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Title:
PESTICIDAL MIXTURES
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/007719
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention relates to pesticidal mixtures comprising a fungicidal compound selected from the group consisting of methyl N-[2-[(1,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-pyrazol-3-yl)oxymethyl]phenyl]- N-methoxy-carbamate;4-(2-bromo-4-fluoro-phenyl)-N-(2-chloro-6-fluoro-phenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-3-amine;3-(difluoromethyl)-N-(7-fluoro-1,1,3-trimethyl-indan-4-yl)-1-methyl-pyrazole-4- carboxamide;2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1,1,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2- (difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1,1,3-trimethylindan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;2-(difluoromethyl)-N- (3-ethyl-1,1-dimethyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-ethyl-1,1- dimethyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1,1-dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4- yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1,1-dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine- 3-carboxamide;2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-isobutyl-1,1-dimethyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-isobutyl-1,1-dimethyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;1,3- dimethyl-N-(1,1,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyrazole-4-carboxamide 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1- difluoro-3-(tetrazol-1-yl)-1-[5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]-2-pyridyl]propan-2-ol; 2-(2,4- difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(tetrazol-1-yl)-1-[5-[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-2-pyridyl]propan-2- ol;N-[(2Z)-2-[3-chloro-5-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-2-pyridyl]-2-isopropoxyimino-ethyl]-3- (difluoromethyl)-1-methyl-pyrazole-4-carboxamide and (4-phenoxyphenyl)methyl 2-amino-6- methyl-pyridine-3-carboxylate; and an insecticidal compound II selected from the group consist- ing of alphacypermethrin, afidopyropen, 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1,2,2,2- tetrafluoro-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide and 2-(1,2- dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide.

Inventors:
WINTER, Christian (Carl-Bosch-Strasse 38, Ludwigshafen, 67056, DE)
GEWEHR, Markus (Speyerer Straße 2, Limburgerhof, 67117, DE)
Application Number:
EP2018/066856
Publication Date:
January 10, 2019
Filing Date:
June 25, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
BASF SE (Carl-Bosch-Strasse 38, Ludwigshafen am Rhein, 67056, DE)
International Classes:
A01N37/18; A01N43/40; A01N43/56; A01N43/58; A01N43/713; A01N47/20; A01N53/00; A01P3/00; A01P7/00
Domestic Patent References:
WO2011107508A22011-09-09
WO2010000790A12010-01-07
WO2011039104A22011-04-07
WO2014095675A12014-06-26
WO2013116251A22013-08-08
WO2015143180A12015-09-24
WO2015197530A22015-12-30
WO2015197530A22015-12-30
WO2013116251A22013-08-08
WO2012084812A12012-06-28
WO2014083088A22014-06-05
WO2015143180A12015-09-24
WO2015119246A12015-08-13
WO2014095675A12014-06-26
WO2013050302A12013-04-11
WO2006043635A12006-04-27
WO2015055752A12015-04-23
WO2016096849A12016-06-23
WO2016096944A12016-06-23
WO2016097003A12016-06-23
WO2016139189A12016-09-09
WO2002015701A22002-02-28
WO1993007278A11993-04-15
WO1995034656A11995-12-21
WO2003018810A22003-03-06
WO2003052073A22003-06-26
WO2003018810A22003-03-06
Foreign References:
CN103387541A2013-11-13
JP2015089883A2015-05-11
JP2015120675A2015-07-02
CN103387541A2013-11-13
EP2910126A12015-08-26
EP0374753A21990-06-27
EP0427529A11991-05-15
EP0451878A11991-10-16
EP0392225A21990-10-17
Other References:
MOLLET; GRUBEMANN: "Formulation technology", 2001, WILEY VCH
KNOWLES: "Agrow Reports DS243", 2005, T&F INFORMA, article "New developments in crop protection product formulation"
MCCUTCHEON: "Emulsifiers & Detergents", vol. 1, 2008, MCCUTCHEON'S DIRECTORIES
KNOWLES: "Agrow Reports DS256", 2006, T&F INFORMA, article "Adjuvants and additives"
PEST MANAGEMENT SCI., vol. 61, 2005, pages 246
PEST MANAGEMENT SCI., vol. 61, 2005, pages 258
PEST MANAGEMENT SCI., vol. 61, 2005, pages 277
PEST MANAGEMENT SCI., vol. 61, 2005, pages 269
PEST MANAGEMENT SCI., vol. 61, 2005, pages 286
PEST MANAGEMENT SCI., vol. 64, 2008, pages 326
PEST MANAGEMENT SCI., vol. 64, 2008, pages 332
WEED SCI., vol. 57, 2009, pages 108
AUSTRAL. J. AGRICULT. RES., vol. 58, 2007, pages 708
SCIENCE, vol. 316, 2007, pages 1185
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BASF IP ASSOCIATION (BASF SE, G-FLP - C006, Ludwigshafen, 67056, DE)
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Claims:
Claims

Pesticidal mixtures comprising, as active components,

1 ) an fungicidal compound I selected from the group consisting of

methyl N-[2-[(1 ,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-pyrazol-3-yl)oxymethyl]phenyl]-N-methoxy- carbamate;

4-(2-bromo-4-fluoro-phenyl)-N-(2-chloro-6-fluoro-phenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-3- amine;

3-(difluoromethyl)-N-(7-fluoro-1 ,1 ,3-trimethyl-indan-4-yl)-1 -methyl-pyrazole-4- carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-ethyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-ethyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1 ,1 -dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1 ,1 -dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-isobutyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-isobutyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3- carboxamide;

1 ,3-dimethyl-N-(1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyrazole-4-carboxamide

2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1 , 1 -difluoro-3-(tetrazol-1 -yl)-1 -[5-[4-(2,2,2- trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]-2-pyridyl]propan-2-ol;

2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1 ,1 -difluoro-3-(tetrazol-1 -yl)-1 -[5-[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]- 2-pyridyl]propan-2-ol;

N-[(2Z)-2-[3-chloro-5-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-2-pyridyl]-2-isopropoxyimino-ethyl]-3- (difluoromethyl)-l -methyl-pyrazole-4-carboxamide; and

(4-phenoxyphenyl)methyl 2-amino-6-methyl-pyridine-3-carboxylate; and

2) an insecticidal compound II selected from the group consisting of

Alphacypermethrin; afidopyropen; 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2- tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide; and

2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4- carboxamide.

A mixture as claimed in claim 1 , wherein compound I is selected from N-[(2Z)-2-[3-chloro-

5-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-2-pyridyl]-2-isopropoxyimino-ethyl]-3-(difluoromethyl)-1 -methyl- pyrazole-4-carboxamide

4-phenoxyphenyl)methyl 2-amino-6-methyl-pyridine-3-carboxylate2-(difluoromethyl)-N- (1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1 ,1 ,3- trimethylindan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-ethyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl- indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-ethyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan- 4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1 ,1 -dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4- yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1 ,1 -dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4- yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-isobutyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4- yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide; 2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-isobutyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4- yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide; N-[(2Z)-2-[3-chloro-5-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-2-pyridyl]-2- isopropoxyimino-ethyl]-3-(difluoromethyl)-1 -methyl-pyrazole-4-carboxamide; and (4- phenoxyphenyl)methyl 2-amino-6-methyl-pyridine-3-carboxylate.

3. A mixture as claimed in any of claims 1 to 2, wherein compound II is selected from

3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6- (trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide; and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-

N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide.

4. A pesticidal composition, wherein the ratio by weight of compound I to compound II is from 1000:1 to 1 :1000.

5. A pesticidal composition, wherein the ratio by weight of compound I to compound II is from 100:1 to 1 :100.

6. A pesticidal composition, comprising a liquid or solid carrier and a mixtures as defined in any of claims 1 to 5.

7. A method for controlling phytopathogenic pests, wherein the pest, their habitat, breeding grounds, their locus or the plants to be protected against pest attack, the soil or plant propagation material are treated with an effective amount of a mixtures as defined in any of claims 1 to 5.

8. A method for improving the health of plants, wherein the plant, the locus where the plant is growing or is expected to grow or plant propagation material from which the plant grows are treated with an effective amount of a mixtures as defined in any of claims 1 to 5.

9. A method for protection of plant propagation material from pests comprising contacting the plant propagation materials with a mixtures as defined in any of claims 1 to 5 in pesticidally effective amounts. 10. A method as claimed in claim 9, wherein the mixtures as defined in any of claims 1 to 5 is applied in an amount of from 0.01 g to 10 kg per 100 kg of plant propagation materials.

1 1 . A method as claimed in any of claims 7 to 10, wherein the mixtures as defined in any of claims 1 to 13 are applied simultaneously, that is jointly or separately, or in succession.

12. Plant propagation material, comprising the mixtures as defined in any of claims 1 to 5 in an amount of from 0.01 g to 10 kg per 100 kg of plant propagation materials.

Description:
Pesticidal mixtures Description The present invention relates to pesticidal mixtures comprising

1 ) a fungicidal compound I selected from the group constising of

methyl N-[2-[(1 ,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-pyrazol-3-yl)oxymethyl]phenyl]-N-methox y- carbamate;

4-(2-bromo-4-fluoro-phenyl)-N-(2-chloro-6-fluoro-phenyl)-2,5 -dimethyl-pyrazol-3-amine; 3-(difluoromethyl)-N-(7-fluoro-1 ,1 ,3-trimethyl-indan-4-yl)-1 -methyl-pyrazole-4- carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-ethyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-ethyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1 ,1 -dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1 ,1 -dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-isobutyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-isobutyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

1 ,3-dimethyl-N-(1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyrazole-4-carboxamide

2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1 ,1 -difluoro-3-(tetrazol-1 -yl)-1 -[5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]-2- pyridyl]propan-2-ol;

2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1 ,1 -difluoro-3-(tetrazol-1 -yl)-1 -[5-[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-2- pyridyl]propan-2-ol;

N-[(2Z)-2-[3-chloro-5-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-2-pyridyl]-2-is opropoxyimino-ethyl]-3- (difluoromethyl)-l -methyl-pyrazole-4-carboxamide; and

(4-phenoxyphenyl)methyl 2-amino-6-methyl-pyridine-3-carboxylate; and

2) an insecticidal compound II selected from the group consisting of

Alphacypermethrin; afidopyropen; 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2- tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro -benzamide; and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide.

The above-referred mixtures are herein below also referred as "inventive mixtures".

Moreover, the invention relates to a method for controlling pests, this refers to includes animal pests and harmful fungi, using the inventive mixtures and to the use of compound I and compound II for preparing such mixtures, and also to compositions comprising such mixtures.

Moreover, the invention relates to a method for controlling harmful fungi, using the inventive mixtures of compound I and II for preparing such mixtures, and also to compositions comprising such mixtures. Additionally, the present invention also comprises a method for protection of plant propagation material (preferably seed) from harmful pests, such as fungi or animal pests (insects, arachnids or nematodes) comprising contacting the plant propagation materials (preferably seeds) with an inventive mixture in pesticidally effective amounts

The term "plant propagation material" is to be understood to denote all the generative parts of the plant such as seeds and vegetative plant material such as cuttings and tubers (e. g. potatoes), which can be used for the multiplication of the plant. This includes seeds, roots, fruits, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, shoots, sprouts and other parts of plants, including seedlings and young plants, which are to be transplanted after germination or after emergence from soil.

These young plants may also be protected before transplantation by a total or partial treatment by immersion or pouring. In a particular preferred embodiment, the term propagation material denotes seeds. Additionally, the present invention also comprises a method for protection of plant propagation material (preferably seed) from harmful fungi comprising contacting the plant propagation materials (preferably seeds) with the inventive mixture in pesticidally effective amounts.

Moreover, the invention relates to a method for controlling harmful fungi using the inventive mix- tures and to the use of the compounds present in the inventive mixtures for preparing such mixtures, and also to compositions comprising such mixtures.

The present invention further relates to plant-protecting active ingredient mixtures having syner- gistically enhanced action of improving the health of plants and to a method of applying such inventive mixtures to the plants.

Compounds I and analogues as well as their pesticidal action and methods for producing them are known e.g. from WO 2015197530, JP2015089883, JP2015120675, CN 103387541 , WO 20131 16251 , WO 2012084812, WO14083088, WO 2015143180, WO 20151 19246 and WO 2014095675. Compounds II as well as their pesticidal action and methods for producing them are generally known e.g. e-Pesticide Manual V5.2 (ISBN 978 1 901396 85 0) (2008-201 1 ), EP 2910126, WO 2013050302, WO 06/043635 and WO 2015/055752.

