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Title:
A POLYGENE INFLUENZA VACCINE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/081750
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention relates to a nucleic acid vaccine. Specifically, the use of a single nucleic acid sequence comprising combinations of influenza genes coding for selected hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), matrix protein 1 (M1), matrix protein 2 (M2) and nucleoprotein (NP) interspaced with selected linkers comprising cleavage sites to produce individual proteins, together forming one polyvalent influenza vaccine for use in medicine for humans and animals.

Inventors:
POLACEK, Charlotta (Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen S, 2300, DK)
FOMSGAARD, Anders (Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen S, 2300, DK)
Application Number:
EP2018/079481
Publication Date:
May 02, 2019
Filing Date:
October 26, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
STATENS SERUM INSTITUT (Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen S, 2300, DK)
International Classes:
A61K39/12; A61P31/16
Domestic Patent References:
WO2010060430A22010-06-03
WO2006053871A22006-05-26
WO2016174408A12016-11-03
WO2018013704A12018-01-18
WO2016041562A12016-03-24
WO2008145129A22008-12-04
WO2010060430A22010-06-03
Other References:
ALFRED T. HARDING ET AL: "Rationally Designed Influenza Virus Vaccines That Are Antigenically Stable during Growth in Eggs", MBIO, vol. 8, no. 3, 5 July 2017 (2017-07-05), US, pages e00669 - 17, XP055452815, ISSN: 2150-7511, DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00669-17
YUNG-YI C. MOSLEY ET AL: "Eliciting specific humoral immunity from a plasmid DNA encoding infectious bursal disease virus polyprotein gene fused with avian influenza virus hemagglutinin gene", JOURNAL OF VIROLOGICAL METHODS, vol. 211, 1 January 2015 (2015-01-01), NL, pages 36 - 42, XP055532118, ISSN: 0166-0934, DOI: 10.1016/j.jviromet.2014.10.011
DE FELIPE PABLO: "Skipping the co-expression problem: the new 2A "CHYSEL" technology", GENETIC VACCINES AND THERAPY, BIOMED CENTRAL, LONDON, GB, vol. 2, no. 1, 13 September 2004 (2004-09-13), pages 13, XP021009743, ISSN: 1479-0556, DOI: 10.1186/1479-0556-2-13
JIAN'ER LIN ET AL: "Impact of Signal Peptides on Furin-2A Mediated Monoclonal Antibody Secretion in CHO Cells", BIOTECHNOLOGY JOURNAL, vol. 12, no. 9, 1 September 2017 (2017-09-01), DE, pages 1700268, XP055533345, ISSN: 1860-6768, DOI: 10.1002/biot.201700268
X-L GUO ET AL: "Cleavage mechanism of the H5N1 hemagglutinin by trypsin and furin", AMINO ACIDS ; THE FORUM FOR AMINO ACID AND PROTEIN RESEARCH, SPRINGER-VERLAG, VI, vol. 35, no. 2, 31 January 2008 (2008-01-31), pages 375 - 382, XP019634514, ISSN: 1438-2199
WILLIAMS JA, VACCINES, vol. 1, 2013, pages 225 - 249
WILLIAMS J.: "Vector design for improved DNA vaccine efficacy, safety and production", VACCINES, vol. 1, 2013, pages 225 - 249, XP002713195, DOI: doi:10.3390/vaccines1030225
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PLOUGMANN VINGTOFT A/S (Strandvejen 70, 2900 Hellerup, 2300, DK)
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Claims:
Claims

1. A nucleotide sequence comprising one or more influenza genes encoding haemagglutinin (HA) and one or more influenza genes encoding neuraminidase (NA), said influenza genes being connected by linkers each comprising at least one cleavage site.

2. The nucleotide sequence according to claim 1, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding haemagglutinin (HA) are selected from the group consisting of subtypes H1-H18 and variants thereof.

3. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 1 or 2, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding neuraminidase (NA) are selected from the group consisting of subtypes Nl-Nll and variants thereof. 4. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence further comprises one or more influenza genes encoding matrix proteins selected from matrix protein 1 (Ml) and matrix protein 2 (M2) and variants thereof. 5. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence further comprises an influenza gene encoding

nucleoprotein (NP) or variants thereof.

6. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence is comprised of DNA or RNA nucleotides.

7. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence is comprised of DNA nucleotides. 8. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the influenza genes originates from Influenza A virus or Influenza B virus.

9. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the influenza genes originates from Influenza A virus.

10. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the influenza genes originates from one or more pandemic influenza strains.

11. The nucleotide sequence according to claim 10, wherein the pandemic influenza strains are one or more selected from the group consisting of

HlNlpdm2009, H3N2 1968, H2N2 1957 and H1N1 1918. 12. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding haemagglutinin (HA) are selected from:

(i) SEQ ID NO: 8 or SEQ ID NO: 12, or

(ii) a nucleic acid sequence having at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID SEQ ID NO: 8 or SEQ ID NO: 12,

wherein the amino acid sequences resulting from the nucleic acid sequences of (ii) are immunogenic.

13. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding neuraminidase (NA) are selected from:

(i) SEQ ID NO: 14 or SEQ ID NO: 16, or

(ii) a nucleic acid sequence having at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID SEQ ID NO: 14 or SEQ ID NO: 16,

wherein the amino acid sequences resulting from the nucleic acid sequences of (ii) are immunogenic.

14. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 4-13, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding matrix proteins are selected from :

(i) SEQ ID NO: 22 or SEQ ID NO: 24, or

(ii) a nucleic acid sequence having at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID SEQ ID NO: 22 or SEQ ID NO: 24,

wherein the amino acid sequences resulting from the nucleic acid sequences of (ii) are immunogenic.

15. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 5-14, wherein the influenza gene encoding nucleoprotein (NP) are selected from :

(i) SEQ ID NO: 18, or

(ii) a nucleic acid sequence having at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID SEQ ID NO: 18,

wherein the amino acid sequences resulting from the nucleic acid sequences of (ii) are immunogenic.

16. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises:

(i) SEQ ID NO: 8 and SEQ ID NO: 14, and/or

(ii) SEQ ID NO: 12 and SEQ ID NO: 16, and/or

(iii) SEQ ID NO: 22, SEQ ID NO: 24 and SEQ ID NO: 18,

and variants of any of (i), (ii) and/or (iii).

17. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises:

(i) SEQ ID NO: 8 and SEQ ID NO: 14, and

(ii) SEQ ID NO: 12 and SEQ ID NO: 16,

and variants of any of (i) and (ii).

18. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises:

(i) SEQ ID NO: 8 and SEQ ID NO: 14, and

(ii) SEQ ID NO: 12 and SEQ ID NO: 16, and

(iii) SEQ ID NO: 22, SEQ ID NO: 24 and SEQ ID NO: 18,

and variants of any of (i), (ii) and (iii).

19. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the linkers each comprises a self-cleaving 2A peptide and/or a furin cleavage site.

20. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the linkers each comprises a self-cleaving 2A peptide.

21. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the linkers each comprises at least two cleavage sites.

22. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the linkers each comprises a furin cleavage site and a self-cleaving 2A peptide.

23. The nucleotide sequence according to claim 22, wherein the linkers each comprise a GSG peptide between the furin cleavage site and the self-cleaving 2A peptide.

24. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 19-23, wherein the self-cleaving 2A peptide comprises an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 26, SEQ ID NO: 27, SEQ ID NO: 28 and SEQ ID NO: 29.

25. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 19-24, wherein the furin cleavage site comprises the amino acid sequence according to SEQ ID NO:4. 26. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 19-25, wherein the furin cleavage site comprises the nucleotide sequence according to SEQ ID NO: 3.

27. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the linkers each comprises SEQ ID NO: 5 or SEQ ID NO: 7.

28. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 12-27, wherein SEQ ID NO: 8 is replaced by SEQ ID NO: 10.

29. The nucleotide sequence according to claim 28, wherein an amino acid sequence resulting from translation of said one or more influenza genes encoding haemagglutinin (HA) comprises SEQ ID NO: 11.

30. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 15-29, wherein SEQ ID NO: 18 is replaced by SEQ ID NO: 20.

31. The nucleotide sequence according to claim 30, wherein an amino acid sequence resulting from translation of said influenza gene encoding nucleoprotein (NP) comprises SEQ ID NO : 21. 32. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises SEQ ID NO : l .

33. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence is incorporated into an expression vector.

34. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence is expressed and cleaved at each cleavage site in vivo in a subject to provide the individual antigenic peptides encoded by said influenza genes.

35. The nucleotide sequence according to claim 34, wherein the subject is selected from the group consisting of humans, pigs, horses, birds, cattle, dogs, ferrets, mice, rabbits and guinea pigs. 36. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 34 or 35, wherein the subject is a human.

37. The nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleotide sequence is codon optimized for expression in humans.

38. A nucleotide vaccine comprising a nucleotide sequence according to any one of the preceding claims.

39. The nucleotide vaccine according to claim 38, wherein the nucleotide vaccine is provided with a pharmaceutical acceptable diluent, excipient and/or adjuvant.

40. A nucleotide sequence according any one of claims 1-37 or a nucleotide vaccine according to any one of claims 38 or 39 for use in the prevention of influenza infection.

41. The nucleotide sequence or nucleotide vaccine for use according to claim 40, wherein the nucleotide sequence or nucleotide vaccine is administered in an effective amount. 42. A kit comprising :

(i) an effective amount of a nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 1-37, or

(ii) an effective amount of a nucleotide vaccine according to any one of claims 38 or 39, and

(ii) optionally, instructions for use.

43. A method for producing a nucleotide vaccine comprising multiple antigen- encoding nucleic acids, said method comprising the following steps:

(i) providing a nucleotide sequence of at least two genes encoding

antigenic peptides or proteins, wherein said at least two genes are connected by linkers comprising at least one cleavage site, and

(ii) mixing said nucleotide sequence with a pharmaceutical acceptable diluent, excipient and/or adjuvant,

thereby providing a nucleotide vaccine.

44. The method according to claim 43, wherein said antigen-encoding nucleic acids originates from a genus selected from the group consisting of

alphainfluenzavirus and betainfluenzavirus.

Description:
A polygene influenza vaccine

Technical field of the invention

The present invention relates to a nucleic acid vaccine. Specifically, the use of a single nucleic acid sequence comprising combinations of influenza genes coding for selected hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), matrix protein 1 (Ml), matrix protein 2 (M2) and nucleoprotein (NP) interspaced with selected linkers comprising cleavage sites to produce individual proteins, together forming one polyvalent influenza vaccine for use in medicine for humans and animals.

Background of the invention

Vaccination is the preferred choice for influenza prophylaxis. Inactivated influenza virus vaccines are licenced worldwide while cold-adapted live vaccines are licenced only in Russia and the USA. The most common prophylaxis of annual influenza infections is vaccination with inactivated protein vaccines from influenza A virus propagated in hens' eggs or cell lines. Thus, the common vaccines are the inactivated vaccine viruses, which are propagated in hens' eggs or cell lines and inactivated e.g. by formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. There are three main classes of inactivated vaccines; whole virus, protein split (chemically disrupted with ether or tributyl phosphate) and protein subunit (purified surface glycoproteins), administrated intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Whole, inactivated influenza vaccine is not widely used due to varying protective effect and high levels of side effects and adverse reactions. The seasonal influenza vaccine (split and subunit) for humans is trivalent or tetravalent, comprising an H3N2 and an H1N1 influenza A virus strain and one or two influenza B virus strains. The normal human vaccine dose is standardised to 15Mg HA protein of each virus component administrated once in normal healthy adults and twice in children and persons with no preexisting influenza A immunity. The conventional vaccines induce merely a humoral immune response and are strain specific. These vaccines provide limited

protection in case of antigen mismatch, when the circulating virus strains and the vaccine differ. The protective effect of the traditional protein split vaccine is therefore very limited with little or no cross-protection to influenza A virus variants. Because of the continuous evolution of influenza A virus strains, the high mutation rate in HA and NA and the type-specific antibodies induced by the conventional vaccines, a new vaccine has to be produced every year based on the most recent circulating influenza A strain. Even the efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccines are affected by the extent of antigenic similarity between the vaccine strain and the circulating virus strains as well as the age of the vaccines. Several vaccine improvements are necessary in case of a new emerging human influenza A strain. Virus vaccine production in cell lines in vitro is a relatively slow process with relatively low yields which is suboptimal when high amounts of vaccine is needed, and the vaccine strain has first to be designed and adapted for growth in cells. In the case of emerging strains, egg adaptation and production of a certain influenza virus strain is too slow (6-12 months). If this strain is also a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, egg production in fertilized eggs might be impossible, because the virus kills the egg embryo. In addition, the availability of eggs might be limited during outbreaks of avian influenza among birds, thus slowing down the vaccine production even further. In terms of populations with no pre-existing immunity, two vaccinations would be necessary, thereby further burdening the vaccine production. Even if there is no new pandemic influenza A circulating among humans, and only spread of HPAI among poultry, the shortage of eggs will limit the production of traditional seasonal influenza vaccines in eggs. In addition, traditional influenza protein vaccines do not have optimal protection as prophylaxis and lack therapeutic effect. Thus, there is a great need for alternative influenza vaccines with more "universal" or broad- range protection and easier and faster production free of egg proteins. Although DNA vaccines were developed more than 20 years ago, clinical trials preceding stage I and II in humans are rare. Currently, about one hundred stage I and II clinical trials for DNA vaccines in humans are being conducted . However, three prophylactic veterinary DNA vaccines, have been licensed : one for West Nile Virus (in horses) and a second for Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis virus in Salmon, and an immunotherapeutic vaccine for cancer in dogs. A forth DNA plasmid construct is licensed as a growth hormone therapy for pigs (production animals). This demonstrates that DNA vaccines can have good and protective effects and that new DNA vaccines are not limited by the size of the animal or species. The great success with DNA vaccines observed for the murine model for the first generation of DNA vaccines did initially not translate well to humans. However, the field has moved significantly forward through improvements of gene expression, the vaccine gene constructs, the vector backbones, use of adjuvants, the delivery methods, the vaccine modality such as different prime-boost strategies, DNA dose and vaccine intervals, and have together made the nucleotide vaccines highly clinically relevant. Researchers have recently

demonstrated protective antibodies levels by a single dose of gene gun

administrated HA DNA vaccine to humans. "Nucleic acid immunization", which is a more correct term since both naked DNA and RNA can be used, or the commonly preferred name "DNA vaccine", is the inoculation of antigen-encoding DNA or RNA as either synthetic genes or incorporated into various expression cassettes or vectors in order to induce immunity to the gene product. The genes may instead be incorporated into viral vectors with the purpose of inducing immunity to the gene product. Thus, in the present definition of a "DNA vaccine" is meant a nucleotide vaccine, which includes all kinds of delivery systems for the antigen encoding DNA or RNA. The vaccine gene of interest can be in the form of a naked circular plasmid or linear expression cassette with only the key features necessary for expression (e.g. promotor, gene of interest and polyadenylation signal) from a DNA or RNA. Delivery systems may most often be naked DNA in buffer with or without adjuvant, DNA coupled to nanoparticles and/or formulated into adjuvant containing compounds or inserted into live bacterial or viral vectors such as

Adenovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), alphavirus, poxvirus and herpes virus.

Nucleic-acid vaccines based on synthetic RNA encoding the gene of interest are also possible either as a conventional, non-amplifying mRNA or as a so called self- amplifying mRNA). The self-amplifying mRNAs can be derived from modified alphavirus single-stranded RNA genome that are expressed in the host cells with the additional intrinsic innate immune stimulating capabilities. Self-amplifying RNA (saRNA) can even be inserted into a circular plasmid as a DNA vaccine that upon injection can generate multiple RNA copies inside the transfected cell. The mRNA nucleic acid vaccine can be delivered separately or formulated e.g. with emulsions with or without adjuvants or as lipid nanoparticles. Alpha-tocopherol based adjuvant for nucleic acid vaccines has previously been disclosed in

WO2016041562. Previously, DNA and RNA vaccines against influenza A virus with a broad protection against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses have been developed, i.e. challenge in animals with common circulating strains belonging to H1N1 and to H3N2 types with and without adjuvants. WO2008145129 and

WO2010060430 disclose the use of pandemic influenza A genes to produce nucleotide vaccines to induce immune responses able to cross-react and cross- protect against drifted virus variants and even heterologous strains and

heterotypic strains like the highly pathogenic H5N1 in ferrets. These nucleotide vaccines can be used for both annual seasonal influenza A vaccine development as well as vaccines in the case of emerging new influenza A strains. The broad protective DNA/RNA vaccines disclosed in WO2008145129 and WO2010060430, comprising selected influenza A genes, can also protect pigs from circulating swine influenza A virus strains including the wide spread HINlpdm strain. Thus, influenza A DNA vaccine has been found to be very immunogenic in pigs and able to induce protection against shedding and disease in pigs after various influenza A virus challenge.

