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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
PERFORATED MAST MOUNT
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/164407
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A mast mount (40) arranged to be fixed in the ground (99), the mast mount comprising a tubular mounting portion (42) comprising a wall portion (49) with an outside (43) and an inside (44). The mounting portion (42) is adapted for positioning in the ground (99), and the wall portion (49) includes at least one perforation (45) arranged to let a material (51) flow between the outside (43) and the inside (44) of the wall portion (49).

Inventors:
FJELDE, Ole Gunnar (Nagaveien 54, 4120 TAU, 4120, NO)
Application Number:
NO2019/050040
Publication Date:
August 29, 2019
Filing Date:
February 22, 2019
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
COMROD AS (Fiskåveien 1, 4120 Tau, 4120, NO)
International Classes:
E04H12/22; E02D27/42
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HÅMSØ PATENTBYRÅ AS (P.O. Box 171, 4301 Sandnes, 4301, NO)
Download PDF:
Claims:
C l a i m s

A mast mount (40) arranged to be fixed in the ground (99), the mast mount (40) comprising a tubular mounting portion (42) comprising a wall portion (49) with an outside (43), an inside (44); wherein

- the mounting portion (42) is adapted for a positioning in the ground (99); and

- the wall portion (49) is provided with at least one perforation (45) arranged to let a material (51) flow between the outside (43) and the inside (44) of the wall portion (49).

The mast mount (40) according to claim 1 , wherein the wall portion (49) is pro vided with a plurality of perforations (45).

The mast mount (40) according to claims 1-2, wherein the mast mount (40) comprises a composite material.

A method for fixing a mast mount (40) in the ground (99), the mast mount (40) comprising a tubular mounting portion (42) comprising a wall portion (49) with an outside (43) and an inside (44), the wall portion (49) being provided with at least one perforation (45) arranged to let a material (51) flow between the out side (43) and the inside (44) of the wall portion (49), wherein the method com prises the steps:

a) forming at least one perforation (45) in the wall portion (49);

b) positioning the mast mount (40) in the ground; and

c) adding a material (51) in such a way that the material flows down along the wall portion (49), the material (51) flowing through the at least one perforation (45).

5. The method according to claim 4, wherein the material (51) is a curing one.

6. The method according to claims 4-5, wherein the material (51) is a fluid one.

Description:
PERFORATED MAST MOUNT

The invention relates to a mast mount which includes a tubular mounting portion to be fixed in the ground. Further, the invention relates to a method for fixing said mast mount.

Background of the invention It is known to establish a hollow mast mount in a firm ground by forming a recess and then positioning the hollow mast mount in the recess. The recess surrounds a substantially compact core and includes an outer wall and an inner wall. The hollow mast mount is normally fixed to the ground by adding a stabilizing material to an outer annular space formed between the mast mount and the outer wall of the recess. The stabilizing material may be drill dust from the formation of the recess, or sand. The patent document

W02004/101914 discloses how a hollow mast mount can be placed in rocky ground.

A prior-art hollow mast mount is typically tubular and comprises a tight wall with an inside and an outside. The mast mount further includes a first annular end face arranged to stand on a bottom surface at the bottom of the recess. The mast mount may include a conical portion.

In some cases, it is also desirable to have stabilizing material on the inside of the hollow mast mount. This is especially the case if there is a risk that the mast mount will be sub jected to forces which will cause the mast mount to move in both horizontal and vertical directions. Such forces may arise in strong wind. If the mast mount is positioned in a recess, and the core within the recess is intact, the stabilizing material must be added to an internal annular space formed between the core and the mast mount. Adding the stabilizing material to this annular space has turned out to be difficult or impossible when using the prior art. In some cases, the uppermost portion of the annular space is blocked by the top of the core and the inside of the mast mount forming a substantially tight connection across the annular space which will thereby be inaccessible. It is also known that particles may come loose from the core and completely or partially block an upper portion of the annular space. If the bottom surface of the recess and/or the first end face of the mast mount are/is une ven, small passages may form between the end face and the bottom surface. Attempts have been made to use said passages to distribute a fluid, curable material, for example fluid concrete, from the outside of the mast mount to the inside of the mast mount. In prac tice, this solution has turned out to have little or no effect because the passages are small and randomly arranged and have great resistance to flow.

The invention has for its object to remedy or reduce at least one of the drawbacks of the prior art or at least provide a useful alternative to the prior art.

The object is achieved through the features that are specified in the description below and in the claims that follow. General description of the invention

The invention is defined by the independent claims. The dependent claims define advan tageous embodiments of the invention.