Mixtures of compound I with selected insecticides are known from WO 2016096849, WO 2016096944, WO 2016097003 and WO 2016139189. However, the combinations set forth above is not described therein.

One typical problem arising in the field of pest control lies in the need to reduce the dosage rates of the active ingredient in order to reduce or avoid unfavorable environmental or toxicolog- ical effects whilst still allowing effective pest control.

In regard to the instant invention the term pests embrace harmful fungi and animal pests. Another problem encountered concerns the need to have available pest control agents which are effective against a broad spectrum of harmful fungi and harmful animal pests.

There also exists the need for pest control agents that combine knock-down activity with prolonged control, that is, fast action with long lasting action.

Another difficulty in relation to the use of pesticides is that the repeated and exclusive application of an individual pesticidal compound leads in many cases to a rapid selection of pests, that means animal pests, and harmful fungi, which have developed natural or adapted resistance against the active compound in question. Therefore there is a need for pest control agents that help prevent or overcome resistance.

Another problem underlying the present invention is the desire for compositions that improve plants, a process which is commonly and hereinafter referred to as "plant health".

The term plant health comprises various sorts of improvements of plants that are not connected to the control of pests. For example, advantageous properties that may be mentioned are improved crop characteristics including: emergence, crop yields, protein content, oil content, starch content, more developed root system (improved root growth), improved stress tolerance (e.g. against drought, heat, salt, UV, water, cold), reduced ethylene (reduced production and/or inhibition of reception), tillering increase, increase in plant height, bigger leaf blade, less dead basal leaves, stronger tillers, greener leaf color, pigment content, photosynthetic activity, less input needed (such as fertilizers or water), less seeds needed, more productive tillers, earlier flowering, early grain maturity, less plant verse (lodging), increased shoot growth, enhanced plant vigor, increased plant stand and early and better germination; or any other advantages familiar to a person skilled in the art.

It was therefore an object of the present invention to provide pesticidal mixtures which solve the problems of reducing the dosage rate and / or enhancing the spectrum of activity and / or com- bining knock-down activity with prolonged control and / or to resistance management and/or promoting the health of plants.

We have found that this object is in part or in whole achieved by the mixtures comprising the active compounds defined in the outset.

Especially, it has been found that the mixtures as defined in the outset show markedly enhanced action against pests compared to the control rates that are possible with the individual compounds and/or is suitable for improving the health of plants when applied to plants, parts of plants, seeds, or at their locus of growth.

It has been found that the action of the inventive mixtures comprising compound I and compound II goes far beyond the fungicidal and/or insecticidal and/or plant health improving action of the active compounds present in the mixture alone (synergistic action). Moreover, we have found that simultaneous, that is joint or separate, application of the compound I and the compound II or successive application of the compound I and compound II allows enhanced control of harmful fungi, compared to the control rates that are possible with the individual compounds (synergistic mixtures).

Moreover, we have found that simultaneous, that is joint or separate, application of the compound I and the compound II or successive application of the compound I and the compound II allows enhanced control of harmful animal pests, compared to the control rates that are possi- ble with the individual compounds (synergistic mixtures).

Moreover, we have found that simultaneous, that is joint or separate, application of the compound I and the compound II or successive application of the compound I and the compound II provides enhanced plant health effects compared to the plant health effects that are possible with the individual compounds.

The ratio by weight of compound I and compound II in binary mixtures is from 20000:1 to 1 :20000, from 500:1 to 1 :500, preferably from 100:1 to 1 :100 more preferably from 50:1 to 1 :50, most preferably from 20:1 to 1 :20, including also ratios from 10:1 to 1 :10, 1 :5 to 5:1 , or 1 :1.

As set forth above, the present specifically relates to the inventive mixtures as defined above, namely pesticidal mixtures comprising

1 ) a fungicidal compound selected from the group constising of

methyl N-[2-[(1 ,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-pyrazol-3-yl)oxymethyl]phenyl]-N-methox y- carbamate;

4-(2-bromo-4-fluoro-phenyl)-N-(2-chloro-6-fluoro-phenyl)-2,5 -dimethyl-pyrazol-3-amine;

3-(difluoromethyl)-N-(7-fluoro-1 ,1 ,3-trimethyl-indan-4-yl)-1 -methyl-pyrazole-4- carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-ethyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-ethyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(1 ,1 -dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-1 ,1 -dimethyl-3-propyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-(3-isobutyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl)pyridine-3-carboxamide;

2-(difluoromethyl)-N-[(3R)-3-isobutyl-1 ,1 -dimethyl-indan-4-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide;

1 ,3-dimethyl-N-(1 ,1 ,3-trimethylindan-4-yl)pyrazole-4-carboxamide

2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1 ,1 -difluoro-3-(tetrazol-1 -yl)-1 -[5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]-2- pyridyl]propan-2-ol;

2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1 ,1 -difluoro-3-(tetrazol-1 -yl)-1 -[5-[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-2- pyridyl]propan-2-ol; and N-[(2Z)-2-[3-chloro-5-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-2-pyndyl]-2-iso propoxyimino-ethyl]-3- (difluoromethyl)-l -methyl-pyrazole-4-carboxamide; (4-phenoxyphenyl)methyl 2-amino-i methyl-pyridine-3-carboxylate; and

an insecticidal compound II selected from the group consisting of

Alphacypermethrin; afidopyropen; 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2- tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro -benzamide; and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide.

Preferably, compound I comprises the compounds listed in table 1 below, wherein the mixtures

Thus, in a preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising com- pound I and alphacypermethrin, wherein compound I is compound 1-1 , I-2 or I-3. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and alphacypermethrin, wherein compound I is compound 1-4, 1-5, 1-6, 1-7, 1-8, 1-9, 1-10 or 1-1 1 . In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and alphacypermethrin, wherein compound I is compound 1-12, 1-13 or 1-14. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and alphacypermethrin, wherein compound I is compound 1-15. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and alphacypermethrin, wherein compound I is compound 1-16. Thus, in a preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and afidopyropen, wherein compound I is compound 1-1 , I-2 or I-3.

In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and afidopyropen, wherein compound I is compound I-4, I-5, I-6, I-7, I-8, I-9, 1-10 or I- 1 1 . In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and afidopyropen, wherein compound I is compound 1-12, 1-13 or 1-14. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and afidopyropen, wherein compound I is compound 1-15. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and afidopyropen, wherein compound I is compound 1-16.

Thus, in a preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]- 6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-1 , I-2 or I-3. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]- 6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound I-4, I-5, I-6, I-7, I-8, I-9, 1-10 or 1-1 Un a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 - (trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro- benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-12, 1-13 or 1-14. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2- tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro -benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-15. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2- tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro -benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-16.

Thus, in a preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4- carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-1 , I-2 or I-3. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4- carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound I-4, I-5, I-6, I-7, I-8, I-9, 1-10 or 1-1 1 . In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 2- (1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-12, 1-13 or 1-14. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl- N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-15. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-16.

In a more preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising com- pound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]- 6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound I-4, I-5, I-6, I-7, I-8, I-9, 1-10 or 1-1 1 .

In an equally more preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -

(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluo ro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-15.

In an equally more preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -

(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluo ro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-16.

In an equally more preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4- carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound I-4, I-5, I-6, I-7, I-8, I-9, 1-10 or 1-1 1 .

In an equally more preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4- carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-15.

In an equally more preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4- carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-16.

The inventive mixtures can further contain one or more insecticides, fungicides, herbicides.

The inventive mixtures can be converted into customary types of agrochemical compositions, e. g. solutions, emulsions, suspensions, dusts, powders, pastes, granules, pressings, capsules, and mixtures thereof. Examples for composition types are suspensions (e.g. SC, OD, FS), emulsifiable concentrates (e.g. EC), emulsions (e.g. EW, EO, ES, ME), capsules (e.g. CS, ZC), pastes, pastilles, wetTable Apowders or dusts (e.g. WP, SP, WS, DP, DS), pressings (e.g. BR, TB, DT), granules (e.g. WG, SG, GR, FG, GG, MG), insecticidal articles (e.g. LN), as well as gel formulations for the treatment of plant propagation materials such as seeds (e.g. GF). These and further compositions types are defined in the "Catalogue of pesticide formulation types and international coding system", Technical Monograph No. 2, 6 th Ed. May 2008, CropLife International.

The compositions are prepared in a known manner, such as described by Mollet and Grubemann, Formulation technology, Wiley VCH, Weinheim, 2001 ; or Knowles, New developments in crop protection product formulation, Agrow Reports DS243, T&F Informa, London, 2005.

Suitable auxiliaries are solvents, liquid carriers, solid carriers or fillers, surfactants, disper- sants, emulsifiers, wetters, adjuvants, solubilizers, penetration enhancers, protective colloids, adhesion agents, thickeners, humectants, repellents, attractants, feeding stimulants, compatibil- izers, bactericides, anti-freezing agents, anti-foaming agents, colorants, tackifiers and binders.

Suitable solvents and liquid carriers are water and organic solvents, such as mineral oil fractions of medium to high boiling point, e.g. kerosene, diesel oil; oils of vegetable or animal origin; aliphatic, cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons, e. g. toluene, paraffin, tetrahydronaphthalene, al- kylated naphthalenes; alcohols, e.g. ethanol, propanol, butanol, benzylalcohol, cyclohexanol; glycols; DMSO; ketones, e.g. cyclohexanone; esters, e.g. lactates, carbonates, fatty acid esters, gamma-butyrolactone; fatty acids; phosphonates; amines; amides, e.g. N-methylpyrrolidone, fatty acid dimethylamides; and mixtures thereof.

Suitable solid carriers or fillers are mineral earths, e.g. silicates, silica gels, talc, kaolins, limestone, lime, chalk, clays, dolomite, diatomaceous earth, bentonite, calcium sulfate, magnesium sulfate, magnesium oxide; polysaccharides, e.g. cellulose, starch; fertilizers, e.g. ammonium sulfate, ammonium phosphate, ammonium nitrate, ureas; products of vegetable origin, e.g. cereal meal, tree bark meal, wood meal, nutshell meal, and mixtures thereof.

Suitable surfactants are surface-active compounds, such as anionic, cationic, nonionic and amphoteric surfactants, block polymers, polyelectrolytes, and mixtures thereof. Such surfactants can be used as emulsifier, dispersant, solubilizer, wetter, penetration enhancer, protective colloid, or adjuvant. Examples of surfactants are listed in McCutcheon's, Vol.1 : Emulsifiers & Detergents, McCutcheon's Directories, Glen Rock, USA, 2008 (International Ed. or North American Ed.).

Suitable anionic surfactants are alkali, alkaline earth or ammonium salts of sulfonates, sulfates, phosphates, carboxylates, and mixtures thereof. Examples of sulfonates are alkylaryl- sulfonates, diphenylsulfonates, alpha-olefin sulfonates, lignine sulfonates, sulfonates of fatty acids and oils, sulfonates of ethoxylated alkylphenols, sulfonates of alkoxylated arylphenols, sulfonates of condensed naphthalenes, sulfonates of dodecyl- and tridecylbenzenes, sulfonates of naphthalenes and alkylnaphthalenes, sulfosuccinates or sulfosuccinamates. Examples of sulfates are sulfates of fatty acids and oils, of ethoxylated alkylphenols, of alcohols, of ethoxylated alcohols, or of fatty acid esters. Examples of phosphates are phosphate esters. Examples of carboxylates are alkyl carboxylates, and carboxylated alcohol or alkylphenol ethoxylates. Suitable nonionic surfactants are alkoxylates, N-subsituted fatty acid amides, amine oxides, esters, sugar-based surfactants, polymeric surfactants, and mixtures thereof. Examples of alkoxylates are compounds such as alcohols, alkylphenols, amines, amides, arylphenols, fatty acids or fatty acid esters which have been alkoxylated with 1 to 50 equivalents. Ethylene oxide and/or propylene oxide may be employed for the alkoxylation, preferably ethylene oxide. Examples of N-subsititued fatty acid amides are fatty acid glucamides or fatty acid alkanolamides. Examples of esters are fatty acid esters, glycerol esters or monoglycerides. Examples of sugar- based surfactants are sorbitans, ethoxylated sorbitans, sucrose and glucose esters or al- kylpolyglucosides. Examples of polymeric surfactants are home- or copolymers of vinylpyrroli- done, vinylalcohols, or vinylacetate.