A major disadvantage with these vaccines is that the production is complicated and expensive due to the need for separate manufacturing of the several individual nucleic acid components (plasmids) i.e. as individual DNA plasmid components comprising the nucleic acid influenza A virus vaccine.

Hence, an improved method for production of nucleotide vaccines and provision of such nucleotide vaccines would be advantageous. In particular, a more efficient and/or less expensive method for providing nucleotide vaccines comprising multiple antigen-encoding nucleic acids would be advantageous.

Summary of the invention

Thus, an object of the present invention relates to the provision of an efficient method for providing nucleotide vaccines comprising multiple antigen-encoding nucleic acids.

In particular, it is an object of the present invention to provide a nucleotide influenza vaccine comprising a single nucleic acid sequence encoding several selected influenza proteins, with various modifications, interspaced with selected cleavage-inducing linkers, thus enabling the expression of separate influenza proteins from one single open reading frame, both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, one aspect of the invention relates to a nucleotide sequence comprising one or more influenza genes encoding haemagglutinin (HA) and one or more influenza genes encoding neuraminidase (NA), said influenza genes being connected by linkers each comprising at least one cleavage site. Another aspect of the present invention relates to a nucleotide vaccine comprising a nucleotide sequence as described herein.

Yet another aspect of the present invention relates to the provision of a nucleotide sequence or a nucleotide vaccine as described herein for use in the prevention of influenza infection.

Still another aspect of the present invention is to provide a kit comprising :

(i) an effective amount of a nucleotide sequence as described herein, or

(ii) an effective amount of a nucleotide vaccine as described herein, and (ii) optionally, instructions for use.

A further aspect of the present invention relates to a method for producing a nucleotide vaccine comprising multiple antigen-encoding nucleic acids, said method comprising the following steps:

(i) providing a nucleotide sequence of at least two genes encoding

antigenic peptides, wherein said at least two genes are connected by linkers comprising at least one cleavage site, and

(ii) mixing said nucleotide sequence with a pharmaceutical acceptable

diluent, excipient and/or adjuvant,

thereby providing a nucleotide vaccine.

Brief description of the figures

Figure 1 shows an overview of the polygene influenza vaccine. The polygene, or single nucleic acid, construct express 7 different selected influenza A virus proteins (HA (H I and H3), NA (N l and N2), NP, M l and M2), interspaced with cleavage sites for furin and porcine teschovirus-1 2A (P2A), here referred to as 7mer. The possibility to exchange or remove an influenza cod ing reg ion is exemplified here by the alternative furin/P2A linkers flanking the cod ing sequence for N P, which are mod ified to harbor one Kasl site each . One single codon in H I and one epitope reg ion in NP are mod ified to minimize the potential risk for narcolepsy in certain humans.

Figure 2 shows generation of alternative splice variants of influenza A matrix mRNA. During viral mRNA synthesis, the influenza A virus segment 7 gives rise to alternatively spliced RNAs, which encodes matrix proteins M l and M2. Cap : 5'-cap structure, ORF: open reading frame, aa : amino acid .

Figure 3 shows an overview of a 4mer polygene influenza vaccine construct comprising 4 different selected influenza A virus proteins (HA (H I and H3), NA (N l and N2)), interspaced with cleavage sites for furin and porcine teschovirus-1 2A (P2A) .

Figure 4 shows expression of processed influenza proteins from the 7mer and 4mer. (A) Expression of processed hemagglutinin (HA; H lN l) . (B) Expression of processed nucleoprotein (NP; H lN l) . (C) Expression of processed Matrix proteins 1 and 2 (M l, M2; H lN l) . (D) Expression of processed Matrix protein 2 (M2;

H l N l) . Figure 5 shows DNA vaccination and blood sampling scheme for mice and rabbits.

Figure 6 shows antibody responses in mice and rabbits vaccinated with nucleotide vaccine. Antibody response for (A) anti-H l and (B) anti-NP in mice vaccinated with 7mer in PBS or in Dil uvac Forte. Antibody response (C) anti-H l, (D) anti-H3, (E) anti-NP and (F) anti-N2 in rabbits vaccinated with 7mer in PBS, or 4mer or 7mer in Diluvac Forte.

Figure 7 shows cytokine responses in isolated immune cells from polygene DNA vaccinated mice. Mice were vaccinated with 7mer in PBS of Diluvac Forte and splenocytes isolated from the mice were stimulated with a panel of influenza proteins and analysed in a cytokine-ELISA specific for (A) IFN-gamma, or (B) IL- 17A.

Figure 8 Relative nucleoprotein (NP) expression from polygene nucleotide construct. HEK 293 cells were transfected with either equimolar or equal DNA amounts of 7mer nucleotide, a single NP-expression plasmid or a mix of six individual plasmids expressing the seven influenza proteins encoded by the 7mer nucleotide. Equal amounts of cytoplasmic extracts were evaluated with a western blot specific for NP. Subsequent densiometric analysis was performed with Scion Image Beta 4.0.2. Relative protein expression was calculated using 6x plasmid vaccine as reference.

Detailed description of the invention

Definitions

Prior to discussing the present invention in further details, the following terms and conventions will first be defined :

Nucleotide sequence

In the present context, the term "nucleotide sequence" refers to a polymer of nucleotides comprising nucleotides A,C,T,U,G, or other naturally occurring nucleotides or artificial nucleotide analogues. Thus, nucleotide sequences may be comprised of e.g. DNA or RNA. In the present context, nucleotide sequences may comprise multiple genes of any origin, but preferably originating from

Orthomyxoviridae, including Influenzae A-D virus. The genes encompassed by the nucleotide sequences are separated by cleavable linkers.

Haemagglutinin

In the present context, the term "haemagglutinin" (HA) refers to the glycoprotein found on the surface of influenza viruses. HA is involved in host cell binding, internalization and particle formation of influenza virus. HA is found in at least 18 subtypes that may be used to categorize different variants of Influenza virus. Thus, as used herein, e.g. "HI" denotes haemagglutinin subtype 1, "H5" denotes haemagglutinin subtype 5, and so forth. Neuraminidase

In the present context, the term "neuraminidase" (NA) refers to the enzyme found on the surface of influenza viruses. NA removes sialic acid from glycoproteins to avoid virus particle aggregation and promotes viral release from the host cell. NA is found at least 11 subtypes that may be used to categorize different variants of Influenza virus. Thus, as used herein, e.g. "Nl" denotes neuraminidase subtype 1, "N3" denotes neuraminidase subtype 3, and so forth.

Together, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase may therefore be used to

characterize different variants of influenza virus, such as H1N1 (haemagglutinin subtype 1, neuraminidase subtype 1).

Variants

In the present context, the term "variant" refers to a nucleic acid sequence or polypeptide comprising a sequence, which differs (by deletion, insertion, and/or substitution of an nucleic acid or amino acid) in one or more nucleic acid or amino acid positions from that of a wild type nucleic acid or polypeptide sequence.

Linker

In the present context, the term "linker" refers to a connection between two protein coding sequences or their protein products. Linkers comprise a stretch of contiguous nucleic acids or amino acids, which holds at least one cleavage site that enables separation of the genes or their products through cleavage of the linker. Preferably, the linker comprise a cleavage site at its 5' end and a cleavage site at its 3' end, or a cleavage site at its N-terminal end and a cleavage site at its C-terminal end.

Cleavage site

In the present context, the term "cleavage site" refers to a nucleic acid or amino acid motif, which may trigger cleavage of a nucleotide sequence or amino acid sequence. The cleavage may be performed by a variety of mechanisms including, but not limited to, enzymatic cleavage and self-cleavage activity. Thus, a cleavage site may be utilized to divide a nucleotide sequence or amino acid sequence into smaller fragments, e.g. individual genes or peptides. Polygenic and polycistronic

In the present context, the term "polygenic" and "polycistronic" gene refers to single DNA and RNA sequences, respectively, that encodes multiple different peptides or proteins. Thus, the nucleotide sequence comprising multiple antigen- encoding peptides or proteins as described herein, may be either polygenic or polycistronic.

Influenza genes

In the present context, the term "influenza genes" refers to any protein coding sequence originating form an influenza virus and which may express an

immunogenic peptide or protein relevant for preparation of a nucleotide vaccine.

Influenza infection

In the present context, the term "influenza infection" refers to an acute viral infection by an influenza virus. Influenza infection may cause symptoms, such as fever, chills and muscle pain.

Codon optimization

In the present context, the term "codon optimization" refers to changing the codons of a nucleotide sequence without altering the amino acid sequence that it encodes in order to favour expression in a specific species. Codon optimization may be used to increase the abundance of the peptide or protein that the nucleotide sequence encodes since "rare" codons are removed and replaced with abundant codons.

In the present context, the nucleotide sequences as described herein may be codon optimized specifically for expression in humans. Expression vector

In the present context, the term "expression vector" refers to a vector comprising a recombinant polynucleotide comprising expression control sequences operatively linked to a nucleotide sequence to be expressed. An expression vector comprises sufficient cis-acting elements for expression; other elements for expression can be supplied by the host cell or in vitro expression systems. Expression vectors include all those known in the art, such as cosmids, plasmids (e.g., naked or contained in liposomes) and viruses or viral vectors that incorporate the recombinant polynucleotide.

Operatively linked

In the present context, the term "operatively linked" refers to the connection of elements being a part of a functional unit such as a gene, a protein coding sequence or an open reading frame. Accordingly, by operatively linking a promoter to a nucleic acid sequence encoding a polypeptide, the two elements becomes part of a functional unit. The linking of the expression control sequence (promoter) to the nucleic acid sequence enables the transcription of the nucleic acid sequence directed by the promoter. By operatively linking two heterologous nucleic acid sequences encoding a polypeptide, the sequences becomes part of the functional unit - an open reading frame encoding a fusion protein comprising the amino acid sequences encoded by the heterologous nucleic acid sequences. Homologous nucleic acid sequences may be operatively linked in a similar manner.

Vaccine and nucleotide vaccine

In the present context, the term "vaccine" refers to a composition intended to induce immunity to a disease. A vaccine functions by exposing the immune system to antigenic peptides or proteins. One type of vaccines are "nucleotide vaccines" that functions by inoculation of antigen-encoding DNA or RNA as either synthetic genes or incorporated into various expression cassettes or vectors in order to induce immunity to the gene product. Thus, a nucleotide vaccine may comprise a nucleotide sequence composed of either DNA or RNA. The nucleotide vaccine may include any type of delivery system for the antigen-encoding DNA or RNA, including, but not limited to, plasmids, expression cassettes, adjuvants, particles, and bacterial or viral vectors. Immunogenic

In the present context, the term "immunogenic" refers to the ability of an antigenic peptide or protein to elicit an immune response that induce protective immunity to the antigenic peptide or protein over time. Thus, an immunogenic peptide or protein may be used as antigen in a vaccine.

Pharmaceutically acceptable

In the present context, the term "pharmaceutically acceptable" refers to a vaccine that is physiologically tolerable and do not typically produce an unintended allergic or similar untoward reaction, such as gastric upset, dizziness and the like, when administered to a human. Preferably, as used herein, the term "pharmaceutically acceptable" means approved by a regulatory agency of the Federal or a state government or listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia or other generally recognized pharmacopoeia for use in animals, and more particularly in humans.

Adjuvant

In the present context, the term "adjuvant" refers to a compound or mixture that enhances the immune response to an antigen. An adjuvant can serve as a tissue depot that slowly releases the antigen and as a lymphoid system activator, which non-specifically enhances the immune response. Often, a primary challenge with an antigen alone, in the absence of an adjuvant, will fail to elicit a humoral or cellular immune response. Adjuvants include, but are not limited to, complete Freund's adjuvant, incomplete Freund's adjuvant, saponin, mineral gels such as aluminum hydroxide, surface active substances such as lysolecithin, pluronic polyols, polyanions, peptides, oil or hydrocarbon emulsions, keyhole limpet hemocyanins, dinitrophenol, DL-a-tocopherol and potentially useful human adjuvants such as BCG (bacille Calmette-Guerin) and Corynebacterium parvum. Preferably, the adjuvant is pharmaceutically acceptable. Excipient

In the present context, the term "excipient" refers to a diluent, adjuvant, carrier, or vehicle with which the composition of the invention is administered. Such pharmaceutical carriers can be sterile liquids, such as water and oils, including those of petroleum, animal, vegetable or synthetic origin, such as peanut oil, soybean oil, mineral oil, sesame oil and the like. Water or aqueous saline solutions and aqueous dextrose and glycerol solutions are preferably employed as carriers, particularly for injectable solutions. Suitable pharmaceutical carriers are described in "Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences" by E. W. Martin.

Effective amount

In the present context, the term "effective amount" refers to a dosage or amount sufficient to produce a desired effect. The desired effect may comprise an objective or subjective improvement in the recipient of the dosage or amount, such as preventive protection of an individual against infection.

Prop hy I a ctic/pre ven tive trea tm en t

In the present context, the term "prophylactic treatment" refers to a treatment administered to an individual who does not display signs or symptoms of a disease, pathology, or infection, or displays only early signs or symptoms of a disease, pathology, or infection, such that treatment is administered for the purpose of diminishing, preventing, or decreasing the risk of developing the disease, pathology, or infection. A prophylactic treatment functions as a

preventative treatment against a disease or infection, and therefore the terms "prophylactic treatment" and "preventive treatment" are used interchangeably herein.

Sequence identity

In the present context, the term "sequence identity" is here defined as the sequence identity between genes or proteins at the nucleotide, base or amino acid level, respectively. Specifically, a DNA and a RNA sequence are considered identical if the transcript of the DNA sequence can be transcribed to the

corresponding RNA sequence. Thus, in the present context "sequence identity" is a measure of identity between proteins at the amino acid level and a measure of identity between nucleic acids at nucleotide level. The protein sequence identity may be determined by comparing the amino acid sequence in a given position in each sequence when the sequences are aligned. Similarly, the nucleic acid sequence identity may be determined by comparing the nucleotide sequence in a given position in each sequence when the sequences are aligned.

To determine the percent identity of two amino acid sequences or of two nucleic acids, the sequences are aligned for optimal comparison purposes (e.g., gaps may be introduced in the sequence of a first amino acid or nucleic acid sequence for optimal alignment with a second amino or nucleic acid sequence). The amino acid residues or nucleotides at corresponding amino acid positions or nucleotide positions are then compared. When a position in the first sequence is occupied by the same amino acid residue or nucleotide as the corresponding position in the second sequence, then the molecules are identical in that position. The percent identity between the two sequences is a function of the number of identical positions shared by the sequences (i.e., % identity = # of identical positions/total # of positions (e.g., overlapping positions) x 100). In one embodiment, the two sequences are the same length.

In another embodiment, the two sequences are of different length and gaps are seen as different positions. One may manually align the sequences and count the number of identical amino acids. Alternatively, alignment of two sequences for the determination of percent identity may be accomplished using a mathematical algorithm. Such an algorithm is incorporated into the NBLAST and XBLAST programs of (Altschul et al. 1990). BLAST nucleotide searches may be performed with the NBLAST program, score = 100, wordlength = 12, to obtain nucleotide sequences homologous to a nucleic acid molecule of the invention. BLAST protein searches may be performed with the XBLAST program, score = 50, wordlength = 3 to obtain amino acid sequences homologous to a protein molecule of the invention.

To obtain gapped alignments for comparison purposes, Gapped BLAST may be utilized. Alternatively, PSI-Blast may be used to perform an iterated search, which detects distant relationships between molecules. When utilising the NBLAST, XBLAST, and Gapped BLAST programs, the default parameters of the respective programs may be used. See http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Alternatively, sequence identity may be calculated after the sequences have been aligned e.g. by the BLAST program in the EMBL database (www.ncbi.nlm.gov/cgi-bin/BLAST). Generally, the default settings with respect to e.g. "scoring matrix" and "gap penalty" may be used for alignment. In the context of the present invention, the BLASTN and PSI BLAST default settings may be advantageous. The percent identity between two sequences may be determined using techniques similar to those described above, with or without allowing gaps. In calculating percent identity, only exact matches are counted. An embodiment of the present invention thus relates to sequences of the present invention that has some degree of sequence variation.

The invention will now be described in more details.

