Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
PREDICTIVE FACTORS FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/204509
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention relates to methods of determining if a subject has an increased risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) prior to the onset of any detectable symptoms thereof. The methods comprise analyzing at least one sample from the subject to determine a value of the subject's biomarker profile and comparing the value of the subject's biomarker profile with the value of a normal biomarker profile. A change in the value of the subject's biomarker profile, over or under normal values is indicative that the subject has an increased risk of having or developing symptoms associated with ARDS prior to the onset of any detectable symptoms thereof.

Inventors:
GUTIERREZ, Joseph (Inc.6720-A Rockledge Drive,Suite 10, Bethesda Maryland, 20817, US)
SCHOBEL-MCHUGH, Seth (Uniformed Services University4301 Jones Bridge Roa, Bethesda Maryland, 20814, US)
ELSTER, Eric (Department of Surgery4301 Jones Bridge Roa, Bethesda Maryland, 20814, US)
Application Number:
US2018/030675
Publication Date:
November 08, 2018
Filing Date:
May 02, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
THE HENRY M. JACKSON FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MILITARY MEDICINE, INC. (6720-A Rockledge Drive, Suite 100Bethesda, Maryland, 20817, US)
International Classes:
A61K38/21; A61P11/00
Foreign References:
US20150377885A12015-12-31
US20160312285A12016-10-27
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SMYTH, Robert et al. (Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP1111 Pennsylvania Ave., N, Washington District of Columbia, 20004, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
  Claims 

1. A method of determining if a human subject has an increased risk of developing acute 

respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) prior to the onset of detectable symptoms thereof, the  method comprising (a) obtaining a biological sample from the human subject, and (b)  measuring the levels of one or more of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF‐basic),  granulocyte colony‐stimulating factor (G‐CSF), granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating  factor (GM‐CSF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interferon alpha (IFN‐α), interferon  gamma (IFN‐γ), interleukin‐1 alpha (IL‐1α), interleukin‐1 beta (IL‐1β), interleukin‐1 receptor  agonist (IL‐1RA), interleukin‐6 (IL‐6), interleukin‐8 (IL‐8), interleukin‐9 (IL‐9), interleukin‐10  (IL‐10), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), monokine induced by gamma  interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein‐1 beta (MIP1β), and vascular  endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the biological sample to create a biomarker profile,  wherein an increase in the biomarker profile compared with a normal biomarker profile is  indicative that the human subject has an increased risk of developing ARDS compared to  individuals with a normal biomarker profile.  2. The method of claim 1, wherein the normal biomarker profile comprises levels of one or  more of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF, GM‐CSF, HGF, IFN‐α, IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐9, IL‐ 10, MCP1, MIG, MIP1β, and VEGF generated from a population of human subjects that did  not exhibit ARDS.    3. The method of claim 2, wherein the normal biomarker profile comprises levels of one or  more of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF, GM‐CSF, HGF, IFN‐α, IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐9, IL‐ 10, MCP1, MIG, MIP1β, and VEGF generated from a population of human subjects that were  trauma patients.  4. The method of claim 1, wherein the human subject is a trauma patient.   5. The method of claim 4, wherein the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of FGF‐basic,  G‐CSF, IFN‐α, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐10, MCP1, and MIP1β.    6. The method of claims 1 or 2, wherein the human subject is not a trauma patient.    7. The method of claim 6, wherein the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of MCP1 and  MIG.     8. The method of claims 1 ‐ 3, wherein the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of G‐CSF,  GM‐CSF, IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐10, IL‐15, MCP1, MIG, and VEGF.    9. A method of detecting elevated levels of biomarkers in a human subject, the method 

comprising measuring serum levels of two or more of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF, GM‐CSF, HGF, IFN‐α,  IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐9, IL‐10, MCP1, MIG, MIP1β, and VEGF in a serum  sample obtained from the human subject.   10. A method of detecting changed elevated levels of biomarkers in a human subject, the 