Suitable cationic surfactants are quaternary surfactants, for example quaternary ammonium compounds with one or two hydrophobic groups, or salts of long-chain primary amines. Suitable amphoteric surfactants are alkylbetains and imidazolines. Suitable block polymers are block polymers of the A-B or A-B-A type comprising blocks of polyethylene oxide and polypropylene oxide, or of the A-B-C type comprising alkanol, polyethylene oxide and polypropylene oxide. Suitable polyelectrolytes are polyacids or polybases. Examples of polyacids are alkali salts of polyacrylic acid or polyacid comb polymers. Examples of polybases are polyvinylamines or pol- yethyleneamines.

Suitable adjuvants are compounds, which have a neglectable or even no pesticidal activity themselves, and which improve the biological performance of the inventive mixtures on the target. Examples are surfactants, mineral or vegetable oils, and other auxilaries. Further examples are listed by Knowles, Adjuvants and additives, Agrow Reports DS256, T&F Informa UK, 2006, chapter 5.

Suitable thickeners are polysaccharides (e.g. xanthan gum, carboxymethylcellulose), anor- ganic clays (organically modified or unmodified), polycarboxylates, and silicates.

Suitable bactericides are bronopol and isothiazolinone derivatives such as alkyliso- thiazolinones and benzisothiazolinones.

Suitable anti-freezing agents are ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, urea and glycerin.

Suitable anti-foaming agents are silicones, long chain alcohols, and salts of fatty acids. Suitable colorants (e.g. in red, blue, or green) are pigments of low water solubility and water- soluble dyes. Examples are inorganic colorants (e.g. iron oxide, titan oxide, iron hexacyanofer- rate) and organic colorants (e.g. alizarin-, azo- and phthalocyanine colorants).

Suitable tackifiers or binders are polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyvinylacetates, polyvinyl alcohols, polyacrylates, biological or synthetic waxes, and cellulose ethers.

Examples for composition types and their preparation are:

i) Water-soluble concentrates (SL, LS)

10-60 wt% of an inventive mixture and 5-15 wt% wetting agent (e.g. alcohol alkoxylates) are dissolved in water and/or in a water-soluble solvent (e.g. alcohols) ad 100 wt%. The active sub- stance dissolves upon dilution with water.

ii) Dispersible concentrates (DC)

5-25 wt% of an inventive mixture and 1 -10 wt% dispersant (e. g. polyvinylpyrrolidone) are dissolved in organic solvent (e.g. cyclohexanone) ad 100 wt%. Dilution with water gives a dis- persion.

iii) Emulsifiable concentrates (EC)

15-70 wt% of an inventive mixture and 5-10 wt% emulsifiers (e.g. calcium dodecylben- zenesulfonate and castor oil ethoxylate) are dissolved in water-insoluble organic solvent (e.g. aromatic hydrocarbon) ad 100 wt%. Dilution with water gives an emulsion.

iv) Emulsions (EW, EO, ES)

5-40 wt% of an inventive mixture and 1 -10 wt% emulsifiers (e.g. calcium dodecylbenzene- sulfonate and castor oil ethoxylate) are dissolved in 20-40 wt% water-insoluble organic solvent (e.g. aromatic hydrocarbon). This mixture is introduced into water ad 100 wt% by means of an emulsifying machine and made into a homogeneous emulsion. Dilution with water gives an emulsion.

v) Suspensions (SC, OD, FS)

In an agitated ball mill, 20-60 wt% of an inventive mixture are comminuted with addition of 2- 10 wt% dispersants and wetting agents (e.g. sodium lignosulfonate and alcohol ethoxylate), 0.1 - 2 wt% thickener (e.g. xanthan gum) and water ad 100 wt% to give a fine active substance suspension. Dilution with water gives a stable suspension of the active substance. For FS type composition up to 40 wt% binder (e.g. polyvinylalcohol) is added.

vi) Water-dispersible granules and water-soluble granules (WG, SG)

50-80 wt% of an inventive mixture are ground finely with addition of dispersants and wetting agents (e.g. sodium lignosulfonate and alcohol ethoxylate) ad 100 wt% and prepared as water- dispersible or water-soluble granules by means of technical appliances (e. g. extrusion, spray tower, fluidized bed). Dilution with water gives a stable dispersion or solution of the active substance.

vii) Water-dispersible powders and water-soluble powders (WP, SP, WS)

50-80 wt% of an inventive mixture are ground in a rotor-stator mill with addition of 1 -5 wt% dispersants (e.g. sodium lignosulfonate), 1 -3 wt% wetting agents (e.g. alcohol ethoxylate) and solid carrier (e.g. silica gel) ad 100 wt%. Dilution with water gives a stable dispersion or solution of the active substance.

viii) Gel (GW, GF)

In an agitated ball mill, 5-25 wt% of an inventive mixture are comminuted with addition of 3- 10 wt% dispersants (e.g. sodium lignosulfonate), 1 -5 wt% thickener (e.g. carboxy- methylcellulose) and water ad 100 wt% to give a fine suspension of the active substance. Dilution with water gives a stable suspension of the active substance.

ix) Microemulsion (ME)

5-20 wt% of an inventive mixture are added to 5-30 wt% organic solvent blend (e.g. fatty acid dimethylamide and cyclohexanone), 10-25 wt% surfactant blend (e.g. alcohol ethoxylate and arylphenol ethoxylate), and water ad 100 %. This mixture is stirred for 1 h to produce spontaneously a thermodynamically stable microemulsion.

x) Microcapsules (CS)

An oil phase comprising 5-50 wt% of an inventive mixture, 0-40 wt% water insoluble organic solvent (e.g. aromatic hydrocarbon), 2-15 wt% acrylic monomers (e.g. methylmethacrylate, methacrylic acid and a di- or triacrylate) are dispersed into an aqueous solution of a protective colloid (e.g. polyvinyl alcohol). Radical polymerization initiated by a radical initiator results in the formation of poly(meth)acrylate microcapsules. Alternatively, an oil phase comprising 5-50 wt% of an inventive mixture according to the invention, 0-40 wt% water insoluble organic solvent (e.g. aromatic hydrocarbon), and an isocyanate monomer (e.g. diphenylmethene-4,4'- diisocyanatae) are dispersed into an aqueous solution of a protective colloid (e.g. polyvinyl al- cohol). The addition of a polyamine (e.g. hexamethylenediamine) results in the formation of pol- yurea microcapsules. The monomers amount to 1-10 wt%. The wt% relate to the total CS composition.

xi) Dustable powders (DP, DS)

1 -10 wt% of an inventive mixture are ground finely and mixed intimately with solid carrier (e.g. finely divided kaolin) ad 100 wt%.

xii) Granules (GR, FG)

0.5-30 wt% of an inventive mixture is ground finely and associated with solid carrier (e.g. silicate) ad 100 wt%. Granulation is achieved by extrusion, spray-drying or fluidized bed.

xiii) Ultra-low volume liquids (UL)

1 -50 wt% of an inventive mixture are dissolved in organic solvent (e.g. aromatic hydrocarbon) ad 100 wt%.

The compositions types i) to xi) may optionally comprise further auxiliaries, such as 0.1 -1 wt% bactericides, 5-15 wt% anti-freezing agents, 0.1 -1 wt% anti-foaming agents, and 0.1 -1 wt% colorants.

In a preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 3- [benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6- (trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-1 , I-2 or I-3. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 3- [benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6- (trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound I-4, I-5, I-6, I-7, I- 8, I-9, 1-10 or 1-1 Un a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 3-[benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6- (trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-12, 1-13 or 1-14. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 3- [benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6-

(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-15. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 3- [benzoyl(methyl)amino]-N-[2-bromo-4-[1 ,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 -(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-6- (trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-fluoro-benzamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-16. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2- dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-1 , I-2 or I-3.

In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2- dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound I-4, I-5, I-6, I-7, I-8, I-9, 1-10 or 1-1 1 . In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N- pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-12, 1-13 or 1-14. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2- dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide, wherein com- pound I is compound 1-15. In a further preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of treating plant propagation material (preferably seeds) using mixtures comprising compound I and 2-(1 ,2-dimethylpropyl)-N-ethyl-3-methyl-N-pyridazin-4-yl-1 H-pyrazole-4- carboxamide, wherein compound I is compound 1-16.

The resulting agrochemical compositions generally comprise between 0.01 and 95%, preferably between 0.1 and 90%, and in particular between 0.5 and 75%, by weight of active substance. The active substances are employed in a purity of from 90% to 100%, preferably from 95% to 100% (according to NMR spectrum).

Solutions for seed treatment (LS), Suspoemulsions (SE), flowable concentrates (FS), powders for dry treatment (DS), water-dispersible powders for slurry treatment (WS), water-soluble powders (SS), emulsions (ES), emulsifiable concentrates (EC) and gels (GF) are usually employed for the purposes of treatment of plant propagation materials, particularly seeds. The compositions in question give, after two-to-tenfold dilution, active substance concentrations of from 0.01 to 60% by weight, preferably from 0.1 to 40%, in the ready-to-use preparations. Application can be carried out before or during sowing. Methods for applying the inventive mixtures and compositions thereof, respectively, on to plant propagation material, especially seeds include dressing, coating, pelleting, dusting, soaking and in-furrow application methods of the propagation material. Preferably, the inventive mixtures or the compositions thereof, respective- ly, are applied on to the plant propagation material by a method such that germination is not induced, e. g. by seed dressing, pelleting, coating and dusting.

When employed in plant protection, the amounts of active substances applied are, depending on the kind of effect desired, from 0.001 to 2 kg per ha, preferably from 0.005 to 2 kg per ha, more preferably from 0.01 to 1 .0 kg per ha, and in particular from 0.05 to 0.75 kg per ha.

In treatment of plant propagation materials such as seeds, e. g. by dusting, coating or drenching seed, amounts of active substance of from 0.01 -10kg, preferably from 0.1 -1000 g, more preferably from 1 -100 g per 100 kilogram of plant propagation material (preferably seeds) are generally required. When used in the protection of materials or stored products, the amount of active substance applied depends on the kind of application area and on the desired effect. Amounts customarily applied in the protection of materials are 0.001 g to 2 kg, preferably 0.005 g to 1 kg, of active substance per cubic meter of treated material.

Various types of oils, wetters, adjuvants, fertilizer, or micronutrients, and further pesticides (e.g. herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, growth regulators, safeners) may be added to the active substances or the compositions comprising them as premix or, if appropriate not until immediately prior to use (tank mix). These agents can be admixed with the compositions according to the invention in a weight ratio of 1 :100 to 100:1 , preferably 1 :10 to 10:1.

The user applies the composition according to the invention usually from a predosage device, a knapsack sprayer, a spray tank, a spray plane, or an irrigation system. Usually, the ag- rochemical composition is made up with water, buffer, and/or further auxiliaries to the desired application concentration and the ready-to-use spray liquor or the agrochemical composition according to the invention is thus obtained. Usually, 20 to 2000 liters, preferably 50 to 400 liters, of the ready-to-use spray liquor are applied per hectare of agricultural useful area.

According to one embodiment, individual components of the composition according to the invention such as parts of a kit or parts of a binary or ternary mixture may be mixed by the user himself in a spray tank or any other kind of vessel used for applications (e. g. seed treater drums, seed pelleting machinery, knapsack sprayer) and further auxiliaries may be added, if appropriate.

Consequently, one embodiment of the invention is a kit for preparing a usable pesticidal composition, the kit comprising a) a composition comprising component 1 ) as defined herein and at least one auxiliary; and b) a composition comprising component 2) as defined herein and at least one auxiliary; and optionally c) a composition comprising at least one auxiliary and optionally a further active component 3) as defined herein.

As said above, the inventive mixtures are employed by treating the pests or the plants, plant propagation materials (preferably seeds), materials or soil to be protected from fungal attack with a pesticidally effective amount of the active compounds. The application can be carried out both before and after the infection of the materials, plants or plant propagation materials (preferably seeds) by the pests.

Herein, the present invention comprises a method for controlling harmful fungi, wherein the pest, their habitat, breeding grounds, their locus or the plants to be protected against pest attack, the soil or plant propagation material (preferably seed) are treated with an pesticidally effective amount of a inventive mixture.