The present invention discloses nucleotide sequence constructs comprising the influenza genes coding for selected hemagglutinins (HA) and neuraminidases (NA) fused together with a linker comprising at least one cleavage site. The nucleotide constructs can additionally comprise influenza genes coding for matrix protein 1 (M l) and matrix protein 2 (M2) and nucleoprotein (NP), interspaced or fused together with linkers comprising at least one protein cleavage site, and where the genes preferably stem from a pandemic influenza strain as depicted in figure 1. The nucleotides of this polygene construct are either DNA or RNA.

The nucleotide sequence comprising multiple antigen-encoding influenza genes may, upon administration to a subject, such as a human or animal, be expressed as a single polypeptide or polyprotein in vivo in the recipient of the nucleotide sequence. Subsequent to expression, the individual gene products are separated via intracellular cleavage of the polypeptide or polyprotein at the designed cleavage sites. Thus, the strategy described herein takes advantage of the cellular machinery of the recipient to process the nucleotide sequence into final antigenic peptides or proteins.

An advantage of the described strategy is the reduced time consumption of producing the vaccine as only a single nucleotide sequence construct must be produced and introduced in a single "vaccine-plasmid" for GMP production and QA. The alternative of producing the individual gene constructs separately, such as seven individual constructs, which is subsequently mixed, is not only a more complex solution with higher risks of error, but also a less attractive economic solution.

Another advantage of the described strategy is that the nucleotide sequence described herein is expressed in equimolar ratios of the separate genes, which negates the risk of variable expression of multiple individual constructs caused by inter-gene competition between a mixture of plasmids. An additional concern with mixtures of plasmids is whether all cells receive and get exposed to all antigens. Such concerns are redundant for the nucleotide sequence construct described herein. Thus, the nucleotide sequence comprising multiple antigen-encoding influenza genes as described herein will benefit from enhanced vaccine effect and fewer QA concerns.

A further advantage achieved by the present invention is that the recipient of the nucleotide vaccine as described herein only has to receive the vaccination regimen once to obtain sustained protection against a broad spectrum of influenza strains. Thus, there is no need for the recipient to receive repeated annual influenza vaccinations as is the standard today. This will lower the cost of influenza vaccination programs.

Thus, a first aspect of the present invention relates to a nucleotide sequence comprising one or more influenza genes encoding haemagglutinin (HA) and one or more influenza genes encoding neuraminidase (NA), said influenza genes being connected by linkers each comprising at least one cleavage site.

Historically, the influenza virus is evolving fast and it is an eternal challenge to keep up with new variants of known epidemic influenza strains. Variants of influenza strains arise not only from mutations of viral antigens, but also from combinations of antigens. Thus, the nucleotide sequence as described herein may comprise a variety of different combinations of HA and NA.

Therefore, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding haemagglutinin (HA) are selected from the group consisting of subtypes H1-H18 and variants thereof. Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding

neuraminidase (NA) are selected from the group consisting of subtypes N l-N l l and variants thereof.

In nature, the influenza A matrix-encoding genomic RNA generates at least two alternative spliced mRNAs; mRNA M l and mRNA M2 (figure 2). These two mRNAs encode matrix proteins M l and M2, respectively. To enable codon optimization of the matrix sequence for Ml and M2 expression in humans without interfering with wild type splicing, the nucleotide sequence comprises separate M l- and M2 coding sequences.

Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence further comprises one or more influenza genes encoding matrix proteins selected from matrix protein 1 (M l) and matrix protein 2 (M2) and variants thereof.

Influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) is a structural protein which encapsidates the viral negative stranded RNA. It is a key component of the ribonucleoprotein complex necessary for viral RNA synthesis with a relatively well conserved amino acid sequence. NP is one of the main determinants of species specificity and constitutes a relevant antigenic target for vaccination. Therefore, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence further comprises an influenza gene encoding nucleoprotein (NP) or variants thereof.

The nucleotide sequences may be utilized in vaccines termed "nucleotide vaccines". These vaccines are neither built on inactivated or attenuated virulent microorganisms nor protein subunits, but instead functions by inoculation of antigen-encoding DNA or RNA as either synthetic genes or incorporated into various expression cassettes or vectors in order to induce immunity to the gene product. Thus, a nucleotide vaccine may comprise a nucleotide sequence composed of either DNA or RNA Consequently, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence is comprised of DNA or RNA nucleotides.

A preferred embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence is comprised of DNA nucleotides. Influenza viruses are negative stranded RNA viruses that make up four of the seven genera of the family Orthomyxoviridae. The four genera are denoted Influenza A virus, Influenza B virus, Influenza C virus and Influenza D virus.

Therefore, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the influenza genes originate from

Influenza A virus or Influenza B virus.

Especially, influenza A virus is of interest since it is known to comprise the most virulent human pathogens among the four influenza genera and causes the severest disease with the risk of causing pandemics with rather frequent occurrences. Examples of variants of influenza A virus that has caused pandemics include HlNl (Spanish Flu in 1918, Swine Flu in 2009) and H3N2 (Hong Kong flu 1968). It has also caused panzootics, including the H5N1 (Bird flu 2004), which caused a global concern for potential recombination with human strains.

Consequently, protection against influenza A virus is of high relevance.

Thus, a preferred embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the influenza genes originates from Influenza A virus.

Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the influenza genes originate from one or more pandemic influenza strains. The nucleotide sequence construct may encode multiple selected influenza proteins derived from pandemic strains like H 1N1 1918, H2N2 1957,

HlN lpdm2009, H3N2 1968. However, the applicability of the nucleotide sequence as described herein is not limited to any specific influenza strain.

Thus, a further embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the pandemic influenza strains are one or more selected from the group consisting of HlN lpdm2009, H3N2 1968, H2N2 1957 and H 1N 1 1918.

The influenza virus proteins haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) play crucial roles as antigenic targets for vaccination directed against influenza. Many variants of influenza virus with different combinations of subtypes of HA and NA exist, with some variants being more abundant and/or pathogenic. HA exist in at least 18 subtypes denoted H 1-H18 and NA exist in at least 11 subtypes denoted Nl-N l l, in which e.g. H 1-H 18 is to be understood as H I, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, H7, H8, H9, H 10, H l l, H 12, H 13, H14, H 15, H 16, H 17 and H 18.

Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding

haemagglutinin (HA) are selected from H 1-H18 and the one or more influenza genes encoding neuraminidase (NA) are selected from N l-N l l . Especially favored are combinations of H I, H3, N l and N2. Although the present invention is not limited to any specific combination of subtypes of HA and NA, some combinations of HA and NA are preferred in the present context.

Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding

haemagglutinin (HA) are selected from :

(i) SEQ ID NO : 8 or SEQ ID NO: 12, or

(ii) a nucleic acid sequence having at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID SEQ ID NO: 8 or SEQ ID NO: 12, wherein the amino acid sequences resulting from the nucleic acid sequences of (ii) are immunogenic.

Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleic acid sequence has at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8 or SEQ ID NO: 12, such as at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, and at least 99.5%. A further embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding

neuraminidase (NA) are selected from :

(i) SEQ ID NO: 14 or SEQ ID NO: 16, or

(ii) a nucleic acid sequence having at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID SEQ ID NO: 14 or SEQ ID NO: 16,

wherein the amino acid sequences resulting from the nucleic acid sequences of (ii) are immunogenic.

Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleic acid sequence has at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO: 14 or SEQ ID NO: 16, such as at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, and at least 99.5%. Yet another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the one or more influenza genes encoding matrix proteins are selected from :

(i) SEQ ID NO: 22 or SEQ ID NO: 24, or

(ii) a nucleic acid sequence having at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID SEQ ID NO: 22 or SEQ ID NO: 24,

wherein the amino acid sequences resulting from the nucleic acid sequences of (ii) are immunogenic.

Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleic acid sequence has at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO: 22 or SEQ ID NO: 24, such as at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, and at least 99.5%. A still further embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the influenza gene encoding nucleoprotein (NP) are selected from :

(i) SEQ ID NO: 18, or

(ii) a nucleic acid sequence having at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID SEQ ID NO: 18,

wherein the amino acid sequences resulting from the nucleic acid sequences of (ii) are immunogenic.

Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleic acid sequence has at least 80% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO: 18, such as at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, and at least 99.5%. It is to be understood that the nucleic acid sequences encoding various influenza genes may have higher sequence identity with the sequences (SEQ ID NOs) to which they refer. Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleic acid sequence has at least 80% sequence identity, such as at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, and at least 99.5%.

A preferred embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises:

(i) SEQ ID NO: 8 and SEQ ID NO: 14, and/or

(ii) SEQ ID NO: 12 and SEQ ID NO: 16, and/or

(iii) SEQ ID NO: 22, SEQ ID NO: 24 and SEQ ID NO: 18,

and variants of any of (i), (ii) and/or (iii). Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises:

(i) SEQ ID NO: 8 and SEQ ID NO: 14, and

(ii) SEQ ID NO: 12 and SEQ ID NO : 16,

and variants of any of (i) and (ii).

An even further embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises:

(i) SEQ ID NO: 8 and SEQ ID NO: 14, and

(ii) SEQ ID NO: 12 and SEQ ID NO : 16, and

(iii) SEQ ID NO : 22, SEQ ID NO: 24 and SEQ ID NO: 18,

and variants of any of (i), (ii) and (iii).

All nucleotide sequence as described herein may be preceded by a Kozak sequence. The Kozak sequence is a sequence which occurs on eukaryotic mRNA and plays an important role in the initiation of the translation process.

Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises a Kozak sequence (SEQ ID NO : 30). Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the Kozak sequence (SEQ ID NO: 30) is located at the 5' end of the nucleotide sequence.

Moreover, the nucleotide sequence may be terminated with three stop codons in three different reading frames. Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises three stop codons at the 3' end .

The nucleotide sequence as described here comprise multiple influenza genes that are connected by linkers. The linkers between the influenza protein coding regions hold at least one of the two protein cleavage sites; 1) a furin cleavage site, and 2) a self-cleaving 2A peptide.

The furin cleavage site consists of the motif R-X-R/K-R and its function is to release the newly synthesized protein at its C-terminus, but allow the ribosome to continue translation. In the single nucleic acid construct, each (downstream) furin cleavage site is responsible for the release of the upstream protein, except for the final protein, which terminates with a stop codon. The furin cleavage site sequence can be chosen from RXRR or RXKR, where X can be any amino acid. Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the linkers each comprise a furin cleavage site comprising a sequence selected from RXRR or RXKR. The present invention exemplifies the furin cleavage site with the amino acid sequence RRKR. An embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the furin cleavage site comprises the amino acid sequence according to SEQ ID NO:4.

Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence according to any one of claims 19-25, wherein the furin cleavage site comprises the nucleotide sequence according to SEQ ID NO: 3.

After cleavage, the remaining C-terminal amino acids of the furin cleavage site are eliminated by cellular carbopeptidases, which remove the basic amino acids R and K. The furin cleavage sites in the polygene are thus removed from each mature protein of interest.

The self-cleaving 2A peptide may consist of an amino acid sequence chosen from APVKQTLNFDLLKLAGDVESNPGP (SEQ ID NO: 26), ATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGP (SEQ ID NO: 27), QCTNYALLKLAGDVESNPGP (SEQ ID NO: 28) and

EGRGSLLTCGDVEENPGP (SEQ ID NO: 29).

Therefore, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the self-cleaving 2A peptide comprises an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 26, SEQ ID NO: 27, SEQ ID NO: 28 and SEQ ID NO: 29.

The self-cleaving 2A peptide is present to release the linker from the N-terminal end of the downstream protein to be translated. The present invention exemplifies the self-cleaving porcine teschovirus-1 (also known as Teschovirus A) 2A peptide (P2A) with a nucleotide seq uence coding for ATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGP. The P2A has been shown to be highly efficient in its self-processing through ribosome skipping, which impairs the bond between the final g lycine (G) and proline (P), without affecting the translation of the downstream protein .

While two specific cleavage sites are described more thoroughly herein, the present invention is not limited to these two specific cleavage sites. Thus, the cleavage sites include, but are not limited to, a self-cleaving 2A peptide, a furin cleavage site, and cleavage sites of cellular enzymes.

In one variant of the nucleotide seq uence, the seven selected vaccine genes are separated by selected spacers of a viral 2A self-processing peptide that results in a co-translational cleavage in an unconventional process during intracellular translation resulting in prod uction of all individual vaccine proteins intracellularly. As an alternative and enhancing cleavage strategy, a furin enzyme cleavage site may be incorporated in the cleavage sequence.

Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the linkers each comprises a self-cleaving 2A peptide and/or a furin cleavage site.

Another embod iment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the linkers each comprises a self-cleaving 2A peptide.

Cleavage of the expressed nucleotide sequence may be enhanced by introduction of an additional cleavage site, thereby enabling cleavage at the N- and C- terminals of two adjacent gene prod ucts of the nucleotide sequence. Therefore, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide seq uence as described herein, wherein the linkers each comprises at least two cleavage sites. A preferred embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide seq uence as described herein, wherein the linkers each comprises a furin cleavage site and a self-cleaving 2A peptide. To even further enhance the cleavage of the 2A peptide, a GSG peptide cod ing seq uence may be inserted between the furin cleavage site and the self-cleaving 2A. This setup allows for a versatile monocistronic polyprotein generating construct, which can express several individual proteins from one sing le open reading frame in equimolar ratios.

Therefore, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide seq uence as described herein, wherein the linkers each comprise a GSG peptide between the furin cleavage site and the self-cleaving 2A peptide. In the present invention, the nucleotide seq uence may also comprise a cassette with un iq ue restriction enzyme sites for easy molecular deletion of particular components like one or more vaccine genes like the internally influenza protein NP. Thus, in an embodiment of the present invention, the two linkers flanking the seq uence coding for NP may be modified to comprise a restriction enzyme site (KasI) to enable the removal, or exchange, of NP. The nucleic acid seq uence has been mod ified, but the protein sequence is the same as in the unmodified linker. This mod ification does not affect the expression of the proteins and can be applied to other lin kers in the nucleotide vaccine construct, if desired . Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the linkers each comprises SEQ ID NO : 5 or SEQ ID NO : 7.

Previous influenza vaccines have been subject to d ifferent adverse effects, such as cases of narcoleptic seizures. To avoid a presumed narcolepsy risk for certain ind ivid uals that was coupled to the Pandemrix influenza vaccine, putative narcolepsia epitopes in NP and HA may be carefully mutated to minimize or prevent ind uction of immunity to human epitopes suggested to be involved in narcolepsy. Thus, to minimize the potential risk of narcolepsy, the HA (H 1N 1) amino acid sequence HDSN KGV may be changed to HDSDKGV and the NP (H 1 N 1) epitope sequence YDKEEIRRIWR may be changed to WEKDDIKRIYK. Hence, both putative reg ions, suspected of potentially playing a role for narcolepsy, may in some embod iments be altered . Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein SEQ ID NO : 8 is replaced by SEQ ID NO : 10.

Another embod iment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein an amino acid sequence resulting from translation of said one or more influenza genes encod ing haemagg lutinin (HA) comprises SEQ ID NO : l l .

A further embod iment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein SEQ ID NO : 18 is replaced by SEQ ID NO : 20.

An even further embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide seq uence as described herein, wherein an amino acid sequence resulting from translation of said influenza gene encoding nucleoprotein (NP) comprises SEQ ID NO : 21.

In one version of the nucleotide sequence as described herein, seven selected ind ivid ual influenza vaccine genes are used in a selected order as one

polycistronic-like or multi-gene sequence. The nucleotide sequence (as depicted in fig ure 1 and SEQ ID NO : 1) comprises the influenza A virus genes coding for hemagg lutinins (HA) from H 1 N 1 (includ ing an amino acid change in the site implicated in narcolepsy) and from H3N2, neuraminidases (NA) from H 1 N 1 and H3N2, matrix protein 1 (M l), matrix protein 2 (M2) and nucleoprotein (NP) from H 1 N 1 (including an epitope change in the site suspected playing a role in narcolepsy), all interspaced with furin-P2A linkers comprising cleavage sites to produce individual proteins. A Kozak sequence (GCCACC, SEQ ID NO : 30) is present at the 5'end, and the sequence terminates with three stop codons in three different read ing frames (TGAcTAGtTAA). Sequences coding for HA, NA, NP, M l, M2 and furin have been codon optimized for expression in humans. Thus, a preferred embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises SEQ ID NO: l. Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence consists of SEQ ID NO: l.

The nucleotide sequence as described herein may be designed for insertion in a DNA plasmid for eukaryotic in vivo expression as a naked DNA where the key element of the vector is CMV Immediate early promotor, Kozak sequence, stop codons in all three reading frames and a polyadenylation signal and a bacterial selection marker for DNA production that do not need to be an antibiotic resistance selection. The nucleotide sequence as described herein may also be designed for insertion in an mRNA producing vector containing a T7 promotor for RNA production and thus RNA vaccination. Alternatively, the nucleotide sequence can also be inserted in a self-amplifying RNA construct derived from alphavirus as a naked self-amplifying RNA or be inserted into a live viral vector that can be used for live-vector genetic vaccinations. Thus, the nucleotide as described herein is not limited to a specific delivery system.

An embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence is incorporated into an expression vector.

In one embodiment, the eukaryotic expression vector in the DNA vaccine plasmid will contain the key elements: a strong constitutive CMV IE promotor, a Kozak translation initiation sequence, a polyadenylation signal, origin of replication and a selection marker for propagating the plasmid in suitable E. coli bacteria. To improve safety of the plasmid, the use of an antibiotic selection marker may be substituted with the use of an miRNA shutting down a suicide gene in the permissive E. coli strain, using the so called HyperGRO technology, but other plasmids and production methods may be used to optimize production yields and safety e.g. for pigs and other production animals. For mRNA vaccine production, the nucleotide influenza vaccine gene can e.g. be inserted in a vector with a T7, SP6 or T3 promoter for mRNA vaccine production or in expression constructs with alphavirus genes to produce self-amplifying RNA vaccines. Optimization of the immune induction to naked DNA plasmids also involve the delivery method. In this regard, needle-free delivery to the skin, e.g. in rabbits and pigs, may improve the immune induction equally to or better than intradermal injection followed by electroporation. In agreement, others have found that needle-free delivery of DNA vaccine to the skin is superior to delivery to the muscle of pigs. Therefore, to improve the immunogenicity and to save vaccination time, thus avoid retention of many pigs that also improve animal welfare, herein is preferred the needle-free delivery to the skin of DNA or RNA e.g. in mass-vaccinations of pigs and other production animals, but which is also suitable for humans.

Subsequent to delivery to a subject, the nucleotide sequence is expressed and processed to the final individual antigenic peptides or proteins.

Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence is expressed and cleaved at each cleavage site in vivo in a subject to provide the individual antigenic peptides encoded by said influenza genes.

The vaccination strategy described herein is not limited to human use, but is in principle applicable to all mammals. Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the subject is a mammal.

Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the subject is selected from the group consisting of humans, pigs, horses, birds, cattle, dogs, ferrets, mice, rabbits and guinea pigs.

A further and preferred embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the subject is a human.

The influenza genes of the nucleotide sequence may be codon optimized for high expression in human cells and thus other mammalian cells. Therefore, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence is codon optimized for expression in humans.

The present invention additionally relates to a nucleotide vaccine for immunizing against influenza A disease in humans and animals. The nucleotide vaccine gene construct has several features in its design that together provide a more safe, polyvalent and broad protection against influenza A strains in humans and animals, e.g. pigs, horses and birds.

Therefore, another aspect of the present invention relates to a nucleotide vaccine comprising a nucleotide sequence as described herein. The nucleotide vaccine may comprise components normally provided together with a vaccine and which would be known to a person skilled in the art. Such components include, but are not limited to, diluents, excipients and adjuvants.

Thus, an embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide vaccine as described herein, wherein the nucleotide vaccine is provided with a

pharmaceutical acceptable diluent, excipient and/or adjuvant.

When used as a naked DNA vaccine the single nucleotide sequence may be incorporated into a eukaryotic expression vector as a circular plasmid.

The present invention is also concerned with prevention of disease by providing an effective nucleotide vaccination. The nucleotide vaccine may be administered by standard means and in doses suitable for inducing an immune response and obtaining a sustained protective effect.

Consequently, a further aspect of the present invention relates to a nucleotide sequence as described herein or a nucleotide vaccine as described herein for use in the prevention of influenza infection. Another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence or nucleotide vaccine as described herein for use as a therapeutic vaccine.

An embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence or nucleotide vaccine for use as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence or nucleotide vaccine is administered in an effective amount.

The nucleotide sequence constructs may be used in influenza A vaccines for human or animal use. Thus, another embodiment of the present invention relates to the nucleotide sequence or nucleotide vaccine for use as described herein, wherein the nucleotide sequence or nucleotide vaccine as described herein is administered to a human or an animal, preferably a human.

The nucleotide sequence or nucleotide vaccine may be supplied as a kit for easy use.

Consequently, another aspect of the present invention relates to a kit comprising :

(i) an effective amount of a nucleotide sequence as described herein, or

(ii) an effective amount of a nucleotide vaccine as described herein, and (ii) optionally, instructions for use.

The strategy of expressing a single nucleotide sequence comprising cleavage sites for easy in vivo separation of the individual antigenic peptides or proteins encoded by the nucleotide sequence is a general concept that may be expanded to development of vaccines for many different diseases.

Therefore, yet another aspect of the present invention relates to a method for producing a nucleotide vaccine comprising multiple antigen-encoding nucleic acids, said method comprising the following steps:

(i) providing a nucleotide sequence of at least two genes encoding

antigenic peptides or proteins, wherein said at least two genes are connected by linkers comprising at least one cleavage site, and (ii) mixing said nucleotide sequence with a pharmaceutical acceptable

diluent, excipient and/or adjuvant,

thereby providing a nucleotide vaccine. An embodiment of the present invention relates to the method as described herein, wherein said antigen-encoding nucleic acids originates from a genus selected from the group consisting of alphainfluenzavirus and betainfluenzavirus.

It should be noted that embodiments and features described in the context of one of the aspects of the present invention also apply to the other aspects of the invention. All patent and non-patent references cited in the present application, are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

The invention will now be described in further details in the following non-limiting examples.

Examples

Example 1 : Construction of polygene DNA vaccines

All selected influenza A sequences are obtained from GenBank and codon optimized for expression in humans, maintaining their original amino acid sequence. The DNA is synthetically synthesized and cloned into a high efficiency expression vector, NTC-9385R (Nature Technology Corp., Lincoln NE, USA). Key features of this expression vector are small vector size, high expression and antibiotic-free selection marker RNA-OUT (Williams JA, Vaccines 2013, 1, 225- 249).

Two variants of the invention are produced I) a 7mer, coding for seven influenza proteins [hemagglutinins (HA) and neuraminidases (NA) from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) and A/Aichi/2/1968 (H3N2), and nucleoprotein (NP), Matrix protein 1 (Ml) and Matrix protein 2 (M2) from A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 (H1N 1)], and II) a 4mer, coding for four influenza proteins [hemagglutinins (HA) and neuraminidases (NA) from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) and A/Aichi/2/1968 (H3N2)]. Both constructs are under the control of a CMV promoter and their start codons are in a Kozak sequence context (gccaccatg...). The influenza coding sequences are interspersed by linkers containing a furin cleavage site and a Porcine Teschovirus 1 2A self- cleaving peptide, enabling the processing of the polyprotein into individual proteins. The polyprotein sequences are terminated by three stop codons, one in each reading frame, to ensure translation termination. Both constructs were sequenced, and manufactured under GMP conditions.

The 7mer construct is depicted in figure 1 and the 4mer construct is depicted in figure 3.

Example 2: Expression of processed proteins from polygene DNA vaccine

To confirm expression from the polygene DNA vaccine constructs, the plasmids are transfected into eukaryotic cells (HEK 293) and examined by immunoblotting.

Transfected cells are harvested at 24 or 48 h post transfection, and cytoplasmic lysates are prepared. The lysates are separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by western blot using antibodies against the influenza proteins HI (anti-HA (H1N1) A01500, Genscript), NP (anti-Inf A 1918 NP, clone IC5-1B7 BEI, USA), Ml and M2

(anti-Inf A Ml, HYB344-01, SSI, Denmark, and anti-Inf A M2, PA5-32233,

ThermoFisher).

The resulting expression of proteins comprised in the DNA vaccine construct is depicted in figure 4A-D. More specifically, the lanes of the immunoblots depicted in figure 4A-D represents the following :

(A) Expression of processed hemagglutinin (HA; H1N1)

HEK 293 cells transfected with (1) HI expression plasmid, (2) H3 expression plasmid, (3-4) 4mer, (5) 4mer + furin expression plasmid, (6-7) 7mer, (8) 7mer + furin expression plasmid, (9) furin-expression plasmid, (10) uninfected HEK 293 cells, and positive control (11) MDCK cells infected with A/California/04/09.

(B) Expression of processed nucleoprotein (NP; H1N1)

HEK 293 cells transfected with (1) NP-expressing plasmid (positive control), (2-3) 7mer. Negative control (4) uninfected HEK 293. Positive control (5) MDCK cells infected with A/California/04/09.

(C) Expression of processed Matrix proteins 1 and 2 (Ml, M2; H1N1) HEK 293 cells transfected with (1) Matrix-expressing plasmid (positive control), (2-3) 7mer. Negative controls (4) uninfected HEK 293, and (7) uninfected MDCK cells. Positive control (5) MDCK cells infected with A/California/04/09. (D) Expression of processed Matrix protein 2 (M2; H1N1)

HEK 293 cells transfected with (1) Matrix-expressing plasmid (positive control), (2-3) 7mer, (4) 7mer and furin expressing plasmid or (5) furin plasmid. Negative controls (6) uninfected HEK 293, and (8) uninfected MDCK cells. Positive control (7) MDCK cells infected with A/California/04/09.

Conclusion

In vitro expression of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccine construct is confirmed. In vitro processing of the polyprotein into individual proteins, exemplified by HI, NP and M2, is confirmed. In vitro processing of the modified linker (SEQ ID NO: 7) flanking NP, is confirmed.

Example 3 : Vaccination in animal models

The immune response against the polygene DNA vaccine is examined in two animal models; mice (figure 6A-B) and rabbits (figure 6C-F).

In the experiment conducted in mice, 16 female mice (strain CB6F1, 8 weeks of age) are divided in two groups. The first group (n=8) receives the 7mer vaccine in PBS, while the second group (n=8) receives the 7mer vaccine in the adjuvant Diluvac Forte ® (adjuvant component of PRRSV vaccine, MSD Animal Health). The active adjuvant component of Diluvac Forte ® is DL-a-tocopherol. The mice receive two vaccinations, at day 0 and day 21, with 50 Mg DNA

vaccine/vaccination, administered intracutanously by injection. Blood samples are collected at three occasions; pre-vaccination (day -1), pre-boost (day-20) and two weeks after second vaccination (day 35). Splenocytes are isolated at day 35 and used for cellular immune response analyses.

In the experiment conducted in rabbits, 9 female rabbits (strain NZW, 10 weeks of age) are divided in three groups with three rabbits in each group. Group 1 receives the 7mer in PBS, administered intradermally by a needle-free device (2x100 uL,Tropis, Pharmajet). Group 2 receives the 7mer in Diluvac Forte ®, administered intradermal^ by a needle-free device (1x200 μΙ_, IDAL gun, IDAL). Group 3 receives the 4mer in Diluvac Forte ®, administered intradermally by a needle-free device (1x200 μΙ_, IDAL gun, IDAL). All groups are vaccinated twice, on day 0 and day 22 with 125 Mg DNA vaccine at each occasion. Blood samples are taken pre-vaccination (day -1), pre-boost (day 21) and two weeks after the second vaccination (day 35).

The vaccination scheme is outlined in figure 5. Conclusion

All animals were reported to be in good health post vaccination, and did not react adversely against the vaccine.

Example 4: Generation of antibody response against the polygene DNA vaccine The generation of an antibody response against the influenza proteins present in the DNA vaccine is analyzed in both mice and rabbits by antibody ELISA.

96-well plates are coated with 100 μΙ_ influenza protein (0.2 g/mL for mice and 2 g/mL for rabbits, Sino Biologicals) in carbonate buffer pH 9.6 overnight at 4°C.

Wells are then blocked with 2% skim milk in dilution buffer (SSI Diagnostica) for 1 h at room temperature (RT) followed by a wash with PBS with 0.1% Triton X-100.

Wells are then incubated with serially diluted serum and incubated for 1 h at RT.

Unbound antibodies are washed away with PBS with 0.1% Triton X-100 and an

HRP-labeled secondary antibody is added matching the primary antibody and the plate is incubated lh at RT. Plates are washed again with PBS with 0.1% Triton X- 100 and 100 μΙ_ of TMB substrate (KemEnTech) is added. The reaction is incubated at RT in the dark for 30 min, whereupon 150 μΙ_ 0.2M H2SO4 is added to stop the reaction. Reactants are identified by measuring absorbance at 450 nm.

All absorbances are calculated as the difference between Abs450nm and Abs620 nm, with subtracted blank values. Error bars: SEM.

In mice, a strong response against HA (H1N1 A/Cal/04/09) and NP (H1N1

A/Brevig Mission/1/18) was observed after vaccination with the 7mer (see figure 6A-B). In rabbits, both DNA vaccines (7mer and 4mer) antibody responses were induced against HA (H1 N1 A/Cal/04/09), H3 and N2 (see figure 6C-D and figure 6F). The 7mer also induced an antibody response against NP (H1N 1 A/Brevig

Mission/1/18), a protein lacking in the 4mer vaccine (see figure 6E) .

Conclusion

The polygene DNA vaccine is able to induce antibody production against both early and late proteins in the polygene construct (e.g. H I and NP) and these antibodies can react against purified influenza proteins.

Example 5 : Generation of cellular response against the polygene nucleotide vaccine

To assess the ability of the 7mer polygene vaccine to induce cellular immune responses, splenocytes from mice immunized with 7mer in the presence of PBS or Diluvac Forte, were isolated and re-stimulated with homologous influenza proteins (HA, NP and Ml) for 72 h.

Following stimulation, supernatants were collected and interferon gamma (INF- gamma) and IL-17A were quantified in cytokine-ELISAs specific for IFN-gamma or IL-17A, as surrogates for T helper 1 (Th l) and Thl7 cellular responses, respectively (see figure 7A-B). Average responses are indicated as a horizontal line in each group. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA comparison paired with Sidak significance analysis (95% confidence interval).

*P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001, ****p < 0.0001

All three influenza proteins induced IFN-gamma production. Conversely, only M l induced IL-17A production.

The 7mer polygene vaccine induces cellular immune responses characterized by the secretion of IFN-gamma upon stimulation with (i) wild type influenza surface protein (HA) as well as (ii) wild type internal proteins (NP and M l) (figure 7A). This provides additional evidence towards the production, processing and presentation of the vaccine-associated viral proteins to antigen presenting cells. The isolated immune cells from this experiment could also be stimulated by M l to produce IL-17A (figure 7B), which is an important cytokine for the recruitment of immune cells that eliminate infected cells.

Conclusion

The observed responses against IFN-gamma and IL-17A confirm the priming of the immune system by the 7mer polygene vaccine and supports the observation of an acquired ability of the immune system to recognize influenza viruses as well as the activation of different subset of immune cells. Example 6 : Relative protein expression from polygene nucleotide vaccine

A DNA influenza vaccine composed of six individual plasmids encoding the seven influenza proteins present in the 7mer polygene has previously been described in WO2010060430. Here, the 7mer polygene nucleotide vaccine is compared to the DNA influenza vaccine of WO2010060430.

The relative protein expression of these two vaccine candidates was evaluated in vitro by transfection of HEK 293 cells with equimolar and equal absolute DNA amounts of these constructs. As a comparison, one of the six plasmids present in the six-plasmid vaccine, encoding NP, was used as a control. Cells were lipofected with PolyFect with various amounts of DNA (see figure 8 for details) using the protocol for transient transfection provided by the manufacturer (PolyFect tranfection reagent, Qiagen). Cytoplasmic extracts were prepared 48h post lipofection, and 30 Mg of extract was analyzed on a 10% PAGE followed by a western blot specific for NP (primary antibody; mouse Mab Inf A 1918 NP clone IC5-1B7 (NR-43899) BEI, USA). The relative expression was then calculated using densiometry data obtained with Scion Image Beta 4.0.2. The previously characterized six-plasmid vaccine was used as a reference to calculate the relative protein expression of NP. When using equimolar amounts of NP-expressing plasmids, i.e. (i) single expression NP-plasmid, (ii) six-plasmid vaccine, or (iii) 7mer polygene nucleotide vaccine, equal amounts of NP-protein is obtained. However, if the same absolute DNA amounts of the six-plasmid vaccine and the 7mer polygene nucleotide vaccine is used, the 7mer polygene nucleotide vaccine produces approximately twice as much NP-protein (see figure 8). Conclusion

Consequently, vaccination with the same DNA amount of the six-plasmid vaccine and the 7mer polygene nucleotide vaccine generates a superior protein expression by the 7mer polygene nucleotide vaccine (exemplified by NP). Therefore, less DNA can be used for vaccination with the 7mer polygene nucleotide vaccine.

