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Title:
PIPE MACHINING DEVICE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2009/099782
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Pipe machining device in the form of a pipe cutting device, pipe gripping device, or pipe rectangular end facing device, including a non-rotating fixed or positionable gripping device (2) for gripping a pipe to be machined; a rotatable machining device (4), that is mechanically connected to the gripping device (2), but is placed so that it can be rotated at least 360° relative to the gripping device (2), around a rotation axis (10) that is aligned with a pipe center axis of the pipe to be machined, defined by the gripping device (2); a rotatable, motor-drivable tool shaft (20) for the tool (24) that machines the pipe, placed in the rotatable machining device (4); distinguished in that the rotatable machining device (4) is equipped with a cold-air blower device (60) that has a pressurized air inlet (68) and a pressurized air outlet such that the pressurized air outlet is used as a cold air outlet (62) and directed onto the part of the tool (24) that contacts the pipe during machining, blowing the tool (24) with cold pressurized air.

Inventors:
CAGLAR, Hasan (3600 West Lake Avenue, Glenview, Illinois, 60026, US)
SULLIVAN, William (3600 West Lake Avenue, Glenview, Illinois, 60026, US)
Application Number:
US2009/031942
Publication Date:
August 13, 2009
Filing Date:
January 26, 2009
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
ILLINOIS TOOL WORKS INC. (3600 West Lake Avenue, Glenview, Illinois, 60026, US)
CAGLAR, Hasan (3600 West Lake Avenue, Glenview, Illinois, 60026, US)
SULLIVAN, William (3600 West Lake Avenue, Glenview, Illinois, 60026, US)
International Classes:
B23D45/12; F25B9/04
Domestic Patent References:
WO2002016876A2
Foreign References:
DE10352890A1
DE3128893A1
Other References:
See also references of EP 2262602A1
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HAUPTMAN, Benjamin, J. (LOWE HAUPTMAN HAM & BERNER, LLP1700 Diagonal Road, Suite 30, Alexandria Virginia, 22314, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Patent Claims

1. Pipe machining device in the form of a pipe cutting device, pipe gripping device, or pipe rectangular end facing device, including a non- rotating fixed or positional gripping device (2) for gripping a pipe to be machined; a rotatable machining device (4), that is mechanically connected to the gripping device (2), but is placed so that it can be rotated at least 360° relative to the gripping device (2), around a rotation axis (10) that is aligned with a pipe center axis of the pipe to be machined, defined by the gripping device (2); a rotatable, motor- drivable tool shaft (20) for the tool (24) that machines the pipe, placed in the rotatable machining device (4); distinguished in that the rotatable machining device (4) is equipped with a cold air blower device (60; 94) that has a pressurized air inlet (68) and a pressurized air outlet such that the pressurized air outlet is used as a cold air outlet (62) and directed onto the part of the tool (24) that contacts the pipe during machining, blowing the tool (24) with cold pressurized air.

2. Pipe machining device as in Claim 1, distinguished in that a flexible pressurized air hose (66), one end of which is connected to the pressurized air inlet (68) of the cold air blowing device (60; 94), and whose other end is connected to or can be connected to a pressurized air source (70) that is separate from the rotatable machining device (4).

3. Pipe machining device as in one of the preceding claims, distinguished in that the cold air blower device (60) has a vortex tube (72), fastened to the rotatable machining device (4), that works according to the vortex tube principle to separate a pressurized air current into a warm air current and

a cold air current, wherein the vortex tube (72) has a vortex generation chamber (76), a warm air outlet (86), and a cold air outlet (80) axially opposed to the warm air outlet (86), both of which exit from the vortex generation chamber (76), such that the pressurized air inlet (68) empties into the vortex generation chamber (76), and the cold air outlet (80), or the outlet of a cold air outlet pipe (81) extending from the cold air outlet (80) and functioning as a cold air outlet (62), is directed onto the part of the tool (24) that contacts the pipe during machining, so that it blows on the tool (24).

4. Pipe machining device as in Claim 1 or 2, distinguished in that a cooling device (96) for cooling the pressurized air is provided, and is connected to the cold air blower device (94) at the pressurized air intake (68).