Advantageously, the inventive mixtures are suitable for controlling the following fungal plant diseases:

Albugo spp. (white rust) on ornamentals, vegetables (e. g. A. Candida) and sunflowers (e. g. A. tragopogonis); Alternaria spp. (Alternaria leaf spot) on vegetables, rape (A. brassicola or brass/- cae), sugar beets (A tenuis), fruits, rice, soybeans, potatoes (e. g. A. so/an/ or A alternata), tomatoes (e. g. A so/an/ or A alternata) and wheat; Aphanomyces spp. on sugar beets and vegetables; As<%>c/7 /s spp. on cereals and vegetables, e. g. A /r/¾e/ (anthracnose) on wheat and A horde/ on barley; Bipolaris and Drechslera spp. (teleomorph: Cochliobolus spp.), e. g. Southern leaf blight (/9. maydis) or Northern leaf blight (.?. zeicola) on corn, e. g. spot blotch (.?. sorokiniana) on cereals and e. g. z?. oryzae on rice and turfs; Blumeria (formerly Erysiphe) graminis (powdery mildew) on cereals (e. g. on wheat or barley); Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana. grey mold) on fruits and berries (e. g. strawberries), vegetables (e. g. lettuce, carrots, celery and cabbages), rape, flowers, vines, forestry plants and wheat; Bremia lactucae (downy mildew) on lettuce; Ceratocystis (syn. Ophiostoma) spp. (rot or wilt) on broad- leaved trees and evergreens, e. g. C. iy/ 7/ ' (Dutch elm disease) on elms; Cercospora spp. (Cer- cospora leaf spots) on corn (e. g. Gray leaf spot: C. zeae-maydis), rice, sugar beets (e. g. C. beticola), sugar cane, vegetables, coffee, soybeans (e. g. C. sojina or C. kikuchii) and rice; Cladosporium spp. on tomatoes (e. g. C. fulvurrr. leaf mold) and cereals, e. g. C. herbarum (black ear) on wheat; Claviceps purpurea (ergot) on cereals; Cochliobolus (anamorph: Helminthosporium oft Bipolaris) spp. (leaf spots) on corn (C. carbonum), cereals (e. g. C. sativus, anamorph: B. sorokiniana) and rice (e. g. C. miyabeanus, anamorph: H. oryzae); Colletotrichum (teleomorph: Giomereiia) spp. (anthracnose) on cotton (e. g. C. gossypii), corn (e. g. C. gramini- co/a/Anthracnose stalk rot), soft fruits, potatoes (e. g. C. coccodes. black dot), beans (e. g. C. lindemuthianum) and soybeans (e. g. C. truncatum or C. gloeosporioides); Corticium spp., e. g. C. sasakii (sheath blight) on rice; Corynespora cassiicola (leaf spots) on soybeans and ornamentals; Cycloconium spp., e. g. C. oleaginum on olive trees; Cylindrocarpon spp. (e. g. fruit tree canker or young vine decline, teleomorph: Nectria or Neonectria spp.) on fruit trees, vines (e. g. C. liriodendri, teleomorph: Neonectria liriodendri. Black Foot Disease) and ornamentals; Dematophora (teleomorph: Rosellinia) necatrix (root and stem rot) on soybeans; Diaporthe spp., e. g. D. phaseolorum (damping off) on soybeans; Drechslera (syn. Helminthosporium, teleomorph: Pyrenophora) spp. on corn, cereals, such as barley (e. g. D. teres, net blotch) and wheat (e. g. D. tritici-repentis. tan spot), rice and turf; Esca (dieback, apoplexy) on vines, caused by Formitiporia (syn. Phellinus) punctata, F. mediterranea, Phaeomoniella chlamydospora (earlier Phaeoacremonium chlamydosporum), Phaeoacremonium aleophilum and/or Botryosphaeria obtusa, Elsinoe spp. on pome fruits (E. pyri), soft fruits (E. veneta: anthracnose) and vines (E. ampe/ina: anthracnose); Enty/oma oryzae (leaf smut) on rice; Epicoccum spp. (black mold) on wheat; Erysiphe spp. (powdery mildew) on sugar beets (E. betae), vegetables (e. g. E. pisi), such as cucurbits (e. g. E. cichoracearum), cabbages, rape (e. g. E. cruciferarum); Eutypa lata (Eutypa canker or dieback, anamorph: Cytosporina lata, syn. Libertella blepharis) on fruit trees, vines and ornamental woods; Exserohilum (syn. Helminthosporium) spp. on corn (e. g. E. turci- cum); Fusarium (teleomorph: Gibberella) spp. (wilt, root or stem rot) on various plants, such as F. graminearum or F. culmorum (root rot, scab or head blight) on cereals (e. g. wheat or barley), F. oxysporum on tomatoes, F. so/ani( sp. glycines new syn. F. virguliforme ) and F. tucumani- se and F. brasiliense each causing sudden death syndrome on soybeans, and F. verticillioides on corn; Gaeumannomyces graminis (take-all) on cereals (e. g. wheat or barley) and corn; Gibberella spp. on cereals (e. g. G zeae) and rice (e. g. G fujikuror. Bakanae disease); Giomereiia cingulata on vines, pome fruits and other plants and G gossypii on cotton; Grainstaining com- plex on rice; Guignardia bidwellii ' (black rot) on vines; Gymnosporangium spp. on rosaceous plants and junipers, e. g. G sabinae (rust) on pears; e/minthosporium spp. (syn. Drechslera, teleomorph: Cochiioboius) on corn, cereals and rice; Hemileia spp., e. g. H. vastatrix (coffee leaf rust) on coffee; Isariopsis clavispora (syn. Cladosporium vitis) on vines; Macrophomina phaseolina (syn. phaseoll) (root and stem rot) on soybeans and cotton; Microdochium (syn. Fusarium) nivale (pink snow mold) on cereals (e. g. wheat or barley); Microsphaera diffusa (powdery mildew) on soybeans; Monilinia spp., e. g. A /ara, A fructicola and MA /fr/cV- ^e a (bloom and twig blight, brown rot) on stone fruits and other rosaceous plants; Myco- sphaerella spp. on cereals, bananas, soft fruits and ground nuts, such as e. g. MA graminicoia (anamorph: Septoria tritici, Septoria blotch) on wheat or MA fijiensis (black Sigatoka disease) on bananas; Peronospora spp. (downy mildew) on cabbage (e. g. P. brassicae), rape (e. g. P. parasitica), onions (e. g. P. destructor), tobacco {P. tabacina) and soybeans (e. g. P. manshuri- ca); Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae (soybean rust) on soybeans; Phialophora spp. e. g. on vines (e. g. P. tracheiphila and P. tetraspora) and soybeans (e. g. P. gregata. stem rot); Phoma lingam (root and stem rot) on rape and cabbage and P. betae (root rot, leaf spot and damping-off) on sugar beets; Phomopsis spp. on sunflowers, vines (e. g. P. vitico/a: can and leaf spot) and soybeans (e. g. stem rot: P. phaseoli, teleomorph: Diaporthe phaseolorum); Phy- soderma maydis (brown spots) on corn; Phytophthora SOO. (wilt, root, leaf, fruit and stem root) on various plants, such as paprika and cucurbits (e. g. P. capsicl), soybeans (e. g. P.

megasperma, syn. P. sojae), potatoes and tomatoes (e. g. P. infestans. late blight) and broad- leaved trees (e. g. P. ramorum. sudden oak death); Plasmodiophora brassicae (club root) on cabbage, rape, radish and other plants; Plasmopara spp., e. g. P. viticola (grapevine downy mildew) on vines and P. halstedii on sunflowers; Podosphaera spp. (powdery mildew) on rosaceous plants, hop, pome and soft fruits, e. g. P. leucotricha on apples; Polymyxa spp., e. g. on cereals, such as barley and wheat {P. graminis) and sugar beets {P. betae) and thereby transmitted viral diseases; Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides (eyespot, teleomorph: Tapes/a yal- lundae) on cereals, e. g. wheat or barley; Pseudoperonospora (downy mildew) on various plants, e. g. P. cubensis on cucurbits or P. hum/lion hop; Pseudopezicula tracheiphila (red fire disease or .rotbrenner', anamorph: Phialophora) on vines; Puccinia spp. (rusts) on various plants, e. g. P. triticina (brown or leaf rust), P. striiformis (stripe or yellow rust), P. horde! (dwarf rust), P. graminis (stem or black rust) or P. recondita (brown or leaf rust) on cereals, such as e. g. wheat, barley or rye, P. kuehnii (orange rust) on sugar cane and P. asparagion asparagus; Pyrenophora (anamorph: Drechslera) tritici-repentis (tan spot) on wheat or P. teres (net blotch) on barley; Pyricularia spp., e. g. P. oryzae (teleomorph: Magnaporthe grisea, rice blast) on rice and P. grisea on turf and cereals; Pythium spp. (damping-off) on turf, rice, corn, wheat, cotton, rape, sunflowers, soybeans, sugar beets, vegetables and various other plants (e. g. P. ultimum or P. aphanidermatum); Ramularia spp., e. g. R. co/io-cygni (Ramu\ar\a leaf spots, Physiological leaf spots) on barley and R. bet/cola on sugar beets; Rh/zocton/a spp. on cotton, rice, potatoes, turf, corn, rape, potatoes, sugar beets, vegetables and various other plants, e. g. R. so/ani (root and stem rot) on soybeans, R. so/ani (sheath blight) on rice or R. cerea/is (Rhizoctonia spring blight) on wheat or barley; Rhizopus sto/onifer (black mold, soft rot) on strawberries, carrots, cabbage, vines and tomatoes; Rhynchosporium seca/is (scald) on barley, rye and triticale; Sa- rocladium oryzae and S. attenuatum (sheath rot) on rice; Sclerotinia spp. (stem rot or white mold) on vegetables and field crops, such as rape, sunflowers (e. g. S. sclerotiorum) and soybeans (e. g. S. ro/fsiior S. sclerotiorum); Septoria spp. on various plants, e. g. S. glycines (brown spot) on soybeans, S. tritici (Septoria blotch) on wheat and S. (syn. Stagonospora) no- dorum (Stagonospora blotch) on cereals; Uncinula (syn. Erysiphe) necator (powdery mildew, anamorph: Oidium tucker!) on vines; Setospaeria spp. (leaf blight) on corn (e. g. S. turcicum, syn. Helminthosporium turcicum) and turf; Sphacelotheca spp. (smut) on corn, (e. g. S. reiliana. head smut), sorghum und sugar cane; Sphaerotheca fuliginea (powdery mildew) on cucurbits; Spongospora subterranea (powdery scab) on potatoes and thereby transmitted viral diseases; Stagonospora spp. on cereals, e. g. S. nodorum (Stagonospora blotch, teleomorph: Lepto- sphaeria [syn. Phaeosphaeria] nodorum) on wheat; Synchytrium endobioticum on potatoes (potato wart disease); Taphrina spp., e. g. T. deformans (leaf curl disease) on peaches and T. pruni (plum pocket) on plums; Thielaviopsis spp. (black root rot) on tobacco, pome fruits, vegetables, soybeans and cotton, e. g. T. basicola (syn. Chalara elegans); Tilletia spp. (common bunt or stinking smut) on cereals, such as e. g. T. tritici {syn. T. caries, wheat bunt) and T. controversa (dwarf bunt) on wheat; Typhula incarnata (grey snow mold) on barley or wheat; Urocystis spp., e. g. U. occulta (stem smut) on rye; Uromyces spp. (rust) on vegetables, such as beans (e. g. U. appendicu/atus, syn. U. phaseoli) and sugar beets (e. g. U. betae); Ustilago spp. (loose smut) on cereals (e. g. U. nuda and U. avaenae), corn (e. g. U. maydis. corn smut) and sugar cane; Venturia spp. (scab) on apples (e. g. V. inaequalis) and pears; and Verticillium spp. (wilt) on various plants, such as fruits and ornamentals, vines, soft fruits, vegetables and field crops, e. g. V. dahliae on strawberries, rape, potatoes and tomatoes.

The mixtures according to the present invention, respectively, are also suitable for controlling harmful fungi in the protection of stored products or harvest and in the protection of materials.

The term "protection of materials" is to be understood to denote the protection of technical and non-living materials, such as adhesives, glues, wood, paper and paperboard, textiles, leather, paint dispersions, plastics, cooling lubricants, fiber or fabrics, against the infestation and destruction by harmful microorganisms, such as fungi and bacteria. As to the protection of wood and other materials, the particular attention is paid to the following harmful fungi: Ascomycetes such as Ophiostoma spp., Ceratocystis spp., Aureobasidium pullulans, Sclerophoma spp., Chaetomium spp., Hum/cola spp., Petriella spp., Trichurus spp:, Basidiomycetes such as Coni- ophora spp., Coriolus spp., Gloeophyllum spp., Lentinus spp., Pleurotus spp., Poria spp., Ser- pu/a spp. and Tyromyces spp., Deuteromycetes such as Aspergillus spp., Cladosporium spp., Penicillium spp., Trichoderma spp., Alternaria spp., Paecilomyces spp. and Zygomycetes such as Mucorspp., and in addition in the protection of stored products and harvest the following yeast fungi are worthy of note: Candida spp. and Saccharomyces cerevisae.