method comprising measuring serum levels of two or more of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF, GM‐CSF,  HGF, IFN‐α, IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐9, IL‐10, IP‐10, IL‐15, MCP1, MIG, MIP1β,  and VEGF in a serum sample obtained from the human subject.   11. The method of claim 9, wherein the human subject is a trauma patient.   12. The method of claim 11, wherein the serum levels of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF, IFN‐α, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐ 1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐10, MCP1, and MIP1β are measured.    13. The method of claim 9, wherein the human subject is not a trauma patient.    14. The method of claim 13, wherein the serum levels of MCP1 and MIG are measured.   15. The method of claims 9, wherein the levels of eotaxin, GM‐CSF, IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐13, MCP1 and  RANTES are measured.  16. A method of treating a human subject for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the  method comprising (a) producing a biomarker profile comprising measuring serum levels of  two or more of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF, GM‐CSF, HGF, IFN‐α, IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8,  IL‐9, IL‐10, MCP1, MIG, MIP1β, and VEGF, and (b) administering a treatment for ARDS to the  human subject when the biomarker profile for the subject is greater than the biomarker  profile of a normal subject.  17. The method of claim 16, wherein the treatment is administered to the human subject prior  to the onset of any detectable symptoms of the subject exhibiting ARDS.  18. The method of claims 16 or 17, wherein the human subject is a trauma patient.   19. The method of claim 18, wherein the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of FGF‐basic,  G‐CSF, IFN‐α, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐10, MCP1, and MIP1β.      20. The method of claims 16 or 17, wherein the human subject is not a trauma patient.    21. The method of claim 19, wherein the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of MCP1 and  MIG.   22. The method of claims 16 or 17, wherein the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of  eotaxin, GM‐CSF, IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐13, MCP1 and RANTES.      

Description:
  PREDICTIVE FACTORS FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYND ROME  Statement Regarding Federally Sponsored Research or De velopment 

[0001] This invention was made with government support under  HT9404‐13‐1 and HU0001‐15‐2‐ 0001 awarded by The Department of Defense.  The gov ernment has certain rights in the invention.    Background of the Invention 

Field of the Invention 

[0002] The present invention relates to methods of determini ng if a subject has an increased risk of  developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)  prior to the onset of any detectable  symptoms thereof.  The methods comprise analyzing at least one sample from the subject to  determine a value of the subject’s biomarker profil e and comparing the value of the subject’s  biomarker profile with the value of a normal biomark er profile.  A change in the value of the  subject’s biomarker profile, over or under normal v alues is indicative that the subject has an  increased risk of developing ARDS prior to the onset  of any detectable symptoms thereof.    Background of the Invention 

[0003] Each year in the United States there are approximate ly 190,600 cases of acute respiratory  distress syndrome (ARDS), which are associated with 7 4,500 deaths and 3.6 million hospital days.   Despite recent advancements in the treatment of ARDS,  effective treatment options remain limited  and there is a need for the development of preventi on strategies and methods of early detection to  better guide clinical practice.  Given that alveolar inflammation is the major underlying mechanism  of ARDS, several serum inflammatory biomarkers have b een identified among ARDS patients with  the goal of developing predictive models for ARDS in  the future.  Summary of the Invention 