References

• WO2016041562

· WO2008145129

• WO2010060430

• Williams J. Vector design for improved DNA vaccine efficacy, safety and production. Vaccines 2013; 1:225-249 Items

Item 1. A single nucleotide sequence comprising the influenza genes coding for haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) fused together with linkers comprising two cleavage sites. Item 2. A single nucleotide sequence comprising according to item 1, additionally comprising influenza genes coding matrix protein 1 (Ml) and matrix protein 2 (M2) fused together with linkers comprising two cleavage sites.

Item 3. A single nucleotide sequence comprising the influenza genes according to item 2, additionally comprising an influenza gene coding nucleoprotein (NP).

Item 4. A single nucleotide sequence according to any one of items 1-3, wherein the influenza genes stems from pandemic influenza strains. Item 5. A single nucleotide sequence according to item 4, where the HA (HI) and NA (Nl) stems from HlNlpdm2009, HA (H3) and NA (N2) stems from H3N21968 and Ml, M2 and NP stems from H1N1 1918. Item 6. A sing le nucleotide seq uence accord ing to any one of items 1-5, wherein the nucleotides are DNA or RNA.

Item 7. A sing le nucleotide seq uence accord ing to item 6, where the nucleotide seq uences are codon optimized for expression in humans.

Item 8. A sing le nucleotide seq uence accord ing to item 7, wherein the linkers comprise a cleavage site for furin. Item 9. A sing le nucleotide seq uence accord ing to item 8, where the amino acid seq uence for the furin cleavage site is RRKR.

Item 10. A single nucleotide seq uence accord ing to any one of items 8 or 9, where the l inker comprises SEQ ID NO 3.

Item 11. A single nucleotide seq uence accord ing to item 7, where the cleavage site is a self-cleaving 2A peptide.

Item 12. A single nucleotide seq uence accord ing to item 11, where the self- cleaving 2A peptide amino acid sequence is chosen from the following sequences APVKQTLNFDLLKLAGDVESNPGP, ATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGP,

QCTNYALLKLAGDVESNPGP and EGRGSLLTCGDVEENPGP.

Item 13. A single nucleotide seq uence accord ing to any one of items 1- 12, where the l inkers comprise a furin cleavage site and a self-cleaving 2A peptide.

Item 14. A single nucleotide seq uence accord ing to item 13, where the linkers comprise a GSG peptide between the furin cleavage site and the self-cleaving 2A peptide.

Item 15. A single nucleotide seq uence accord ing to item 14, where the linker comprises SEQ ID NO 5 or 7. Item 16. A single nucleotide sequence according to any one of items 1-15, where the HA (H 1N 1) amino acid sequence HDSNKGV optionally is changed to

HDSDKGV. Item 17. A single nucleotide sequence according to item 16, where the gene coding for HA comprises SEQ ID NO 8 or 10.

Item 18. A single nucleotide sequence according to any one of items 3-17, where the NP (H 1N 1) epitope YDKEEIRRIWR optionally is changed to WEKDDIKRIYK.

Item 19. A single nucleotide sequence according to item 18, where the gene coding for NP comprises SEQ ID NO 18 or 20.

Item 20. A single nucleotide sequence according to any one of items 1-19, where the polygene nucleotide sequence is incorporated into an expression vector.

Item 21. A single nucleotide sequence according to any one of items 3-18 as given in SEQ ID NO 1. Item 22. A vaccine comprising a single nucleotide sequence according to any one of item 1-21.

Sequence listing

Polygene nucleotide sequences (SEQ ID NO 1)

GCCACCATGAAGGCTATCCTGGTGGTGCTGCTGTACACCTTCGCCACCGCCAACGCC

GATACCCTGTGCATCGGCTACCACGCCAACAACAGCACCGACACCGTGGATACCGTG

CTGGAAAAGAACGTGACCGTGACCCACAGCGTGAACCTGCTGGAAGATAAGCACAAC

G G CA AG CTGTG CAAG CTG AG AG G CGTG G CCCCTCTG CACCTG G G CAAGTG CAATAT

CGCCGGCTGGATCCTGGGCAACCCCGAGTGCGAGAGCCTGAGCACCGCCAGCTCTT

GGTCCTACATCGTGGAGACACCCAGCAGCGACAACGGCACCTGTTACCCCGGCGACT

TCATCGACTACGAGGAACTGCGGGAGCAGCTGTCCAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGCGG

TTCGAGATCTTCCCCAAGACCAGCTCCTGGCCCAACCACGACAGCGATAAGGGCGTG

ACCGCCGCCTGTCCTCACGCTGGGGCCAAGAGCTTCTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTG

GTGAAGAAGGGCAACAGCTACCCCAAGCTGTCCAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGG CAAAGAGGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGCATCCACCACCCTAGCACCAGCGCCGACCAGC

AGAGCCTGTACCAGAACGCCGACACCTACGTGTTCGTGGGCAGCAGCCGGTACAGC

AAGAAGTTCAAGCCCGAGATCGCCATCAGACCCAAAGTGCGGGACCAGGAAGGCCG

GATGAACTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAGCCCGGCGACAAGATCACCTTCGAGGCCAC

CGGCAATCTGGTGGTGCCCAGATACGCCTTCGCCATGGAAAGAAACGCCGGCAGCG

GCATCATCATCAGCGACACCCCCGTGCACGACTGCAACACCACCTGTCAGACCCCCA

AGGGGGCCATCAACACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAACATCCACCCCATCACCATCGGCA

AGTGCCCTAAGTACGTGAAGTCCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCCACCGGCCTGCGGAAC

ATCCCCAGCATCCAGAGCAGAGGCCTGTTCGGGGCCATTGCCGGCTTTATCGAGGG

CGGCTGGACCGGAATGGTGGACGGGTGGTACGGCTACCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGG

GCAGCGGCTACGCCGCCGACCTGAAGTCCACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACC

AACAAAGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTCACCGCCGTGGGCAAA

GAGTTCAACCACCTGGAAAAGCGGATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAGGTGGACGACGG

CTTCCTGGACATCTGGACCTACAACGCCGAGCTGCTGGTGCTGCTGGAAAACGAGCG

GACCCTGGACTACCACGACTCCAACGTGAAGAATCTGTACGAGAAAGTGCGGAGCCA

GCTGAAGAACAACGCCAAAGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTCGAGTTCTACCACAAGTG

CGACAACACCTGTATGGAAAGCGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCCAAGTACAG

CGAGGAAGCCAAGCTGAACCGGGAAGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAGCTGGAAAGCACCC

GGATCTACCAGATCCTGGCCATCTACAGCACCGTGGCCAGCTCACTGGTCCTGGTCG

TGTCCCTG G G CG CTATCAG CTTCTG G ATGTG CAG C AACG G C AG CCTG CAGTGCCGG

ATCTGCATCCGGCGGAAGCGGggaagcggagctactaacttcagcctgctgaagcag gctggagac gtggaggagaaccctggacctATGAAAACCATCATCGCCCTGAGCTACATCTTCTGCCTC GC

CCTCGGCCAGGACCTGCCCGGCAACGACAACAGCACCGCCACCCTGTGCCTGGGCC

ACCACGCCGTGCCCAACGGCACCCTGGTGAAAACAATTACCGACGACCAGATCGAG

GTGACCAACGCCACCGAGCTGGTGCAGAGCAGCAGCACCGGCAAGATCTGCAACAA

CCCCCACCGCATCCTGGACGGCATCGACTGCACCCTGATCGACGCCCTGCTGGGCG

ACCCTCACTGCGACGTGTTCCAGAACGAGACCTGGGACCTGTTCGTGGAGCGCAGCA

AGGCCTTCAGCAACTGCTACCCCTACGACGTGCCCGACTACGCTTCCCTGCGCAGCC

TGGTCGCCAGCTCCGGGACCCTGGAGTTCATCACCGAGGGCTTCACCTGGACCGGG

GTCACACAGAATGGGGGGTCCAACGCCTGCAAGCGCGGACCCGGCAGCGGCTTCTT

CAGCCGCCTGAACTGGCTGACCAAGAGCGGCAGCACCTACCCCGTGCTGAACGTGA

CCATGCCCAACAACGACAACTTCGACAAGCTGTACATCTGGGGCGTGCACCACCCCA

GCACCAACCAGGAACAGACCAGCCTGTACGTGCAGGCCAGCGGCAGGGTGACCGTG

AGCACCCGCCGCAGCCAGCAGACCATCATCCCCAACATCGAGTCCCGGCCCTGGGT

CCGCGGGCTGTCCAGCCGCATCAGCATCTACTGGACCATCGTGAAGCCCGGCGACG TGCTGGTGATCAACAGCAACGGCAACCTGATCGCCCCCAGGGGCTACTTCAAGATGC

GGACCGGCAAGAGCAGCATCATGCGCAGCGACGCCCCCATCGACACCTGCATCAGC

GAGTGCATCACCCCCAACGGCAGCATCCCCAACGACAAGCCCTTCCAGAACGTGAAC

AAGATCACCTACGGGGCCTGTCCTAAGTACGTGAAGCAGAACACCCTGAAGCTCGCT

ACCGGCATGCGGAACGTGCCCGAGAAGCAGACCAGGGGCCTGTTCGGGGCCATCGC

CGGCTTCATCGAGAACGGCTGGGAGGGCATGATCGACGGGTGGTATGGCTTCCGCC

ACCAGAACAGCGAGGGCACCGGCCAGGCCGCCGACCTGAAGAGCACCCAGGCCGC

CATCGACCAGATCAACGGCAAGCTGAACCGCGTGATCGAGAAAACCAACGAGAAGTT

CCACCAGATCGAGAAAGAGTTCAGCGAGGTCGAGGGCCGCATCCAGGACCTGGAGA

AGTACGTGGAGGACACCAAGATCGACCTGTGGAGCTACAACGCCGAGCTGCTGGTC

GCCCTGGAGAACCAGCACACCATCGACCTGACCGACAGCGAGATGAACAAGCTGTTC

GAGAAAACCCGCAGGCAGCTGCGCGAGAACGCCGAGGACATGGGCAACGGCTGCTT

CAAGATCTACCACAAGTGCGACAACGCCTGCATCGAGAGCATCCGCAACGGCACCTA

CGACCACGACGTGTACCGCGACGAGGCCCTGAACAACCGCTTCCAGATCAAGGGCG

TGGAGCTGAAGAGCGGCTACAAGGACTGGATCCTGTGGATCAGCTTCGCTATCAGCT

G CTTCCTG CTGTG CGTG GTG CTGCTG G G CTTCATC ATGTG G G CCTG CCAG CG G G G C

AACATCCGCTGCAACATCTGCATCCGGCGGAAGCGGggaagcggagctactaacttc agcct gctgaagcaggctggagacgtggaggagaaccctggacctATGAACCCCAACCAGAAGAT CATCA

CCATCGG C AG CGTGTG CATG ACCATCG G CATG G CC AACCTG ATCCTG CAG ATCG G C A

ACATCATCAGCATCTGGATCAGCCACAGCATCCAGCTGGGCAACCAGAACCAGATCG

AGACATGCAACCAGAGCGTGATCACCTACGAGAACAACACCTGGGTGAACCAGACCT

ACGTGAACATCAGCAACACCAACTTCGCCGCTGGCCAGAGCGTGGTGTCTGTGAAGC

TGGCCGGCAACAGCAGCCTGTGCCCTGTGTCCGGCTGGGCCATCTACAGCAAGGAC

AACAGCGTGCGGATCGGCAGCAAGGGCGACGTGTTCGTGATCCGGGAGCCCTTCAT

CAGCTGCAGCCCCCTGGAATGCCGGACCTTCTTCCTGACCCAGGGGGCCCTGCTGAA

CGACAAGCACAGCAACGGCACCATCAAGGACAGAAGCCCCTACCGGACCCTGATGA

GCTGCCCCATCGGCGAGGTGCCCAGCCCCTACAACAGCAGATTCGAGTCCGTGGCTT

GGAGCGCCTCTGCCTGCCACGACGGCATCAACTGGCTGACAATCGGCATCAGCGGC

CCTGATAACGGCGCTGTGGCCGTGCTGAAGTACAACGGCATCATCACCGACACAATC

AAGAGCTGGCGGAACAACATCCTGCGGACCCAGGAATCCGAGTGCGCCTGCGTGAA

CGGCAGCTGCTTCACCGTGATGACCGACGGCCCTAGCAATGGCCAGGCCAGCTACA

AGATCTTCCGGATCGAGAAGGGCAAGATCGTGAAGTCCGTGGAGATGAACGCCCCC

AACTACCACTACGAGGAATGCAGCTGCTACCCCGACAGCAGCGAGATCACCTGTGTG

TGCCGGGACAACTGGCACGGCAGCAACAGACCCTGGGTGTCCTTCAACCAGAATCTG

GAATACCAGATCGGCTACATTTGCAGCGGCATCTTCGGCGACAACCCCAGACCCAAC GACAAGACCGGAAGCTGCGGCCCTGTGTCTAGCAACGGGGCCAACGGCGTGAAGGG

CTTC AG CTTCAAGTACG G CAATG GCGTGTG G ATCG G CCG G ACCAAG AG CATC AG CA

GCCGGAACGGCTTCGAGATGATCTGGGACCCCAACGGCTGGACCGGCACCGACAAC

AACTTCAGCATCAAGCAGGACATCGTGGGCATCAACGAGTGGAGCGGCTACAGCGG

CAGCTTCGTGCAGCACCCTGAGCTGACCGGCCTGGACTGCATCCGGCCCTGCTTTTG

GGTGGAGCTGATCAGAGGCAGACCCAAAGAGAACACCATCTGGACCAGCGGCAGCA

GCATCAGCTTTTGCGGCGTGAACAGCGACACCGTGGGCTGGTCTTGGCCCGATGGG

GCCGAGCTGCCCTTCACCATCGACAAGCGGCGGAAGCGGggaagcggagctactaac ttca gcctgctgaagcaggctggagacgtggaggagaaccctggacctATGAACCCCAACCAGA AGATCA

TCACCATCGGCAGCGTGAGCCTGACAATCGCTACCGTGTGCTTCCTGATGCAGATCG

CCATCCTGGTGACCACCGTGACCCTGCACTTCAAGCAGTACGAGTGCGACAGCCCCG

CCAGCAACCAGGTCATGCCCTGCGAGCCCATCATCATCGAGCGCAACATCACCGAGA

TCGTGTACCTGAACAACACCACCATCGAGAAGGAAATCTGCCCCAAGGTCGTGGAGT

ACCGCAACTGGTCCAAGCCCCAGTGCCAGATCACCGGCTTCGCCCCCTTCAGCAAGG

ACAACAGCATCCGCCTGAGCGCCGGAGGGGACATCTGGGTCACCCGCGAGCCCTAC

GTGAGCTGCGACCACGGCAAGTGCTACCAGTTCGCTCTGGGGCAGGGGACAACACT

CGATAACAAGCACAGCAACGACACCATCCACGACCGCATCCCCCACCGCACCCTGCT

GATGAACGAGCTGGGCGTGCCCTTCCACCTGGGCACCCGCCAGGTCTGCATCGCCT

GGTCCAGCAGCAGCTGCCACGACGGCAAGGCCTGGCTGCACGTGTGCATCACCGGC

GACGACAAGAACGCCACCGCCAGCTTCATCTACGACGGCCGCCTGGTGGACAGCAT

CGGCAGCTGGTCCCAGAACATCCTGCGCACCCAAGAAAGCGAGTGCGTCTGCATCAA

CGGGACCTGCACCGTGGTGATGACCGATGGAAGCGCCAGCGGCAGGGCCGATACCC

GGATCCTGTTCATCGAGGAAGGCAAGATCGTGCACATCAGCCCTCTCAGCGGCTCCG

CCCAGCACGTGGAAGAGTGCAGCTGCTACCCCCGCTACCCCGGCGTGCGCTGCATC

TGCCGCGACAACTGGAAGGGCAGCAACCGCCCCGTGGTGGACATCAACATGGAGGA

CTACAGCATCGACAGCAGCTACGTGTGCAGCGGCCTGGTCGGCGACACACCCCGCA

ACGACGACCGCAGCAGCAACAGCAACTGCCGCAACCCCAACAACGAGCGCGGCAAC

CAGGGCGTGAAGGGCTGGGCCTTCGACAACGGCGACGACGTGTGGATGGGCCGCA

CCATCTCCAAGGACCTGCGCAGCGGCTACGAGACCTTCAAGGTGATCGGCGGGTGG

AGCACCCCCAACAGCAAGAGCCAGATCAACCGCCAGGTGATCGTGGACAGCGACAA

CCGCTCCGGCTACAGCGGCATCTTCAGCGTGGAGGGCAAGTCCTGCATCAACCGCT

GCTTCTACGTGGAGCTGATCCGCGGCAGGAAGCAAGAAACCCGCGTCTGGTGGACC

AGCAACTCCATCGTGGTGTTCTGCGGCACCAGCGGCACCTACGGCACCGGCAGCTG

GCCCGACGGGGCCAACATCAACTTCATGCCCATCCGGCGGAAGCGGggaagcggCgc C actaacttcagcctgctgaagcaggctggagacgtggaggagaaccctggacctATGGCC AGCCAGGG CACCAAGAGAAGCTACGAGCAGATGGAAACCGACGGCGAGAGGCAGAACGCCACCG