They are particularly important for controlling a multitude of fungi on various cultivated plants, such as bananas, cotton, vegetable

species (for example cucumbers, beans and cucurbits), cereals such as wheat, rye, barley, rice, oats; grass coffee, potatoes, corn, fruit species, soya, tomatoes, grapevines, ornamental plants, sugar cane and also on a large number of seeds. Furthermore, as outlined above, the present invention comprises a method for controlling harmful animal pest, wherein the pest, their habitat, breeding grounds, their locus or the plants to be protected against pest attack, the soil or plant propagation material (preferably seed) are treated with an pesticidally effective amount of a inventive mixture.

Herein, the mixtures according to the present publication exhibit also outstanding action against animal pests from the following orders: insects from the order of Lepidoptera, for example Achroia grisella, Aden ' s spp. such as A. fim- briana, A. gloverana, A. variana; Acrolepiopsis assectella, Acronicta major, Adoxophyes spp. such as A. cyrtosema, A. orana; Aedia leucomelas, Agrotis spp. such as A. exclamationis, A. fucosa, A. ipsilon, A. orthogoma, A. segetum, A. subterranea; Alabama argillacea, Aleurodicus dispersus, Alsophila pometaria, Ampelophaga rubiginosa, Amyelois transitella, Anacampsis sarcitella, Anagasta kuehniella, Anarsia lineatella, Anisota senator/a, Antheraea pernyi, Anticar- sia (=Thermesia) spp. such as A. gemmatalis; Apamea spp., Aproaerema modicella, Archips spp. such as A. argyrospiia, A. fuscocupreanus, A. rosana, A. xyloseanus; Argyresthia conjugel- la, Argyroploce spp., Argyrotaenia spp. such as A. velutinana; Athetis mindara, Austroasca vi- ridigrisea, Autographa gamma, Autographa nigrisigna, Barathra brassicae, Bedel/la spp., Bon- agota salubricola, Borbo cinnara, Bucculatrix thurberiella, Bupalus piniarius, Busseola spp., Cacoecia spp. such as C. murinana, C. podana; Cactobiastis cactorum, Cadra cauteiia, Caiingo braziliensis, Caloptilis theivora, Capua reticulana, Carposina spp. such as C. niponensis, C. sasakii; Cephus spp., Chaetocnema aridula, Cheimatobia brumata, Chilo spp. such as C Indi- cus, C suppressalis, C partellus; Choreutis pariana, Choristoneura spp. such as C conflictana, C fumiferana, C longicellana, C murinana, C occidentalis, C rosaceana; Chrysodeixis (=Pseudoplusia) spp. such as C eriosoma, C includens; Cirphis unipuncta, Clysia ambiguella, Cnaphalocerus spp., Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, Cnephasia spp., Cochylis hospes, Coleophora spp., Co/las eurytheme, Conopomorpha spp., Conotrache/us spp., Cop/tarsia spp., Corcyra cepha/onica, Crambus caliginosellus, Crambus teterrellus, Crocidosema (=Epinotia) aporema, Cydalima (=Diaphania) perspectalis, Cydia (=Carpocapsa) spp. such as C. pomonella, C.

latiferreana; Dalaca noctuides, Datana integerrima, Dasychira pinicola, Dendrolimus spp. such as D. pini, D. spectabilis, D. sibiricus; Desmia funeralis, Diaphania spp. such as D. nitidalis, D. hyalinata; Diatraea grandiose/la, Diatraea saccharalis, Diphthera f estiva, Ear/as spp. such as E. insulana, E. vittella; Ecdytolopha aurantianu, Egira (=Xylomyges) curia/is, E/asmopa/pus ligno- sellus, Eldana saccharina, Endopiza viteana, Ennomos subsignaria, Eoreuma loftini, Ephestia spp. such as E. cauteiia, E. elutella, E. kuehniella; Epinotia aporema, Epiphyas postvittana, Erannis tiliaria, Erionota thrax, Etiella spp., Eulia spp., Eupoecilia ambiguella, Euproctis chrysorrhoea, Euxoa spp., Evetria bou liana, Faronta albilinea, Feltia spp. such as F. subterranean; Galleria mellonella, Gracillaria spp., Grapholita spp. such as G. funebrana, G. molesta, G. inopinata; Ha lysidota spp., Harrisina americana, Hedylepta spp., Helicoverpa spp. such as H. armigera (=Heliothis armigera), H. zea (=Heliothis zea); Heliothis spp. such as H. assulta, H. subflexa, H. virescens; Hellula spp. such as H. undalis, H. rogatalis; Helocoverpa gelotopoeon, Hemileuca oliviae, Herpetogramma licarsisalis, Hibernia defoliaria, Hofmannophila pseu- dospretella, Homoeosoma electellum, Homona magnanima, Hypena scabra, Hyphantria cunea, Hyponomeuta padella, Hyponomeuta maiineiius, Kakivoria fiavofasciata, Keiferia lycopersiceiia, Lambdina fiscellaria fiscellaria, Lambdina fiscellaria lugubrosa, Lamprosema indicata,

Laspeyresia molesta, Leguminivora glycinivorella, Lerodea eufala, Leucinodes orbonalis, Leu- coma salicis, Leucoptera spp. such as L. coffeella, L. scitella; Leuminivora lycinivorella,

Lithocolletis blancardella, Lithophane antennata, Llattia octo (=Amyna axis), Lobes/a botrana, Lophocampa spp., Loxagrotis albicosta, Loxostege spp. such as L. sticticalis, L. cereralis;

Lymantria spp. such as L. dispar, L. monacha; Lyonetia clerkella, Lyonetia prunifoliella, Malaco- soma spp. such as M. americanum, M. caiifornicum, M. constrictum, M. neustria; Mamestra spp. such as M. brassicae, M. configurata; Mamstra brassicae, Manduca spp. such as M. quin- quemaculata, M. sexta; Marasmia spp, Marmara spp., Maruca testulalis, Megalopyge lanata, Melanchra picta, Melanitis leda, Mods spp. such as M. lapites, M. repanda; Mods latipes, Mon- ochroa fragariae, Mythimna separata, Nemapogon cloacella, Neoleucinodes elegantalis, Nepytia spp., Nymphula pp., Oiketicus spp., Omiodes indicata, Omphisa anastomosalis, Oper- ophtera brumata, Orgy/a pseudotsugata, Or/a spp., Orthaga thyrisalis, Ostrinia spp. such as O. nubilalis; Oulema oryzae, Paleacrita vernata, Pa no/is f/ammea, Parnara spp., Papaipema nebris, Papilio cresphontes, Paramyelois transitella, Paranthrene regalis, Paysandisia archon, Pectinophora spp. such as P. gossypiella; Peridroma saucia, Perileucoptera spp., such as P. coffeella; Phalera bucephala, Phryganidia californica, Phthorimaea spp. such as P. operculella; Phyllocnistis citrella, Phyllonorycter spp. such as P. blancardella, P. crataegella, P. issikii, P. ringoniella; Pieris spp. such as P. brassicae, P. rapae, P. napi; Pilocrocis tripunctata, Plathy- pena scabra, Platynota spp. such as P. flavedana, P. idaeusalis, P. stultana; Platyptilia cardui- dactyla, Plebejus argus, Plodia interpunctella, Plusia spp, Plutella maculipennis, Plutella xy- lostella, Pontia protodica, Prays spp., Prodenia spp., Proxenus /epigone, Pseuda/et/a spp. such as P. sequax, P. unipuncta; Pyrausta nubilalis, Rachi plusia nu, Rich/a albicosta, Rhizobius ven- tralis, Rhyacionia frustrana, Sabulodes aegrotata, Schizura concinna, Schoenobius spp., Schreckensteinia festaliella, Scirpophaga spp. such as S. incertulas, S. innotata; Scotia segetum, Sesamia spp. such as S. inferens, Seudyra subflava, Sitotroga cerealella, Spargan- othis pilleriana, Spilonota lechriaspis, S. ocellana, Spodoptera (=Lamphygma) spp. such as S. cosmoides, S. eridania, S. exigua, S. frugiperda, S. latisfascia, S. littoralis, S. litura, S. omitho- galli; Stigmella spp., Stomopteryx subsecivella, Strymon bazochii, Sylepta derogata, Synant he- don spp. such as S. exitiosa, Tec/a so/an/vora, Telehin ileus, Thaumatopoea pityocampa, Thaumatotibia (=Cryptophlebia) leucotreta, Thaumetopoea pityocampa, Thecla spp., Theresi- mima ampelophaga, Thyrinteina spp, Tildenia inconspicuella, Tinea spp. such as T. cloacella, T. pellionella; Tineola bisselliella, Tortrix spp. such as T. viridana; Trichophaga tapetzella, Tri- choplusia spp. such as T. ni; Tuta (=Scrobipalpula) absoluta, Udea spp. such as U. rubigalis, U. rubigalis; Virachola spp., Yponomeuta padella, and Zeiraphera canadensis;

insects from the order of Coleoptera, for example Acalymma vittatum, Acanthoscehdes obtec- tus, Adoretus spp., Agelastica alni, Agrilus spp. such as A. anxius, A. planipennis, A. sinuatus; Agriotes spp. such as A. fuscicollis, A. lineatus, A. obscurus; Alphitobius diaperinus, Amphimal- /us so/stitia/is, Anisandrus dispar, Anisop/ia austriaca, Anobium punctatum, Anoma/a corpu/en- ta, Anoma/a rufocuprea, Anop/ophora spp. such as A. g/abr/penn/s; Anthonomus spp. such as A. eugen/i, A. grandis, A. pomorum; Anthrenus spp., Aphthona euphor/dae, Ap/on spp., Apogo- nia spp., Athous haemorrhoida/is, Atomaria spp. such as A. linearis; Attagenus spp., Aula- cophora femoralis, Blastophagus piniperda, Blitophaga undata, Bruchidius obtectus, Bruchus spp. such as B. lentis, B. pisorum, B. rufimanus; Byctiscus betulae, Callidiellum rufipenne, Cal- lopistria floridensis, Callosobruchus chinensis, Cameraria ohridella, Cassida nebulosa, Ceroto- ma trifurcata, Cetonia aurata, Ceuthorhynchus spp. such as C. assimiiis, C. napi; Chaetocnema tibialis, Cleonus mendicus, Conoderus spp. such as C vespertinus; Conotrachelus nenuphar, Cosmopolites pp., Costelytra zealandica, Crioceris asparagi, Cryptolestes ferrugineus, Cryp- torhynchus lapathi, Ctenicera spp. such as C destructor; Curculio spp., Cylindrocopturus spp., Cyclocephala spp., Dactyl/spa ba/yi, Dectes texanus, Dermestes spp., Diabrotica spp. such as D. undecimpunctata, D. speciosa, D. longicornis, D. semipunctata, D. virgifera; Diaprepes ab- breviates, Dichocrocis spp., Dicladispa armigera, Diloboderus abderus, Diocalandra frumenti (Diocalandra stigmaticollis), Enaphalodes rufulus, Epilachna spp. such as E. varivestis, E.

