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Title:
PORTABLE CHAIR AND CUP HOLDER ASSEMBLY
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/165090
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A portable chair (100) may include a first front leg (112A) and a second front leg (112B) connected by a front sled (110) and a first back leg (122A) and a second back leg (122B) connected by a back sled (120). The front sled (110) may include a first front foot (111A) and a second front foot (111B) and the back sled (120) may include a first back foot (121A) and a second back foot (121B). Each of the feet attached to the front and back sleds (110, 120) may include retention feature holes configured to allow water to drain from the sled/foot interface. The portable chair (100) may further include a seat (130) including a seat frame border (183) including a plurality of protrusions. The seat frame border (183) may be rigidly attached to the seat (130) via an injection molding process. In addition, the portable chair (100) may have a cup holder assembly (300) that can detachably attach to either of the front legs (112A, 112B) of the chair (100). The cup holder assembly (300) may have a cup holder portion (131) that can attach to a mounting base (650) that is attached to the leg of the portable chair (100).

Inventors:
WINTERHALTER, Andrew J. (LLC7601 Southwest Parkwa, Austin Texas, 78735, US)
NICHOLS, Steve C. (LLC7601 Southwest Parkwa, Austin Texas, 78735, US)
Application Number:
US2019/018980
Publication Date:
August 29, 2019
Filing Date:
February 21, 2019
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
YETI COOLERS, LLC (7601 Southwest Parkway, Austin, Texas, 78735, US)
International Classes:
A47C7/62; A47C4/20
Foreign References:
US3881677A1975-05-06
US4795211A1989-01-03
US5356107A1994-10-18
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BOYD, Robert M. (Banner & Witcoff Ltd, 71 South Wacker Drive, Suite 360, Chicago Illinois, 60606, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
I/We Claim:

1. A cup holder assembly comprising:

a cup holder comprising a bottom surface, an upper iip, a substantially cylindrical wall positioned between the bottom surface and the upper lip, and an attachment member extending from the substantially cylindrical wall, wherein the cylindrical wall defines a longitudinal axis,

wherein the attachment member includes a pair of substantially parallel side walls, wherein each of the side walls includes a rail that extends from each of the side walls towards each other; and

a mounting base connected to a leg of a chair, wherein the raiis of the attachment member slide along a pair of slots on the mounting base to secure the cup holder to the mounting base

2. The cup holder assembly of claim 1, wherein an interior of the cup holder comprises a plurality of tiers, wherein the tiers each have a different height.

3. The cup holder assembly of claim 2, wherein the plurality of tiers comprises three tiers.

4. The cup holder assembly of claim 1, wherein the cup holder comprises a notch in the upper lip.

5. The cup holder assembly of claim 1, wherein the cup holder is formed as a unitary component.

6. The cup holder assembly of claim 1, wherein each rail includes a detent that extends into a pocket located in each slot of the mounting base.

7. The cup holder assembly of claim 6, wherein the pocket is centrally located along each of the pair of slots.

8 The cup holder assembly of claim 1, wherein the pair of side wails are angled with respect to the longitudinal axis of the substantially cylindrical wall.

9. A portable chair and cup holder system comprising:

a portable chair comprising:

a first front leg and a second front leg connected by a front sled, a first back leg and a second back leg connected by a back sled;

a seat comprising a weave-type construction, and a cup holder assembly comprising:

a cup holder having a bottom surface, an upper lip, and a plurality of cylindrically shaped portions arranged in a multi-tiered shape positioned between the bottom surface and the upper lip, wherein the plurality of cylindrically shaped portions are concentric around a longitudinal axis, and an attachment member including a spacer portion extending from at least one of the cylindrical shaped portions and a pair of substantially parallel side walls, wherein each of the side walls includes a rail that extends from each of the side walls towards each other; and

a mounting base connected to the first front leg of the portable chair, wherein the rails of the attachment member slide along a pair of slots on the mounting base to secure the cup holder to the mounting base.

10. The portable chair and cup holder system of claim 9, wherein the mounting base includes a pair of holes and is attached to the first front leg of the portable chair using a pair of mechanical fasteners that extend through each of the pair of holes.

11. The portable chair and cup holder system of claim 9, wherein the cup holder is releasably secured to the mounting base, wherein the cup holder may be removed from the mounting base without using a tool.

12. The portable chair and cup holder system of claim 9, wherein each rail includes a detent that extends into a pocket located in each slot of the mounting base.

13. The portable chair and cup holder system of claim 12, wherein the pocket is centrally located along each of the pair of slots.

14. The portable chair and cup holder system of claim 9, wherein an interior of the cup holder comprises a plurality of tiers, wherein the tiers each have a different height.

15. The portable chair and cup holder system of claim 9, wherein the pair of substantially parallel side walls are angled with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cup holder.

16. A cup holder assembly comprising:

a cup holder having a bottom surface, an upper lip, and a plurality of cylindrically shaped portions arranged in a multi-tiered shape positioned between the bottom surface and the upper lip, wherein the cup holder comprises a notch in the upper lip, and an attachment member includes a spacer portion extending from at least one of the cylindrical shaped portions and a pair of substantially parallel side walls, wherein each of the side walls includes a rail that extends from each of the side walls towards each other; and

a mounting base connected to a leg of a chair, wherein the rails of the attachment member slide along a pair of slots on the mounting base to secure the cup holder to the mounting base.

17. The cup holder assembly of claim 16, wherein the notch has a length within a range of 12 percent and 38 percent of a circumference of the upper lip.

18. The cup holder assembly of claim 16, wherein the notch has a length of approximately 25 percent of a circumference of the upper lip.

19. The cup holder assembly of claim 16, wherein a center of the notch is positioned approximately 90 degrees from a location of the attachment member.

20. The cup holder assembly of claim 16, wherein the notch has a height of within 25 percent to 75 percent of an upper tier of the cup holder.

Description:
PORTABLE CHAIR AND CUP HOLDER ASSEMBLY

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION S

[oooi i This application claims priority to U.S. Application No. 15/904,270 filed on February 23, 2018, which application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Application No. 15/698,403 filed on September 7, 2017, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Application No. 15/602,841 filed on May 23, 2017. This above referenced applications are incorporated by reference in their entirety.

FIELD

[0002] Aspects described herein generally relate to portable chairs and a cup holder assembly for use with portable chairs. More specifically, aspects relate to portable and collapsible chairs.

BACKGROUND

[0003] Portable chairs are commonly used during events and activities where seating is desirable, but not always provided, such as tailgating, camping, and outdoor barb eques. In most cases, however, such chairs are made with cheap, low-end materials that provide for an uncomfortable seating experience, poor durability, minimal long-term viability, and susceptibility to accelerated deterioration under exposure to environmental phenomena. Accordingly, overall user satisfaction with low-end portable chairs is low and the frequency of replacement is high.

[0004] In other cases in which higher quality materials are used in the manufacture of portable chairs, extended longevity may be achievable as compared to low-end offerings. However, such high-end chairs exhibit marginal improvements in comfortability, resistance to weather-induced deterioration, and overall durability, while being offered at a substantially higher price point

00Q5] Accordingly, there exists a need for high quality, comfortable, and durable portable chairs.

BRIEF SUMMARY

100061 The following presents a simplified summary of various aspects described herein This summary is not an extensive overview, and is not intended to identify key or critical elements or to delineate the scope of the claims. The following summary merely presents some concepts in a simplified form as an introductory prelude to the more detailed description provided below.

[00Q7] To overcome limitations in the prior art described above, and to overcome other limitations that will be apparent upon reading and understanding the present specification, aspects described herein are directed to a portable chair and methods of forming a portable chair.

[0008] In accordance with one or more embodiments, a portable chair may include a first front leg and a second front leg connected by a front sled and a first back leg and a second back leg connected by a back sled. The front sled may include a first front foot and a second front foot and the back sled may include a first back foot and a second back foot. Each of the feet attached to the front and back sleds may include retention feature holes configured to allow water to drain from the sled/foot interface. The portable chair may further include a seat of a highly-permeable, weave-type construction which may include a seat frame border. The seat frame border may be a rigid thermoplastic over mold including a plurality of protrusions on an underside portion. The seat frame border may be rigidly attached to the seat via an injection molding process which may form the plurality of protrusions. The portable chair may also include a seat frame including a first terminal end, a second terminal end, a first seat attachment rail, and a second seat attachment rail. The plurality of protrusions on the underside portion of the seat frame border may be configured to removably engage with the first seat attachment rail and the second seat attachment rail. Additionally, the seat frame may include a carrying handle.

In some embodiments, in a state in which the seat frame border of the seat is removably engaged with the first seat attachment rail and the second seat attachment rail, the seat may be configured to slope downward at a front end portion.

In some embodiments, the portable chair may further include a first front leg joinery interface including a tubular protrusion onto which the first front leg may be configured to be inserted and fastened onto via a structural adhesive. The portable chair may also include a first back leg joinery' interface including a tubular protrusion onto which the first back leg may be configured to be inserted and fastened onto via a structural adhesive.

In some embodiments, the portable chair may further include a first arm rest that may be configured to be rotatably fastened to the first front leg joinery interface and the first back leg joinery interface via a first front pin.

In some embodiments, the portable table chair may further include a second front leg joinery interface including a tubular protrusion onto which the second front leg may be configured to be inserted and fastened onto via a structural adhesive. The portable chair may also include a second back leg joinery interface including a tubular protrusion onto which the second back leg may be configured to be inserted and fastened onto via a structural adhesive. [0013] In some embodiments, the portable chair may further include a second aim rest that may be configured to be rotatably fastened to the second front leg joinery interface and the second back leg joinery interface via a second front pin.

[0014] In some embodiments, the portable chair may further include a back of a highly- permeable, weave-type construction which may include a back frame border. The back frame border may be a rigid thermoplastic over-mold including a plurality of protrusions on a backside portion The back frame border may be rigidly attached to the back via an injection molding process which may form the plurality of protrusions. The portable chair may also include a back frame including a first terminal end, a second terminal end, a first back attachment rail, and a second back attachment rail. The plurality of protrusions on the backside portion of the back frame border may be configured to removably engage with the first back attachment rail and the second back attachment rail.

[0015] In some embodiments, the portable chair may further include a first back joinery interface. The first back joinery interface may include a tubular protrusion onto which the first terminal end of the back frame may be configured to be inserted and fastened onto via structural adhesive. The portable chair may also include a second back joinery ' interface. The second back joinery' interface may include a tubular protrusion onto which the second terminal end of the back frame may be configured to be inserted and fastened onto via structural adhesive.

[0016] In some embodiments, the portable chair may further include a First seat joinery interface. The first seat joinery interlace may include a tubular protrusion onto which the first terminal end of the seat frame may be configured to be inserted and fastened onto via structural adhesive. The portable chair may also include a second seat joinery interface. The second seat joinery' interface may include a tubular protrusion onto which the second terminal end of the seat frame may be configured to be inserted and fastened onto via structural adhesive.

[0017] In some embodiments, each of the first front leg, second front leg, front sled, first back leg, second back leg, back sled, seat frame, and back frame may be composed of hydroformed aluminum.

[0018] Additional aspects of this disclosure may relate to a cup holder assembly comprising a cup holder having a bottom interior surface, a lip, a substantially cylindrical wall positioned between the bottom surface and the lip, and an engaging member extending from the substantially cylindrical wall. The cup holder assembly may also have a collar with a first side that releasabiy secures to the engaging member of the cup holder and a second side secured to a clamp member with a substantially C-shaped member, where the collar can rotate relative to the clamp member. The collar may have a plurality of flex fingers that engage a corresponding plurality of flex fingers on the engaging member of the cup holder to releasabiy secure the cup holder to the collar. The plurality of flex fingers on the collar may comprise an upper flex finger positioned on a top portion of the collar and a lower flex finger positioned on a bottom portion of the collar, where the upper flex finger and the lower flex finger are spaced from each other. The collar may further comprise an alignment member positioned between the upper flex finger and the lower flex finger, where the alignment member has a radially extending flange that contacts a portion of at least one of the plurality of flex fingers on the engaging member of the cup holder to prevent rotation of the cup holder relative to the collar. In addition, the lower flex linger may be larger than the upper flex finger to prevent the cup holder from improper installation on the collar. Lastly, the collar may rotate relative to the clamp member in two positions. [0019] Still even other aspects of this disclosure may relate to a portable chair and cup holder system comprising a portable chair that includes a first front leg and a second front leg connected by a front sled, a first back leg and a second back leg connected by a back sled, a seat comprising a weave-type construction, and a cup holder assembly that includes a cup holder having a bottom interior surface, a lip, and a substantially cylindrical wall positioned between the bottom interior surface and the lip, and an engaging member extending from the substantially cylindrical wall of the cup holder. The engaging member may releasably connect to a collar that may be secured to a clamp member having a substantially C-shaped member, where the C-shaped member may releasably connects to either the first front leg or the second front leg. The cup holder can rotate from an outboard position to an inboard position while still being connected to the portable chair. The C-shaped member may have a portion of an upper surface and a portion of a lower surface with a rounded edge such that the rounded edge contacts a bushing extending inwardly from either the first front leg or the second front leg of the portable chair. The cup holder may further rotate relative to the clamp member. The engaging member on the cup holder may include a plurality of flex fingers that engage a plurality of flex fingers on a collar, where the collar may be slidably connected to an engaging member extending from the C-shaped member of the clamp member. The collar and the engaging member of the clamp member may each have rotation inhibiting features.

[0020] Other aspects of this disclosure may relate to a cup holder assembly comprising a cup holder comprising a bottom surface, a lip, a substantially cylindrical wall positioned between the bottom surface and the lip, and an engaging member extending from the substantially cylindrical wall, a collar having a first side that releasably secures to the engaging member and a second side secured to a clamp member comprising a substantially ( ' -shaped member, where the collar is slidably engaged with the clamp member. The cup holder assembly may be configured such that if a force exceeding 100 newtons (N) is applied to the cup holder in a vertical direction, the cup holder will release from the collar.

In addition, the collar may further comprise a plurality of rotation inhibiting features that engage a plurality of rotation inhibiting features on the clamp member to prevent inadvertent rotation of the collar relative to the clamp member The collar can rotate relative to the clamp member, when the plurality of rotation inhibiting features on both the collar and the clamp member are disengaged by slidably moving the collar away from the clamp member. The plurality of rotation inhibiting features on the collar may comprise a plurality of bosses that are rotationally spaced apart, where one of the plurality of bosses has a first length that is greater than a second length a remainder of the bosses. Lastly, the plurality of rotation inhibiting features on the clamp member may comprise a plurality of pockets.