AGATCAGGGCCAGCGTGGGCAGGATGATCGGCGGCATCGGCAGGTTCTACATCCAG

ATGTGCACCGAGCTGAAGCTGTCCGACTACGAGGGCAGGCTGATCCAGAACAGCAT

CACCATCGAGAGGATGGTGCTGTCCGCCTTCGACGAGAGAAGAAACAAGTACCTGG

AAGAGCACCCCAGCGCCGGCAAGGACCCCAAGAAAACCGGCGGACCCATCTACAGA

AGGATCGACGGCAAGTGGATGAGAGAGCTGATCCTGtgggagaaggacgacatcaag cgga tctacaagCAGGCCAACAACGGCGAGGACGCCACAGCCGGCCTGACCCACATGATGAT

CTGGCACAGCAACCTGAACGACGCCACCTACCAGAGGACCAGGGCCCTCGTCAGAA

CCGGCATGGACCCCCGGATGTGCAGCCTGATGCAGGGCAGCACACTGCCCAGAAGA

AGCGGAGCTGCTGGAGCCGCCGTGAAGGGCGTGGGCACCATGGTGATGGAACTGAT

CAGGATGATCAAGAGGGGCATCAACGACAGGAACTTTTGGAGGGGCGAGAACGGCA

GAAGGACCAGGATCGCCTACGAGAGGATGTGCAACATCCTGAAGGGCAAGTTCCAG

ACAGCCGCCCAGAGGGCCATGATGGACCAGGTCCGGGAGAGCAGGAACCCCGGCA

ACGCCGAGATCGAGGACCTGATCTTCCTGGCCAGAAGCGCCCTGATCCTGAGGGGC

AGCGTGGCCCACAAGAGCTGCCTGCCCGCCTGCGTGTACGGACCCGCCGTGGCCAG

CGGCTACGACTTCGAGAGAGAGGGCTACAGCCTGGTCGGCATCGACCCCTTCAGGC

TGCTGCAGAACTCCCAGGTGTACTCTCTGATCAGGCCCAACGAGAACCCCGCCCACA

AGTCCCAGCTGGTCTGGATGGCCTGCCACAGCGCCGCCTTCGAGGATCTGAGAGTG

AGCAGCTTCATCAGGGGCACCAGAGTGGTGCCCAGGGGCAAGCTGTCCACCAGGGG

CGTGCAGATCGCCAGCAACGAGAACATGGAAACCATGGACAGCAGCACCCTGGAAC

TGAGAAGCAGGTACTGGGCCATCAGGACCAGAAGCGGCGGCAACACCAACCAGCAG

AGGGCCAGCGCCGGACAGATCAGCGTGCAGCCCACCTTCTCCGTGCAGAGGAACCT

GCCCTTCGAGAGGGCCACCATCATGGCCGCCTTCACCGGCAACACCGAGGGCAGGA

CCAGAGACATGAGGACCGAGATCATCAGAATGATGGAAAGCGCCAGGCCCGAGGAC

GTGAGCTTCCAGGGCAGGGGCGTGTTCGAGCTGTCCGATGAGAAGGCCACCTCCCC

CATCGTGCCCAGCTTCGACATGAGCAACGAGGGCAGCTACTTCTTCGGCGACAACGC

CGAGGAATACGACAACCGGCGGAAGCGGggaagcggCgcCactaacttcagcctgct gaagca ggctggagacgtggaggagaaccctggacctATGTCCCTGCTGACAGAGGTGGAGACCTA CGT

GCTGTCCATCGTGCCCTCTGGCCCTCTGAAGGCCGAGATCGCCCAGAGACTGGAGG

ACGTGTTCGCCGGCAAGAACACAGATCTGGAGGCCCTGATGGAGTGGCTGAAGACA

AGGCCAATCCTGTCTCCCCTGACCAAGGGCATCCTGGGCTTCGTGTTTACACTGACC

GTGCCTAGCGAGAGGGGACTGCAGCGGAGAAGGTTCGTGCAGAATGCCCTGAACGG

CAATGGCGACCCAAACAATATGGATCGGGCCGTGAAGCTGTATAGAAAGCTGAAGAG

GGAGATCACCTTTCACGGAGCCAAGGAGGTGGCCCTGTCTTACAGCGCCGGGGCCC

TG G CAAGCTG CATG G G ACTG ATCTATAAC AGG ATG G G CAC AGTG ACC ACAG AG GTG GCCTTCGGCCTGGTGTGCGCAACCTGTGAGCAGATCGCAGACAGCCAGCACCGCTC

CCACAGGCAGATGGTGACCACAACCAACCCCCTGATCCGCCACGAGAATCGGATGGT

GCTGGCCTCCACAACCGCCAAGGCCATGGAGCAGATGGCAGGCAGCTCCGAGCAGG

CAGCAGAGGCCATGGAGGTGGCCTCTCAGGCCAGACAGATGGTGCAGGCCATGAGG

ACAATCGGAACCCACCCTTCTAGCTCCGCCGGCCTGAAGGACGATCTGATCGAGAAT

CTGCAGGCCTACCAGAAGCGCATGGGCGTGCAGATGCAGCGGTTTAAGCGGCGGAA

GCGGggaagcggagctactaacttcagcctgctgaagcaggctggagacgtggagga gaaccctggacct

ATGTCCCTGCTGACCGAGGTGGAGACCCCAACACGGAACGAGTGGGGCTGCAGATG

TAATGACAGCTCCGATCCCCTGGTCATCGCCGCCTCTATCATCGGCATCCTGCACCT G

ATCCTGTGGATCCTGGACAGGCTGTTCTTTAAGTGCATCTACCGGAGACTGAAGTAT

GGCCTGAAGAGAGGCCCCTCTACAGAGGGCGTGCCTGAGAGCATGAGGGAGGAGTA

CCGCAAGGAGCAGCAGAGCGCCGTGGATGTGGACGATGGCCACTTCGTGAACATCG

AGCTGGAGTGACTAGTTAA

Polygene amino acid sequences (SEQ ID NO 2)

M KAILVVLLYTFATAN ADTLCIGYH AN N STDTVDTVLE KNVTVTH S VN LLED KH NGKLCK

LRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYIVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEE LRE

QLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSDKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVKKGNSYPK LS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADTYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPK VR

DQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTT CQ

TPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPSIQSRGLFGAIAGFI EGGWT

GMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNH

LEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNN AKE

IGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQILAI YSTV

ASSLVLVVSLGAISFWMCSNGSLQCRICIRRKRGSGATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGPMK TII

ALSYIFCLALGQDLPGNDNSTATLCLGHHAVPNGTLVKTITDDQIEVTNATELVQSS STG

KICNNPHRILDGIDCTLIDALLGDPHCDVFQNETWDLFVERSKAFSNCYPYDVPDYA SLR

SLVASSGTLEFITEGFTWTGVTQNGGSNACKRGPGSGFFSRLNWLTKSGSTYPVLNV T

MPNNDNFDKLYIWGVHHPSTNQEQTSLYVQASGRVTVSTRRSQQTIIPNIESRPWVR G

LSSRISIYWTIVKPGDVLVINSNGNLIAPRGYFKMRTGKSSIMRSDAPIDTCISECI TPNG

SIPNDKPFQNVNKITYGACPKYVKQNTLKLATGMRNVPEKQTRGLFGAIAGFIENGW EG

MIDGWYGFRHQNSEGTGQAADLKSTQAAIDQINGKLNRVIEKTNEKFHQIEKEFSEV EG

RIQDLEKYVEDTKIDLWSYNAELLVALENQHTIDLTDSEMNKLFEKTRRQLRENAED MG

NGCFKIYHKCDNACIESIRNGTYDHDVYRDEALNNRFQIKGVELKSGYKDWILWISF AIS CFLLCVVLLGFIMWACQRGNIRCNICIRRKRGSGATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGPMNPNQK

IITIGSVCMTIGMANLILQIGNIISIWISHSIQLGNQNQIETCNQSVITYENNTWVN QTYV

NISNTNFAAGQSVVSVKLAGNSSLCPVSGWAIYSKDNSVRIGSKGDVFVIREPFISC SPL

ECRTFFLTQGALLNDKHSNGTIKDRSPYRTLMSCPIGEVPSPYNSRFESVAWSASAC HD

GINWLTIGISGPDNGAVAVLKYNGIITDTIKSWRNNILRTQESECACVNGSCFTVMT DG

PSNGQASYKIFRIEKGKIVKSVEMNAPNYHYEECSCYPDSSEITCVCRDNWHGSNRP W

VSFNQNLEYQIGYICSGIFGDNPRPNDKTGSCGPVSSNGANGVKGFSFKYGNGVWIG R

TKSISSRNGFEMIWDPNGWTGTDNNFSIKQDIVGINEWSGYSGSFVQHPELTGLDCI R

PCFWVELIRGRPKENTIWTSGSSISFCGVNSDTVGWSWPDGAELPFTIDKRRKRGSG A

TNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGPM NPNQKIITIGSVSLTIATVCFLMQIAILVTTVTLHFKQYECD

SPASNQVMPCEPIIIERNITEIVYLNNTTIEKEICPKVVEYRNWSKPQCQITGFAPF SKDN

SIRLSAGGDIWVTREPYVSCDHGKCYQFALGQGTTLDN KHSNDTIHDRIPHRTLLMNEL

GVPFHLGTRQVCIAWSSSSCHDGKAWLHVCITGDDKNATASFIYDGRLVDSIGSWSQ

NILRTQESECVCINGTCTVVMTDGSASGRADTRILFIEEGKIVHISPLSGSAQHVEE CSC

YPRYPGVRCICRDNWKGSNRPVVDINMEDYSIDSSYVCSGLVGDTPRNDDRSSNSNC R

NPNNERGNQGVKGWAFDNGDDVWMGRTISKDLRSGYETFKVIGGWSTPNSKSQINR

QVIVDSDNRSGYSGIFSVEGKSCINRCFYVELIRGRKQETRVWWTSNSIVVFCGTSG TY

GTGSWPDGANINFMPIRRKRGSGATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGPMASQGTKRSYEQMET

DGERQNATEIRASVGRMIGGIGRFYIQMCTELKLSDYEGRLIQNSITIERMVLSAFD ERR

N KYLEEHPSAGKDPKKTGGPIYRRIDGKWMRELILWEKDDIKRIYKQANNGEDATAGLT

HMMIWHSNLNDATYQRTRALVRTGMDPRMCSLMQGSTLPRRSGAAGAAVKGVGTMV

MELIRMIKRGINDRNFWRGENGRRTRIAYERMCNILKGKFQTAAQRAMMDQVRESRN P

GNAEIEDLIFLARSALILRGSVAH KSCLPACVYGPAVASGYDFEREGYSLVGIDPFRLLQN

SQVYSLIRPNENPAH KSQLVWMACHSAAFEDLRVSSFIRGTRVVPRGKLSTRGVQIASN

ENMETMDSSTLELRSRYWAIRTRSGGNTNQQRASAGQISVQPTFSVQRNLPFERATI MA

AFTGNTEGRTRDMRTEIIRMMESARPEDVSFQGRGVFELSDEKATSPIVPSFDMSNE GS

YFFGDNAEEYDNRRKRGSGATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGPMSLLTEVETYVLSIVPSGP LKA

EIAQRLEDVFAGKNTDLEALMEWLKTRPILSPLTKGILGFVFTLTVPSERGLQRRRF VQNA

LNGNGDPNNMDRAVKLYRKLKREITFHGAKEVALSYSAGALASCMGLIYNRMGTVTT EV

AFGLVCATCEQIADSQHRSHRQMVTTTNPLIRHENRMVLASTTAKAMEQMAGSSEQA A

EAMEVASQARQMVQAMRTIGTHPSSSAGLKDDLIENLQAYQKRMGVQMQRFKRRKRG

SGATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGPMSLLTEVETPTRNEWGCRCNDSSDPLVIAASIIGIL HLIL

WILDRLFFKCIYRRLKYGLKRGPSTEGVPESMREEYRKEQQSAVDVDDGHFVNIELE Defined sequences of the cleavage sites making up the linkers in the single nucleic acid construct (SEQ ID NO 1) depicted in figure 1 :

5'-part of linker: furin cleavage site, codon optimized for human;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 3)

CGGCGGAAGCGG

Amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO 4)

RRKR

3'-part of linker: porcine teschovirus-1 2A peptide including GSG encoding sequence;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 5)

GGAAGCGGAGCTACTAACTTCAGCCTGCTGAAGCAGGCTGGAGACGTGGAGGAGAA CCCTGGACCT

Amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO 6)

GSGATNFSLLKQAGDVEENPGP

Alternative 3'-part of linker; porcine teschovirus-1 2A peptide, with Kasl restriction enzyme site, including GSG encoding sequence;

nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 7)

GGAAGCGGCGCCACTAACTTCAGCCTGCTGAAGCAGGCTGGAGACGTGGAGGAGAA CCCTGGACCT

Amino acid sequence; see SEQ ID NO 6

Overview of defined influenza protein coding sequences making up the single nucleic acid construct depicted in figure 1, with and without modified HA and NP epitopes potentially implicated of playing a role for narcolepsy:

Hemagglutinin (HA) synthetic gene, based on acc. no. FJ966082 (Influenza A virus A/California/04/09 (H INJJ), contains wild type potential narcolepsy- inducing codon (aac; Asn), codon optimized for human;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 8) ATGAAGGCTATCCTGGTGGTGCTGCTGTACACCTTCGCCACCGCCAACGCCGATACC

CTGTGCATCGGCTACCACGCCAACAACAGCACCGACACCGTGGATACCGTGCTGGAA

AAGAACGTGACCGTGACCCACAGCGTGAACCTGCTGGAAGATAAGCACAACGGCAA

GCTGTGCAAGCTGAGAGGCGTGGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAGTGCAATATCGCCG

GCTGGATCCTGGGCAACCCCGAGTGCGAGAGCCTGAGCACCGCCAGCTCTTGGTCC

TACATCGTGGAGACACCCAGCAGCGACAACGGCACCTGTTACCCCGGCGACTTCATC

GACTACGAGGAACTGCGGGAGCAGCTGTCCAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGCGGTTCGA

GATCTTCCCCAAGACCAGCTCCTGGCCCAACCACGACAGCaacAAGGGCGTGACCGC

CGCCTGTCCTCACGCTGGGGCCAAGAGCTTCTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAA

GAAGGGCAACAGCTACCCCAAGCTGTCCAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAG

AGGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGCATCCACCACCCTAGCACCAGCGCCGACCAGCAGAGC

CTGTACCAGAACGCCGACACCTACGTGTTCGTGGGCAGCAGCCGGTACAGCAAGAA

GTTCAAGCCCGAGATCGCCATCAGACCCAAAGTGCGGGACCAGGAAGGCCGGATGA

ACTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAGCCCGGCGACAAGATCACCTTCGAGGCCACCGGC

AATCTGGTGGTGCCCAGATACGCCTTCGCCATGGAAAGAAACGCCGGCAGCGGCAT

CATCATCAGCGACACCCCCGTGCACGACTGCAACACCACCTGTCAGACCCCCAAGGG

GGCCATCAACACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAACATCCACCCCATCACCATCGGCAAGTG

CCCTAAGTACGTGAAGTCCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCCACCGGCCTGCGGAACATCCC

CAGCATCCAGAGCAGAGGCCTGTTCGGGGCCATTGCCGGCTTTATCGAGGGCGGCT

GGACCGGAATGGTGGACGGGTGGTACGGCTACCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGCAGC

GGCTACGCCGCCGACCTGAAGTCCACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACCAACAAA

GTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTCACCGCCGTGGGCAAAGAGTT

CAACCACCTGGAAAAGCGGATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAGGTGGACGACGGCTTCC

TGGACATCTGGACCTACAACGCCGAGCTGCTGGTGCTGCTGGAAAACGAGCGGACC

CTGGACTACCACGACTCCAACGTGAAGAATCTGTACGAGAAAGTGCGGAGCCAGCTG

AAGAACAACGCCAAAGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTCGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGCGAC

AACACCTGTATGGAAAGCGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCCAAGTACAGCGAG

GAAGCCAAGCTGAACCGGGAAGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAGCTGGAAAGCACCCGGAT

CTACCAGATCCTGGCCATCTACAGCACCGTGGCCAGCTCACTGGTCCTGGTCGTGTC

CCTGGGCGCTATCAGCTTCTGGATGTGCAGCAACGGCAGCCTGCAGTGCCGGATCT

GCATC

Amino acid sequence, (SEQ ID NO 9) M KAILVVLLYTFATAN ADTLCIGYH AN N STDTVDTVLE KNVTVTH S VN LLED KH NGKLCK

LRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYIVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEE LRE

QLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVKKGNSYPK LS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADTYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPK VR

DQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTT CQ

TPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPSIQSRGLFGAIAGFI EGGWT

GMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNH

LEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNN AKE

IGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQILAI YSTV

ASSLVLVVSLGAISFWMCSNGSLQCRICI

Hemagglutinin (HA) synthetic gene, based on acc. no FJ966082 (Influenza A virus A/California/04/09 (H 1N 1)), contains modified potential narcolepsy- inducing codon (gat; Asp), codon optimized for human;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 10)

atgAAGGCTATCCTGGTGGTGCTGCTGTACACCTTCGCCACCGCCAACGCCGATACC C

TGTGCATCGGCTACCACGCCAACAACAGCACCGACACCGTGGATACCGTGCTGGAAA

AGAACGTGACCGTGACCCACAGCGTGAACCTGCTGGAAGATAAGCACAACGGCAAG

CTGTGCAAGCTGAGAGGCGTGGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAGTGCAATATCGCCGG

CTGGATCCTGGGCAACCCCGAGTGCGAGAGCCTGAGCACCGCCAGCTCTTGGTCCT

ACATCGTGGAGACACCCAGCAGCGACAACGGCACCTGTTACCCCGGCGACTTCATCG

ACTACGAGGAACTGCGGGAGCAGCTGTCCAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGCGGTTCGAG

ATCTTCCCCAAGACCAGCTCCTGGCCCAACCACGACAGCgatAAGGGCGTGACCGCC

G CCTGTCCTCACG CTG G G G CCAAG AG CTTCTACAAG AACCTG ATCTG GCTG GTGAAG

AAGGGCAACAGCTACCCCAAGCTGTCCAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGA

GGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGCATCCACCACCCTAGCACCAGCGCCGACCAGCAGAGCC

TGTACCAGAACGCCGACACCTACGTGTTCGTGGGCAGCAGCCGGTACAGCAAGAAG

TTCAAGCCCGAGATCGCCATCAGACCCAAAGTGCGGGACCAGGAAGGCCGGATGAA

CTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAGCCCGGCGACAAGATCACCTTCGAGGCCACCGGCA

ATCTGGTGGTGCCCAGATACGCCTTCGCCATGGAAAGAAACGCCGGCAGCGGCATC

ATCATCAGCGACACCCCCGTGCACGACTGCAACACCACCTGTCAGACCCCCAAGGGG

GCCATCAACACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAACATCCACCCCATCACCATCGGCAAGTGC

CCTAAGTACGTGAAGTCCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCCACCGGCCTGCGGAACATCCCC

AGCATCCAGAGCAGAGGCCTGTTCGGGGCCATTGCCGGCTTTATCGAGGGCGGCTG GACCGGAATGGTGGACGGGTGGTACGGCTACCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGCAGCG

GCTACGCCGCCGACCTGAAGTCCACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACCAACAAAG

TGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTCACCGCCGTGGGCAAAGAGTTCA

ACCACCTGGAAAAGCGGATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAGGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTG

GACATCTGGACCTACAACGCCGAGCTGCTGGTGCTGCTGGAAAACGAGCGGACCCT

GGACTACCACGACTCCAACGTGAAGAATCTGTACGAGAAAGTGCGGAGCCAGCTGAA

GAACAACGCCAAAGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTCGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGCGACAA

CACCTGTATGGAAAGCGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCCAAGTACAGCGAGGA

AGCCAAGCTGAACCGGGAAGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAGCTGGAAAGCACCCGGATCT

ACCAGATCCTGGCCATCTACAGCACCGTGGCCAGCTCACTGGTCCTGGTCGTGTCCC

TG G G CG CTATCAG CTTCTG G ATGTG CAG C AACG G CAGCCTG C AGTG CCG G ATCTG C

ATC

Amino acid sequence, (SEQ ID NO 11)

M KAILVVLLYTFATAN ADTLCIGYH AN N STDTVDTVLE KNVTVTH S VN LLED KH NGKLCK

LRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYIVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEE LRE

QLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSDKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVKKGNSYPK LS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADTYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPK VR

DQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTT CQ

TPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPSIQSRGLFGAIAGFI EGGWT

GMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNH

LEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNN AKE

IGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQILAI YSTV

ASSLVLVVSLGAISFWMCSNGSLQCRICI

Hemagglutinin (HA) synthetic gene, based on acc. no AB295605 (Influenza A virus A/Aichi/2/1968(H3N2)), codon optimized for human;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 12)

atgAAAACCATCATCGCCCTGAGCTACATCTTCTGCCTCGCCCTCGGCCAGGACCTG C

CCGGCAACGACAACAGCACCGCCACCCTGTGCCTGGGCCACCACGCCGTGCCCAAC

GGCACCCTGGTGAAAACAATTACCGACGACCAGATCGAGGTGACCAACGCCACCGA

GCTGGTGCAGAGCAGCAGCACCGGCAAGATCTGCAACAACCCCCACCGCATCCTGG

ACGGCATCGACTGCACCCTGATCGACGCCCTGCTGGGCGACCCTCACTGCGACGTGT

TCCAGAACGAGACCTGGGACCTGTTCGTGGAGCGCAGCAAGGCCTTCAGCAACTGCT ACCCCTACGACGTGCCCGACTACGCTTCCCTGCGCAGCCTGGTCGCCAGCTCCGGGA

CCCTGGAGTTCATCACCGAGGGCTTCACCTGGACCGGGGTCACACAGAATGGGGGG

TCCAACGCCTGCAAGCGCGGACCCGGCAGCGGCTTCTTCAGCCGCCTGAACTGGCT

GACCAAGAGCGGCAGCACCTACCCCGTGCTGAACGTGACCATGCCCAACAACGACA

ACTTCGACAAGCTGTACATCTGGGGCGTGCACCACCCCAGCACCAACCAGGAACAGA

CCAGCCTGTACGTGCAGGCCAGCGGCAGGGTGACCGTGAGCACCCGCCGCAGCCAG

CAGACCATCATCCCCAACATCGAGTCCCGGCCCTGGGTCCGCGGGCTGTCCAGCCG

CATCAGCATCTACTGGACCATCGTGAAGCCCGGCGACGTGCTGGTGATCAACAGCAA

CGGCAACCTGATCGCCCCCAGGGGCTACTTCAAGATGCGGACCGGCAAGAGCAGCA

TCATGCGCAGCGACGCCCCCATCGACACCTGCATCAGCGAGTGCATCACCCCCAACG

GCAGCATCCCCAACGACAAGCCCTTCCAGAACGTGAACAAGATCACCTACGGGGCCT

GTCCTAAGTACGTGAAGCAGAACACCCTGAAGCTCGCTACCGGCATGCGGAACGTGC

CCGAGAAGCAGACCAGGGGCCTGTTCGGGGCCATCGCCGGCTTCATCGAGAACGGC

TGGGAGGGCATGATCGACGGGTGGTATGGCTTCCGCCACCAGAACAGCGAGGGCAC

CGGCCAGGCCGCCGACCTGAAGAGCACCCAGGCCGCCATCGACCAGATCAACGGCA

AGCTGAACCGCGTGATCGAGAAAACCAACGAGAAGTTCCACCAGATCGAGAAAGAGT

TCAGCGAGGTCGAGGGCCGCATCCAGGACCTGGAGAAGTACGTGGAGGACACCAAG

ATCGACCTGTGGAGCTACAACGCCGAGCTGCTGGTCGCCCTGGAGAACCAGCACAC

CATCGACCTGACCGACAGCGAGATGAACAAGCTGTTCGAGAAAACCCGCAGGCAGCT

GCGCGAGAACgCCGAGGACATGGGCAACGGCTGCTTCAAGATCTACCACAAGTGCG

ACAACGCCTGCATCGAGAGCATCCGCAACGGCACCTACGACCACGACGTGTACCGC

GACGAGGCCCTGAACAACCGCTTCCAGATCAAGGGCGTGGAGCTGAAGAGCGGCTA

CA AG G ACTG G ATCCTGTG G ATC AG CTTCG CTATCAG CTG CTTCCTG CTGTG CGTG GT

G CTG CTG G G CTTC ATCATGTG G G CCTG CC AG CG G G G CAAC ATCCG CTG CAAC ATCTG

CATC

Amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO 13)

M KTIIALSYIFCLALGQDLPGNDNSTATLCLGHHAVPNGTLVKTITDDQIEVTNATELVQS

SSTGKICNNPHRILDGIDCTLIDALLGDPHCDVFQNETWDLFVERSKAFSNCYPYDV PDY

ASLRSLVASSGTLEFITEGFTWTGVTQNGGSNACKRGPGSGFFSRLNWLTKSGSTYP VL

NVTMPNNDNFDKLYIWGVHHPSTNQEQTSLYVQASGRVTVSTRRSQQTIIPNIESRP W

VRGLSSRISIYWTIVKPGDVLVINSNGNLIAPRGYFKMRTGKSSIM RSDAPIDTCISECIT

PNGSIPNDKPFQNVNKITYGACPKYVKQNTLKLATGMRNVPEKQTRGLFGAIAGFIE NG

WEGMIDGWYGFRHQNSEGTGQAADLKSTQAAIDQINGKLNRVIEKTNEKFHQIEKEF S EVEGRIQDLEKYVEDTKIDLWSYNAELLVALENQHTIDLTDSEMNKLFEKTRRQLRENAE DMGNGCFKIYHKCDNACIESIRNGTYDHDVYRDEALNNRFQIKGVELKSGYKDWILWIS FAISCFLLCVVLLGFIMWACQRGNIRCNICI

Neuraminidase (NA) synthetic gene, based on acc. no FJ966084 (Influenza A virus A/California/04/09(H 1N 1)), codon optimized for human;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 14)

ATGAACCCCAACCAGAAGATCATCACCATCGGCAGCGTGTGCATGACCATCGGCATG

G CC AACCTG ATCCTG CAG ATCG G C AA CATC ATC AG CATCTG GATCAG CCACAG CATC

CAGCTGGGCAACCAGAACCAGATCGAGACATGCAACCAGAGCGTGATCACCTACGA

GAACAACACCTGGGTGAACCAGACCTACGTGAACATCAGCAACACCAACTTCGCCGC

TGGCCAGAGCGTGGTGTCTGTGAAGCTGGCCGGCAACAGCAGCCTGTGCCCTGTGT

CCGGCTGGGCCATCTACAGCAAGGACAACAGCGTGCGGATCGGCAGCAAGGGCGAC

GTGTTCGTGATCCGGGAGCCCTTCATCAGCTGCAGCCCCCTGGAATGCCGGACCTTC

TTCCTGACCCAGGGGGCCCTGCTGAACGACAAGCACAGCAACGGCACCATCAAGGA

CAGAAGCCCCTACCGGACCCTGATGAGCTGCCCCATCGGCGAGGTGCCCAGCCCCT

ACAACAGCAGATTCGAGTCCGTGGCTTGGAGCGCCTCTGCCTGCCACGACGGCATCA

ACTGGCTGACAATCGGCATCAGCGGCCCTGATAACGGCGCTGTGGCCGTGCTGAAG

TACAACGGCATCATCACCGACACAATCAAGAGCTGGCGGAACAACATCCTGCGGACC

CAGGAATCCGAGTGCGCCTGCGTGAACGGCAGCTGCTTCACCGTGATGACCGACGG

CCCTAGCAATGGCCAGGCCAGCTACAAGATCTTCCGGATCGAGAAGGGCAAGATCGT

GAAGTCCGTGGAGATGAACGCCCCCAACTACCACTACGAGGAATGCAGCTGCTACCC

CGACAGCAGCGAGATCACCTGTGTGTGCCGGGACAACTGGCACGGCAGCAACAGAC

CCTGGGTGTCCTTCAACCAGAATCTGGAATACCAGATCGGCTACATTTGCAGCGGCA

TCTTCGGCGACAACCCCAGACCCAACGACAAGACCGGAAGCTGCGGCCCTGTGTCTA

G CA ACG G G GCCAACGGCGTGAAGG G CTTCAG CTTC AAGTACG G CAATG GCGTGTG G

ATCGGCCGGACCAAGAGCATCAGCAGCCGGAACGGCTTCGAGATGATCTGGGACCC

CAACGGCTGGACCGGCACCGACAACAACTTCAGCATCAAGCAGGACATCGTGGGCA

TCAACGAGTGGAGCGGCTACAGCGGCAGCTTCGTGCAGCACCCTGAGCTGACCGGC

CTGGACTGCATCCGGCCCTGCTTTTGGGTGGAGCTGATCAGAGGCAGACCCAAAGA

GAACACCATCTGGACCAGCGGCAGCAGCATCAGCTTTTGCGGCGTGAACAGCGACA

CCGTGGGCTGGTCTTGGCCCGATGGGGCCGAGCTGCCCTTCACCATCGACAAG

Amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO 15) MNPNQKIITIGSVCMTIGMANLILQIGNIISIWISHSIQLGNQNQIETCNQSVITYENNT W

VNQTYVNISNTNFAAGQSVVSVKLAGNSSLCPVSGWAIYSKDNSVRIGSKGDVFVIR EP

FISCSPLECRTFFLTQGALLNDKHSNGTIKDRSPYRTLMSCPIGEVPSPYNSRFESV AWS

ASACHDGINWLTIGISGPDNGAVAVLKYNGIITDTIKSWRNNILRTQESECACVNGS CF

TVMTDGPSNGQASYKIFRIEKGKIVKSVEMNAPNYHYEECSCYPDSSEITCVCRDNW HG

SNRPWVSFNQNLEYQIGYICSGIFGDNPRPNDKTGSCGPVSSNGANGVKGFSFKYGN G

VWIGRTKSISSRNGFEMIWDPNGWTGTDNNFSIKQDIVGINEWSGYSGSFVQHPELT G

LDCIRPCFWVELIRGRPKENTIWTSGSSISFCGVNSDTVGWSWPDGAELPFTIDK

Neuraminidase (NA) synthetic gene, based on acc. no AB295606 Influenza A virus (A/Aichi/2/1968(H3N2)), codon optimized for human;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 16)

atgAACCCCAACCAGAAGATCATCACCATCGGCAGCGTGAGCCTGACAATCGCTACC G

TGTGCTTCCTGATGCAGATCGCCATCCTGGTGACCACCGTGACCCTGCACTTCAAGC

AGTACGAGTGCGACAGCCCCGCCAGCAACCAGGTCATGCCCTGCGAGCCCATCATCA

TCGAGCGCAACATCACCGAGATCGTGTACCTGAACAACACCACCATCGAGAAGGAAA

TCTGCCCCAAGGTCGTGGAGTACCGCAACTGGTCCAAGCCCCAGTGCCAGATCACCG

GCTTCGCCCCCTTCAGCAAGGACAACAGCATCCGCCTGAGCGCCGGAGGGGACATC

TGGGTCACCCGCGAGCCCTACGTGAGCTGCGACCACGGCAAGTGCTACCAGTTCGC

TCTGGGGCAGGGGACAACACTCGATAACAAGCACAGCAACGACACCATCCACGACC

GCATCCCCCACCGCACCCTGCTGATGAACGAGCTGGGCGTGCCCTTCCACCTGGGCA

CCCGCCAGGTCTGCATCGCCTGGTCCAGCAGCAGCTGCCACGACGGCAAGGCCTGG

CTGCACGTGTGCATCACCGGCGACGACAAGAACGCCACCGCCAGCTTCATCTACGAC

GGCCGCCTGGTGGACAGCATCGGCAGCTGGTCCCAGAACATCCTGCGCACCCAAGA

AAGCGAGTGCGTCTGCATCAACGGGACCTGCACCGTGGTGATGACCGATGGAAGCG

CCAGCGGCAGGGCCGATACCCGGATCCTGTTCATCGAGGAAGGCAAGATCGTGCAC

ATCAGCCCTCTCAGCGGCTCCGCCCAGCACGTGGAAGAGTGCAGCTGCTACCCCCG

CTACCCCGGCGTGCGCTGCATCTGCCGCGACAACTGGAAGGGCAGCAACCGCCCCG

TGGTGGACATCAACATGGAGGACTACAGCATCGACAGCAGCTACGTGTGCAGCGGC

CTGGTCGGCGACACACCCCGCAACGACGACCGCAGCAGCAACAGCAACTGCCGCAA

CCCCAACAACGAGCGCGGCAACCAGGGCGTGAAGGGCTGGGCCTTCGACAACGGC

GACGACGTGTGGATGGGCCGCACCATCTCCAAGGACCTGCGCAGCGGCTACGAGAC

CTTCAAGGTGATCGGCGGGTGGAGCACCCCCAACAGCAAGAGCCAGATCAACCGCC

AGGTGATCGTGGACAGCGACAACCGCTCCGGCTACAGCGGCATCTTCAGCGTGGAG G G CA AGTCCTG C ATCAACCG CTG CTTCTACGTG GAG CTG ATCCG CG G CAG G AAG C AA