vigintioctomaculata; Epitrix spp. such as E. hirtipennis, E. similaris; Eutheola humilis, Eu- tinobothrus brasiliensis, Faustinus cubae, Gibbium psylloides, Gnathocerus cornutus, Hellula undalis, Heteronychus arator, Hylamorpha elegans, Hylobius abietis, Hylotrupes bajulus, Hy- pera spp. such as H. brunneipennis, H. postica; Hypomeces squamosus, Hypothenemus spp., Ips typographus, Lachnosterna consanguinea, Lasioderma serricorne, Latheticus oryzae, Lath- ridius spp., Lema spp. such as L. bilineata, L. melanopus; Leptinotarsa spp. such as L. decem- lineata; Leptispa pygmaea, Limonius californicus, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus, Lixus spp., Lu- perodes spp., Lyctus spp. such as L. bruneus; Liogenys fuscus, Macrodactylus spp. such as M. subspinosus; Maladera matrida, Megaplatypus mutates, Megascelis spp., Melanotus communis, Meligethes spp. such as M. aeneus; Melolontha spp. such as M. hippocastani, M. melol- ontha; Metamasius hemipterus, Microtheca spp., Migdolus spp. such as M. fryanus, Monocha- mus spp. such as M. alternatus; Naupactus xanthographus, Niptus hololeucus, Oberia brevis, Oemona hirta, Oryctes rhinoceros, Oryzaephilus surinamensis, Oryzaphagus oryzae, Otiorrhyn- chus sulcatus, Otiorrhynchus ovatus, Otiorrhynchus sulcatus, Oulema melanopus, Oulema oryzae, Oxycetonia jucunda, Phaedon spp. such as P. brassicae, P. cochleariae; Phoracantha re- curva, Phyllobius pyri, Phyllopertha horticola, Phyllophaga spp. such as P. helleri; Phyllotreta spp. such as P. chrysocephala, P. nemorum, P. striolata, P. vittula; Phyllopertha horticola, Pop- illia japonica, Premnotrypes spp., Psacothea hilaris, Psylliodes chrysocephala, Prostephanus truncates, Psylliodes spp., Ptinus spp., Pulga saltona, Rhizopertha dominica, Rhynchophorus spp. such as R. billineatus, R. ferrugineus, R. palmarum, R. phoenicis, R. vulneratus; Saperda Candida, Scolytus schevyrewi, Scyphophorus acupunctatus, Sitona lineatus, Sitophilus spp. such as S. granaria, S. oryzae, S. zeamais; Sphenophorus spp. such as S. levis; Stegobium paniceum, Sternechus spp. such as S. subsignatus; Strophomorphus ctenotus, Symphyletes spp., Tanymecus spp., Tenebrio molitor, Tenebrioides mauretanicus, Tribolium spp. such as T. castaneum; Trogoderm a spp., Tychius spp., Xylotrechus spp. such as X. pyrrhoderus; and, Za- brus spp. such as Z. tenebrioides;

insects from the order of Diptera for example Aedes spp. such as A aegypti, A. albopictus, A. vexans; Anastrepha ludens, Anopheles spp. such as A. albimanus, A. crucians, A. freeborni, A. gambiae, A. leucosphyrus, A. maculipennis, A. minimus, A. quadrimaculatus, A. sinensis; Bac- trocera in va dens, Bibio hortu/anus, Calliphora erythrocephala, Calliphora vicina, Ceratitis capi- tata, Chrysomyia spp. such as C. bezziana, C. hominivorax, C. maceiiaria; Chrysops atianticus, Chrysops discalis, Chrysops silacea, Cochliomyia spp. such as C. hominivorax; Contarinia spp. such as C. sorghicola; Cordylobia anthropophaga, Culex spp. such as C. nigripalpus, C.

pipiens, C. quinquefasciatus, C. tarsalis, C. tritaeniorhynchus; Culicoides furens, Culiseta inor- nata, Culiseta melanura, Cuterebra spp., Dacus cucurbitae, Dacus oleae, Dasineura brassicae, Dasineura oxycoccana, Delia spp. such as D. antique, D. coarctata, D. platura, D. radicum; Dermatobia hominis, Drosophila spp. such as D. suzukii, Fannia spp. such as F. canicularis; Gastraphilus spp. such as G. intestinalis; Geomyza tipunctata, Glossina spp. such as G fusci- pes, G morsitans, G pa/pa/is, G tachinoides; Haematobia irritans, Haplodiplosis equestris, Hippelates spp., Hylemyia spp. such as H. platura; Hypoderma spp. such as H. lineata; Hyppo- bosca spp., Hydrellia phiiippina, Leptoconops torrens, Liriomyza spp. such as L. sativae, L. trifo- ///; Lucilia spp. such as L. caprina, L. cuprina, L. sericata; Lycoria pectoralis, Mansonia titillanus, Mayetiola spp. such as M. destructor; Musca spp. such as M. autumnalis, M. domestica; Musci- na stabulans, Oestrus spp. such as O. ovis; Opomyza florum, Oscinella spp. such as O. frit; Orseolia oryzae, Pegomya hysocyami, Phlebotomus argentipes, Phorbia spp. such as P. anti- qua, P. brassicae, P. coarctata; Phytomyza gymnostoma, Prosimulium mixtum, Psila rosae, Psorophora columbiae, Psorophora discolor, Rhagoletis spp. such as R. cerasi, R. cingulate, R. indifferens, R. mendax, R. pomonella; Rivellia quadrifasciata, Sarcophaga spp. such as S.

haemorrhoidalis; Simulium vittatum, Sitodiplosis mosellana, Stomoxys spp. such as S. calci- trans; Tabanus spp. such as T. atratus, T. bovinus, T. lineola, T. similis; Tannia spp., Thecodi- plosis japonensis, Tipula oleracea, Tipula paludosa, and Wohlfahrtia spp;

insects from the order of Thysanoptera for example, Baliothrips biformis, Dichromothrips cor- betti, Dichromothrips ssp., Echinothrips americanus, Enneothrips flavens, Frankliniella spp. such as F. fusca, F. occidentalis, F. tritici; Heliothrips spp., Hercinothrips femora/is, Kakothrips spp., Microcephalothrips abdominalis, Neohydatothrips samayunkur, Pezothrips kellyanus, Rhipiphorothrips cruentatus, Scirtothrips spp. such as S. citri, S. dorsalis, S. perseae; Stenchae- tothrips spp, Taeniothrips cardamoni, Taeniothrips inconsequens, Thrips spp. such as T. imagines, T. hawaiiensis, T. oryzae, T. pa I mi, T. parvispinus, T. tabaci;

insects from the order of Hemiptera for example, Acizzia jamatonica, Acrosternum spp. such as A. are/Acyrthosipon spp. such as A. onobrychis, A. pisum; Adelges laricis, Adelges tsugae, Adelphocoris spp., such as A. rapidus, A. superbus; Aeneolamia spp., Agonoscena spp., Au- lacorthum solani, Aleurocanthus woglumi, Aleurodes spp., Aleurodicus disperses, Aleurolobus barodensis, Aleurothrixus spp., Amrasca spp., Anasa tristis, Antestiopsis spp., Anuraphis car- dui, Aonidiella spp., Aphanostigma piri, Aphidula nasturtii, Aphis spp. such as A. craccivora, A. fabae, A. forbesi, A. gossypii, A. grossulariae, A. maidiradicis, A. pomi, A. sambuci, A. Schneider/, A. spiraeco/a; Arbor/d/a apica/is, Ar/ius cr/tatus, Aspidiella spp., Aspidiotus spp., Atanus spp., Aulacaspis yasumatsui, Aulacorthum solani, Bactericera cockerelli (Paratrioza cockerel I i), Bemisia spp. such as B. argentifolii, B. tabaci (Aleurodes tabaci); Blissus spp. such as B. leu- copterus; Brachycaudus spp. such as B. cardui, B. helichrysi, B. persicae, B. prunicola; Brachy- co/us spp., Brachycorynella asparagi, Brevicoryne brassicae, Cacopsylla spp. such as C. fulgu- ralis, C. pyricola (Psylla piri); Calligypona marginata, Calocoris spp., Campylomma livida, Capi- tophorus horn/, Carneocephala fulgida, Cavelerius spp., Ceraplastes spp., Ceratovacuna lanig- era, Ceropiastes ceriferus, Cerosipha gossypii, Chaetosiphon fragaefoiii, Chionaspis tegaiensis, Chlorita onukii, Chromaphis juglandicola, Chrysomphalus ficus, Cicadulina mbila, Cimex spp. such as C hemipterus, C lectularius; Coccomytilus halli, Coccus spp. such as C. hesperidum, C. pseudomagnoliarum, Corythucha arcuata, Creontiades dilutus, Cryptomyzus ribis,

Chrysomphalus aonidum, Cryptomyzus ribis, Ctenarytaina spatuiata, Cyrtopeitis notatus, Dalbu- lus spp., Dasynus piperis, Dialeurodes spp. such as D. citrifolii; Dalbulus maidis, Diaphorina spp. such as D. citri; Diaspis spp. such as D. bromeiiae; Dicheiops furcatus, Diconocoris hewet- ti, Dora/is spp., Dreyfus/a nordmann/anae, Dreyfus/a piceae, Drosicha spp., Dysaph/s spp. such as D. plantaginea, D. pyri, D. radicola; Dysaulacorthum pseudosolani, Dysdercus spp. such as

D. cingulatus, D. intermedius; Dysmicoccus spp., Edessa spp., Geocoris spp., Empoasca spp. such as E. fabae, E. soiana; Epidiaspis leperii, Eriosoma spp. such as E. lanigerum, E. pyricola; Erythroneura spp., Eurygaster spp. such as E. integriceps; Euscelis bilobatus, Euschistus spp. such as E. heros, E. impictiventris, E. servus; Fiorinia theae, Geococcus coffeae, Glycaspis brimblecombei, Halyomorpha spp. such as H. halys; Heliopeltis spp., Homalodisca vitripennis (=H. coagulata), Horcias nobilellus, Hyalopterus pruni, Hyperomyzus lactucae, lcerya spp. such as I. purchase; Idiocerus spp., Idioscopus spp., Laodelphax striatellus, Lecanium spp.,

Lecanoideus floccissimus, Lepidosaphes spp. such as L. ulmi; Leptocorisa spp., Leptoglossus phyllopus, Lipaphis erysimi, Lygus spp. such as L. hesperus, L. lineolaris, L. pratensis; Ma- conellicoccus hirsutus, Marchalina hellenica, Macropes excavatus, Macrosiphum spp. such as M. rosae, M. a venae, M. euph orb/a e; Macrosteles quadrilineatus, Mahanarva fimbriolata, Meg- acopta cribraria, Megoura viciae, Melanaphis pyrarius, Melanaphis sacchari, Melanocallis (=Tinocallis) caryaefoliae, Metca fie/la spp., Metopolophium dirhodum, Monellia costalis, Monel- liopsis pecanis, Myzocallis coryli, Murgantia spp., Myzus spp. such as M. ascalonicus, M.

cerasi, M. nicotianae, M. persicae, M. varians; Nasonovia ribis-nigri, Neotoxoptera formosana, Neomegalotomus spp, Nephotettix spp. such as N. malayanus, N. nigropictus, N. parvus, N. virescens; Nezara spp. such as N. viridula; Nilaparvata lugens, Nysius huttoni, Oebalus spp. such as O. pugnax; Oncometopia spp., Orthezia praelonga, Oxycaraenus hyalinipennis, Para- bemisia myricae, Parlatoria spp., Parthenolecanium spp. such as P. corn/, P. persicae; Pemphigus spp. such as P. bursar/us, P. populivenae; Peregrinus maidis, Perkinsiella saccharic/da, Phenacoccus spp. such as P. aceris, P. gossypii; Ph/oeomyzus passer/nil, Phorodon humu/i, Phylloxera spp. such as P. devastatrix, Piesma quadrata, Piezodorus spp. such as P. guildinii; Pinnaspis aspidistrae, Planococcus spp. such as P. citri, P. ficus; Prosapia bicincta, Protopulvi- naria pyri form is, Psallus seriatus, Pseudacysta per sea, Pseudaulacaspis pentagona, Pseudo- coccus spp. such as P. comstocki; Psylla spp. such as P. mali; Pteromalus spp., Pulvinaria amygdali, Pyrilla spp., Quadraspidiotus spp., such as Q. perniciosus; Quesada gigas, Rastro- coccus spp., Reduvius senilis, Rhizoecus americanus, Rhodnius spp., Rhopalomyzus ascalonicus, Rhopalosiphum spp. such as R. pseudobrassicas, R. insertum, R. maidis, R. pad/; Saga- todes spp., Sahlbergella singularis, Saissetia spp., Sappaphis mala, Sappaph/s mail, Scapto- cor/s spp., Scaphoides titanus, Schizaphis graminum, Schizoneura lanuginosa, Scotinophora spp., Selenaspidus articulatus, Sitobion avenae, Sogata spp., Sogatella furcifera, Solubea insu- laris, Spissistilus festinus (=Stictocephala festina), Stephanitis nashi, Stephanitis pyrioides, Stephanitis takeyai, Tenalaphara malayensis, Tetraleurodes perseae, Therioaphis maculate, Thyanta spp. such as T. accerra, T. perditor; Tibraca spp., Tomaspis spp., Toxoptera spp. such as T. aurantii; Trialeurodes spp. such as T. abutilonea, T. ricini, T. vaporariorum; Triatoma spp., Trioza spp., Typhlocyba spp., Unaspis spp. such as U. citri, U. yanonensis; and Viteus vitifolii, Insects from the order Hymenoptera for example Acanthomyops interjectus, Athaiia rosae, Atta spp. such as A. capiguara, A. cephalotes, A. cephalotes, A. laevigata, A. robusta, A. sexdens, A. texana, Bombus spp., Brachymyrmex spp., Camponotus spp. such as C. floridanus, C.