[0004] The present invention relates to methods of determini ng if a human subject has an  increased risk of developing ARDS prior to the onset  of any detectable symptoms thereof.  The  methods comprise analyzing at least one sample from  the subject to determine a value of the  subject’s biomarker profile and comparing the value of the subject’s biomarker profile with the value of a normal biomarker profile.  A change in the va lue of the subject’s biomarker profile, over or  under normal values is indicative that the subject h as an increased risk of developing or developing  symptoms associated with ARDS prior to the onset of any detectable symptoms thereof.    [0005] The present invention relates to a method of determi ning if a human subject has an  increased risk of developing acute respiratory distres s syndrome (ARDS) prior to the onset of    detectable symptoms thereof, the method comprising (a)  obtaining a biological sample from the  human subject, and (b) measuring the levels of one  or more of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF‐ basic), granulocyte colony‐stimulating factor (G‐CSF ), granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating  factor (GM‐CSF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), int erferon alpha (IFN‐α), interferon gamma (IFN‐ γ), interleukin‐1 alpha (IL‐1α), interleukin‐1  beta (IL‐1β), interleukin‐1 receptor agonist (IL 1RA),  interleukin‐6 (IL‐6), interleukin‐8 (IL‐8), inte rleukin‐9 (IL‐9), interleukin‐10 (IL‐10), monocy te  chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage  inflammatory protein‐1beta (MIP1β), and vascular end othelial growth factor (VEGF) in the biological  sample to create a biomarker profile, wherein an inc rease in the biomarker profile compared with a  normal biomarker profile is indicative that the human  subject has an increased risk of developing  ARDS compared to individuals with a normal biomarker profile.  [0006] In some embodiments, the biomarker profile further in cludes interferon gamma‐induced  protein 10 (IP‐10) and/or interleukin‐15 (IL‐15) and a decrease in the level of these biomarkers  compared to a normal biomarker profile is indicative that the human subject has an increased risk of  developing ARDS compared to individuals with a normal  biomarker profile.  [0007] In some embodiments, the normal biomarker profile com prises levels of one or more of  basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF‐basic), granulocy te colony‐stimulating factor (G‐CSF),  granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating factor (GM CSF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF),  interferon alpha (IFN‐α), interferon gamma (IFN‐γ ), interleukin‐1 alpha (IL‐1α), interleukin‐1 be ta (IL‐ 1β), interleukin‐1 receptor agonist (IL‐1RA), inte rleukin‐6 (IL‐6), interleukin‐8 (IL‐8), interleu kin‐9 (IL‐ 9), interleukin‐10 (IL‐10), monocyte chemoattractant  protein 1 (MCP1), monokine induced by  gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein ‐1beta (MIP1β), and vascular endothelial  growth factor (VEGF)  generated from a population of  human subjects that did not exhibit ARDS.    [0008] In some embodiments, the normal biomarker profile com prises levels of one or more of  basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF‐basic), granulocy te colony‐stimulating factor (G‐CSF),  granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating factor (GM CSF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF),  interferon alpha (IFN‐α), interferon gamma (IFN‐γ ), interleukin‐1 alpha (IL‐1α), interleukin‐1 be ta (IL‐ 1β), interleukin‐1 receptor agonist (IL‐1RA), inte rleukin‐6 (IL‐6), interleukin‐8 (IL‐8), interleu kin‐9 (IL‐ 9), interleukin‐10 (IL‐10), monocyte chemoattractant  protein 1 (MCP1), monokine induced by  gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein ‐1beta (MIP1β), and vascular endothelial  growth factor (VEGF) generated from a population of  human subjects that were trauma patients.    [0009] In some embodiments, the human subject is a trauma  patient and the biomarker profile  comprises serum levels of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF, IFN‐ α, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL 10, MCP1, and  MIP1β.    [0010] In some embodiments, the human subject is not a tra uma patient and the biomarker profile  comprises serum levels of MCP1 and MIG.   [0011] In some embodiments, the human subject is not a tra uma patient and the biomarker profile  comprises serum levels of eotaxin, GM‐CSF, IL‐8,  IL‐12, IL‐13, IP‐10, MCP1 and RANTES.    [0012] In some embodiments, the biomarker profile comprises  serum levels of G‐CSF, GM‐CSF, IFN‐ γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL 10, IL‐15, MCP1, MIG, and VEGF.  [0013] The invention relates to a method of detecting eleva ted levels of biomarkers in a human  subject, the method comprising measuring serum levels of two or more of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF, GM‐ CSF, HGF, IFN‐α, IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL 1RA, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐9, IL‐10, MCP1, MIG, MIP 1β, and VEGF in a  serum sample obtained from the human subject.   [0014] In some embodiments, the human subject is a trauma  patient and the serum levels of FGF‐ basic, G‐CSF, IFN‐α, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA,  IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐10, MCP1, and MIP1β are measu red.    [0015] In some embodiments, the human subject is not a tra uma patient and the serum levels of  MCP1 and MIG are measured.    [0016] In some embodiments, the levels of eotaxin, GM‐CSF,  IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐13, IP‐10, MCP1 and  RANTES are measured.    [0017] The invention relates to a method of treating a hum an subject for acute respiratory distress  syndrome (ARDS), the method comprising (a) producing  a biomarker profile comprising measuring  serum levels of two or more of FGF‐basic, G‐CSF,  GM‐CSF, HGF, IFN‐α, IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL‐1β , IL‐1RA, IL‐6,  IL‐8, IL‐9, IL‐10, MCP1, MIG, MIP1β, and VEGF,  and (b) administering a treatment for ARDS to the human subject when the biomarker profile for the sub ject is greater than the biomarker profile of a  normal subject.  [0018] In some embodiments, the treatment is administered to  the human subject prior to the  onset of any detectable symptoms of the subject exhi biting ARDS.  In some embodiments, the  human subject is a trauma patient and the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of FGF‐basic, G‐ CSF, IFN‐α, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1RA, IL‐6, I L‐8, IL‐10, MCP1, and MIP1β.      [0019] In some embodiments, the human subject is not a tra uma patient and the biomarker profile  comprises serum levels of MCP1 and MIG. In some emb odiments, the biomarker profile comprises  serum levels of eotaxin, GM‐CSF, IL‐8, IL‐12, I L‐13, IP‐10, MCP1 and RANTES.  [0020] In some embodiments the biological sample is a blood  sample. In some embodiments the  sample is a serum sample. In some embodiments the s ample is a plasma sample.  Brief Description of the Drawings 