5. Pipe machining device as in one of the preceding claims, distinguished in that the cold air outlet (62) is also directed toward the machining area of the pipe, where the tool (24) is machining the pipe, so that this machining area is also blown with cold air.

6. Pipe machining device as in one of the preceding claims, distinguished in that the rotatable machining device (4) has a handgrip (26, 28, 30), used to rotate the device manually at least 360° around the aforementioned rotation axis (10), as described above.

Description:

PIPE MACHINING DEVICE

The invention consists of a pipe machining device in the form of a pipe cutting device, pipe gripping device, or pipe rectangular end facing device as described in Claim 1.

Examples of this type of pipe cutting device are described in the following documents: CH 372 202, DE 101 34 269 B4, EP 1 138 125 Bl, US 2005/0097752 Al. Examples of a device for machining pipe ends are described in DE 101 20 185 B4, EP 0 855 944 Bl, US 6 637 304 B2, and US 6 968 761 B2. Pipe end machining can involve beveling and/or rectangular end facing. Rectangular end facing means that the end surface of a pipe is machined in such a way that it is precisely perpendicular to the pipe's lengthwise axis.

DE 30 02 887 Al and DE 30 17 688 Al include examples of vortex tubes that generate a vortex current and separate it into a warm air current and a cold air current, such that the cold air current moves within the warm air current in a direction axially opposed to the warm air current. The principle was discovered in 1930 by French physicist Georges Ranque. The cold air current can be used, when machining workpieces, to cool them and the machine tools used on them while they are milled, drilled, ground, and rotated. To date there are no reports of using vortex tubes to generate cold air for cooling workpieces or machine tools on pipe machining devices where the tool is positioned rotatably in a machining device that itself can be rotated around the pipe that is being machined.

The invention should make it possible to achieve the goal of longer tool use times, with a tool that is positioned so that it can rotate and can also simultaneously be moved at least 360° around the pipe to be machined.

This solution is achieved using the version of the invention described in Claim 1.

Additional versions of the invention are included in the subsequent claims.

During the invention process it was determined that machining, and especially cutting pipes, normally does not cause temperatures high enough to damage the tool, but nonetheless the use time, or lifespan, of the tool can be extended if the tool is cooled during use.

The use of a liquid coolant to cool tools can have the disadvantage that the tool and the workpiece, and often the entire work area, must be cleaned again after cooling, in order to remove the liquid coolant along with any residue of the pipe material and/or abrasion particles from the tool that may be contained in it. In addition, the liquid coolant must be filtered before it can be reused or discarded.

During the invention process it was determined that simply cooling with refrigerated or unrefrigerated cold air can significantly extend the lifespan, or use time, of a machine tool. Pressurized air leaves no dirt behind. Cold air, both refrigerated and not, is already used in areas other than pipe machining equipment. For the aforementioned types of pipe machining devices, the use of a coolant in either liquid or air form had not been suggested to date, which may be due to the lower temperatures involved in pipe machining, but also to the fact that, in the aforementioned types of pipe machining devices, not only can the tool be motor-driven— if it is a circular saw blade, an end cutting disc, or something similar— but the tool shaft itself is located in a machining device that can be moved at least 360° around the pipe, so delivering the coolant is difficult.

The invention provides a simple process and means of cooling the tool and/or the pipe being machined, without requiring rotating elements, regardless of

whether or not the machining device in which the rotating tool is located can itself be rotated around the pipe.

With one previously mentioned advantageous execution form of the invention, a cold air blower device with a vortex tube is located on the rotatable machining device in which the tool is placed. The cold air outlet of the vortex tube, or the outlet of a cold air outlet tube extending from the cold air outlet, is directed toward the tool and/or toward the area of the pipe to be machined. In this version, the cold air blower device also includes a device for cooling the pressurized air used as the cold air supply.