pennsylvanicus, C. modoc; Cardiocondyla nuda, Chalibion sp, Crematogaster spp., Dasymutilla occidentalis, Diprion spp., Dolichovespula maculata, Dorymyrmex spp., Dryocosmus kuriphilus, Formica spp., Hoplocampa spp. such as H. minuta, H. testudinea; Iridomyrmex humilis, Lasius spp. such as L. niger, Linepithema humile, Liometopum spp., Leptocybe invasa, Monomorium spp. such as M. pharaonis, Monomorium, Nylandria fulva, Pachycondyla chinensis, Paratre- china longicornis, Paravespula spp., such as P. germanica, P. pennsylvanica, P. vulgaris; Phei- dole spp. such as P. megacephala; Pogonomyrmex spp. such as P. barbatus, P. californicus, Polistes rubiginosa, Prenolepis impairs, Pseudomyrmex gracilis, Schelipron spp., Sirex cya- neus, Solenopsis spp. such as S. geminata, S.invicta, S. molesta, S. richteri, S. xy/oni, Sphe- cius speciosus, Sphex spp., Tapinoma spp. such as T. melanocephalum, T. sessile; Tetramori- um spp. such as T. caespitum, T. bicarinatum, Vespa spp. such as V. crabro; Vespula spp. such as V. squamosal; Wasmannia auropunctata, Xylocopa sp;

Insects from the order Orthoptera for example Acheta domesticus, Calliptamus italicus, Chor- toicetes terminifera, Ceuthophilus spp., Diastrammena asynamora, Dociostaurus maroccanus, Gryllotalpa spp. such as G. africana, G. gryllotalpa; Gryllus spp., Hieroglyphus daganensis, Kraussaria angulifera, Locusta spp. such as L. migratoria, L. pardalina; Melanoplus spp. such as M. bivittatus, M. femurrubrum, M. m ex/can us, M. sanguinipes, M. spretus; Nomadacris sep- temfasciata, Oedaleus senegalensis, Scapteriscus spp., Schistocerca spp. such as S. america- na, S. gregaria, Stemopelmatus spp., Tachycines asynamorus, and Zonozerus variegatus; Pests from the Class Arachnida for example Acari,e.g. of the families Argasidae, Ixodidae and Sarcoptidae, such as Amblyomma spp. (e.g. A. americanum, A. variegatum, A. maculatum), Argas spp. such as A. persicu), Boophilus spp. such as B. annulatus, B. decoloratus, B. mi- croplus, Dermacentor spp. such as D.siivarum, D. andersoni, D. variabilis, Hyalomma spp. such as H. truncatum, Ixodes spp. such as /. ricinus, I. rubicundus, I. scapularis, I. holocyclus, I.

pacificus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ornithodorus spp. such as O. moubata, O. hermsi, O. turicata, Ornithonyssus bacoti, Otobius megnini, Dermanyssus gallinae, Psoroptes spp. such as P. ovis, Rhipicephalus spp. such as R. sanguineus, R. appendiculatus, Rhipicephalus everts/, Rhizoglyphus spp., Sarcoptes spp. such asS. Scabiei, and Family Eriophyidae including Acer/a spp. such as A. she/doni, A. anthocoptes, A callitus spp., Aculops spp. such as A. lycopersici, A. pelekassi, Aculus spp. such as A. schlechtendali; Colomerus vitis, Epitrimerus pyri, Phyllo- coptruta oleivora; Eriophytes ribis and Eriophyes spp. such as Er/ophyes she/doni, Family Tar- sonemidae including Hemitarsonem us spp., Phytonemus pallidus and Polyphagotarsonemus latus, Stenotarsonemus spp. Steneotarsonemus spinki, Family Tenuipalpidae including Brevi- palpus spp. such as B. phoenicis, Family Tetranychidae including Eotetranychus spp., Eute- tranychus spp., Oligonychus spp., Petrobia latens, Tetranychus spp. such as T. cinnabarinus, T. evansi, T. kanzawai, T, pacificus, T. phaseulus, T. telarius and T. urticae; Bryobia praetiosar, Panonychus spp. such as P. ulmi, P. citri, Metatetranychus spp. and Oligonychus spp. such as O. pratensis, O. perseae, Vasates lycopersici, Raoiella indica, /¾/77// Carpoglyphidae including Carpoglyphus spp.; Penthaleidae spp. such as a/otydeus destructor, Family Demodicidae with species such as Demodexspp:, Family Trombicidea including Trombicula spp:, Family Macro- nyssidae including Ornothonyssus spp:, Family Pyemotidae including Pyemotes tritici, Tyropha- gus putrescentiae, Family Acaridae including Acarus siro; Family Araneida including Latrodec- tus mactans, Tegenaria agrestis, Chiracanthium sp, Lycosa sp Achaearanea tepidariorum and Loxosceles reclusa,

Pests from the Phylum Nematoda, for example, plant parasitic nematodes such as root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp. such as M. hapla, M. incognita, M. javanica; cyst-forming nematodes, Globodera spp. such as G. rostochiensis; Heterodera spp. such as H. avenae, H. glycines, H. schachtii, H. trifo/ii; Seed gall nematodes, Anguina spp.; Stem and foliar nematodes, Aphelenchoides spp. such as A. besseyi; Sting nematodes, Belonolaimus spp. such as B. lon- gicaudatus; Pine nematodes, Bursaphelenchus spp. such as B. lignicolus, B. xylophilus; Ring nematodes, Criconema pp., Criconemella spp. such as C. xenoplax and C. ornata; and, Criconemoides spp. such as Criconemoides in formis; Mesocriconema spp.; Stem and bulb nematodes, Ditylenchus spp. such as D. destructor, D. dipsaci; Awl nematodes, Dolichodorus spp.; Spiral nematodes, Heliocotylenchus multicinctus; Sheath and sheathoid nematodes, Hem- icycliophora spp. and Hemicriconemoides spp. ; Hirshmanniella spp.; Lance nematodes, Hop- loaimus spp.; False rootknot nematodes, Nacobbus spp.; Needle nematodes, Longidorus spp. such as L. elongatus; Lesion nematodes, Pratylenchus spp. such as P. brachyurus, P. neglec- tus, P. penetrans, P. curvitatus, P. goodeyi; Burrowing nematodes, Radopholus spp. such as R. similis; Rhadopholus spp.; Rhodopholus spp.; Reniform nematodes, Rotylenchus spp. such as R. robustus, R. reniformis; Scutellonema spp.; Stubby-root nematode, Trichodorus spp. such as T. obtusus, T. primitivus; Paratrichodorus spp. such as P. minor; Stunt nematodes, Tylencho- rhynchus spp. such as T. c/aytoni, T. dub/us; Citrus nematodes, Tylenchulus spp. such as 7^ semipenetrans; Dagger nematodes, Xiphinema spp.; and other plant parasitic nematode species;

Insects from the order Isoptera for example Calotermes flavicollis, Coptotermes spp. such as C. formosanus, C. gestroi, C. acinaciformis; Cornitermes cumulans, Cryptotermes spp. such as C. brevis, C. cavifrons; Giobitermes suifureus, Heterotermes spp. such as H. aureus, H. longiceps, H. tenuis; Leucotermes flavipes, Odontotermes spp., I ncisitermes spp. such as /. minor, I.

Snyder, Marginitermes hubbardi, Ma stotermes spp. such as M. darwiniensis Neocapritermes spp. such as N. opacus, N. parvus; Neotermes spp., Procornitermes spp., Zootermopsis spp. such as Z. angusticollis, Z. nevadensis, Reticulitermes spp. such as R. hesperus, R. tibialis, R. speratus, R. flavipes, R. grassei, R. lucifugus, R. santonensis, R. virginicus; Termes natalensis, Insects from the order Blattaria for example Blatta spp. such as B. orientalis, B. lateralis; Blattel- la spp. such as B. asahinae, B. germanica; Leucophaea maderae, Panchlora nivea, Peripianeta spp. such as P. americana, P. australasiae, P. brunnea, P. fuligginosa, P. japonica; Supella longipalpa, Parcoblatta pennsylvanica, Eurycotis floridana, Pycnoscelus surinamensis,

Insects from the order Siphonoptera for example Cediopsylla simples, Ceratophyllus spp., Ctenocephalides spp. such as C. felis, C. cam ' s, Xenopsylla cheopis, Pulex irritans, Tr/ ' cho- dectes cam ' s, Tung a penetrans, and Nosopsyllus fascia tus,

Insects from the order Thysanura for example Lepisma saccharina , Ctenolepisma urbana, and Thermobia domestica,

Pests from the class Chilopoda for example Geophilus spp., Scutigera spp. such as Scutigera coleoptrata, Pests from the class Diplopoda for example Blaniulus guttulatus, Ju/us spp., Narceus spp., Pests from the class Symphyla for example Scutigerella immaculata,

Insects from the order Dermaptera, for example Forficula auricularia,

Insects from the order Collembola, for example Onychiurus spp., such as Onychiurus armatus, Pests from the order Isopoda for example, Armadillidium vulgare, Oniscus asellus, Porcellio scaber,

Insects from the order Phthiraptera, for example Damalinia spp., Pediculus spp. such as Pe- diculus human us capitis, Pediculus human us corporis, Pediculus human us humanus; Pthirus pubis, Haematopinus spp. such as Haematopinus eurysternus, Haematopinus suis,

Linognathus spp. such as Linognathus vituli; Bovicola bovis, Menopon gallinae, Menacanthus stramineus and Solenopotes capillatus, Trichodectes spp.,

Examples of further pest species which may be controlled by compounds of fomula (I) include: from the Phylum Mollusca, class Bivalvia, for example, Dreissena spp.; class Gastropoda, for example, Arion spp., Biomphalaria spp., Bulinus spp., Deroceras spp., Ga/ba spp., Lymnaea spp., Oncomelania spp., Pomacea canaliclata, Succinea spp.; from the class of the helminths, for example, Ancylostoma duodenale, Ancylostoma ceyianicum, Acyiostoma braziiiensis, Ancylostoma spp., Ascaris lubricoides, Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Brugia timori, Bunostomum spp., Chabertia spp., Clonorchis spp., Cooper/a spp., Dicrocoelium spp., Dictyocaulus filaria, Diphyl- lobothrium latum, Dracuncuius medinensis, Echinococcus granulosus, Echinococcus multilocu- laris, Enterobius vermicularis, Faciola spp., Haemonchus spp. such as Haemonchus contortus; Heterakis spp., Hymenolepis nana, Hyostrongulus spp., Loa Loa, Nematodirus spp., Oesoph- agostomum spp., Opisthorchis spp., Onchocerca volvulus, Ostertagia spp., Paragonim us spp., Schistosomen spp., Strongyloides fuelleborni, Strongyloides stercora lis, Stronyloides spp., Taenia saginata, Taenia solium, Trichinella spiralis, Trichinella nativa, Trichinella britovi, Trichi- nella nelsoni, Trichinella pseudopsiralis, Trichostrongulus spp., Trichuris trichuria, Wuchereria bancrofti.

The inventive mixture can be applied to any and all developmental stages of pests, such as egg, larva, pupa, and adult. The pests may be controlled by contacting the target pest, its food supply, habitat, breeding ground or its locus with a pesticidally effective amount of the inventive mixtures or of compositions comprising the mixtures.

"Locus" means a plant, plant propagation material (preferably seed), soil, area, material or environment in which a pest is growing or may grow. In general, "pesticidally effective amount" means the amount of the inventive mixtures or of compositions comprising the mixtures needed to achieve an observable effect on growth, including the effects of necrosis, death, retardation, prevention, and removal, destruction, or otherwise diminishing the occurrence and activity of the target organism. The pesticidally effective amount can vary for the various mixtures / compositions used in the invention. A pesticidally effective amount of the mixtures / compositions will also vary according to the prevailing conditions such as desired pesticidal effect and duration, weather, target species, locus, mode of application, and the like. As said above, the present invention comprises a method for improving the health of plants, wherein the plant, the locus where the plant is growing or is expected to grow or plant propagation material, from which the plant grows, is treated with an plant health effective amount of an inventive mixture.