Yet other aspects of this disclosure may relate to a cup holder assembly comprising a cup holder having a bottom surface, an upper lip, a substantially cylindrical wall positioned between the bottom surface and the upper lip, and an attachment member extending from the substantially cylindrical wall. The cylindrical wall may define a longitudinal axis. The attachment member may include a pair of substantially parallel side walls, where each of the pair of substantially parallel side walls includes a rail that extends from each of the side walls towards each other. The cup holder assembly may also include a mounting base connected to a leg of a chair, where the rails of the atachment member slide along a pair of slots on the mounting base to secure the cup holder to the mounting base. In addition, an interior of the cup holder may comprise a plurality of tiers, where each of the tiers have a different height. The plurality of tiers may comprise three tiers. Also, the cup holder may have a notch in the upper lip and be formed as a unitary ' component. Each rail may include a detent that extends into a pocket located in each slot of the mounting base, where the pocket may be centrally located along each of the pair of slots. The pair of substantially parallel side walls may be angled with respect to the longitudinal axis of the substantially cylindrical wall. Additional aspects of this disclosure may relate to a portable chair and cup holder system comprising a portable chair having a first front leg and a second front leg connected by a front sled, a first back leg and a second back leg connected by a back sled, a seat comprising a weave-type construction, and a cup holder assembly. The cup holder assembly may include a cup holder having a bottom surface, an upper lip, and a plurality of cylindricaily shaped portions arranged in a multi-tiered shape positioned between the bottom surface and the upper lip, where the plurality of cylindricaily shaped portions are concentric around a longitudinal axis. The cup holder may also include an attachment member including a spacer portion extending from at least one of the cylindrical shaped portions and a pair of substantially parallel side -walls, wherein each of the side walls includes a rail that extends from each of the side wails towards each other. The cup holder assembly may further comprise a mounting base connected to the first front leg of the portable chair, where the rails of the atachment member slide along a pair of slots on the mounting base to secure the cup holder to the mounting base. The mounting base may include at least one mounting hole and is attached to the first front leg of the portable chair using at least one mechanical fastener that extends through the at least one mounting hole. The cup holder may be releasably secured to the mounting base, wherein the cup holder may be removed from the mounting base without using a tool. Each rail may include a detent that extends into a pocket located in each slot of the mounting base, where the pocket may be centrally located along each of the pair of slots. The interior of the cup holder may include a plurality of tiers, where the tiers each have a different height.

[0024] Other aspects of this disclosure may relate to a cup holder assembly comprising a cup holder having a bottom surface, an upper lip, and a plurality of cylindrically shaped portions arranged in a multi-tiered shape positioned between the bottom surface and the upper lip, wherein the cup holder comprises a notch in the upper lip, and an attachment member that may include a spacer portion extending from at least one of the cylindrical shaped portions and a pair of substantially parallel side walls. Each of the side walls may include a rail that extends from each of the side walls towards each other. The cup holder assembly may further comprise a mounting base connected to a leg of a chair, where the rails of the attachment member slide along a pair of slots on the mounting base to secure the cup holder to the mounting base. The notch may have a length within a range of 12 percent and 38 percent of a circumference of the upper lip, or may have a length of approximately 25 percent of a circumference of the upper lip. The center of the notch may be positioned approximately 90 degrees from a location of the attachment member. Lastly, the notch may have a height of within 25 percent to 75 percent of an upper tier of the cup holder.

[0025] These features, along with many others, are discussed in greater detail below.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0026] A more complete understanding of aspects described herein and the advantages thereof may be acquired by referring to the following description in consideration of the accompanying drawings, in which like reference numbers indicate like features, and wherein: [0027] FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of an example of a portable chair according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0028] FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C respectively illustrate front perspective views of example sections of the example portable chair of FIG. 1 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0029] FIG. 3 is a side perspective view of the example portable chair of FIG. 1 according to one or more aspects described herein

[0030] FIGS 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D respectively illustrate an underside perspective view of a first example seat, a top perspective view of a first example seat frame, a sectional view of the first example seat engaged with the first example seat frame, and an exploded view of components of the first example seat and the first example seat frame of the example portable chair of FIG. 1 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0031] FIGS. 5 A, 5B, 5C, 5D, and 5E respectively illustrate a front perspective view of a second example seat frame, a front perspective view of a second example seat, an underside perspective view of the second example seat, a sectional view' of the second example seat engaged with the second example seat frame, and a front perspective view of the second example seat engaged with the second example seat frame of the example portable chair of FIG. 1 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0032] FIGS. 6 A, 6B, and 6C respectively illustrate a rear view of an example back, a front view of an example back frame, and a sectional view of the example back engaged with the example back frame of the example portable chair of FIG. I according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0033] FIGS. 7 A and 7B respectively illustrate a front perspective view and a section of the example portable chair of FIG. 1 in a folded configuration according to one or more aspects described herein. [0034] FIG. BA illustrates an isometric view of an embodiment of the cup holder assembly as described herein.

[0035] FIGS. 8B and 8C illustrate cross-sectional views of the cup holder securing a beverage container as described herein.

[0036] FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrate isometric views of the cup holder assembly as installed on the example portable chair of FIG. 1 as described herein.

[0037] FIGS. 10A and 10B illustrate detailed view ' s of the cup holder assembly installed on the example portable chair as shown in FIGS. 9B as described herein.

[0038] FIG. 11 illustrates a front perspective view of the cup holder assembly as installed on the example portable chair of FIG. 1 in a folded configuration according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0039] FIG. 12 illustrates a front perspective view of the cup holder assembly as installed on the example portable chair of FIG. 1 in a folded configuration according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0040] FIGS. 13A-C illustrate detailed views of the cup holder assembly rotating from an outward position to an inward position according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0041] FIGS. 14 A-C illustrate perspective views of the cup holder rotating relative to the clamp member according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0042] FIGS. 15A and 15B respectively illustrate cross-sectional view's of cup holder assembly with the collar in an engaged position and a disengaged position according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0043] FIG. 16A illustrates a perspective view of the cup holder assembly with the cup holder removed for clarity according to one or more aspects described herein. [0044] FIG. 16B illustrates a perspective view of a cross-sectional view of the cup holder assembly through the collar component according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0045] FIG. 17 illustrates a front view of the clamp member of the cup holder assembly according to one of more aspects described herein.

[0046] FIGS. 18A and 18B illustrate front and rear perspective views of the collar component of the cup holder assembly according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0047] FIG. 19 illustrates a detailed view of the cup holder component of the cup holder assembly according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0048] FIGS. 20A and 20B respectively illustrate cross-sectional view¾ of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly with the collar in an engaged position and a disengaged position according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0049] FIG. 21 illustrates a perspective view' of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly with the cup holder removed for clarity according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0050] FIG. 22A illustrates a detailed perspective view of an alternate embodiment of a cup holder assembly attached to the chair according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0051] FIG. 22B illustrates a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of a cup holder assembly attached to the chair according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0052] FIG. 23 illustrates a perspective view of an exploded view of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 being atached to the chair according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0053] FIG. 24A illustrates a perspective view of the cup holder of FIG. 22 being partially attached to the mounting base on the chair according to one or more aspects described herein. [0054] FIG. 24B illustrates a perspective view of an exploded view of the cup holder of FIG. 22 to the mounting base on the chair according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0055] FIG. 25A illustrates a perspective view of the mounting base of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 attached to a chair according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0056] FIG. 25B illustrates an exploded perspective view of the cup holder assembly of FIG.

22 and its attachment to a chair according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0057] FIGS. 26A, 26B, 26C illustrate side views of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 with a container secured in the cup hol der according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0058] FIG. 27 illustrates a perspective view of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 with a container that has a handle secured in the cup holder according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0059] FIG. 28 illustrates a front right perspective view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0060] FIG. 29 illustrates a front left perspective view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0061] FIG. 30 illustrates a front view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0062] FIG. 31 illustrates a back view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0063] FIG. 32 illustrates a right view' of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0064] FIG. 33 illustrates a left view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0065] FIG. 34 illustrates a top view ? of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein. [0066] FIG. 35 illustrates a botom view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0067] FIG. 36 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 shown in FIG. 34 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0068] FIG. 37 illustrates a bottom view of the attachment member of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0069] FIG. 38 illustrates a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0070] FIG. 39 illustrates a perspective view of the mounting base of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 38 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0071] FIG. 40 illustrates a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein .

[0072] FIG. 41 illustrates a perspective view of the mounting base of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 40 according to one of more aspects described herein.

[0073] FIG. 42 illustrates a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0074] FIG. 43A illustrates a perspective view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 42 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0075] FIG. 43B illustrates a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 42 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0076] FIG. 44A illustrates a perspective view of the mounting base of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 42 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0077] FIG. 44B illustrates a perspective view of an alternate mounting base of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 42 according to one or more aspects described herein. [0078] FIG. 45 illustrates a side view an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0079] FIG. 46 illustrates a perspective view of the cup holder of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 45 according to one of more aspects described herein.

[0080] FIG. 47 illustrates a perspective view of the mounting base of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 45 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0081] FIG. 48 illustrates a perspective view of a mounting base of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly of FIG 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0082] FIG. 49 illustrates a front view of a mounting base of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 22 according to one or more aspects described herein.

[0083] FIG. 50 illustrates a perspective view of a mounting base of an alternate embodiment of the cup holder assembly of FIG. 49 according to one or more aspects described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the following description of the various examples and components of this disclosure, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, which form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustration various example structures and environments in which aspects of the disclosure may be practiced. It is to be understood that other structures and environments may be utilized and that structural and functional modifications may be made from the specifically described structures and methods without departing from the scope of the present disclosure.

Also, while the terms“top,”“botom,”“front,”“back,”“side, “rear,”“upward,”

“downward,” right, left, and the like may be used in this specification to describe various example features and elements of the invention, these terms are used herein as a matter of convenience, e.g., based on the example orientations shown in the figures or the orientation during typical use. Additionally, the term "plurality,” as used herein, indicates any number greater than one, either disjunctively or conjunctively, as necessary, up to an infinite number. Nothing in this specification should be construed as requiring a specific three dimensional orientation of structures in order to fail within the scope of this invention. Also, the reader is advised that the attached drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale.

[0086] Overview of Chair

] 0087 j FIG. 1 depicts a front perspective view of an example of a chair 100, which can be a foldable and portable chair. Chair 100 may include a front sled 110 connecting front legs 112A and 1 12B and a back sled 120 connecting back legs 122 A and 122B. The front sled 110 and the back sled 120 may be configured to support the chair 100 on a surface. The front legs 112A and 112B may be further connected and reinforced by front crossbar 1 14. The chair 100 may also include seat 130 connected to seat frame 131, and a back 140 connected to back frame 141 . The chair 100 may include arm rests 150A and 150B. ,4s will be discussed in further detail below, the chair 100 can be configured to fold up into a smaller profile for ease of storage and transportability.

[0088] Additionally, chair 100 may be of a symmetric construction wherein components on a left side of chair 100 (e.g., side corresponding to arm rest 15GB) are mirrored on a right side (e.g., side corresponding to arm rest 150A). As such, front leg 112B may correspond to front leg 112A, arm rest 150B may correspond to arm rest 150A, and so on. Furthermore, as will be described in further detail below, components of chair 100 such as seat frame 131 and back frame 141, which extend from the left side to the right side of chair 100, may also be of a symmetric construction. For instance, seat frame 131 may include a first seat atachment rail on the left side and second seat atachment rail on the right side, back frame 141 may include a first back attachment rail on the left side and a second back attachment rail on the right side, and so on.

Legs

The portable chair 100 may include two front legs 112A and 1 12B and two back legs 122A and 122B. The two front legs 112A and 1 12B and the two back legs 122A and 122B may be cylindrical rods, tribes, and/or shafts and may be made of, for example, aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, polymers, composites, carbon fiber, and/or wood, such as bamboo. In instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of the two front legs 112 A and 112B and the two back legs 122A and I22B, the metals may be hydroform ed and vacuum casted and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals and alloys used in the fabrication of legs 1 G2A, 112B, 122A, and 122B may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

The front legs 1 12A and 112B of portable chair 100 may be connected by front crossbar 1 14. Front crossbar 1 14 may be made of the same material as that of front legs 112 A and 1 12B (e.g., aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo) or may be made of a different material than that of front legs 1 12 A and 112B. In instances in which front legs 112A and 1 12B are made of a metal and front crossbar 1 14 is also made of a metal, front crossbar 114 may be welded to an inner portion of front legs 112A and 112B. Alternatively, front legs T12A and 112B and front crossbar 1 14 may be fabricated in a single continuous piece in a molding operation. In such instances, the fabrication may be done through hydroforming. Similarly, in instances in which front legs 112A and 112B are made of carbon fiber and front crossbar 114 is also made of carbon fiber, front legs G12A and 112B and front crossbar 114 may be fabricated in a single continuous piece in a molding operation. However, it is also contemplated that front crossbar 114 may be screwed, bolted, clamped, or otherwise fastened to an inner portion of front legs 112A and 1 12B, for example, in instances in which front legs G12A and 1 12B are made of a different material than that of front crossbar 114. Front crossbar 1 14 may be a low flex and low creep member and may able to support up to a 5001b applied load. While not shown in FIG. 1, in some instances the back legs 120A and 120B of portable chair 100 may be connected by a back crossbar in a manner similar to the arrangement described above regarding front legs 110A and 110B and front crossbar 114.

[0092] In some embodiments, combinations of different materials can be used to form the chair 100. For example, front legs 110A and 1 10B and front crossbar 114 may be made of a different material than that of back legs 120A and 12QB. For example, front legs 1 10A and 110B and front crossbar 114 may be made of carbon fiber and back legs 120A and 120B may be made of metal. Alternatively, front legs 110A and HOB and back legs 120 A and 120B may be made of a first material (e.g., metal) and front crossbar 114 may be made of a second material (e.g., carbon fiber).

[0093] In arrangements in which a back crossbar is included, similar combinations of different materials as described above may be used to form the chair 100. For example, front legs 1 10A and 1 10B and front crossbar 1 14 may be made of a different material than that of back legs 120A and 120B and the back crossbar. For example, front legs 110A and 110B and front crossbar 114 may be made of carbon fiber and back legs 120A and 120B and the back crossbar may be made of metal. Alternatively, front legs 1 10A and 110B and back legs 120A and 120B may be made of a first material (e.g., metal) and front crossbar 114 and the back crossbar may be made of a second material (e.g., carbon fiber).

[0094] Sleds and Feet

[0095] The two front legs 1 12A and 112B may be joined by front sled 110, which may be a continuous connecting member As such, the two front legs 112A and 112B and the front sled 110 may be fabricated in a single continuous piece through, for example, any of the manufacturing methods described herein. Similarly, the two back legs 122A and 122B may be joined by back sled 120 and may be fabricated in a single continuous piece. The front sled 110 and the back sled 120 may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray, as well as through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

[0096] Additionally, the front sled 110 may include front foot 111A and front foot 11 IB, which may be plastic and/or rubber caps at a lowermost and/or bottommost portion of sled 110 to facilitate or improve the frictional engagement with an adjacent contact surface (e.g., floor, ground, etc.). The front feet can include a suitable material or texture to increase the coefficient of friction between the front feet and the surface which the chair is placed. As shown in FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C, front feet 111 A and 11 IB may be configured to engage with a section of front sled 110 proximate to the front legs 1 12A and 1 12B As such, front foot 1 11 A may be configured to engage with a section of front si ed 110 proximate to front leg 1 12A and front foot 11 IB may be configured to engage with a section of front sled 110 proximate to front leg 112B. [0097] As shown in FIG. 2C, front foot 1 1 IB may include engagement plug 117B. In some instances, engagement plug 117B may be a plastic, rubber, and/or metal protrusion extending radially from front foot 11 IB. Additionally and/or alternatively, engagement plug 117B may be a screw-like structure made of plastic, rubber, and/or metal. The engagement plug 1 T7B may be configured to be inserted into front sled 110. Before, during, or after insertion, a binding agent and/or structural adhesive may be applied to engagement plug 1 17B to secure front foot 1 1 IB to front sled 1 10. Additionally, front foot 11 IB may include retention feature hole 115B which may be configured to allow water to drain away from the foot/sled interface. Similar to front foot 11 1 B, front foot 111 A may include an engagement plug 117A and a retention feature hole 115A, each of which may be configured to interface with sled 110 and function in the manner described in regard to front foot 1 l IB.

