VIV suppression devices after the pipeline is layed, substantially complicating and reducing deployment options.

It is an object of the invention to provide a system which effectively suppresses vortex induced vibration in a cylindrical structure deployed in a marine application, and which system has a relatively low weight and is easy to install.

In accordance with the invention there is provided a partial helical strake system for suppressing vortex induced vibration in a cylindrical structure deployed in a marine application, the system comprising: -a base connected to the cylindrical structure; and -at least one helical strake projection from the base for a part of the circumference of the cylindrical structure.

With the system of the invention it is achieved that a significant weight reduction is achieved compared to systems having helical strakes extending along the whole circumference of the cylindrical structure, while at the same time vortex induced vibrations are effectively suppressed. Furthermore, the system of the invention can be easily installed by radially moving the base towards

the cylindrical structure and connecting the base to the cylindrical structure upon contact therewith.

The invention will be described hereinafter in more detail and by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a partial helical strake system in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention deployed on a cylindrical marine element; FIG. 2 is a top elevational view of the partial helical strake system of FIG. 1; FIG. 3A is a transversely taken cross sectional view along line 3A-3A of FIG. 1 in the process of being installed; FIG. 3B is a transversely taken cross sectional view along line 3A-3A of FIG. 1 when installed; FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of an alternate embodiment of a partial helical strake system in accordance with the present invention; FIG. 5 is a transverse cross sectional view of the partial helical strake system of FIG. 4, taken at line 5-5 in FIG. 4; and FIG. 6 is a transverse cross section of an alternative embodiment of a partial helical strake system in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a partial helical strake system 10 secured about substantially cylindrical marine element 11. Cylindrical element or structure 11 generically illustrates riser, tendon, spar hull, subsea pipeline or other marine application of cylindrical structures having significant unsupported spans subjected to current influences. For the purposes of further discussions of FIGS. 1-3B as an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, cylindrical element 10 will be discussed as subsea pipeline 11A. See also the overhead view of FIG. 2.

Absent partial helical strake system 10, an unsupported span of subsea pipeline 11A that traverses an underwater trench or between two high points on the seafloor could be caused to fail in the long term presence of current passing across the pipeline. Such current passing the sides of the cylindrical marine element would tend to shed vortexes, inducing vibrations and adversely affecting the fatigue life of the pipeline.

Failure risks are exacerbated if the vibration drives the unsupported cylindrical element near its natural harmonic frequency.

However, partial helical strake system 10 serves to disrupt the correlation of the flow about cylindrical structure 11 so as to markedly reduce vortex shedding and the attendant VIV problems. Partial helical strake 10 has a base 12 from which a plurality of partial helical strakes 14 project. Surprisingly, such partial helical strakes have been found effective though covering only a small portion of the circumference of cylindrical structure 11, e. g., 20-50%. This can substantially reduce the material cost for VIV reduction, but can also be instrumental in facilitating post deployment installation such as on an unsupported span of subsea pipeline 11A already layed on the ocean floor. Further such partial strakes are lighter, use less material, and can produce less drag than the conventional, full circumferential strakes.

In this embodiment, base 12 and partial helical strakes 14 are formed of a lightweight, non-corrosive material such as fiberglass and the ends of base section 12 are secured about subsea pipeline 11A with connectors 16, here clamps 16A, 16B.

The features and operation of clamps 16A, 16B are illustrated in FIGS. 1-3B. Stiffeners or gussets 22 provide additional stability to u-shaped fiberglass clamp housing 18, which receives base 12 and extends downwardly

arms 23 terminating in guide edges 24. Pad eyes 20 are provided at the apex of clamp housing 18. Arms 23 are provided with bolt blocks 26 with bonded nuts inside threadingly engaging lock bolts 36. Fiberglass dogs 28 are also mounted inside arms 23, pivotally secured with hinge pins 32 formed from solid or heavy wall tubing.

Spacers 30 of DELRIN or nylon facilitate the free rotation of dogs 28. A stop wedge 34 is positioned within arm 23 to receive dog 28.

For installation on a substantially horizontal subsea pipeline 11A, partial helical strake system 10 is lowered by hook and line 21 engaging pad eyes 20 provided at the top of clamp housing 18. See FIG. 3A. The partial helical strake system 10 may be guided by divers in shallower water or remotely operated vehicle ("ROV") 40 having a video feed to the surface through umbilical 44.

See FIG. 3B. The pipeline 11A is covered with a corrosion inhibiting and possibly thermally insulative pipe coating 42. Guide edges 24 center the strake system over the pipe and further lowering causes freely rotating dogs 28 to retract until base 12 seats on pipeline 11A.

See FIG. 3B.

Once base 12 lands on the pipeline, dogs 28 drop toward engaging position and diver or ROV 44 advance lock bolts 36 to engage dogs 28 at shoulder 46, driving and securing the dogs in locked position, backed into stop wedge 34. In the locked position, dogs 28 hold the lightweight partial helical strake securely to the subsea pipeline despite the current loads. Hook and line 21 can be removed and retrieved to surface.

FIGS. 4-6 illustrate alternative embodiments of the present invention. FIGS. 4 and 5 mount partial strakes 14 on a fully circumferencial base 12. Here the base may be the marine cylindrical structure 11 itself or may be endwise-received thereover before deployment into the marine environment.

FIG. 6 illustrates an even shorter partial helical strake 14, here addressing about 20% of the circumference as opposed to the 50% of FIG. 5. FIG. 6 also illustrates a hinge 50 and latch 52 in base 12 for securing the partial helical strake system 10 about the outside of the cylindrical structure (not shown).

Partial strakes 14 are directional and their efficiency can be affected by orientation to the current.

The hinge and latch system embodiment of FIG. 6 can be loosely fitted and also provided with a weathervaning tail 54 to orient the straked array for optimum effectiveness at 90 degrees to the current. Another approach to address variability in current headings is to provide a number of fixed arrays of partial helical strakes at different orientations along the length of the cylindrical structure. Although helical strakes might, in the aggregate, surround the circumference of the cylindrical structure, each array would be limited to about half or less of the circumference straked in each section protected by the present invention.

Although the illustrative embodiment described in detail is a subsea pipeline, those skilled in the art and provided with this disclosure could readily practice the invention across a full range of other cylindrical marine elements, including, but not limited to drilling risers, import and export risers, tendons for tension leg platforms, legs for traditional fixed and for compliant platforms, cables and other mooring elements for deepwater platforms, and the hull structure of spar type structures.

Other modifications, changes, and substitutions are also intended in the foregoing disclosure. Further, in some instances, some features of the present invention will be employed without a corresponding use of other features described in these illustrative embodiments.