The term "plant effective amount" denotes an amount of the inventive mixtures, which is sufficient for achieving plant health effects as defined herein below. More exemplary information about amounts, ways of application and suitable ratios to be used is given below. Anyway, the skilled artisan is well aware of the fact that such an amount can vary in a broad range and is dependent on various factors, e.g. the treated cultivated plant or material and the climatic conditions.

When preparing the mixtures, it is preferred to employ the pure active compounds, to which further active compounds against pests, such as insecticides, herbicides, fungicides or else herbicidal or growth-regulating active compounds or fertilizers can be added as further active components according to need.

The inventive mixtures are employed by treating the pests or the plants, plant propagation materials (preferably seeds), materials or soil to be protected from fungal attack with a pesticidally effective amount of the active compounds. The application can be carried out both before and after the infection of the materials, plants or plant propagation materials (preferably seeds) by the pests.

In the context of the present invention, the term plant refers to an entire plant, a part of the plant or the propagation material of the plant.

The inventive mixtures and compositions thereof are particularly important in the control of a multitude of phytopathogenic fungi and/or harmful insects on various cultivated plants, such as cereals, e. g. wheat, rye, barley, triticale, oats or rice; beet, e. g. sugar beet or fodder beet; fruits, such as pomes, stone fruits or soft fruits, e. g. apples, pears, plums, peaches, almonds, cherries, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries or gooseberries; leguminous plants, such as lentils, peas, alfalfa or soybeans; oil plants, such as rape, mustard, olives, sunflowers, coconut, cocoa beans, castor oil plants, oil palms, ground nuts or soybeans; cucurbits, such as squashes, cucumber or melons; fiber plants, such as cotton, flax, hemp or jute; citrus fruit, such as or- anges, lemons, grapefruits or mandarins; vegetables, such as spinach, lettuce, asparagus, cabbages, carrots, onions, tomatoes, potatoes, cucurbits or paprika; lauraceous plants, such as avocados, cinnamon or camphor; energy and raw material plants, such as corn, soybean, rape, sugar cane or oil palm; corn; tobacco; nuts; coffee; tea; bananas; vines (Table grapes and grape juice grape vines); hop; turf; sweet leaf (also called Stevia); natural rubber plants or or- namental and forestry plants, such as flowers, shrubs, broad-leaved trees or evergreens, e. g. conifers; and on the plant propagation material, such as seeds, and the crop material of these plants.

Preferably, the inventive mixtures and compositions thereof, respectively are used for con- trolling a multitude of fungi on field crops, such as potatoes, sugar beets, tobacco, wheat, rye, barley, oats, rice, corn, cotton, soybeans, rape, legumes, sunflowers, coffee or sugar cane; fruits; vines; ornamentals; or vegetables, such as cucumbers, tomatoes, beans or squashes.

Preferably, treatment of plant propagation materials with the inventive mixtures and compo- sitions thereof, respectively, is used for controlling a multitude of fungi on cereals, such as wheat, rye, barley and oats; potatoes, tomatoes, vines, rice, corn, cotton and soybeans.

The term "cultivated plants" is to be understood as including plants which have been modified by breeding, mutagenesis or genetic engineering including but not limiting to agricultural biotech products on the market or in development (cf. http://cera-gmc.org/, see GM crop data- base therein). Genetically modified plants are plants, which genetic material has been so modified by the use of recombinant DNA techniques that under natural circumstances cannot readily be obtained by cross breeding, mutations or natural recombination. Typically, one or more genes have been integrated into the genetic material of a genetically modified plant in order to improve certain properties of the plant. Such genetic modifications also include but are not lim- ited to targeted post-translational modification of protein(s), oligo- or polypeptides e. g. by gly- cosylation or polymer additions such as prenylated, acetylated or farnesylated moieties or PEG moieties.

Plants that have been modified by breeding, mutagenesis or genetic engineering, e. g. have been rendered tolerant to applications of specific classes of herbicides, such as auxin herbi- cides such as dicamba or 2,4-D; bleacher herbicides such as hydroxylphenylpyruvate dioxy- genase (HPPD) inhibitors or phytoene desaturase (PDS) inhibitors; acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors such as sulfonyl ureas or imidazolinones; enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) inhibitors, such as glyphosate; glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitors such as glufosinate; protoporphyrinogen-IX oxidase inhibitors; lipid biosynthesis inhibitors such as acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors; or oxynil (i. e. bromoxynil or ioxynil) herbicides as a result of conventional methods of breeding or genetic engineering. Furthermore, plants have been made resistant to multiple classes of herbicides through multiple genetic modifications, such as resistance to both glyphosate and glufosinate or to both glyphosate and a herbicide from another class such as ALS inhibitors, HPPD inhibitors, auxin herbicides, or ACCase inhibitors. These herbicide resistance technologies are e. g. described in Pest Management Sci. 61 , 2005, 246; 61 , 2005, 258; 61 , 2005, 277; 61 , 2005, 269; 61 , 2005, 286; 64, 2008, 326; 64, 2008, 332;

Weed Sci. 57, 2009, 108; Austral. J. Agricult. Res. 58, 2007, 708; Science 316, 2007, 1 185; and references quoted therein. Several cultivated plants have been rendered tolerant to herbicides by conventional methods of breeding (mutagenesis), e. g. Clearfield ® summer rape (Canola, BASF SE, Germany) being tolerant to imidazolinones, e. g. imazamox, or ExpressSun ® sunflowers (DuPont, USA) being tolerant to sulfonyl ureas, e. g. tribenuron. Genetic engineering methods have been used to render cultivated plants such as soybean, cotton, corn, beets and rape, tolerant to herbicides such as glyphosate and glufosinate, some of which are commercially available under the trade names RoundupReady ® (glyphosate-tolerant, Monsanto, U.S.A.), Cultivance ® (imidazolinone tolerant, BASF SE, Germany) and LibertyLink ® (glufosinate-tolerant, Bayer CropScience, Germany).

Furthermore, plants are also covered that are by the use of recombinant DNA techniques capable to synthesize one or more insecticidal proteins, especially those known from the bacte- rial genus Bacillus, particularly from Bacillus thuringiensis, such as δ-endotoxins, e. g. CrylA(b), CrylA(c), CrylF, CrylF(a2), CryllA(b), CrylllA, CrylllB(bl ) or Cry9c; vegetative insecticidal proteins (VIP), e. g. VIP1 , VIP2, VIP3 or VIP3A; insecticidal proteins of bacteria colonizing nematodes, e. g. Photorhabdus spp. or Xenorfiabdus spp.; toxins produced by animals, such as scorpion toxins, arachnid toxins, wasp toxins, or other insect-specific neurotoxins; toxins produced by fungi, such Streptomycetes toxins, plant lectins, such as pea or barley lectins; agglutinins; proteinase inhibitors, such as trypsin inhibitors, serine protease inhibitors, patatin, cystatin or papain inhibitors; ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP), such as ricin, maize-RIP, abrin, luffin, saporin or bryodin; steroid metabolism enzymes, such as 3-hydroxysteroid oxidase, ecdyster- oid-IDP-glycosyl-transferase, cholesterol oxidases, ecdysone inhibitors or HMG-CoA-reductase; ion channel blockers, such as blockers of sodium or calcium channels; juvenile hormone esterase; diuretic hormone receptors (helicokinin receptors); stilben synthase, bibenzyl synthase, chitinases or glucanases. In the context of the present invention these insecticidal proteins or toxins are to be understood expressly also as pre-toxins, hybrid proteins, truncated or otherwise modified proteins. Hybrid proteins are characterized by a new combination of protein domains, (see, e. g. WO 02/015701 ). Further examples of such toxins or genetically modified plants capable of synthesizing such toxins are disclosed, e. g., in EP-A 374 753, WO 93/007278, WO 95/34656, EP-A 427 529, EP-A 451 878, WO 03/18810 und WO 03/52073. The methods for producing such genetically modified plants are generally known to the person skilled in the art and are described, e. g. in the publications mentioned above. These insecticidal proteins contained in the genetically modified plants impart to the plants producing these proteins tolerance to harmful pests from all taxonomic groups of athropods, especially to beetles (Coelop- tera), two-winged insects (Diptera), and moths (Lepidoptera) and to nematodes (Nematoda). Genetically modified plants capable to synthesize one or more insecticidal proteins are, e. g., described in the publications mentioned above, and some of which are commercially available such as YieldGard ® (corn cultivars producing the CrylAb toxin), YieldGard ® Plus (corn cultivars producing CrylAb and Cry3Bb1 toxins), Starlink ® (corn cultivars producing the Cry9c toxin), Herculex ® RW (corn cultivars producing Cry34Ab1 , Cry35Ab1 and the enzyme Phosphinothri- cin-N-Acetyltransferase [PAT]); NuCOTN ® 33B (cotton cultivars producing the CrylAc toxin), Bollgard ® I (cotton cultivars producing the CrylAc toxin), Bollgard ® II (cotton cultivars producing CrylAc and Cry2Ab2 toxins); VIPCOT ® (cotton cultivars producing a VIP-toxin); NewLeaf ® (potato cultivars producing the Cry3A toxin); Bt-Xtra ® , NatureGard ® , KnockOut ® , BiteGard ® , Pro- tecta ® , Bt1 1 (e. g. Agrisure ® CB) and Bt176 from Syngenta Seeds SAS, France, (corn cultivars producing the CrylAb toxin and PAT enyzme), MIR604 from Syngenta Seeds SAS, France (corn cultivars producing a modified version of the Cry3A toxin, c.f. WO 03/018810), MON 863 from Monsanto Europe S.A., Belgium (corn cultivars producing the Cry3Bb1 toxin), IPC 531 from Monsanto Europe S.A., Belgium (cotton cultivars producing a modified version of the CrylAc toxin) and 1507 from Pioneer Overseas Corporation, Belgium (corn cultivars producing the Cry1 F toxin and PAT enzyme).

Furthermore, plants are also covered that are by the use of recombinant DNA techniques capable to synthesize one or more proteins to increase the resistance or tolerance of those plants to bacterial, viral or fungal pathogens. Examples of such proteins are the so-called "path- ogenesis-related proteins" (PR proteins, see, e. g. EP-A 392 225), plant disease resistance genes (e. g. potato cultivars, which express resistance genes acting against Phytophthora in- festans derived from the mexican wild potato Solanum bulbocastanum) or T4-lysozym (e. g. potato cultivars capable of synthesizing these proteins with increased resistance against bacteria such as Erwinia amylvora). The methods for producing such genetically modified plants are generally known to the person skilled in the art and are described, e. g. in the publications mentioned above.

Furthermore, plants are also covered that are by the use of recombinant DNA techniques capable to synthesize one or more proteins to increase the productivity (e. g. bio mass production, grain yield, starch content, oil content or protein content), tolerance to drought, salinity or other growth-limiting environmental factors or tolerance to pests and fungal, bacterial or viral pathogens of those plants.

Furthermore, plants are also covered that contain by the use of recombinant DNA techniques a modified amount of substances of content or new substances of content, specifically to improve human or animal nutrition, e. g. oil crops that produce health-promoting long-chain omega-3 fatty acids or unsaturated omega-9 fatty acids (e. g. Nexera ® rape, DOW Agro Sciences, Canada).

Furthermore, plants are also covered that contain by the use of recombinant DNA techniques a modified amount of substances of content or new substances of content, specifically to improve raw material production, e. g. potatoes that produce increased amounts of amylopectin (e. g. Amflora ® potato, BASF SE, Germany).

The separate or joint application of the compounds of the inventive mixtures is carried out by spraying or dusting the seeds, the seedlings, the plants or the soils before or after sowing of the plants or before or after emergence of the plants.

The inventive mixtures and the compositions comprising them can be used for protecting wooden materials such as trees, board fences, sleepers, etc. and buildings such as houses, outhouses, factories, but also construction materials, furniture, leathers, fibers, vinyl articles, electric wires and cables etc. from ants and/or termites, and for controlling ants and termites from doing harm to crops or human being (e.g. when the pests invade into houses and public facilities).

Customary application rates in the protection of materials are, for example, from 0.01 g to 1000 g of active compound per m 2 treated material, desirably from 0.1 g to 50 g per m 2 .

For use in spray compositions, the content of the mixture of the active ingredients is from 0.001 to 80 weights %, preferably from 0.01 to 50 weight % and most preferably from 0.01 to 15 weight %.