[0098] Also the engagement plugs 117A, 117B can each include a series of holes 123, which provide a channel for moisture located in the frame. The series of holes 123 in combination with the retention feature holes 115A, 115B create an outlet for any moisture that collects inside the frame of the chair. In one example, a single hole or a plurality of holes can be included on the end of the engagement plugs 117A, 117B. In other examples, the engagement plugs 117A, 117B can be formed of a porous material that allows water to flow through the engagement plugs 117A, 117B to allow for water to escape through the retention feature holes 115A, 115B. it is also envisioned that separate holes can be included in the frame and in the front feet 111 A, 11 IB to allow for water or moisture to escape out of the frame of the chair.

[0099] In other examples, the front feet 11 1 A and 111 B may be plasti c and/or rubber coatings applied to front sled 110 and may be included in recessed or notched pockets (not shown) proximate to the two front legs 112A and 112B. Alternatively, the plastic and/or robber coating may be applied along the length of the front sled 1 10 at a lowermost and/or botommost portion and the first and second front engagement faces and may form a continuous front engagement face. In other examples, the plastic and/or rubber coating may be applied intermittently in uniform intervals along the l ength of the front sled 1 10 at a lowermost and/or bottommost portion. In such examples, the front feet may form an intermittent front engagement face.

[00100] Similar to front sled 110, the back sled 120 may include back foot 121A and back foot 121B, which may be plastic and/or robber caps at a lowermost and/or bottommost portion to facilitate frictional engagement with an adjacent contact surface (e.g., floor, ground, etc.). Back feet 121A and 121B may be configured to engage with a section of back sled 120 proximate to the back legs 122 A and 122B. As such, back foot 121A may be configured to engage with a section of back sled 120 proximate to back leg 122A and back foot 12 IB may be configured to engage with a section of back sled 120 proximate to back leg 122B.

[00101] Similar to front feet l l lA and 111B, back feet 121A and 121B may each include an engagement plug and a retention feature hole. The engagement plug and retention feature hole of back feet 121A and 121B may be configured to interface with sled 120 and function in the manner described in regard to front feet 111 A and 1 1 IB. Also the back feet 121A and 121B can be provided with similar draining features discussed above in relation to front feet 11 1 A and 11 1 B.

[00102] Again, in other examples, back feet 121A and 121B may be plastic and/or rubber coatings applied to back sled 120 and may be included in recessed pockets proximate to the two back legs 122A and 122B. Alternatively, the plastic and/or rubber coating may be applied along the length of the back sled 120 at a lowermost and/or bottommost portion and the first and second back engagement faces and may form a continuous back engagement face. In other examples, the plastic and/or robber coating may be applied intermittently in uniform intervals along the length of the back sled 120 at a lowermost and/or bottommost portion. In such examples, the first and second back engagement faces may form an intermittent back engagement face.

[00103] Joinery Interfaces

[00104] As shown in FIG. 3, at an upper and/or top proximal end portion, front leg 112A may intersect with front leg joinery interface 116A. In particular, front leg joinery interface G16A may include a tubular termination onto which front leg 112A may be configured to be inserted. Before, during, or after insertion, a binding agent and/or structural adhesive may be applied to the tubular termination of front leg joinery interface 116A and/or upper/top proximal end portion of front leg 112A to secure front leg 112A to the front leg joinery interface 116A. Such adhesives may include drying adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, contact adhesives, hot adhesives, reactive adhesives, multi-part adhesives, one-part adhesives. The adhesives may be either natural or synthetic and can be based on one or more of thermoplastics, emul sions, or thermosets, including one or more of epoxy, polyurethane, cyanoacrylate, or acrylic polymers. Additionally, and/or alternatively, front leg 112A may be welded onto front leg joiner} ' interface 116A.

[00105] Front leg 1 12B may be configured to engage with front leg joinery interface 1 16B in the manner described in regard to front leg 112A and front leg joinery' interface 116A (e.g., adhered and/or welded).

[00106] Similarly, at an upper and/or top proximal end portion, back leg 122A may intersect with back leg joinery' interface 126A. In particular, back leg joinery interface 126 A may include a tubular termination onto which back leg 122A may be configured to be inserted. Before, during, or after insertion, a binding agent and/or structural adhesive as discussed herein may be applied to the tubular termination of back leg joinery interface 126A and/or upper and/or top proximal end portion of back leg 122A to secure back leg 122 A to the back leg joinery interface 126A. Additionally and/or alternatively, back leg 122 A may be welded onto back leg joinery interface 126 A. Back leg 122B may be configured to engage with back leg joinery interface 126B in the manner described in regard to back leg 122A and back leg joinery' interface 126A (e g. adhered and/or welded) Nevertheless, it is also contemplated that the joints discussed herein could be formed by mechanical fastening techniques, such as, friction fits, threads, ball and sockets, bayonet connections, and the like.

[00107] In certain arrangements, at an upper and/or top proximal end portion of front leg 1 12 A, the front leg 112A may be bent in a rearward direction at an obtuse angle and may terminate at front leg joinery interface 116A. In some instances, front leg joinery interface 116A may be a continuous upper and/or top terminal end portion of front leg 110A and may be made of the same material as that of front leg 112A (e.g., aluminum, titanium, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo).

[00108] Back leg 122A may extend linearly to an upper and/or top proximal end portion and may terminate at back leg joinery' interface 126A. Back leg joinery' interface 126A may be a continuous upper and/or top terminal end portion of back leg 122A and may be made of the same material as that of back leg 122A (e.g., aluminum, titanium, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo).

[00109] Front leg joinery interfaces 116A, 116B may be configured to join, interface, and/or otherwise connect with back leg joinery' interfaces 126 A, 126B. In one example, the front joinery' interfaces 116A, 116B and the back joinery interfaces 126 A, 126B are configured to pivot about pins 128A, 128B such that the front legs 112A, 112B are configured to pivot relative to the back legs 122A, 122B. Seat and Seat Frame

Portable chair 100 may include seat 130, which may be removably attached to seat frame 131. Front legs I 12A and 112B may be configured to be rotatably joined and/or fastened to front leg attachment portions 170A and 170B, respectively, of seat frame 131 via pins 171 A and 171 B. The bushings 173 A and 173 B may extend between the front leg attachment portions 170A and 170B and the front legs 112A and 112B.

Seat frame 131 may be a cylindrical rod, tube, shaft, and/or extrusion I-beam and may be made of aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo. In instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of seat frame 131, the material may be hydroform ed and vacuum casted and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals used in the fabrication of seat frame 131 may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength

] Seat frame 131 may include front leg attachment portions 170A and 170B, which may be configured to facilitate the rotatable attachment of seat frame 131 to front legs G12A and 1 I2B, respectively, by way of pins 171 A and 171B. Additionally, seat frame 131 may intersect with seat joinery 7 interfaces 133 A and 133B. In particular, seat joinery interfaces I33A and I33B may include tubular terminations onto which seat frame 131 may be configured to be inserted. Before, during, or after insertion, a binding agent and/or structural adhesive as discussed herein may be applied to the tubular terminations of seat joinery 7 interfaces 133A and 133B and/or terminal ends of seat frame 131 to secure the seat frame 131 to the seat joinery' interfaces 133A and 133B. [00114] As shown in FIGS. 4B, 5 A, 7A, and 7B, seat frame 131 may include carrying handle 172. Carrying handle 172 may he a front over-mold fixing extrusion that extends from an inner face of seat frame 131. The handle 172 may double as a large, easy -grip carry ' handle for carrying chair 100. Carrying handle 172 may be positioned on an inner face of a front portion of seat frame 131 and may be made of the same material as that of seat frame 131 (e.g., aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo). As such, carrying handle 172 may be manufactured as a continuous piece of seat frame 131. Thus, in instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of seat frame 131 and carrying handle 172, the material may be hydroformed and vacuum casted and into seat frame 131 and carrying handle 172 and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals used in the fabrication of seat frame 131 and carrying handle 172 may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

[00115] Alternatively, carrying handle 172 may not form a continuous piece with seat frame 131 and, as such, may be a separate component. In such instances, carrying handle 172 may be made of either the same material as that of seat frame 131, or may be made of a different material. In either event, carrying handle 172 may be attached to seat frame 131 via adhesion, welding, mechanical fastening (e.g., nut and bolt), and the like.

First Embodiment of Seat / Seat Frame Engagement [00117J According to a first embodiment of the seat/seat frame engagement and as shown in FIG. 4B, carrying handle 172 may include front attachment hole 177B on a first side of carrying handle 172 (e.g., left side of carrying handle 172), front attachment hole 177 A on a second side of carrying handl e 172 (e.g., right side of carrying handle 172), and front attachment hole 177 on a third side of carrying handle 172 (e.g., center of carrying handle 172). As will be described in further detail below, front attachment holes 177, 177A, and 177B may be respectively configured to engage with front attachment clips 187, 187A, and 187B of seat 130.

[00118] Furthermore, seat frame 131 may also include seat attachment rail 172B. Seat attachment rail 172B may be positioned on an inner face of a side portion of seat frame 131 proximate to arm rest 1 SOB, front leg 1 12B, and the like. Seat atachment rail 172B may be made of the same material as that of seat frame 131 (e.g., aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo). As such, seat attachment rail 172B may be manufactured as a continuous piece of seat frame 131. Thus, in instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of seat frame 131 and seat attachment rail 172B, the material may be hydroformed and vacuum casted and into seat frame 131 and seat attachment rail 172B and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals used in the fabrication of seat frame 131 and seat attachment rail 172B may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

[00119] Alternatively, seat attachment rail 172B may not form a continuous piece with seat frame 131 and, as such, may be a separate component. In such instances, seat attachment rail 172B may be made of either the same material as that of seat frame 131, or may be made of a different material. In either event, seat attachment rail 172B may be attached to seat frame 131 via adhesion, welding, mechanical fastening (e.g. , nut and bolt), and the like.

Seat attachment rail 172B may include rib engagement channels and a plurality of side attachment holes. For example, as shown in FIG. 4B, seat attachment rail 172B may include rib engagement channels 175B and side attachment holes 174B. Rib engagement channels 175B may ran along the entirety of the length of seat attachment rail 172B Rib engagement channels 175B may be configured to support side ribs 185B and flanges 19 IB of seat 130. A plurality of side attachment holes 174B may be positioned on the rib engagement channels 175B. Each of the side attachment holes 174B may be configured to receive a side attachment screw interface 184B of seat 130. While five side attachment holes 174B are depicted in FIG. 4B, a fewer number (e.g., one, two, three, or four) or a greater number (six, ten, etc.) of side attachment holes 174B may be included.

Seat frame 131 may also include seat attachment rail 172A. Seat attachment rail 1 72A may be positioned on an inner face of a side portion of seat frame 131 proximate to arm rest 150A, front leg 112A, and the like. Seat attachment rail 172A may be made of the same material as that of seat frame 131 (e.g., aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo). As such, seat attachment rail 172A may be manufactured as a continuous piece of seat frame 131. Thus, in instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of seat frame 131 and seat attachment rail 172A, the material may be hydroformed and vacuum casted and into seat frame 131 and seat attachment rail 172A and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals used in the fabrication of seat frame 131 and seat attachment rail 172A may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

[00122] Alternatively, seat attachment rail 172A may not form a continuous piece with seat frame 131 and, as such, may be a separate component. In such instances, seat attachment rail 172A may be made of either the same material as that of seat frame 131, or may be made of a different material. In either event, seat attachment rail 172A may be attached to seat frame 131 via adhesion, welding, mechanical fastening (e.g., nut and bolt), and the like.

[00123] Seat attachment rail 172A may include rib engagement channels and a plurality of side attachment holes. For example, as shown in FIG. 4B, seat attachment rail G72A may include rib engagement channels 175 A and side attachment holes 174A. Rib engagement channels 175 A may run along the entirety of the length of seat attachment rail 172A. Rib engagement channels 175A may be configured to support side ribs 185A and flanges 191A of seat 130. A plurality of side attachment holes 174A may be positioned on the rib engagement channels 175A. Each of the side atachment holes 174 A may be configured to receive a side attachment screw interface 184A of seat 130. While five side attachment holes 174A are depicted in FIG. 4B, a fewer number (e.g., one, two, three, or four) or a greater number (six, ten, etc.) of side atachment holes 174 A may be included.

[00124] Referring to FIG. 4A, seat 130 may be composed of any of a number of materials including, but not limited to, armored fabric cloth, sail fabric, awning fabric, Kevlar, tarp canvas, vinyl coated polyester, nylon mesh, neoprene, aluminized nylon, and/or cotton canvas. In some embodiments, the material may be treated to provide increased UV stabilization and weathering resistance, fire-resistance, abrasion and tear resistance, and waterproofing.

The material used in the fabrication of seat 130 may be manufactured in a highly-peraieable, weave-type and/or mesh-like construction and, as such, may provide for increased load capacity and user comfort. The perimeter of the weave-type and/or mesh-like fabric construction of seat 130 may be configured to interface with seat frame border 183, which may be a rigid thermoplastic over-mold. In forming the interface between seat 130 and seat frame border 183, seat frame border 183 may be over-molded onto seat 130 through a method of local injection molding. The process may form a thermoplastic feature (e.g., seat frame border 183 and components included therein) through the fabric weave along the perimeter of seat 130. After the method of local injection molding is completed, the weave-type and/or mesh-like fabric construction of seat 130 may be taut and the seat frame border 183 may be rigidly attached to seat 130. Such an attachment method may eliminate stitching in the seat fabric and, by extension, offer advantages including repeatability, durability, dimensional accuracy, frame attachment flexibility and improved aesthetics.

Seat frame border 183 may include a plurality of protrusions of various types configured to aide and/or facilitate the engagement between seat 130 and seat frame 131. In particular, seat frame border 183 may include front atachment clips 187, 187A, and 187B, seat frame comer engagement faces 189A and 189B, side attachment screw interfaces 184A and 184B, side ribs 185 A and 185B, flanges 19LA and 191B, and back bar groove 196.