The invention is described below, with reference to the attached drawings and using the previously described execution forms as examples. The drawings show:

Fig. 1 a perspective view of a pipe machining device according to the invention, seen diagonally from the front,

Rg. 2 a front view of the pipe machining device from Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 a vertical axial cross-section along the plane III-III from Fig. 2,

Fig. 4 a cam-type drive for radial movement of a sliding element to which a cutting tool is attached,

Fig. 5 the principle of a vortex tube, which is used to cool pressurized air according to the vortex current principle,

Fig. 6 a schematic of another way to execute the invention, and

Fig. 7 a schematic of yet another way to execute the invention.

The pipe cutting device shown in the drawings includes a gripping device 2, in the form of a vise, for example, for gripping the pipe to be cut, and a machining device 4 for machining a pipe held in the gripping device 2. The machining device 4 includes a guide ring 6, which is connected to the main body 8 of the gripping device 2 in such a way that it cannot move and defines a rotation axis

10 (Fig. 3), around which a rotating body 12 of the machining device 4 attached to the guide ring 6 can be rotated at least 360°. The rotation axis 10 of the rotating body 12 is aligned with the center axis of the pipe to be cut, defined by the gripping device 2.

The rotating body 12 includes a sliding element 14, which slides easily in the rotating body 12 radially to the rotation axis 10 of the rotating body 12. On the sliding element 14 is a tool shaft 20, which is positioned so that it can rotate and which can be driven by a motor 16 through a gear 18. A tool 24 can be attached to the shaft 20 in such a manner that it does not rotate with respect to the shaft, but rotates with it. The rotation axis 22 of the tool shaft 20 is parallel to the rotation axis 10 of the rotating body 12.

The tool 24 is preferably disc-shaped, such as a circular saw blade or an end cutting disc for cutting a pipe. The tool 24 could also be another type of grinding wheel or a different rotating tool for beveling or rectangular end facing of a pipe's end surface.

The drawings show the machining device 4 in a zero rotation direction position.

Here the tool 24 moves radially downward away from the pipe to be cut, and a protrusion 26 connected to the sliding element 14, which contains the motor 16 and a gear 18 or consists at least partially of a motor housing, extends outward and downward from the sliding element 14 like a lever. The protrusion 26 can be provided with one or two grips 28 and 30 on its outer end that is farthest

away from the sliding element 14. The protrusion 26 extends crosswise, preferably radial, to the rotation axis 10 of the rotating body 12.

At the zero rotation direction position shown in the drawings, the sliding element 14 is held by a guide bolt 32 fastened to it in a cam groove 34 of a guide track 36 extending 360° around it. This is shown in the schematic in Fig.

4. The guide bolt 32 is fastened to the sliding element 14. The guide track 36 is located on the guide ring 6 or on a cam disc fastened with a non-rotating connection to the guide ring 6. Segment 37 of the guide track 36 on both sides of the cam groove 34 can be circular, with the circle's center point in the rotation axis 10 of the rotating body 12.

If the rotating body 12 is moved outward from the zero rotation direction position as it rotates around its rotation axis 10, the guide bolt 32 is raised up out from the cam disc 34 on the guide track segment 37, as shown in Fig. 4 at the shaded position 32-2 of the guide bolt 32. The guide track segment 37 has a larger radius than the shaft groove in the cam disc 34. This lifting of the guide bolt 32 out from the cam disc 34 on the radially higher guide track segment 37 causes the sliding element 14 to be lifted up by a corresponding distance, which also lifts the tool 24 into a pipe to be machined, e.g., cut off. With continued rotation of the rotating body 12, the sliding element 14, and the cutting tool around the rotation axis 10 of the rotating body 12— in rotation direction 38, for example— the cutting tool 24 remains in the wall of the pipe being cut, so that the pipe is machined, e.g., cut. At the end of 360° of rotation by the rotating body 12, the guide bolt 32 goes back into the cam disc 34, which makes the tool 24 with the sliding element 14 fall radially away from the pipe. Now the machining device 4 with the rotating body 12 and the tool 24 can either be rotated farther in the same direction or be rotated back in the opposite rotation direction.

These possibilities, described with reference to Fig. 4, for forward radial movement of the tool 24 radially to the pipe to be machined, e.g., cut off, and then away from said pipe are only one of many possible execution forms. Other forms may also be used, depending on the current state of the technology.