In a first aspect, the invention relates to a mast mount arranged to be fixed in the ground, the mast mount comprising a tubular mounting portion comprising a wall portion with an outside and an inside. The mounting portion is adapted for positioning in the ground, and the wall portion is provided with at least one perforation arranged to let a material flow between the outside and the inside of the wall portion.

In this connection, a mast mount may be understood as a complete mast, wherein the mast is in one undivided piece, or a part of a multipart mast. The mast mount may be completely or partially hollow. The mast mount may include a conical portion. The mast mount may include a cylindrical portion and a first annular end face arranged to stand on a substantially horizontal bottom surface in the ground.

By a perforation is meant, in this connection, for example one or more holes. The at least one hole may be a through opening or a through cut-out. By flow is meant, in this connection, a movement of a material from a first position to a second position by means of gravity. The material may be a particulate material, for ex ample sand or drill dust. The material may be a fluid one, for example water, fluid or fluid concrete.

The effect of providing the wall portion with a perforation as described is that a material that is added on one side of the wall portion can flow through the perforation to the other side of the wall portion. The material may, for example, be added on the outside of the mast mount, after which the material may flow down along the outside of the wall portion and through the perforation to the inside of the wall portion. This makes it possible to add a material to the inside of a hollow mast mount, for example to an internal annular space formed between the wall portion and a core in the ground formed through the establish ment of the recess. A mast mount with a hollow mounting portion may thereby have stabi lizing material added also on the inside of the wall portion, even if the wall portion is posi tioned below ground level. With this, a better fixing of the mast mount is achieved than when material is added only on the outside of the mounting portion. The spreading of a dry particulate material on the inside of the wall portion is restricted by the angle of repose of the material. Said particulate material may be sand, stone dust or drill dust, for example. By spreading is meant, in this connection, how far from the cut-out the material can flow. For the greatest possible spreading of the material, the perforation should be arranged as close to the ground level as possible. A particle fraction with a small angle of repose may flow farther from the perforation than a particle fraction with a large angle of repose or a high viscosity. A material with a small angle of repose or low viscosity, for example a liquid or a fluid, may give a higher degree of filling than a material with a large angle of repose or high viscosity, for example stone dust. By degree of filling is meant, in this connection, how large a portion of the internal void of the mounting por- tion can be filled with material. If all the internal void is filled up to ground level, a degree of filling of 100 % is achieved. If no material is added to the inside of the mounting portion, the degree of filling is 0 %.

The perforation may be formed by using a drilling tool, for example a hand-held drill. The diameter of the perforations may be adapted for the fixing method for the mast mount, ground conditions and the viscosity of the material. Trials carried out by the applicant, show that the perforations should have a diameter of between 25 and 75 millimetres when fine sand is added. However, the perforation may be smaller or larger, depending on the type of material that will be flowing through the perforation. The mounting portion may include a plurality of perforations. The effect of several perfora tions is less flow resistance, a greater degree of filling, a shorter flow distance for the ma terial and quicker filling of the inside of the mast mount. If, for example, a first cut-out is arranged in a wall portion, a dry material flowing through the first cut-out will give a limited degree of filling, for example 50 %. If a second perforation is arranged diametrically to the first perforation, and at the same height, the degree of filling may be increased from 50 to 70 %, for example. The real degree of filling depends, to a great extent, on the size and moisture content of the particles.

T rials carried out by the applicant show that, for fluid concrete or sand, a satisfactory de- gree of filling and a satisfactory filling time may be achieved with between 2 and 10 perfo rations. This shows how much the properties of the material influence the choice of size, number and positions of the perforations.

Trials carried out by the applicant further show that the addition of a liquid to drill dust in an annular space enables the drill dust to settle as sediment, and thereby lock the mast mount into the ground. The liquid may, for example, be water, for example rainwater or groundwater. If a liquid is added to an outer annular space which is completely or partially filled with drill dust, the water may mix with the drill dust and fluidify it. The mixture of liquid and drill dust can thereby flow through the cut-outs.

The material may fill the at least one perforation and connect the material on the outside and inside of the wall of the mounting portion and may thereby give a reinforcing effect. A mounting portion with many perforations may give the mast mount better fixing to the ground than a mounting portion with few perforations. To achieve maximum flow and the best possible distribution of the material added, the perforations may be positioned at dif ferent heights and evenly spaced on the circumference of the mounting portion. The mast mount may comprise a composite material. A composite is a light and strong material, in which a hole can also easily be drilled. Thereby the at least one perforation may be formed with a hand-held tool, for example a drill. Easy forming of the perforations makes it easy to adapt the number, diameter and positions of the perforations to local conditions, and on the site where the mast mount is to be established. The perforations may be formed in a different way, for example by means of a piercing saw. The perfora tion may also be formed simultaneously with the production of the mast mount.