Seat 130 may be configured to be removably attached and/or engaged with seat frame 131. In forming the removable attachment and/or engagement, the various protmsions of seat frame border 183 of seat 130 may be configured to removably connect, insert, and/or interface with specific aspects of front handle 172 and seat attachment rails 172A and 172B. For example, front attachment clips 187, I87A, and 187B and side attachment screw interfaces 184A and 184B of seat frame border 183 may be respectively configured to be removably connected, inserted, and/or interfaced with front attachment holes 177, 177A, and 177B of carrying handle 172 and side attachment holes 174A and 174B of seat attachment rails 172A and 172B. Additionally, seat frame corner engagement faces 189A and 189B and back bar groove 196 of seat frame border 183 of seat 130 may be respectively configured to removably interface with seat frame comers 179A and 179B of seat frame 131 and back bar 197.

[00128] Further, side ribs 185A and 185B and flanges 191A and 191B of seat frame border 183 of seat 130 may be configured to removably interface with rib engagement channels ! 75 A and 175B of seat attachment rails 172A and 172B. Side ribs 185A, 185B may be load carrying ribs and may be configured to interface with rib engagement channels 175 A, 175B of seat attachment rails 572A, 172B. The side ribs 185A, 185B may extend from a bottom surface of a right and left side of the seat frame border 183 and flanges 191A, 191 B may be located on each side of the seat frame border 183. The series of flanges 191 A, 19 IB can extend perpendicular to a bottom surface of the seat frame border 183 and an outer face of the side ribs 175A, 175B The side ribs 185A, 185B and the series of flanges 191 A, 191B can prevent the side ribs from twisting when the seat is loaded. As such, the side ribs 185A, 185B and the flanges 191A, 191B may relieve structural loading from the side attachment screw interfaces 184A, 184B when seat 130 and seat frame 131 are in either of an attached or detached state and may also provide a complimentary force to that provided by side attachment screw' interfaces 184 A, 184B in a state in which seat 130 is atached to seat frame 131. In an attached slated, the side ribs 185 A, 185B may traverse the length of seat attachment rails 172A, 172B and the flanges 191 A, 191B may span the horizontal area of the seat attachment rails 172A, 172B. The number of flanges 191A, 191B can be selected based on the desired threshold loading of the chair, the thickness of each flange, and the weight distribution of the chair.

[00129] Referring in greater detail to FIGS. 4C and 4D, side attachment screw interface 184B may be configured to be inserted through side attachment hole 174B during the formation of the removable attachment between seat 130 and seat frame 131. Side attachment screw interface 184B may be configured to receive screw 194B in order to fasten seat 130 to seat frame 131. For instance, side attachment screw interface 184B may be inserted through side attachment hole 174B. Screw' access panel 195B may be removed from side rail 172B to expose side attachment screw interface 184B. After removal of screw access panel 195B, screw 194B may be rotatably inserted into side attachment screw interface 184B. Similarly, screws 194B may be rotatably inserted into each of the side attachment screw interfaces 184B After each of the screws 194B have been inserted into the side attachment screw interfaces 184B, the screw access panel 195B may be reattached to side attachment rail 172B. A similar process may be performed for side attachment screw interfaces 184A, side attachment holes 178A, screw access panel 195 A, and screws 195 A.

[00130] In the manner described above, seat 130, by way of seat frame border 183 and the plurality of protrusions formed thereto, may be configured to engage with the side attachment rails 172A and 172B and carrying handle 172 of seat frame 131. In some instances, the seat frame border 183 may be secured to seat frame 131 by locating a first end (e.g., front portion) of seat frame border 183 into a first end (e.g., front portion) of the seat frame 131 and rolling and/or flexing the seat frame border 183 from the first end of the seat frame 131 to a second end (e.g., back portion) of the seat frame 131. The rolling and/or flexing of the seat frame border 183 from the first end of the seat frame 131 to the second end may cause the plurality of protrusions of the seat frame border 183 to align with the plurality of slots in the seat attachment rails and to removably attach the seat frame border 183 on the seat frame 131 .

Alternatively, seat frame border 183 may be secured to seat frame 131 by inserting the rearmost side attachment screw interface 184B on the left side of the seat frame border 183 into the rearmost side attachment hole 174B of the left side attachment rail 172B and inserting the rearmost side attachment screw interface 184A on the right side of the seat frame border 183 into the rearmost side attachment hole 174A of the right side attachment rail 172A. Next, the first, second, and third middle side attachment screw interfaces 184B on the left side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the first, second, and third middle side attachment holes 174B of the left side attachment rail 172B. Similarly, the first, second, and third middle side attachment screw interfaces 184A on the right side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the first, second, and third middle side attachment holes 174A of the right side attachment rail 172A. Subsequently, the frontmost side attachment screw interface 184B on the left side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the frontmost side attachment hole 174B of the left side attachment rail 172B and the frontmost side attachment screw interface 184 A on the right side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the frontmost side attachment hole 174A of the right side attachment rail 172A. Then, the seat 130, by way of the seat frame border 183, may be rolled and/or flexed at a front portion of the seat 130 in a downward direction to align and insert the front attachment clips 187, 187 A, and 187B of the seat frame border 183 with the front attachment holes 177, 177A, and 177B of the carrying handle 172 and the front attachment clip on the right side of the seat frame border 183 with the front attachment hole on the right end portion of the carrying handle 172. Next, the screw access panels 195A and 195B may be removed from the side attachment rails 172A and 172B, and each of the screws 194A and 194B may be threaded into the respective side attachment screw interfaces 184A and i 8 1 B. After insertion, the screw access panels 195A and 195B may be reattached to side attachment rails 172A and 172B.

[00132] During the assembly of the seat frame border 183 to the seat frame 131, the seat frame border 183 can be rolled from a rear end to a front end. While such steps are described in a specific order from rear to front, the steps need not be performed in such an order and may be performed in any specific order.

[00133] Furthermore, in the state in which seat 130 is attached to seat frame 131, as shown in FIG. 4C, seat frame border 183 may interface with an outer portion of seat frame 131. In some instances, seat frame border 183 may be machined after the injection molding process described above in order to allow' for cosmetic control of the seat frame border-seat frame interface.

[00134] Second Embodiment of Seat / Seat Frame Engagement

[00135] According to a second embodiment of the seat/seat frame engagement and as shown in FIG. 5A, carrying handle 172 may include front attachment hole 177B and side opening 178B on a fist side of carrying handle 172 (e.g , left side of carrying handle 172), front attachment hole 177A and side opening 178A on a second side of carrying handle 172 (e.g., right side of carrying handle 172), and front attachment hole 177 on a third side of carrying handle 172 (e.g., center of carrying handle 172). As will be described in further detail below, front attachment hole 177B and side opening 178B may be configured to engage with front attachment dip 187B and carrying handle side cover 188B, respectively, of seat 130 as shown in FIG. 5B. As noted above, the cornponents (e.g., carrying handle 172) of chair 100 which extend from the left side to the right side of chair 100 may be of a symmetric construction. Thus, carrying handle 172 may further include a front seat attachment hole and side opening on a second side of carrying handle 172 (e.g., right side of carrying handle 172) of an orientation and construction similar to that of front seat attachment hole 177B and side opening I78B.

[00136] Returning to FIG. 5 A, seat frame 131 may also include seat attachment rail 172B. Seat attachment rail 172B may be positioned on an inner face of a side portion of seat frame 131 proximate to arm rest 150B, front leg 1 12B, and the like. Seat attachment rail I72B may be made of the same material as that of seat frame 131 (e.g., aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo). As such, seat attachment rail 172B may be manufactured as a continuous piece of seat frame 131. Thus, in instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of seat frame 131 and seat attachment rail 172B, the material may be hydroformed and vacuum casted and into seat frame 131 and seat attachment rail 172B and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals used in the fabrication of seat frame 13 land seat atachment raill72B may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

[00137] Alternatively, seat attachment rail 172B may not form a continuous piece with seat frame 131 and, as such, may be a separate component. In such instances, seat attachment rail 172B may be made of either the same material as that of seat frame 131, or may be made of a different material. In either event, seat attachment rail 172B may be attached to seat frame 131 via adhesion, welding, mechanical fastening (e.g., nut and bolt), and the like.

[00138] Seat attachment rail 172B may include side openings, rib engagement channels, and a plurality of side attachment holes. For example, as shown in FIG. 5 A, seat attachment rail 172B may include side openings 176B (e.g., distal and proximal side openings), rib engagement channels 175B, and side attachment holes G74B. Side openings 176B may provide openings through which the interior and/or internal portion of seat attachment rail 172B may be accessed. The side openings 176B may be configured to be covered by seat attachment rail side covers 186B of seat 130. The rail side covers 186 may be provided with integral ribs 192 to provide additional support of the seat frame border. Rib engagement channels 175B may run along the entirety of the length of seat attachment rail 172B from the first side opening 176B (e.g., distal side opening furthest from back 140) to the second side opening 176B (e.g., proximal side opening closest to back 140) along a line parallel to the face of seat frame 131 on which seat attachment rail 172B is attached. Rib engagement channels 175B may be configured to support side ribs 185B of seat 130. A plurality of side attachment holes 174B may be positioned on the rib engagement channels 175B. Each of the side attachment holes 174B may be configured to receive a side atachment clip 184B of seat 130. While four side attachment holes 174B are depicted in FIG. 4B, a fewer number (e.g., one, two, or three) or a greater number (five, six, ten, etc.) of side attachment holes 174B may be included. Seat frame 131 may further include an additional seat attachment rail that is positioned on the opposite inner face of the opposite side portion of seat frame 131 to that of seat attachment rail 172B. The additional seat attachment rail may be similar to that of seat attachment rail 172B. [00139J Referring to FIG 5B, seat frame border 183 may include a plurality of protrusions of various types configured to aide and/or facilitate the engagement between seat 130 and seat frame 131. In particular, seat frame border 183 may include front attachment clip 187B, carrying handle side cover 188B, seat frame corner engagement face 189B, seat attachment rail side covers 186B, side attachment clips 184B, and side ribs 185B. Each of such protrusions may be positioned on the left side of seat 130 and may be proximate to front leg 112B, arm rest 150B, and the like in a state in which seat 130 is engaged with seat frame 131. Furthermore, seat 130 may additionally include a front attachment clip, carrying handle side cover, seat frame comer engagement faces, seat attachment rail side covers, side attachment clips, and side ribs on the right side of seat 130. Such protrusions may be similar to those on the left side of seat 130 (e.g., front attachment clip 187B, carrying handle side cover 188B, seat frame corner engagement face 189B, etc.) but at a mirrored orientation on the right side of seat 130. As such, in a state in which seat 130 is engaged with seat frame 131, such protrusions on the right side of seat 130 may be proximate to front leg 1 12 A, ami rest 150A, and the like.

|00140] Seat 130 may be configured to be removably attached and/or engaged with seat frame 131. In forming the removable attachment and/or engagement, the various protrusions of seat frame border 183 of seat 130 may be configured to removably connect and/or interface with specific aspects of front handle 172 and seat atachment rail 172B. For example, front attachment clip 187B and side attachment clips 184B of seat frame border 183 may be configured, respectively, to be removably connected and/or interfaced with front atachment hole 177B of carrying handle 172 and side attachment holes 174B of seat attachment rail 172B of seat frame 131. Further, carrying handle side cover 188B and seat attachment rail side covers 186B of seat frame border 183 of seat 130 may be configured, respectively, to removably interface with side openings 178B of carrying handle 172 and side openings 176B of seat attachment rail 172B of seat frame 131. Additionally, seat frame corner engagement face 189B and side ribs 185B of seat frame border 183 of seat 150 may be configured, respectively, to removably interface with seat frame corner 179B of seat frame 131 and rib engagement channel 175B of seat attachment rail 172B. The aforementioned connections and/or interfacings may occur on the left side of chair 100. In a state in which seat 130 is removably attached and/or engaged with seat frame 131, such connections and/or interfacings may be proximate to front leg 1 12B, arm rest 150B, and the like.

Similarly, the front attachment clip, carrying handle side cover, seat frame corner engagement face, seat attachment rail side covers, side attachment clips, and side ribs on the right side of the seat frame border 183 of seat 130 may be configured to removably connect and/or interface with the front seat attachment hole and side opening on the right side of carrying handle 172, the seat frame corner on the right side of seat frame 131, and the side openings, rib engagement channel, and plurality of side attachment holes of the seat attachment rail on the right side of seat frame 131 in the manner described above.

Referring in greater detail to FIG. 5D, side attachment clip 184B may be configured to be inserted through side attachment hole 174B during the formation of the removable attachment between seat 130 and seat frame 131. Side attachment clip 184B may have an extended rectangular construct with a half-arrow shaped distal end, which may allow for rotational pliability during insertion and removal, as well as for vertical force distribution during engagement. For instance, during insertion into side attachment hole 174B, a rotational force may be applied to the outer face of the half arrow terminal end of side attachment clip 184B. In response to the rotational force, side attachment clip 184B may be configured to rotatably displace and allow for the insertion of side attachment clip 184B into side attachment hole 174B. After insertion has been completed and the rotational force has been removed, the side attachment clip 184B may be configured to return to a static position and an upper and/or overhang face of the half-arrow portion of side attachment clip 184B may be configured to interface with a bottommost face of rib engagement channel 175B of seat attachment rail 172B. Such an interface provided by side attachment clip 184B, in combination with the other side and front attachment clips, may provide for the removable attachment of seat 130 to seat 131.

Side ribs 185A, 185B may be load carrying ribs and may be configured to interface with rib engagement channels 175A, 175B of seat attachment rails 172 A, 172B. The side libs 185 A, 185B may extend from a bottom surface of a right and left side of the seat frame border 183 and a series of flanges 191 may be located on each side of the seat frame border 183. The series of flanges 191 can extend perpendicular to a bottom surface of the seat frame border 183. The series of flanges 191 and the bottom surface of the seat frame border 183 can prevent the side ribs from twisting when the seat is loaded. As such, the side ribs 185A, 185B and the flanges 191 may relieve structural loading from the side attachment clips 184A, 184B and the other side attachment clips during use when seat 130 and seat frame 131 are in either of an atached or detached state and may also provide a complimentary force to that provided by side attachment clips 184A, 184B in a state in which seat 130 is atached to seat frame 131. The number of side ribs 185 can be selected based on the desired threshold loading of the chair, the thickness of each side rib, and the weight distribution of the chair. Additionally, it is also contemplated that the side ribs can be formed of an integral extending rib running the length of the channel of the atachment rails 175 A, 175B.

[00144] In the manner described above, seat 130, by way of seat frame border 183 and the plurality of protrusions formed thereto, may be configured to engage with the side attachment rails and carrying handle 172 of seat frame 131. In particular, the seat frame border 183 may be secured to seat frame 131 by locating a first end (e.g., front portion) of seat frame border 183 into a first end (e.g., front portion) of the seat frame 131 and rolling and/or flexing the seat frame border 183 from the first end of the seat frame 13 1 to a second end (e.g., back portion) of the seat frame 131. The rolling and/or flexing of the seat frame border 183 from the first end of the seat frame 131 to the second end may cause the plurality of protrusions of the seat frame border 183 to align with the plurality of slots in the seat attachment rails and to removably atach the seat frame border 183 on the seat frame 131.