The rotation direction 38 of the rotating body 12 together with the sliding element 14 and the tool 24 is preferably opposite to the rotation direction 40 of the tool 24, as shown, for example, in Fig. 2 by arrows 38 and 40. As an example, in the front view of the cutting device 4, the rotation direction 38 of the rotating body 12 is shown as clockwise and the rotation direction 40 of the tool 24 as counterclockwise.

A protective cap 42 can be placed in front of the tool 24, in order to prevent a person from accidentally stopping the tool 24 when the pipe machining device is switched on and to catch chips that are shaved off and thrown away from the pipe by the tool 24.

The protective cap 42 is swivel-mounted on the sliding element 14 around a swivel axis 54 that is parallel to the rotation axis 22 of the tool shaft 20, against the spring tension of a spring (not shown), in the direction away from the rotation axis 10 of the rotating body 12.

If the sliding element 14 together with the tool 24, as they have previously been described, for example, are moved radially, then the tool 24 goes toward the pipe and makes contact with the pipe wall, so that the pipe pushes the protective cap 42 radially away, causing the protective cap 42 to swivel around its swivel axis 54.

According to the invention, the rotatable machining device 4 is equipped with a cold air blower device 60, whose cold air outlet 62 is directed toward the area

where the tool 24 is working and/or toward the machining area of the pipe to be machined by the tool, in order to blow pressurized cold air 64 on it.

The cold air blower device 60 can be integrated into the rotatable machining device 4 or attached to it.

For feeding pressurized air into the pressurized air blower device 60, a flexible pressurized air hose 66 is provided, with one end connected to a pressurized air inlet 68 of the pressurized air blower device 60, and the other end connected or connectable to a pressurized air source 70. The pressurized air source 70 can be a pressure regulator, pressure reducer, pressurized air supply, or air compressor, for example.

The cold air for the invention can be unrefrigerated or, preferably, refrigerated pressurized air.

According to a previously described execution form of the invention, the cold air blower device 60 has a vortex tube 72, which uses the vortex current principle to divide the pressurized air current 74 from the pressurized air inlet 68 into a warm air current (or hot air current) and a cold air current. Fig. 5 in the drawings shows the principle of such a vortex tube 72.

As shown in Fig. 5, the vortex tube 72 contains a vortex generation chamber 76, into which the pressurized air inlet 68 empties. A warm air pipe 78 extends away from the vortex generation chamber 76 in one axial vortex direction, and a cold air outlet channel 80 in the opposite axial vortex direction. The cold air outlet channel 80, as shown in Fig. 5, or an extension 81 from it as shown in Fig. 6, leads to the aforementioned cold air outlet 62. The extension 81 can be a pipe or hose. The pressurized air 74, which flows through the pressurized air inlet 68 in the vortex generation chamber 76, is placed into rotation in the chamber and rotates in an axial direction through the warm air pipe 78, such

that it is pressed against the inner surface of the warm air pipe 78 and heated. At the end of the warm air pipe 78 away from the vortex generation chamber 76, a smaller portion 82 of the warm air vortex current 84 flows out through a warm air outlet 86 from the warm air pipe 78. The remaining portion 88 of the warm air vortex current 84 is channeled back forcibly, rotating at a low speed, through the middle of the warm air vortex current 84 in the opposite axial direction, so that it gives heat to the faster rotating warm air vortex current 84. This makes the back-rotating portion 88 (cold air vortex current) colder than the original pressurized air 74, until it then flows out as cold air 64 through the cold air outlet channel 80 and then from the cold air outlet 62.

The vortex tube 72 is shown with a noise muffler 90.

According to another execution form of the invention, shown schematically in Fig. 7, the cold air blower device can consist of a blower pipe 94 attached to the rotatable machining device 4, one end of which is directed toward the tool 24 and/or toward the pipe to be machined and acts as the cold air outlet 62, and the other end of which is connected via a pressurized air hose 66 to a pressurized air source 70. Between the pressurized air source 70 and the pressurized air hose 66, a cooling device 96 can be attached for cooling the pressurized air.

At the location of a blower pipe 94, a nozzle fitting can be provided in the rotatable machining device 4, whose nozzle outlet acts as the cold air outlet 62.