GAAACCCGCGTCTGGTGGACCAGCAACTCCATCGTGGTGTTCTGCGGCACCAGCGG

CACCTACGGCACCGGCAGCTGGCCCGACGGGGCCAACATCAACTTCATGCCCATC

Amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO 17)

MNPNQKIITIGSVSLTIATVCFLMQIAILVTTVTLHFKQYECDSPASNQVMPCEPIIIER NI

TEIVYLNNTTIEKEICPKVVEYRNWSKPQCQITGFAPFSKDNSIRLSAGGDIWVTRE PYV

SCDHGKCYQFALGQGTTLDNKHSNDTIHDRIPHRTLLMNELGVPFHLGTRQVCIAWS S

SSCHDGKAWLHVCITGDDKNATASFIYDGRLVDSIGSWSQNILRTQESECVCINGTC T

VVMTDGSASGRADTRILFIEEGKIVHISPLSGSAQHVEECSCYPRYPGVRCICRDNW KG

SNRPVVDINMEDYSIDSSYVCSGLVGDTPRNDDRSSNSNCRNPNNERGNQGVKGWAF

DNGDDVWMGRTISKDLRSGYETFKVIGGWSTPNSKSQINRQVIVDSDNRSGYSGIFS V

EGKSCINRCFYVELIRGRKQETRVWWTSNSIVVFCGTSGTYGTGSWPDGANINFMPI

Nucleoprotein (NP) synthetic gene, based on acc. no. AY744935 (Influenza A virus A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 (H 1N 1)), including wild type potential narcolepsy-inducing epitope, codon optimized for human; nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 18)

ATGGCCAGCCAGGGCACCAAGAGAAGCTACGAGCAGATGGAAACCGACGGCGAGAG

GCAGAACGCCACCGAGATCAGGGCCAGCGTGGGCAGGATGATCGGCGGCATCGGC

AGGTTCTACATCCAGATGTGCACCGAGCTGAAGCTGTCCGACTACGAGGGCAGGCTG

ATCCAGAACAGCATCACCATCGAGAGGATGGTGCTGTCCGCCTTCGACGAGAGAAGA

AACAAGTACCTGGAAGAGCACCCCAGCGCCGGCAAGGACCCCAAGAAAACCGGCGG

ACCCATCTACAGAAGGATCGACGGCAAGTGGATGAGAGAGCTGATCCTGTACGACAA

GGAGGAAATCAGAAGGATCTGGCGGCAGGCCAACAACGGCGAGGACGCCACAGCC

GGCCTGACCCACATGATGATCTGGCACAGCAACCTGAACGACGCCACCTACCAGAGG

ACCAGGGCCCTCGTCAGAACCGGCATGGACCCCCGGATGTGCAGCCTGATGCAGGG

CAGCACACTGCCCAGAAGAAGCGGAGCTGCTGGAGCCGCCGTGAAGGGCGTGGGC

ACCATGGTGATGGAACTGATCAGGATGATCAAGAGGGGCATCAACGACAGGAACTTT

TGGAGGGGCGAGAACGGCAGAAGGACCAGGATCGCCTACGAGAGGATGTGCAACAT

CCTGAAGGGCAAGTTCCAGACAGCCGCCCAGAGGGCCATGATGGACCAGGTCCGGG

AGAGCAGGAACCCCGGCAACGCCGAGATCGAGGACCTGATCTTCCTGGCCAGAAGC

GCCCTGATCCTGAGGGGCAGCGTGGCCCACAAGAGCTGCCTGCCCGCCTGCGTGTA

CGGACCCGCCGTGGCCAGCGGCTACGACTTCGAGAGAGAGGGCTACAGCCTGGTCG G CATCG ACCCCTTCAG G CTG CTG CAG AACTCCC AG GTGTACTCTCTG ATCAG G CCC A

ACGAGAACCCCGCCCACAAGTCCCAGCTGGTCTGGATGGCCTGCCACAGCGCCGCC

TTCGAGGATCTGAGAGTGAGCAGCTTCATCAGGGGCACCAGAGTGGTGCCCAGGGG

CAAGCTGTCCACCAGGGGCGTGCAGATCGCCAGCAACGAGAACATGGAAACCATGG

ACAGCAGCACCCTGGAACTGAGAAGCAGGTACTGGGCCATCAGGACCAGAAGCGGC

GGCAACACCAACCAGCAGAGGGCCAGCGCCGGACAGATCAGCGTGCAGCCCACCTT

CTCCGTGCAGAGGAACCTGCCCTTCGAGAGGGCCACCATCATGGCCGCCTTCACCG

GCAACACCGAGGGCAGGACCAGAGACATGAGGACCGAGATCATCAGAATGATGGAA

AGCGCCAGGCCCGAGGACGTGAGCTTCCAGGGCAGGGGCGTGTTCGAGCTGTCCGA

TGAGAAGGCCACCTCCCCCATCGTGCCCAGCTTCGACATGAGCAACGAGGGCAGCTA

CTTCTTCGGCGACAACGCCGAGGAATACGACAAC

Amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO 19)

MASQGTKRSYEQMETDGERQNATEIRASVGRMIGGIGRFYIQMCTELKLSDYEGRLIQN

SITIERMVLSAFDERRNKYLEEHPSAGKDPKKTGGPIYRRIDGKWMRELILYDKEEI RRI

WRQANNGEDATAGLTHMMIWHSNLNDATYQRTRALVRTGMDPRMCSLMQGSTLPRR

SGAAGAAVKGVGTMVMELIRMIKRGINDRNFWRGENGRRTRIAYERMCNILKGKFQT A

AQRAMMDQVRESRNPGNAEIEDLIFLARSALILRGSVAHKSCLPACVYGPAVASGYD FE

REGYSLVGIDPFRLLQNSQVYSLIRPNENPAHKSQLVWMACHSAAFEDLRVSSFIRG TR

VVPRGKLSTRGVQIASNENMETMDSSTLELRSRYWAIRTRSGGNTNQQRASAGQISV Q

PTFSVQRNLPFERATIMAAFTGNTEGRTRDMRTEIIRMMESARPEDVSFQGRGVFEL SDE

KATSPIVPSFDMSNEGSYFFGDNAEEYDN

Nucleoprotein (NP) synthetic gene, based on acc. no. AY744935 (Influenza A virus A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 (H 1N 1)), with modified potential narcolepsy- inducing epitope, codon optimized for human;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 20)

atgGCCAGCCAGGGCACCAAGAGAAGCTACGAGCAGATGGAAACCGACGGCGAGAG

GCAGAACGCCACCGAGATCAGGGCCAGCGTGGGCAGGATGATCGGCGGCATCGGC

AGGTTCTACATCCAGATGTGCACCGAGCTGAAGCTGTCCGACTACGAGGGCAGGCTG

ATCCAGAACAGCATCACCATCGAGAGGATGGTGCTGTCCGCCTTCGACGAGAGAAGA

AACAAGTACCTGGAAGAGCACCCCAGCGCCGGCAAGGACCCCAAGAAAACCGGCGG

ACCCATCTACAGAAGGATCGACGGCAAGTGGATGAGAGAGCTGATCCTGtgggagaa g gacgacatcaagcggatctacaagCAGGCCAACAACGGCGAGGACGCCACAGCCGGCCTG A CCCACATGATGATCTGGCACAGCAACCTGAACGACGCCACCTACCAGAGGACCAGG

GCCCTCGTCAGAACCGGCATGGACCCCCGGATGTGCAGCCTGATGCAGGGCAGCAC

ACTGCCCAGAAGAAGCGGAGCTGcTGGAGCCGCCGTGAAGGGCGTGGGCACCaTGG

TGATGGAACTGATCAGGATGATCAAGAGGGGCATCAaCGACAGGAACTTTTGGAGGG

GCGAGAACGGCAGAAGGACCAGGATCGCCTACGAGAGGATGTGCAACATCCTGAAG

GGCAAGTTCCAGACAGCCGCCCAGAGGGCCATGATGGACCAGGTCCGGGAGAGCAG

GAACCCCGGCAACGCCGAGATCGAGGACCTGATcTTCCTGGCCAGAAGCGCCCTGAT

CCTGAGGGGCAGCGTGGCCCACAAGAGCTGCCTGCCCGCCTGCGTGTACGGACCCG

CCGTGGCCAGCGGCTACGACTTCGAGAGAGAGGGCTACAGCCTGGTCGGCATCGAC

CCCTTCAGGCTGCTGCAGAACTCCCAGGTGTACTCTCTGATCAGGCCCAACGAGAAC

CCCGCCCACAAGTCCCAGCTGGTCTGGATGGCCTGCCACAGCGCCGCCTTCGAGGA

TCTGAGAGTGAGCAGCTTCATCAGGGGCACCAGAGTGGTGCCCAGGGGCAAGCTGT

CCACCAGGGGCGTGCAGATCGCCAGCAACGAGAACATGGAAACCATGGACAGCAGC

ACCCTGGAACTGAGAAGCAGGTACTGGGCCATCAGGACCAGAAGCGGCGGCAACAC

CAACCAGCAGAGGGCCAGCGCCGGACAGATCAGCGTGCAGCCCACCTTCTCCGTGC

AGAGGAACCTGCCCTTCGAGAGGGCCACCATCATGGCCGCCTTCACCGGCAACACC

GAGGGCAGGACCAGAGACATGAGGACCGAGATCATCAGAATGATGGAAAGCGCCAG

GCCCGAGGACGTGAGCTTCCAGGGCAGGGGCGTGTTCGAGCTGTCCGATGAGAAGG

CCACCTCCCCCATCGTGCCCAGCTTCGACATGAGCAACGAGGGCAGCTACTTCTTCG

GCGACAACGCCGAGGAATACGACAAC

Amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO 21)

MASQGTKRSYEQMETDGERQNATEIRASVGRMIGGIGRFYIQMCTELKLSDYEGRLIQN

SITIERMVLSAFDERRNKYLEEHPSAGKDPKKTGGPIYRRIDGKWMRELILWEKDDI KRI

YKQANNGEDATAGLTHMMIWHSNLNDATYQRTRALVRTGMDPRMCSLMQGSTLPRRS

GAAGAAVKGVGTMVMELIRMIKRGINDRNFWRGENGRRTRIAYERMCNILKGKFQTA A

QRAMMDQVRESRNPGNAEIEDLIFLARSALILRGSVAHKSCLPACVYGPAVASGYDF ER

EGYSLVGIDPFRLLQNSQVYSLIRPNENPAHKSQLVWMACHSAAFEDLRVSSFIRGT RV

VPRGKLSTRGVQIASNENMETMDSSTLELRSRYWAIRTRSGGNTNQQRASAGQISVQ P

TFSVQRNLPFERATIMAAFTGNTEGRTRDMRTEIIRMMESARPEDVSFQGRGVFELS DE

KATSPIVPSFDMSNEGSYFFGDNAEEYDN M l synthetic gene, based on genomic sequence for acc. no. AY130766

(Influenza A virus A/Brevig mission/1/1918 (H 1N 1)), encoding codon optimized alternative splice variant M l ;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 22)

ATGTCCCTGCTGACAGAGGTGGAGACCTACGTGCTGTCCATCGTGCCCTCTGGCCCT

CTGAAGGCCGAGATCGCCCAGAGACTGGAGGACGTGTTCGCCGGCAAGAACACAGA

TCTGGAGGCCCTGATGGAGTGGCTGAAGACAAGGCCAATCCTGTCTCCCCTGACCAA

GGGCATCCTGGGCTTCGTGTTTACACTGACCGTGCCTAGCGAGAGGGGACTGCAGC

GGAGAAGGTTCGTGCAGAATGCCCTGAACGGCAATGGCGACCCAAACAATATGGATC

GGGCCGTGAAGCTGTATAGAAAGCTGAAGAGGGAGATCACCTTTCACGGAGCCAAG

G AG GTG G CCCTGTCTTAC AG CG CCG G G GCCCTG G CAAGCTG CATG G G ACTG ATCTA

TAACAGGATGGGCACAGTGACCACAGAGGTGGCCTTCGGCCTGGTGTGCGCAACCT

GTGAGCAGATCGCAGACAGCCAGCACCGCTCCCACAGGCAGATGGTGACCACAACC

AACCCCCTGATCCGCCACGAGAATCGGATGGTGCTGGCCTCCACAACCGCCAAGGCC

ATGGAGCAGATGGCAGGCAGCTCCGAGCAGGCAGCAGAGGCCATGGAGGTGGCCT

CTCAGGCCAGACAGATGGTGCAGGCCATGAGGACAATCGGAACCCACCCTTCTAGCT

CCGCCGGCCTGAAGGACGATCTGATCGAGAATCTGCAGGCCTACCAGAAGCGCATG

GGCGTGCAGATGCAGCGGTTTAAG

Amino acid sequence; see SEQ ID NO 23

MSLLTEVETYVLSIVPSGPLKAEIAQRLEDVFAGKNTDLEALMEWLKTRPILSPLTKGIL GF

VFTLTVPSERGLQRRRFVQNALNGNGDPNNMDRAVKLYRKLKREITFHGAKEVALSY SA

GALASCMGLIYNRMGTVTTEVAFGLVCATCEQIADSQHRSHRQMVTTTNPLIRHENR MV

LASTTAKAMEQMAGSSEQAAEAMEVASQARQMVQAMRTIGTHPSSSAGLKDDLIENL Q

AYQKRMGVQMQRFK

M2 synthetic gene, based on genomic sequence for acc. no. AY130766

(Influenza A virus A/Brevig mission/1/1918 (H 1N 1)), encoding codon optimized alternative splice variant M2;

Nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO 24)

ATGTCCCTGCTGACCGAGGTGGAGACCCCAACACGGAACGAGTGGGGCTGCAGATG TAATGACAGCTCCGATCCCCTGGTCATCGCCGCCTCTATCATCGGCATCCTGCACCTG ATCCTGTGGATCCTGGACAGGCTGTTCTTTAAGTGCATCTACCGGAGACTGAAGTAT GGCCTGAAGAGAGGCCCCTCTACAGAGGGCGTGCCTGAGAGCATGAGGGAGGAGTA CCGCAAGGAGCAGCAGAGCGCCGTGGATGTGGACGATGGCCACTTCGTGAACATCG AGCTGGAG

Amino acid sequence; see SEQ ID NO 25

MSLLTEVETPTRNEWGCRCNDSSDPLVIAASIIGILHLILWILDRLFFKCIYRRLKYGLK R GPSTEGVPESMREEYRKEQQSAVDVDDGHFVNIELE

SEQ ID NOs:26-29 - amino acid sequences of self-cleaving 2A peptide motifs SEQ ID NO : 26 : APVKQTLN FDLLKLAGDVESNPGP

SEQ ID NO : 27 : ATNFSLLKQAGDVEEN PGP

SEQ ID NO : 28 : QCTN YALLKLAG DVES N PG P

SEQ ID NO : 29 : EG RG S LLTCG DV E E N PG P

SEQ ID NO:30: GCCACC (Kozak sequence) Hence the invention is exemplified by SEQ ID NO 1 (depicted in figure 1) which is a construction made up of the following sequences:

KOZAK (SEQ ID NO: 30) - SEQ ID NO 10 - SEQ ID NO 3 - SEQ ID NO 5 - SEQ ID NO 12 - SEQ ID NO 3 - SEQ ID NO 5 - SEQ ID NO 14 - SEQ ID NO 3 - SEQ ID NO 5 - SEQ ID NO 16 - SEQ ID NO 3 - SEQ ID NO 7 - SEQ ID NO 20 - SEQ ID NO 3 - SEQ ID NO 7 - SEQ ID NO 22 - SEQ ID NO 3 - SEQ ID NO 5 - SEQ ID NO 24 - STOP.