[00145] Alternatively, seat frame border 183 may be secured to seat frame 131 by inserting the rearmost side attachment clip 186B on the left side of the seat frame border 183 into the rearmost side attachment hole 176B of the left side atachment rail 172B and inserting the rearmost side attachment clip on the right side of the seat frame border 183 into the rearmost side attachment hole of the right side atachment rail. Next, the first middle side atachment clip 186B and the second middle side attachment clip 186B on the left side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the first middle side atachment hole 176B and the second middle side attachment hole 176B of the left side attachment rail 172B and the first middle side attachment clip and the second middle side attachment clip on the right side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the first middle side attachment hole and the second middle side attachment hole of the right side atachment rail. Subsequently, the frontmost side attachment clip 186B on the 1 eft side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the frontmost side atachment hole 176B of the left side attachment rail 176B and the frontmost side attachment clip on the right side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the frontmost side attachment hole of the right side attachment rail. Then, the seat 130, by way of the seat frame border 183, may be rolled and/or flexed at a front portion of the seat 130 in a downward direction to align the front attachment clip 187B on the left side of the seat frame border 183 with the front attachment hole 177B on the left end portion of the carrying handle 172 and the front attachment clip on the right side of the seat frame border 183 with the front attachment hole on the right end porti on of the carrying handle 183. Next, the front attachment clip 187B on the left side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the front attachment hole 177B on the left end portion of the earning handle 172 and the front attachment clip on the right side of the seat frame border 183 may be inserted into the front attachment hole on the right end portion of the carrying handle 172.

[00146] During the assembly of the seat frame border 183 with the seat frame 131, the seat frame border 183 can be rolled from a rear end to a front end. While such steps are described in a specific order from rear to front, the steps need not be performed in such an order and may be performed in any specific order.

[00147] Back and Back Frame

[00148] In conjunction with seat 130, portable chair 100 may include back 140, which may be removably attached to back frame 141. Back frame 141 may be a cylindrical rod, tube, shaft, and/or extrusion I-beam and may be made of aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo. In instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of back frame 141, the material may be hydroformed and vacuum casted and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals used in the fabrication of back frame 141 may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

Back frame 141 may include arm rest attachment portions, which may be configured to facilitate the rotatable attachment of back frame 141 to arm rests 150A and 150B by way of pins including pin 157B. Additionally, back frame 141 may intersect with back joinery interfaces 143 A and 143B. In particular, back joinery interfaces 143 A and 143B may include tubular terminations onto which back frame 141 may be configured to be inserted. Before, during, or after insertion, a binding agent and/or structural adhesive may be applied to the tubular terminations of back joinery interfaces 143A and 143B and/or terminal ends of back frame 141 to secure the back frame 141 to the back joinery interfaces 143A and 143B.

In a manner similar to that described above in regard to seat frame 131, back frame 141 may include a carrying handle and one or more back attachment rails. For example, as shown in FIG. 6B, carrying handle 272 may include top attachment hole 277B on a first side of carrying handle 272 (e.g., left side of carrying handle 272), top attachment hole 277A on a second side of carrying handle 272 (e.g., right side of carrying handle 172), and top attachment hole 277 on a third side of carrying handle 272 (e.g , center of carrying handle 272). As will be described in further detail below, top attachment holes 277, 277A, and 277B may be respectively configured to engage with top attachment clips 287, 287A, and 287B of back 140. [00151] Furthermore, back frame 141 may also include back attachment rail 272B Back attachment rail 272B may be positioned on an inner face of a side portion of back frame 141 proximate to arm rest 150B, front leg 112B, and the like. Back attachment rail 272B may be made of the same material as that of back frame 141 (e.g., aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo). As such, back attachment rail 272B may be manufactured as a continuous piece of back frame 141. Thus, in instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of back frame 141 and back attachment rail 272B, the material may be hydroformed and vacuum casted and into back frame 141 and back attachment rail 272B and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals used in the fabrication of back frame 141 and back attachment rail 272B may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

[00152] Alternatively, back attachment rail 272B may not form a continuous piece with back frame 141 and, as such, may be a separate component. In such instances, back attachment rail 272B may be made of either the same material as that of back frame 141, or may be made of a different material. In either event, back attachment rail 272B may he attached to back frame 141 via adhesion, welding, mechanical fastening (e.g., nut and bolt), and the like.

[00153] Back attachment rail 272B may include rib engagement channels and a plurality of side atachment holes. For example, as shown in FIG. 6B, back atachment rail 272B may include rib engagement channels 275B and side attachment holes 274B. Rib engagement channels 275B may run along the entirety of the length of back attachment rail 272B. Rib engagement channels 275B may be configured to support side ribs 285B and flanges 291B of back 140. A plurality of side attachment holes 274B may be positioned on the rib engagement channels 275B. Each of the side attachment holes 274B may be configured to receive a side attachment screw interface 284B of back 140. While five side attachment holes 274B are depicted in FIG. 6B, a fewer number (e.g , one, two, three, or four) or a greater number (six, ten, etc.) of side attachment holes 274B may be included

[00154] Back frame 141 may also include back attachment rail 272A Back attachment rail 272A may be positioned on an inner face of a side portion of back frame 141 proximate to arm rest 150A, front leg 1 12 A, and the like. Back attachment rail 272A may be made of the same material as that of back frame 141 (e.g., aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, metal alloys, carbon fiber, and/or bamboo). As such, back attachment rail 272A may be manufactured as a continuous piece of back frame 141. Thus, in instances in which aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, scandium, and/or metal alloys are used in the fabrication of back frame 141 and back attachment rail 272 A, the material may be hydrofor ed and vacuum casted and into back frame 141 and back attachment rail 272A and may be treated through anodizing, plating, painting, powder coating, and/or the application of enamel in order to prevent corrosion induced by environmental conditions such as salt spray. Additionally, the metals used in the fabrication of back frame 141 and back atachment rail 272A may be treated through annealing, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, tempering, normalizing, and/or quenching in order to increase hardness, toughness, and tensile and shear strength.

[00155] Alternatively, back atachment rail 272 A may not form a continuous piece with back frame 141 and, as such, may be a separate component. In such instances, back attachment rail 272A may be made of either the same materia! as that of back frame 141, or may be made of a different material. In either event, back attachment rail 272A may be attached to back frame 141 via adhesion, welding, mechanical fastening (e.g., nut and bolt), and the like.

[00156] Back attachment rail 272A may include rib engagement channels and a plurality of side attachment holes. For example, as shown in FIG. 6B, back attachment rail 272A may include rib engagement channels 275A and side attachment holes 274A. Rib engagement channels 275A may am along the entirety of the length of back attachment rail 272 A. Rib engagement channels 275A may be configured to support side ribs 285A and flanges 291A of back 140. A plurality of side attachment holes 274A may be positioned on the rib engagement channels 275A. Each of the side attachment holes 274A may be configured to receive a side attachment screw interface 284A of back 140. While five side attachment holes 274A are depicted in FIG. 6B, a fewer number (e.g., one, two, three, or four) or a greater number (six, ten, etc.) of side attachment holes 274A may be included.

[00157] Referring to FIG. 6A, back 140 may be composed of any of a number of materials including, but not limited to, armored fabric cloth, sail fabric, awning fabric, Kevlar, tarp canvas, vinyl coated polyester, nylon mesh, neoprene, aluminized nylon, and/or cotton canvas. In some embodiments, the material may be treated to provide increased UV stabilization and weathering resistance, fire resistance, abrasion and tear resistance, and waterproofing.

[00158] In certain instances, back 140 may be composed of a similar material to that of seat 130. However, in some cases, the material used in the manufacture of back 140 may be different than that used in the manufacture of seat 130. For example, back 140 may be made of a first material and/or combination of materials, and seat 130 may be made of a second material and/or combination of materials different than the first material and/or combination of materials.

[00159] The material used in the fabrication of back 140 may be manufactured in a highly-permeable, weave-type and/or mesh-like construction and, as such, may provide for increased load capacity and user comfort. The perimeter of the weave-type and/or mesh-like fabric construction of back 140 may be configured to interface with back frame border 193, which may be a rigid thermoplastic over-mold In forming the interface between back 140 and back frame border 193, back frame border 193 may be over-molded onto back 140 through a method of local injection molding. The process may form a thermoplastic feature (e.g., back frame border 193 and components included therein) through the fabric weave along the perimeter of back 140. After the method of local injection molding is completed, the weave-type and/or mesh-like fabric construction of back 140 may be taut and the back frame border 193 may be rigidly attached to back 140. Such an attachment method may eliminate stitching in the seat fabric and, by extension, offer advantages including repeatability, durability, dimensional accuracy, frame attachment flexibility and improved aesthetics.

[00160] Back frame border 193 may include a plurality of protrusions of various types configured to aide and/or facilitate the engagement between back 140 and back frame 141. In particul ar, back frame border 193 may include top attachment clips 287, 287A, and 287B, back frame corner engagement faces 289A and 289B, side atachment screw' interfaces 284A and 284B, side ribs 285A and 285B, and flanges 291A and 291B.

[00161] Back 140 may be configured to be removably attached and/or engaged with seat frame 141. In forming the removable atachment and/or engagement, the various protrusions of back frame border 193 of back 140 may be configured to removably connect, insert, and/or interface with specific aspects of top handle 272 and back attachment rails 272A and 272B. For example, top attachment clips 287, 287A, and 287B and side attachment screw interfaces 284A and 284B of back at frame border 193 may be respectively configured to be removably connected, inserted, and/or interfaced with top attachment holes 277, 277A, and 277B of carrying handle 272 and side attachment holes 274 A and 274B of back attachment rails 272 A and 272B. Additionally, back frame comer engagement faces 289A and 289B of back frame border 283 of back 140 may be respectively configured to removably interface with back frame comers 279A and 279B of back frame 141.

[00162] Further, side ribs 285A and 285B and flanges 291A and 291B of back frame border 193 of back 140 may be configured to remov ably interface with rib engagement channels 275A and 275B of back attachment rails 272A and 272B. Side ribs 285A, 285B may be load carrying ribs and may be configured to interface with rib engagement channels 275A, 275B of back attachment rails 272A, 272B. The side ribs 285A, 285B may extend from a bottom surface of a right and left side of the back frame border 193 and flanges 291 A, 291B may be located on each side of the back frame border 193. The series of flanges 291 A, 29 I B can extend perpendicular to a bottom surface of the back frame border 193 and an outer face of the side ribs 275A, 275B. The side ribs 285A, 285B and the series of flanges 291A, 291B can prevent the side ribs from twisting when the back is loaded. As such, the side ribs 285A, 285B and the flanges 291A, 291B may relieve structural loading from the side attachment screw interfaces 284A, 284B when back 140 and back frame 141 are in either of an attached or detached state and may also provide a complimentary force to that provided by side attachment screw interfaces 284A, 284B in a state in which back 140 is attached to back frame 141. In an attached stated, the side ribs 285A, 285B may traverse the length of back attachment rails 272A, 272B and the flanges 291 A, 291B may span the horizontal area of the back attachment rails 272 A, 272B The number of flanges 291 A 291B can be selected based on the desired threshold loading of the chair, the thickness of each flange, and the weight distribution of the chair.

Referring to FIG. 6C, side atachment screw interface 284A may be configured to be inserted through side attachment hole 274A during the formation of the removable attachment between back 140 and back frame 141. Side attachment screw interface 284A may be configured to receive screw 294A in order to fasten back 140 to back frame 141. For instance, side atachment screw' interface 284A may be inserted through side attachment hole 274A. Screw access panel 295A may be removed from side rail 272A to expose side attachment screw interface 284A. After removal of screw access panel 295A, screw 294A may be rotatably inserted into side attachment screw interface 284A. Similarly, screw's 294 A may be rotatably inserted into each of the side attachment screw' interfaces 284A. After each of the screw's 294A have been inserted into the side attachment screw interfaces 284A, the screw access panel 295A may be reattached to side attachment rail 272A. A similar process may be performed for side attachment screw' interfaces 28413, side attachment holes 278B, screw access panel 295B, and screws 295B.

In the manner described above, back 140, by way of back frame border 193 and the plurality of protrusions formed thereto, may be configured to engage with the side atachment rails 272A and 272B and carrying handle 272 of back frame 141. In some instances, the back frame border 183 may be secured to back frame 141 by locating a first end (e.g., top portion) of back frame border 193 into a first end (e.g., top portion) of the back frame 141 and rolling and/or flexing the back frame border 193 from the first end of the back frame 141 to a second end (e.g., bottom portion) of the back frame 141. The rolling and/or flexing of the back frame border 193 from the first end of the back frame 141 to the second end may cause the plurality of protrusions of the back frame border 193 to align with the plurality of slots in the back attachment rails and to removably attach the back frame border 193 on the back frame 141.

Alternatively, back frame border 193 may be secured to back frame 141 by inserting the bottommost side attachment screw interface 284B on the left side of the back frame border 193 into the bottommost side attachment hole 274B of the left side attachment rail 272B and inserting the bottommost side attachment screw interface 284 A on the right side of the back frame border 193 into the bottommost side attachment hole 274 A of the right side attachment rail 272A. Next, the first, second, and third middle side attachment screw interfaces 284B on the left side of the back frame border 193 may be inserted into the first, second, and third middle side attachment holes 274B of the left side attachment rail 272B. Similarly, the first, second, and third middle side attachment screw interfaces 284A on the right side of the back frame border 193 may be inserted into the first, second, and third middle side attachment holes 274A of the right side attachment rail 272A. Subsequently, the topmost side attachment screw interface 284B on the left side of the back frame border 193 may be inserted into the topmost side attachment hole 274B of the left side attachment rail 272B and the topmost side attachment screw interface 284A on the right side of the back frame border 193 may be inserted into the topmost side attachment hole 274A of the right side atachment rail 272 A. Then, the back 140, by way of the back frame border 193, may be rolled and/or flexed at a top portion of the back 140 in a backward direction to align and insert the top attachment clips 287, 287A, and 287B of the back frame border 193 with the top atachment holes 277, 277A, and 277B of the earning handle 272 and the top attachment clip on the right side of the back frame border 193 with the top attachment hole on the right end portion of the carrying handle 272 Next, the screw access panels 295A and 295B may be removed from the side attachment rails 272A and 272B, and each of the screws 294A and 294B may be threaded into the respective side attachment screw interfaces 284A and 284B. After insertion, the screw access panels 295A and 295B may be reattached to side attachment rails 272A and 272B.