In a second aspect, the invention relates, more specifically, to a method for fixing a mast mount into the ground, the mast mount comprising a tubular mounting portion comprising a wall portion with an outside and an inside, the wall portion being provided with at least one perforation arranged to let a material flow between the outside and the inside of the wall portion. The method comprises the steps: a) forming at least one perforation in the wall portion; b) positioning the mast mount in the ground; and c) adding a material in such a way that the material flows down along the wall portion, the material flowing through the at least one perforation.

The method described herein makes it possible to give a mast mount with a tubular end portion both an external support and an internal support. The effect of this is better sup- port and fixing in the ground than what is possible when using the prior art.

The at least one perforation may advantageously be formed with a size and in a number adapted for the conditions where the mast mount is to be erected and fixed. If the material that is to be added is a fluid one, fewer perforations may be formed and with a smaller diameter than if the material is solid, for example sand or drill dust. If the material to be added is drill dust, drill dust on the outside of the wall portion may have water added to it, the drill dust and the water forming a fluid mass which spreads evenly on the outside and the inside of the wall portion.

The perforation may be formed by means of a hand-held tool, for example a drill. The per foration is normally positioned in such a way that it is below ground level when the mast mount is arranged in an operative position. The perforation should thereby be formed be fore the mast mount is positioned in the ground.

The mast mount may be positioned in a recess or in a recess in the ground in accordance with the prior art.

When the mast mount has been positioned in the ground, a material may be added on the outside of the mast mount. The at least one perforation may be positioned in such a way that it is below ground level when the mast mount has been positioned. Thereby the mate rial may flow from ground level and down along the outside of the mast mount and freely through the perforation as the outer annular space is filling with material.

To give maximum flow of the material and the best possible distribution of the material, several perforations may be formed. The perforations may be positioned at different heights and be evenly spaced around the mounting portion.

The material may be a curing one. A material that can cure may, to a greater degree, fix the mast mount to the ground and adjacent elements than a non-curable material, such as loose sand or drill dust settled as sediment. Examples of curing materials are cement and epoxy grouting mortar. A curing material may connect particles in the ground, for example sand or gravel or back-filled excavation residues from the formation of the recess where the mast mount is to be positioned.

The material may be a fluid one. A fluid material has a greater ability to penetrate into cracks and cavities in the ground than a solid material. In addition, a fluid material may fill cracks and cavities in the ground that are positioned higher than the perforation that the material is flowing through, and give a degree of filling of 100 %, as the fluid material will seek to achieve balance on the outside and inside of the wall portion. The fluid material may be a curing one, for example fluid concrete.

If the mast mount is arranged in loose ground, some of the fluid, curing material may run away from the mast mount. In an alternative embodiment, a boundary may be arranged on the outside of the mast mount, for example a pipe. The pipe and the mast mount may be arranged coaxially. Thereby, an outer annulus may be formed between the mast mount and the boundary. If an internal portion of the mast mount is filled with a filling material, for example excavation residues from the recess, or gravel, the fluid material may fill the voids in the filling material. If the fluid material is a curing one, the material surrounded by the curing material may form a compact mass.

In what follows, examples of preferred embodiments are described, which are visualized in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 shows a cross section of a tubular mast mount with a perforated mounting portion fixed in a recess;

Figure 2 shows a section of figure 1 on a larger scale; Figure 3 shows, on a smaller scale, the mast mount fixed in loose ground; Figure 4 shows the mast mount arranged in loose ground and surrounded by a pipe;

and Figure 5 shows a prior-art mast mount fixed to the ground. Figure 1 and figure 2 show a mast mount 40 positioned in a recess 60. Figure 2 shows a section of figure 1 on a larger scale. The mast mount 40 comprises a mounting portion 42 comprising a wall portion 49 with an outside 43 and an inside 44 and a first annular end face 46. The wall portion 49 is further shown with a plurality of perforations 45 here. In this embodiment, the perforations 45 are evenly distributed around the wall portion 49 and are positioned at different heights from the end face 46.

The recess 60 surrounds a compact core 61 and comprises a bottom surface 63. In the ground 99 and in the core 61 , a plurality of cracks 68 and voids 69 are formed in connec tion to the recess 60. Said cracks 68 and voids 69 may have been formed naturally before the drilling of the recess 60 and/or during the drilling of the recess 60.