In some instances, back frame border 193 may have a plurality of back attachment clips in the manner described above in regard to seat frame border 183 as opposed to the back atachment screw interfaces 284A. In such instances, the side attachment clip may be configured to be inserted through side attachment hole 274B during the formation of the removable attachment between back 140 and back frame 141. The side attachment clip may have an extended rectangular construct with a half arrow shaped distal end, which may allow for rotational pliability during insertion and removal, as well as for vertical force distribution during engagement. For instance, during insertion into side attachment hole 274B, a rotational force may be applied to the outer face of the half-arrow terminal end of the side attachment clip. In response to the rotational force, the side attachment clip may be configured to rotatably displace and allow for the insertion of side attachment clip into side attachment hole 274B. After insertion has been completed and the rotational force has been removed, the side attachment clip may be configured to return to a static position and an upper and/or overhang face of the half-arrow portion of side atachment clip may be configured to interface with a bottommost face of rib engagement channel 275B of back attachment rail 272B. Such an interface provided by side attachment clip, in combination with the other side and top atachment clips, may provide for the removable attachment of back

140 to back 141. [00167J In either instance, during the assembly of the back frame border 193 to the back frame 141, the back frame border 193 can be rolled from a bottom end to a top end. While such steps are described in a specific order from bottom to top, the steps need not be performed in such an order and may be performed in any specific order. Furthermore, in the state in which back 140 is attached to back frame 141 , as shown in FIG. 6C, back frame border 193 may interface with an outer portion of back frame 141. In some instances, back frame border 193 may be machined after the injection molding process d escribed above in order to allow for cosmetic control of the back frame border- back frame interface.

[00168] Arm Rests

[00169] Referring back to FIG. 1, portable chair 100 may also include arm rests 150A and 150B. The arm rests 150A and 150B may be pivotably attached to the arm rest attachment portions of back frame 141 via one or more pins including pin 157B. Arm rests 150A and 150B may be further configured to be attached, respectively, to front joinery interface 116A and back joinery interface 126A via pin 128A and front joinery interface 1 16B and back joinery interface 126B via pin 128B.

[00170] Arm rests 150A and 150B may be made of plastic, rubber, metal, carbon fiber, and the like and may be configured to support up to a 5001b load in one example. In some instances arm rests 150A and 150B may serve as buoyancy aides in preventing the submersion of portable chair 100. Similarly, in one example, arm rests 150A and 150B may be fabricated through a gas-assisted injection molding process to create a hollow cavity in the interior of the arm rests. Such a hollow cavity may serve as a buoyancy aide for chair 100.

[00171] Foldabilitv [00172] Referring to FIG. 7A, portable chair 100 may be a foldable and portable chair. Through actuation of the rotational and pivotable interfaces, portable chair 100 may be able to be folded into a portable arrangement and unfolded into a seating arrangement. While in the folded portable arrangement, the chair 100 may be locked and/or sustained in the folded portable arrangement by one or more detents. The one or more detents may provide resistance against the opening of the chair 100 from the folded portable arrangement into the unfolded seating arrangement While in the unfolded seating arrangement the one or more detents may additionally provide resistance against the closing of the chair 100 from the unfolded seating arrangement into the folded portable arrangement.

[00173] For further example, chair 100 may be configured to open from a folded portable arrangement into an unfolded seating arrangement. In the folded portable arrangement, the front legs 112A and 1 12B may be substantially parallel to back legs 122A and 122B and seat 130 may be substantially parallel to back 140. One or more detents may be included in the atachment interfaces between the seat joinery interfaces 133A and 133B of seat frame 131 . Additionally, and/or alternatively, the one or more detents may be included in the attachment interface between front leg attachment portions 1 70A and 170B and front legs 112A and 112B via pins 171 A and 17 IB.

[00174] The one or more detents may provide resistance against the opening displacement of the front legs 112A and 112B and seat 130 away from back legs 122 A and 122B and back 140 and, as such, may function to lock and/or maintain the chair in the folded portable arrangement. In addition to the resistance, the one or more detents may also provide intentional audible feedback to a user of chair 100 indicating that the chair 100 is in a locked position when an attempt is made to open the chair 100 from the folded portable arrangement to the unfolded seating arrangement. [00175] While in the folded portable arrangement, when an opening force is applied to the chair 100 that is greater than the locking force and/or resistance provided by the one or more detents, chair 100 may become openable and the front legs 1 12A and 112B and seat 130 may rotatably displace from back legs 122 A and 122B and back 140. At such a point, the chair 100 may be in an unlocked and transitory state between the folded portable arrangement and the unfolded seating arrangement. Upon the continued application of the opening force, the chair 100 may achieve a maximum opening displacement and arrive at the unfolded seating arrangement. At the unfolded seating arrangement, the front legs 1 12 A and 1 12B and seat 130 may be angled relative to back legs 122A and 122B and back 140.

[00176] Additionally, the one or more detents included in the attachment interface between front leg attachment portions 170A and 170B and front legs 112A and 112B via pins 171 A and 17 IB may provide resistance against the closing displacement of the front legs 112A and 112B and seat 130 towards back legs 122 A and 122B and back 140. As such, the one or more detents may function to lock and/or maintain the chair 100 in the unfolded seating arrangement. In addition to the resistance, the one or more detents may also provide intentional audible feedback to a user of chair 100 indicating that the chair 100 is in a locked position when an attempt is made to close the chair 100 from the unfolded seating arrangement to the folded portable arrangement. While in the unfolded seating arrangement, when a closing force is applied to the chair 100 that is greater than the locking force and/or resistance provided by the one or more detents, the chair 100 may become closeable and the front legs 112A and 112B and seat 130 may rotatably displace towards back legs 122A and 122B and back 140.

[00177] Cun Holders [00178] FIGS. 8-21 illustrate embodiments of an exemplary cup holder assembly 300 that may attach to the portable chair 100. The cup holder assembly 300 may comprise a cup holder 310, a collar 340, and a clamp member 360. The cup holder 310 may be rotatably engaged with the clamp member 360 such that the cup holder 310 may rotate relative to the clamp member 360 The clamp member 360 may releasably engage with either of the front legs 112A and 1 12B of the chair 100 as shown in FIGS. 9A and 9B For example, the cup holder assembly 300 may attach to the front leg 112A proxi ate the intersection with the front leg attachment portion 170 A of the seat frame 131, or alternatively, the cup holder assembly 300 may attach to the front leg 1 12B proximate the intersection with the front leg attachment portion 170B of the seat frame 131. The cup holder assembly 300 may typically be oriented in an outboard position, or user accessible position, such that the cup holder 310 is positioned outside of the profile of the front legs 112A, 112B. In some examples, the cup holder assembly 300 may be rigidly attached to either of the front legs G12A, G12B, or as in the exemplary embodiment shown the cup holder assembly 300 may be detachably attached.

[00179] In either instance (e.g., rigidly attached or detachably attachable) the cup holder assembly 300 may be configured to secure a cup, bottle, thermos, glass, can, mug, or drink container of any of a plurality of sizes. For example, the cup holder 310 may secure different sizes of the YETI® Rambler, such as the lOoz., 2Qoz., 30 oz., 18 oz , and 26 oz., the YETI® Colster for either 12 oz. or 16oz. cans, YETI® bottles, or even solo cups. The embodiment of the cup holder 310 illustrated in FIGS. 8A-21 may have a single wall construction without any integrated insulation.

[00180] Alternatively, the cup holder 310 may be a vacuum insulated cup holder, an aerogel cup holder, or may include one or more vacuum insulated panels and may be configured to maintain a temperature lower or higher than that of the ambient surrounding environment. The cup holder 310 may be configured to cool an inserted drink container and/or maintain and prolong a period of below-ambient temperature of an inserted drink container. Additionally, and/or alternatively, the cup holder may be configured to receive an ice pack and/or natural ice insert in order to aide in cooling of an inserted drink container and/or prolong a period of below-ambient temperature.

[00181] The cup holder 310 may comprise a lip 312, an interior bottom surface 313, and a substantially cylindrical wail 314 positioned between the lip 312 and the bottom surface 313. The substantially cylindrical wall 314 may have a smooth surface having the same diameter the entire height or may have an exterior shape comprising two tiers, an upper tier 315, a lower tier 316, with a step or substantially horizontal connecting wall 317 between the upper tier 315 and lower tier 316 such as the example embodiment shown in FIG. 8 A-8C. The upper tier 315 may have a larger diameter than the diameter of the low¾r tier 316. The two-tiered shape of the cup holder 310 may allow the cup holder 310 to support and secure different sized containers. For example, as shown in FIG. 8B, the lOoz YETI® Rambler 15 rests on the step or connecting wall 317 of the cup holder 310, while in FIG. 8C, a 12 oz. can 17 touches the interior bottom surface 313 of the cup holder 310. The cup holder 310 may have an engaging member 318 that releasably connects to the collar 340 as described in more detail below. The engaging member 318 may be integrally formed or molded to the cup holder 310.

[00182] As shown in Figs. 9 A and 9B, the clamp member 360 of the cup holder assembly 300 may engage the front leg 112A proximate to the intersection with the front leg attachment portion 170A of seat frame 131 or alternatively, the cup holder assembly 300 may be attached to the front leg 112B proximate the intersection with the front leg attachment portion 170B of the seat frame 131. As shown in FIGS. 8 A, 10A, and 10B, the clamp member 360 may have a C-shaped member 362 having an upper surface 364 and a lower surface 366 Each of the upper surface 364 and the lower surface 366 may have a portion with a rounded surface to engage either of the bushings 173A or 173B. The rounded surfaces may have diameters similar to the diameter of bushings 173 A and 173B By engaging the bushings 173A, 173B, the cup holder assembly 300 may have increased support when in an outboard position, or user accessible position.

To connect the clamp member 360 to the collar 340, an engaging member 368 may extend from the C-shaped member 362 at a first end 370 and have a second end 372 to engage the collar 340. The engaging member 368 may have a portion that is a curved member 369 and a portion that is a straight member 371. Additionally, the first end 370 and the second end 372 may be positioned at an angle to each other. The exterior surface of the engaging member 368 may form a rounded shape or partially cylindrical shape. As shown in FIGS. 10A and 17, the interior portion of the curved member 369 may have a plurality of ribs 374 connecting from the first end 370 or C- shaped member 362 to the straight member 371. The ribs 374 may run parallel to the direction of the longitudinal axis 376 of the engaging member 368, although other orientations and combinations of orientations are possible. The plurality of ribs 374 may increase the strength of the clamp member 360 to withstand the forces administered from repeated attachment and removal. The exterior shape of the clamp member 360 may be symmetrical about a horizontal plane extending through the longitudinal axis 376 of the engaging member 368. FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate another feature of the cup holder assembly 300 to make carrying the portable chair 100 easier when the portable chair 100 is in the folded configuration. When attached to the portable chair 100, the cup holder assembly 300 may rotate from an outboard position with the cup holder 310 positioned outside of the profile of the front legs 112A, 112B, shown in FIG. 11, to an inboard position with the cup holder 310 positioned inside the profile of the front legs 112 A, 112B, shown in FIG. 12. The cup holder assembly 300 may be rotated from the outboard position to the inboard position while still connected with one of the front legs 112A, 112B of the portable chair 100.

FIGS. 13A-13C illustrate the method to rotate the cup holder assembly 300 from an outboard position to an inboard position when the portable chair 100 is in the folded configuration. As shown in FIG. 13 A, the cup holder assembly 300 is in an outboard position. During the next step as shown in FIG. 13B, a user may slide the C-shaped member 362 of the clamp member 360 along whichever front leg 112A, 112B the cup holder assembly 300 is attached away from the respective bushing 173A or 173B. Once the lower surface 366 is above the respective bushing 173A or 173B, the user then may rotate the C-shaped member around the front leg 112A, 112B while the clamp member 360 is still attached. Lastly, as shown in FIG. 13C, the user completes the rotation of the cup holder assembly 300 to an inboard position with the cup holder 310 positioned inside the profile of the front legs 112A, 1 12B.

As described above, the cup holder assembly 300 may releasably connect to either of the front legs 112A, 1 12B In order to move the cup holder assembly 300 from one side of the portable chair 100 to the other side, the cup holder 310 may be rotated relative to the clamp member 360 as shown in FIGS. 14A-14C to ensure the cup holder 310 is in the proper drink holding orientation for the user. In at least the exemplary embodiment, the longitudinal axis of the C-shaped member 362 is not parallel or perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical wall 314 of the cup holder 310, such that the two axes are positioned at an angle to each other. To rotate the cup holder 310 relative to the clamp member 360, the user may pull the cup holder 310 and collar 340 outward from the clamp member 360. The collar 340 and cup holder 310 may then slide a predetermined distance along the longitudinal axis 376 of the engaging member 368 to disengage a set of rotationally inhibiting features 341, 367 on the collar 340 and engaging member 368, respectively, shown in FIGS. 16B, 17, and 18A-18B. Once the cup holder 310 and collar 340 have moved the predetermined distance, both the collar 340 and cup holder 310 may be rotated to the desired position for use on the opposite side of the chair 100. For example, as shown in FIGS. 14A-14C, the cup holder 310 may rotate degrees relative to the damp member 360 or rotate until the rotational inhibiting features 341, 367 engage each other as the collar 340 is slid back towards the clamp member 360, shown in FIG. 14C, from its initial position, shown in FIG. 14A. The cup holder 310 may rotate from a first position to a second position where the first position and the second position are approximately 144 degrees apart. Alternatively, the first position and the second position may be within a range of 130 degrees to 150 degrees apart, or within a range of 120 degrees to 160 degrees apart, or within a range of l 10 degrees to 170 degrees apart. As another option, the first position and the second position may be spaced within a range of 5 degrees to 15 degrees apart, or within a range of 15 degrees to 30 degrees apart, or within a range of 30 to 90 degrees apart. The rotational inhibiting features 341 , 367 may be set to secure the collar 340 and cup holder 310 to the clamp member 360 at predetermined positions that allow the bottom of the cup holder 310 to be parallel to the ground when attached on either the left hand side or right hand side of the chair 100. While the exemplary embodiment illustrates two predetermined positions for the cup holder 310 relative to the clamp member 360, the number of predetermined positions may be any number such as 3, 4, or 5 or more. Optionally, a user may rotate the cup holder 10 relative to the clamp member 360 to any location within the predetermined range of motion. Alternatively, the cup holder 310 may be free to rotate the full 360 degrees relative to the collar 340. [00186] To assist the user in aligning the cup holder 310 and collar 340 in the proper position, each of the cup holder 310, the collar 340, and the clamp member 360 may have an alignment indicator 394, 396. Alignment indicator 394 may comprise having a portion positioned on each of the engaging member 318 of the cup holder 310 and the exterior surface of the collar 340. The alignment indicator 394 may align with one of two corresponding alignment indicators 396 positioned on the clamp member 360. When the alignment indicators 394. 396 are eollinear, the collar 340 and the clamp member 360 are properly aligned for the cup holder assembly 300 to be one of the predetermined optimal operating positions. The alignment indicators 394, 396 may be raised surfaces, indentions, or other contrasting features to allow a user to easily identify the predetermined optimal operating positions of the cup holder assembly 300.

[00187] As shown in FIGS 16B, 18A, and 18B, the plurality of rotation inhibiting features 341 on the collar 340 may comprise a plurality of bosses 341 that are rotationally spaced around a central axis of the collar 340. Each of the plurality of bosses 341 may engage a corresponding rotation-inhibiting feature 367 of the clamp member 360 shown in FIGS. 16B and 17. The plurality of rotation inhibiting features 367 on the clamp member 360 may comprise a plurality of pockets sized to receive the bosses 341 of the collar 340. Each of the plurality of bosses 341 and plurality of pockets 367 may have a substantially rectangular shape. The pockets 367 may only comprise side walls and may not have a rear surface to be able to receive bosses having multiple lengths. The number of pockets 367 on the clamp member 360 may be greater than the number of bosses 341 on the collar 340 to allow multiple rotational orientations of the collar 340 to the clamp member 360. For example, as shown in the exemplary' embodiment in FIGS. 16B, 17, 18A, and 18B, the number of bosses 341 is three, while the number of pockets is four. This configuration allows the collar to be rotated relative to the clamp member 360 and still have at least three rotation inhibiting features engaged to the clamp member 360 when the cup holder 310 is in a working position.

[00188] In addition, to determine the range of rotation of the collar 340 to the clamp member 360, at least one of the rotation inhibiting features on the collar may limit the maximum allowable rotation. For instance, one of the plurality of bosses 341, boss 341A may have a side surface with a longer length than the other bosses 341 such that when the user pulls the collar 340 from the clamp member 360 the predetermined distance to disengage the plurality of bosses 341 from the plurality of pockets 367, the longer length of boss 341 A may prevent the collar 340 from rotating beyond a maximum allowable rotation. The collar 340 may be rotated until boss 341A confronts one of tw'o side surfaces 367A that form a portion of at least two of the plurality of pockets 367 on the clamp member 360. The surfaces 367A may also have a longer length and extend closer to the second end 372 of the engaging member 368 than the other side pocket surfaces. Side surfaces 367A may create a stop for the boss 341 A to limit the amount of rotation of the collar 340 relative to the clamp member 360 and effectively set the optimal operating positions of the cup holder 310 relative to the clamp member 360. In the exemplar } - embodiment, the maximum allowable rotation may be approximately 144 degrees, but may be any predetermined angle.

[00189] Once the cup holder 310 is rotated to the new position, the user may detach the C-shaped member 362 of the cup holder assembly 300 from a first front leg 1 12A, 1 12B and reattach the C-shaped member 362 to a second front leg 112B, 112A. The C-shaped member 362 may have a plurality of ridges 386 that may increase the gripping force of the C-shaped member 362 on the front legs 1 12A, 112B. The plurality of ridges 386 may extend longitudinally within the C-shaped member 362 betw-een the upper and lower surfaces, 364, 366. Further, the plurality of ridges 386 may be evenly spaced apart within the C-shaped member 362. Alternatively, the plurality of ridges 386 may he unevenly spaced with more ridges 386 near the open ends of the C-shaped member 362. The plurality of ridges 386 may be integrally formed with C-shape member 362. Optionally, or alternatively, the plurality of ridges 386 may have a coating to improve their gripping force The C-shaped member 362 may require a force of 25 to 40 newtons (N) applied towards the closed end of the C-shaped member to engage the clamp member 360 to the front legs 112 A, 112B

FIGS. 15A and 15B illustrate cross-sectional views of the connection between the engaging member 368 of the clamp member 360, the collar 340, and the cup holder 310 along the longitudinal axis 376. The engaging member 318 may have an exterior surface 320 and an inner cavity 322 that generally follows the shape of the exterior surface 320. For example, the exemplary embodiment as shown in FIGS. 8A and 18 has a substantially cylindrical shaped exterior surface 320, although the exterior surface could have any shape. Within the inner cavity 322, a plurality of flex fingers 324 may extend inwardly from the interior surface 326. Each flex finger 324 may have a tapered member 328. The plurality of flex fingers 324 may be spaced apart from each other and may have different sizes.

As shown in FIGS. 15-19, the collar 340 may have a first end 342 having a corresponding plurality of flex fingers 344 that engage the flex fingers 324 of the cup holder 310 creating a snap fit engagement to secure the collar 340 to the cup holder 310. The plurality of flex fingers 344 on the collar 340 may have a portion that extends along the longitudinal axis and a portion having a taper. The flex fingers 344 may be spaced apart from each other similarly to the flex fingers 324 on the cup holder 310. The collar 340 may also include a plurality of alignment members 352 positioned between the flex fingers 344 as shown in FIGS. 16 and 17. Each alignment member 352 may provide a pair of radially extending flanges 353, which may contact at least one of the ends of the flex fingers 324 on the cup holder 310 to prevent rotation of the cup holder 310 relative to the collar 340 and ensure that the cup holder 310 secures to the collar 340 properly. Thus, the cup holder 310 may be secured to the collar 340 in only one orientation to prevent misassembling the components. The plurality of flex fingers 324, 344 may each comprise two flex fingers 324, 344, but may comprise more than two. For example, the flex fingers 324, 344 may comprise an upper flex finger positioned in the upper portion of the engaging member 318 and upper portion of the collar 340 respectively and a lower flex finger positioned in the lower portion of the engaging member 318 and lower portion of the collar 340 respectively. The flex fingers 324, 344 may have different sizes such that one flex finger is larger than the other. For instance, as shown in the exemplary embodiments, a lower flex finger is larger than the upper flex finger as the lower flex finger extends around a greater portion of the diameter of the collar 340 than the upper flex finger. By adjusting the stiffness of the flex fingers 344, the connection of the cup holder 310 to the collar 340 may support the cup holder 310 under normal use of inserting and removing bottles or other devices in and out of the cup holder 310, but the flex fingers 324 on the cup holder 310 and the flex fingers 344 may be tuned that if a large force exceeding those seen during normal use is applied to the cup holder 310, the fl ex fingers 324, 344 may disengage from each other to allow' the cup holder 310 to unsnap from the collar 340. For example, if a force exceeding 100 newtons (N) is exerted in a vertical direction on the cup holder 310, the cup holder 310 will release from the collar 340, or alternatively, if a force exceeding 115 newtons (N), or exceeding 130 newtons (N), or even exceeding 145 newtons (N), is exerted on the cup holder 310, the cup holder 310 will release from the collar 340 Since this break-away force is applied in a vertical direction, the force creates a moment around the C-shaped member 362. However, since the hreak-away force and moment are oriented in a different direction to the clamp-on force, the clamp member 360 may stay secured to the chair 100. The unsnapping of the cup holder 310 from the collar 340 may keep the collar 340 and clamp member 360 from breaking or suffering any permanent damage. Therefore, the cup holder 310 may be reattached to the collar 340 and ready for use again.

[00193] As discussed above, a feature of the cup holder assembly 300 is the ability of the collar 340 and cup holder 310 to rotate relative to the clamp member 360. To allow this rotation, the collar 340 may be both slidably and rotationally engaged with the clamp member 360 at a second end 346 that connects to the second end 372 of the engaging member 368 of the clamp member 360. In order to rotate the collar 340 relative to the clamp member 360, the user may apply a force to pull the collar 340 away from the clamp member 360, as shown in FIG. 15B. Pulling the collar 340 away from the clamp member 360 disengages a set of rotation inhibiting features 341, 367 on the collar 340 and the clamp member 360 to allow the collar 340 along with the cup holder 310 to rotate relative to the clamp member 360. The rotation inhibiting features 341, 367 prevent any unwanted or inadvertent rotation between the collar 340 and the clamp member 360 when the cup holder 310 is in a predetermined position. As discussed above, in one embodiment, the cup holder 310 may rotate from a first position to a second position where the first position and the second position are approximately 144 degrees apart.

[00194] The collar 340 may be permanently secured to the clamp member 360. The collar 340 may have a central protrusion 345 extending opposite the first end 342 of the collar 340 The central protrusion 345 may extend into the opening 382 of the clamp member 360. The collar 340 may then be secured to the clamp member 360 using a securing member 390 that extends through the opening 382 of the clamp member 360 and through the opening 350 that extends through the collar 340 from the first end 342 through the second end 346. The openings 350, 382 may respectively extend through the center of the collar 340 and the center of the engaging member 368 of the clamp member 360. In addition, the collar 340 may be secured to the clamp member 360 with a spring 392 positioned within the opening 350 of the protrusion 345 that is secured to the clamp member 360 by the securing member 390. The spring 392 applies a force to collar 340 to keep the interface surface 348 in contact with the mounting surface 378 of the cl mp member 360 until a user applies a counter force large enough to overcome the spring force and slide the collar 340 away from the clamp member 360 along the securing member 390 disengaging the rotation inhibiting features 341, 367. Even while the rotation inhibiting features 341, 367 are disengaged, the protrusion 345 may still have a portion extending into the opening 382. The collar 340 may slidably move a predetermined distance, which may be controlled by the length of the securing member 390. The engaging member 368 may also have a shelf 384 extending around a perimeter of the second end 372. The securing member 390 may be a mechanical fastener such as a rivet where the rivet joins the collar 340 to the clamp member 360, or alternatively, the securing member 390 may be a screw that may be secured with a nut securing the collar 340 and damp member 360.

[00195] FIGS. 20A and 20B illustrate an alternate embodiment of the collar 340 and clamp member 360 of the embodiment of FIGS. 8-19. For embodiment of FIGS. 20A and 20B, the features are referred to using similar reference numerals under the“4xx” series of reference numerals, rather than“3xx”as used in the embodiment of FIGS. 8- 19. Accordingly, certain features of the cup holder 400 that were already described above with respect to cup holder 300 of FIGS. 8-19 may be described in lesser detail, or may not be described at all. Specifically, FIGS. 20A and 20B illustrate an alternate connection between the collar 440 and the clamp member 460, where FIGS. 20A shows the collar 440 in an engaged position and FIG. 20B shows the collar 440 in a disengaged position. The alternative embodiment of collar 440 and clamp member 460 are similar to the embodiment shown in FIGS. 15A and 15B, the collar 340 may be permanently secured to the clamp member 360. The alternate embodiment shown in FIGS. 20A and 20B, may have all of the features of the embodiment shown in FIGS. 15A and 15BA, except the collar 440 and cl amp member 460 are arranged such that the col iar 440 lacks the protrusion 345 of collar 340 that extends into the clamp member 360. In addition, clamp member 460 may have a sleeve or spring guide surface 480 extending inward from the second end 472 of the engaging member 468. As shown in FIGS. 20A and 20B, a securing member 490 may secure the collar 440 to the clamp member 460 where the securing member 490 extends through the opening 482 of the clamp member 460 and through the opening 450 that extends through the collar 440 from the first end 442 through the second end 446. The openings 450, 482 may respectively extend through the center of the collar 440 and the center of the engaging member 468 of the clamp member 460. In addition, the collar 440 may be secured to the clamp member 460 with a spring 492 positioned within the opening 482 that is secured to the clamp member 460 by the securing member 490. The spring 492 applies a force to collar 440 to keep the interface surface 448 in contact with the mounting surface 478 of the clamp member 460 until a user applies a counter force large enough to overcome the spring force and slide the collar 440 away from the clamp member 460 along the securing member 490 to disengage the rotation inhibiting features 441 , 467. [00196] FIG. 21 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the collar 540. As an alternative embodiment of the collar 340 of the embodiments of FIGS. 8-20B. For embodiment of FIG. 21, the features of the collar 340 are referred to using similar reference numerals under the “5xx” series of reference numerals, rather than “3xx”as used in the embodiment of FIGS. 8-19. Accordingly, certain features of the collar 540 that were already described above with respect to collar 340, 440 of FIGS. 8-20B may be described in lesser detail, or may not be described at all Specifically, the collar 540 may have either interface shown in describing collar 340 and 440 as either relates to its corresponding clamp member 360 or 460. FIG. 21 specifically shows an embodiment of the collar 540 where the flex fingers 544 have gussets 554 to support and adjust the stiffness or tune the stiffness of the flex fingers 544 to the correct stiffness to enable the flex fingers 544 to disengage from the flex fingers 324 of the cup holder 310 if a force exceeding the normal use is applied to the cup holder 310 to allow the cup holder 310 to unsnap from the collar 540.

[00197] Each of the primary componen ts, such as the cup hol der 310, the coll ar 340, and the clamp member 360, of cup holder assembly 300 may be formed from a metallic material, such as an aluminum alloy or nonmetaliic material, such as a polymer. The polymer may be fiber-reinforced, such as carbon-fiber or glass-fiber polymer. Alternatively, the polymer may be unfilled. For instance, the cup holder 310 may be formed from a nylon or polyamide type material, while the clamp member 360 and collar 340 may be made from a polyoxymethyiene (POM) or other similar material. Further, the components may be formed from an injection molding process, machining, or additive manufacturing process.

[00198] FIGS. 22A-37 illustrate another alternate embodiment for a cup holder assembly 600. Cup holder assembly 600 may comprise a cup holder 610 and a corresponding mounting base 650. The mounting base 650 attaches to a front leg 1 12A of the chair 100 near the corresponding front leg attachment portion 170A of the seat frame 131 as shown in FIGS. 22A and 22B. The cup holder 610 then engages with the mounting base 650 to secure the cup holder 610 to the chair 100. As shown in FIGS. 24-25B, the cup holder 610 may have an attachment member 630 extending from the substantially cylindrical side wall 614 of the cup holder 610 that slidably and releasably engages with the mounting base 650 to secure the cup holder 610 to the chair 100 The attachment member 630 may allow a user to easily install and remove the cup holder 610 onto the mounting base 650 without the use of a tool.

As shown in FIGS. 23, 24A, and 24B, the cup holder 610 slides onto the mounting base 650. The attachment member 630 may be generally have an inverted U-shape with a pair of parallel side walls 632, 634 with each side wall 632,634 having a rail 636 extending toward the opposing respective side wall 634, 632, The attachment member 630 may also include a spacer portion 631 that extends from a portion of the cup holder 610. The spacer portion 631 may have a length to position the cylindrical shape of the cup holder a desired distance from the chair 100 to allow a user to easily reach the container secured within the cup holder 610. The attachment member 630 may also have an upper wall 638 connecting the side walls 632, 634. The upper wall 638 may have a generally curved shape, but may be any shape. The attachment member 630 may further have an opening 640 on the lower portion to engage the mounting base 650. In addition, the substantially parallel side walls 632, 634 of the attachment member 630 may be angled with respect to a longitudinal axis of the cylindrical shape of the cup holder. For example, in the exemplary 7 embodiment, the parallel side wails 632, 634 may be oriented at an angle of approximately 18 degrees from the longitudinal axis, or the parallel side walls 632, 634 may be oriented at an angle within a range of 15 and 21 degrees, or the parallel side walls 632, 634 may be oriented at an angle within a range of 10 and 30 degrees.

[00200] As shown in FIGS. 24A and 24B, to install the cup holder 610 on the mounting base 650, the mounting base 650 inserts into opening 640 of the attachment member 630. As the mounting base 650 is inserted, the rails 636 slide along a pair of slots 652 in the sides of the mounting base 650. The slots 652 may act to guide the cup holder 610 during the installation process. Each rail 636 may also have a detent or protrusion 642 that extends into a pocket 654 positioned within the each of the slots 652. This detent 642 and pocket 654 engagement acts as a stopping mechanism to secure the cup holder 610 and mounting base 650, but also to give positive feedback to a user that the cup holder 610 is securely mounted. The pocket 654 may be located approximately in the center of the mounting base 650 along the length of the mounting base 650, wherein the length is defined from a top 656 to a bottom 658. Alternatively, the pocket 654 may be located anywhere along the length of the slots 652. In addition, the mounting base 650 may be include a pair of mounting holes 660 that extend through the front surface 662 and the rear surface (not shown). The mounting base 650 may be attached to either of the front legs 112 A, 112B by using a mechanical fastener that extends through each of the mounting holes 660 into a receiver positioned in the chair, where the receiver may be a nut or other device configured to receive a mechanical fastener as shown in FIGS. 25 A and 25B.