The recess 60 is of a cylindrical shape. In this embodiment, the mast mount 40 is conical. Thereby a substantially tight annular connection 62 may be formed between the core 61 and the mast mount 40. Below a ground level 96 and between the core 61 and the mast mount 40, an inner annular space 34 is formed. The inner annular space 34 is inaccessi- ble from the ground level 96. Between the mast mount 40 and the outside 64 of the recess 60, an outer annular space 35 which is open in an upper end portion 36 is formed.

A material 51 , shown here as a curing fluid 51a has been added to the outer annular space 35 from the ground level 96. The curing fluid 51a may be fluid concrete, for exam ple. As the outer annular space 35 fills with the fluid 51a, the fluid 51a will also run through the perforations 45 and fill the inner annular space 34, perforations 45, cracks 68 and voids 69. The fluid levels in the outer annular space 35 and the inner annular space 34 have been equalized. In figures 1 and 2, the fluid level is flush with the ground level 96 so that a degree of filling of 100 % is achieved.

When the fluid 51a is curing, a compact and locking connection forms between the mast mount 40, the ground 99 and the core 61. By the perforations 45 also becoming filled with the curing fluid 51a, the perforations 45 will function as a reinforcement.

Figure 3 shows an alternative embodiment, in which the mast mount 40 is arranged in a recess 91 in the ground 99. Excavation residues 97 from the recess 91 have been back filled against the outside 43 of the mounting portion 42 to give an external stabilization and locking of the mast mount 40. To increase the stability of the mast mount 40, an internal volume 48 of the mast mount 40 has been filled with excavation residues 97 via an end opening 41 in the mast mount 40. The curing fluid 51a is added on the outside 43 of the mast mount 40. The fluid levels on the outside 43 and inside 44 of the mast mount 40 have been equalized at a height hi above the bottom surface 93. On the outside of the mast mount 40, the fluid 51a has flowed down and mixed with a portion of the excavation residues 97. On the inside of the mast mount, the fluid 51a covers the internal volume 48. When the fluid 51a has been cured, the excavation residues 97 that are surrounded by the fluid 51a will form a compact mass. By the perforations 45 also becoming filled with the curing material 51a, the perfo rations 45 will function as a reinforcement between the outside 43 and the inside 44 of the wall portion 49. Figure 3 further shows a second mast mount 20 connected to the mast mount 40, the mast mount 40 and the second mast mount 20 having corresponding conicities. The sec ond mast mount 20 is connected to the mast mount 40 after the mast mount 40 has been fixed.

Figure 4 shows an alternative embodiment in which the mast mount 40 is arranged in a pipe 30 in the recess 91. A particulate material 51b, shown here as sand with an angle of repose of 35 degrees, fills the outer annular space 35, formed between the mast mount 40 and the pipe 30 in figure 4. The pipe 30 prevents the particulate material 51 b from running away from the mast mount 40, for example by large amounts of precipitation. When the outer annular space 35 becomes filled with the particulate material 51b, particulate mate- rial 51b will flow through the perforations 45. Because of the angle of repose of the partic ulate material 51 b, the particulate material 51 b will flow through the cut-outs 45 and fill an internal volume 49 in the mast mount 40. The maximum filling height corresponds to the height h2 of the uppermost perforation 45 above the bottom surface 93. In figure 4, the perforations 45 are arranged at different heights above the bottom surface, and, therefore, the filling of the internal volume 40 is not symmetrical.

In an alternative embodiment (not shown), a fluid material 51a can be added instead of the particulate material 51 b. The effect of the pipe 30 will be the same, but because of the principle of balance, the fluid material 51a will have the same height on the outside 43 and the inside 44 of the wall portion 49. In an alternative embodiment, the fluid material 51a may be added to the outer annular space 35 after the particulate material 51 b has been added, and thereby mix with the particulate material 51 b.

Figure 5 shows a prior-art mast mount 40a positioned in the recess 60. The mounting por tion 42 of the mast mount 40a comprises a tight wall portion 49. The material 51 is filled into the outer annular space 35 formed between the mast mount 40 and the outer wall 64 of the recess 60. Unlike the invention (figures 1-4), the tight wall portion 49 will make the material 51 only fill the outer annular space 35. The inner annular space 35 remains emp ty so that the mast mount 40 will only have an external support and fixing. It should be noted that all the above-mentioned embodiments illustrate the invention, but do not limit it, and persons skilled in the art may construct many alternative embodiments without departing from the scope of the attached claims. In the claims, reference numbers in brackets are not to be regarded as restrictive.

The use of the verb "to comprise" and its different forms does not exclude the presence of elements or steps that are not mentioned in the claims. The indefinite article "a" or "an" before an element does not exclude the presence of several such elements.

The fact that some features are indicated in mutually different dependent claims does not indicate that a combination of these features cannot be used with advantage.