[00201] The cup holder 610 may have a substantially cylindrical shape or a substantially tiered cylindrical shape along a longitudinal axis 602. The cup holder 610 may comprise an upper lip 612, at least one substantially cylindrical wall 614 positioned between the lip 612 and the bottom surface 616. The substantially cylindrical wall 614 may have a smooth surface having the same diameter for the entire height or may have tiered cylindrical exterior shape comprising three tiers an upper tier 618, a middle tier 620, and a lower tier 622 as shown in the exemplary embodiment. Each of the tiers 618, 620, 622 may be concentric to each other along the longitudinal axis 602. An upper step 624 or upper connecting wall may be placed between the upper tier 618 and the middle tier 620. Similarly, a lower step 626 or lower connecting wall may be placed between the middle tier 620 and the lower tier 622. The connecting walls 624, 626 may have a generous radius that may comprise a maj ority of the connecting wall. The upper tier 618 may have a larger diameter than the diameter of both the middle tier 620 and the lower tier 622. In addition, the middle tier 620 may have a larger diameter than the diameter the lower tier 622. Each of the tiers 618, 620, 622 may have a different height or each of the tiers may be the same height. This multi-tiered structure may allow the cup holder 610 to support and secure different sized containers in a similar manner to the cup holder 310 described above and also shown in FIGS. 26A-C. As another option, each of the substantially cylindrical walls of the tiers 618, 620, 622 may have a slight taper. Also, while the exemplary embodiment illustrates three tiers, the cup holder 610 may have any number of tiers, such as 2, 4 or even 5 tiers. Alternatively, the exterior of the cup holder 610 may have a smoothed tapered shaped extending from the upper lip 612 to the bottom surface 616, while the interior surface may have a tiered shape as described above.

[00202] Additionally, the upper lip 612 of the upper tier 618 may have a notch 628 that extends along one side of the cup holder 610 to allow' the cup holder 610 to support and secure a container 21 with a handle as shown in FIG. 27. The notch 628 may have a length that extends along approximately one-quarter or 25 percent of the circumference of the upper lip 612. As another option, the length of the notch 628 may be within a range of 12 percent to 38 percent of the circumference of the upper lip 612, or may be within a range of 6 percent to 50 percent of the circumference of the upper lip 612. The notch may have a center that may be positioned approximately 90 degrees from the location of the attachment member, such that the center of the notch may be positioned towards the rear of the cup holder 610 when the cup holder is installed on the chair 100. The notch 628 may have a height of approximately 50 percent of the height of the upper tier 618, or may have a height of within a range of 25 percent to 75 percent of the height of the upper tier 618. As another option, the notch 628 may comprise a plurality of notches, such as a pair of notches as described above positioned on opposite sides of one another.

As shown in FIG. 36, the wall thickness of cylindrical wall 614 of the multi tiered structure may be substantially constant such that the tiered structure is on both the exterior and interior of the cup holder 610. An interior pocket 629 may extend into the spacer portion 631 of the atachment member 630. The pocket 629 may have a shape that generally offset from the exterior surface of the spacer portion 631. In addition, an opening 617 may extend through the bottom surface 616.

The cup holder 610 may be formed as a single unitary component by a forming process such as injection molding. The embodiment of the cup holder 610 illustrated may have a single wall construction without any integrated insulation. In addition, the mounting base 650 may also be formed as a single unitary component, such as injection molding, metal injection molding, casting or other similar process or other methods described above with respect to cup holder 310. Both the cup holder 610 and mounting base 650 may both be formed of a polymer material such as a nylon based polymer. Alternatively, the mounting base may be formed from a metallic material such as aluminum. [00205J Alternatively, the cup holder 610 may be a vacuum insulated cup holder, an aerogel cup holder, or may include one or more vacuum insulated panels and may be configured to maintain a temperature lower or higher than that of the ambient surrounding environment. The cup holder 610 may be configured to cool an inserted drink container and/or maintain and prolong a period of below-ambient temperature of an inserted drink container. Additionally, and/or alternatively, the cup holder may be configured to receive an ice pack and/or natural ice insert in order to aide in cooling of an inserted drink container and/or prolong a period of below-ambient temperature.

[00206] As described above, the cup holder assembly 600 may comprise a cup holder 610 and a mounting base 650. FIGS. 38 and 39 disclose an alternate cup holder assembly 700. For the embodiment of FIGS. 38 and 39, the features of the cup holder assembly 700 are referred to using similar reference numerals under the“7xx” series of reference numerals, rather than“6xx”as used in the embodiment of FIGS. 22A-37. Accordingly, certain features of the cup holder assembly 700 that were already described above with respect to cup holder assembly 600 of FIGS. 22A-37 may be described in lesser detail, or may not be described at all. Specifically, the embodiment of FIGS. 38 and 39 disclose an alternate attachment member 730 and mounting base 750 to mount the cup holder 710 to the chair 100. Here, the mounting base 750 comprises a collar 752 that may have a generally cylindrical shape that wraps around the leg 112A of the chair 100 and where the collar 752 may be secured with a mechanical fastener in the rear of the collar 752 to provide the necessary clamping force to secure the mounting base 750 to the leg 112 A of the chair 100. The collar 752 may have a hinge 751 near the front of the collar 752 and a vertical securing feature 754 in the rear of the collar 752. The attachment member 730 of the cup holder 710 may have a generally C-shaped clamp member 732 that engages the mounting base 750 to secure it to the chair 100 The clamp member 732 may have a corresponding vertical securing feature 734 to the vertical securing feature 754 of the collar 752. Each of the vertical securing features 734, 754 may have a cylindrical shape in a perpendicular orientation to the cylindrical shape of the collar 752 as shown in FIG 38, but the vertical securing features 734, 754 may have any shape to allow the clamping member 732 to slide onto the collar 752 and still provide some vertical support when engaged together. In addition, the collar 752 may have a ledge 756 that may also provide vertical support to the cup holder 710 when engaged to the chair to support the weight of the cup holder 710 and the container received in it

Additionally, FIGS. 40 and 41 disclose an alternate cup holder assembly 800. For the embodiment of FIGS. 40 and 41, the features of the cup holder assembly 800 are referred to using similar reference numerals under the“8xx” series of reference numerals, rather than“6xx”as used in the embodiment of FIGS. 22A-37. Accordingly, certain features of the cup holder assembly 800 that were already described above with respect to cup holder assembly 600 of FIGS. 22A-37 may be described in lesser detail, or may not be described at all. Specifically, the embodiment of FIGS. 40 and 41 disclose an alternate attachment member 830 and mounting base 850 to mount the cup holder 810 to the chair 100. Here, the mounting base 850 may comprise a bracket 852 with a front portion 853 and a rear portion 854 that are connected together on each side of the leg 1 12A of the chair 100. The bracket 852 may then be secured to the leg 112 A using a plurality of mechanical fasteners to provide the clamping force to secure the bracket 852 to the leg. The bracket may have an opening 856 near the top to receive a hook (not shown) formed on the attachment member 830. The hook may comprise a post extending downward from a top surface 832 of the attachment member 830. The post may then insert into the opening 856. Each of the opening 856 and the post may have tapered surfaces to create a dovetail effect to secure the cup holder 810 to the mounting base 850.

[00208] As another option, FIGS. 42, 43 A, 43B 44A, and 44B disclose an alternate cup holder assembly 900. For the embodiment of FIGS. 42, 43 A, 43 B, 44A, and 44B, the features of the cup holder assembly 900 are referred to using similar reference numerals under the “9xx” series of reference numerals, rather than “6xx”as used in the embodiment of FIGS 22A-37 Accordingly, certain features of the cup holder assembly 900 that were already described above with respect to cup holder assembly 600 of FIGS. 22A-37 may be described in lesser detail, or may not be described at all. Specifically, the embodiment of FIGS. 42, 43 A, 43B, 44A, and 44B disclose an alternate attachment member 930 and mounting base 950 to mount the cup holder 910 to the chair 100. Here, the mounting base 950 may comprise a bracket 952 that may be permanently attached to the leg 112A by a means not limited to welding or an adhesive as shown in FIG. 44A. Alternatively, the bracket 952 may be releasably attached to the leg 112A with a hinge 954 positioned on one side to allow the bracket 952 to wrap around the leg 112A of the chair 100 The bracket 952 may then be secured to the leg 1 12A using a plurality of mechanical fasteners to provide the clamping force to secure the bracket 952 to the leg as shown in FIG. 44B. The bracket 952 may have an opening 956 near the top to receive a hook 932 formed on the attachment member 930. The opening 956 may extend through the top and bottom surfaces of the bracket 952. The hook 932 may comprise a post 934 that extends downward from a top surface of the attachment member 930. FIG. 43A illustrates the post 934 as part of a U shaped bracket that is atached to the attachment member 930, while FIG. 43B illustrates an alternate option where the post 934 is integrally formed with the cup holder 910. The post 934 may then insert into the opening 956. While the exemplary embodiment may illustrate the post 934 as a rectangular plate element, the post 934 may have any non-circular shape, such that the non-circular shape provides a rotation inhibiting feature to keep the cup holder 910 from rotating relative to the leg 112A of the chair. As another option, the post 934 may have a circular shape with a protrusion, such as a key, spline, or a flat surface, or similar feature that may act as a rotation inhibiting feature. Similarly, the opening 956 may have a corresponding shape to the post 934 such that it provides a surface to engage the non-circular shape or rotation inhibiting feature of the post 934.

As yet another option, FIGS. 45, 46, and 47 disclose an alternate cup holder assembly 1000. For the embodiment of FIGS. 45, 46, and 47, the features of the cup holder assembly 1000 are referred to using similar reference numerals under the“lOxx” series of reference numerals, rather than“6xx”as used in the embodiment of FIGS. 22A- 37. Accordingly, certain features of the cup holder assembly 1000 that were already described above with respect to cup holder assembly 600 of FIGS. 22A-37 may be described in lesser detail, or may not be described at all. Here, the mounting base 1050 may comprise a recess 1052 or pocket that with a mounting surface 1054 that has at least one mounting hole 1056. The mounting base 1050 may be attached to the leg 112A of the chair 100 using a mechanical fastener extending through the holes. The cup holder 1010 may have an attachment member 1030 with a shape that corresponds to the shape of the pocket 1052. For example, in the exemplar}' embodiment of FIGS. 45, 46, and 47 the attachment member 1030 and the pocket 1052 may have a generally rectangular shape. Alternatively, the shape of the attachment member 1030 and the pocket 1052 are not limited to a rectangul ar shape and may have other geometric shapes such as circular, elliptical, square, or other shapes. The attachment member 1030 may have a hook portion 1032 extending upward from the top surface 1034 of the end 1036 of the attachment member 1030. Additionally, the attachment member 1030 may have a flex finger 1038 extending from the bottom surface 1040 of the end 1036 of the attachment member 1030. In addition, the pocket 1052 may have an undercut surface within the pocket 1052 offset from the front surface of the pocket 1058.

[00210] To engage the atachment member 1030 to the mounting base 1050, a user may angle the attachment member 1030 such that the hook 1032 inserts into the undercut at the top of the pocket 1052. Once the hook 1032 is engaged into the undercut, the user may then rotate the cup holder 1010 downward until the flex linger 1038 engages the lower portion of the pocket 1052. To remove the cup holder 1010, the user may pull upward on the outside of the cup holder 1010 to disengage the flex finger 1038 and remove the cup holder 1010 from the mounting base 1050. While the various mounting bases and methods discussed here relate to attaching a cup holder, the various mounting bases and methods may also be used to attach other accessories such as a tray or fishing rod holder.

[00211] As yet another option, FIG. 48 discloses an alternate mounting base 1150 for a cup holder assembly. Here, the mounting base 1150 may comprise a front mounting surface 1152 with a pair of mounting holes 1 154 extending through the mounting surface 1 152. A boss or protrusion 1156 may extend from the front mounting surface 1152 and have an opening 1158 extending through the protrusion. The opening 1158 may accept a cup holder with an attachment member having a bayonet style connector (not shown). The opening 1 158 may have a generally rectangular shape.

[00212] As yet another option, FIGS. 49 and 50 disclose an alternate mounting base 1250 for a cup holder assembly. Here, the mounting base 1250 may comprise a front mounting surface 1252 with a pair of mounting holes 1254 extending through the mounting surface 1252. A T-shaped boss or protrusion 1256 may extend from the front mounting surface 1252. The T-shaped boss 1256 may have an exterior top surface 1258 and an undercut 1260 between the top surface 1258 and the front mounting surface 1252. The T-shaped boss may be aligned with the sides 1262 of the mounting base 1250 or be positioned at an angle to the sides 1262 of the mounting base 1250 as shown in the exempl ary embodiment of FIGS. 49 and 50. By having the undercut 1260, a cup holder (not shown) or other accessory ay mount to the T-shaped boss 1256.

Optionally, the cup holders as described above may attach to the chair 100 by a multitude of mechanical connection methods, such as a threaded connection between the cup holder and the chair 100. These mechanical connection methods may be releasably or permanently engage the cup holder to the chair 100. As other possible options, the cup holder may be connected to the chair in a variety of ways, but not limited to using a ball and socket connection, a snap-fit connection, a hook and loop type connection, a plurality of flex fingers that engage the leg of the chair, a friction or press-fit a member of the cup holder to a portion of the chair, a riveted connection, a pin or plurality of pins that engage the chair 100, such as a quick release ball-lock pin, a bayonet type connection, a quarter-turn fastener or cam-type connection.

In another example, on the front leg 1 12A proximate to the intersection with the front leg attachment portion 170 A of seat frame 131, chair 100 may include an accessory atachment interface (not shown). The accessor} ' attachment interface may be fabricated into front leg 112A and may be configured to receive YETI® Tundra accessories including YETI® Beverage Holder, YETI® Rod Holster, YETI® Molie Zinger, and the like. Additionally, the accessory' atachment interface may be configured to receive a waterproof storage compartment, anti-varmint device, fish finder, and the like.

Additionally, and/or alternatively, on the front leg 112B proximate to the intersection with the front leg atachment portion I70B of seat frame 131, chair 100 may include a rigidly attached cup holder, a detachably attachable cup holder accessory, and/or an accessory attachment interface configured to receive YETI® Tundra accessories and additional accessories as stated above.

The present invention is disclosed above and in the accompanying drawings with reference to a variety of examples. The purpose served fay the disclosure, however, is to provide examples of the various features and concepts related to the invention, not to limit the scope of the invention. One skilled in the relevant art will recognize that numerous variations and modifications may be made to the examples described above without departing from the scope of the present invention.