[0021] Figure 1. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers in AR DS and Non‐ARDS patients upon initial  presentation. The levels of GM‐CSF, IL‐08, IL‐12 , IL‐13, IP‐10, MCP1, and RANTES were significant ly  different between ARDS and Non‐ARDS patients accordi ng to a Wilcoxon Rank Sum test (p<0.05).  The ends of the box mark the upper and lower quart iles. The median is marked by a vertical line  inside the box. The whiskers extend to the highest  and lowest observations.  [0022] Figure 2. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers in AR DS and Non‐ARDS patients 0 days after  initial presentation. The levels of IL‐1RA, IL‐4, IL‐10, MIP1b, and VEGF were significantly different   between ARDS and Non‐ARDS patients according to a  Wilcoxon Rank Sum test (p<0.05).   [0023] Figure 3. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers in AR DS and Non‐ARDS patients 0 days after  initial presentation. The levels of eotaxin, GM‐CSF,  IFN‐γ, IL‐1a, IL‐2, IL‐17, and MCP1 were  significantly different between ARDS and Non‐ARDS pa tients according to a Wilcoxon Rank Sum test  (p<0.05).   [0024] Figure 4. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers in al l ARDS and Non‐ARDS patients.  [0025] Figure 5. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers in AR DS and Non‐ARDS patients in the  trauma cohort.  [0026] Figure 6. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers in AR DS and Non‐ARDS patients in the non‐ trauma cohort.  [0027] Figure 7. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers at th e initial timepoint in all ARDS and Non‐ ARDS patients.  [0028] Figure 8. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers at th e initial timepoint in ARDS and Non‐ ARDS patients in the trauma cohort.    [0029] Figure 9. Quantification of cytokine biomarkers at th e initial timepoint in ARDS and Non‐ ARDS patients in the non‐trauma cohort.  Detailed Description of the Invention 

[0030] The present invention relates to methods of determini ng if a human subject has an  increased risk of developing ARDS prior to the onset  of any detectable symptoms thereof.  The  methods comprise analyzing at least one sample from  the subject to determine a value of the  subject’s biomarker profile and comparing the value of the subject’s biomarker profile with the value of a normal biomarker profile.  A change in the va lue of the subject’s biomarker profile, over or  under normal values is indicative that the subject h as an increased risk of developing or developing  symptoms associated with ARDS prior to the onset of any detectable symptoms thereof (i.e. a risk  profile for ARDS).    [0031] As used herein, the term “subject” or “test su bject” indicates a human, in particular a human  who is hospitalized.  The test subject is in need  of an assessment of susceptibility of ARDS.  For  example, the test subject may have no symptoms that ARDS may occur.    [0032] In one embodiment, the biomarker profile comprises se rum levels of at least one of eotaxin,  granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating factor (GM CSF), interleukin‐8 (IL‐8), interleukin‐12 (IL 12), interleukin‐13 (IL‐13), interferon gamma induc ed protein 10 (IP‐10), monocyte chemoattractant  protein 1 (MCP‐1), RANTES, interferon gamma (IFN‐ ), interleukin‐1a (IL‐1a), interleukin‐2 (IL‐2) ,  interleukin‐17 (IL‐17), interleukin‐1RA (IL‐1RA),  interleukin‐4 (IL‐4), interleukin‐10 (IL‐10),  macrophage inflammatory protein‐1b (MIP1b) and vascul ar endothelial growth factor (VEGF).    [0033] In one embodiment, the human subject is a trauma pa tient.  In another embodiment, the  subject is not a trauma patient.  In still another embodiment, if the subject is a trauma patient the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of eotaxin,  GM‐CSF, IFN‐γ, IL‐1a, IL‐2, IL‐17 and MCP1.   In  still another embodiment, if the subject is not a t rauma patient, the biomarker profile comprises  serum levels of IL‐1RA, IL‐4, IL‐10, MIP1b and VEGF.  In still another embodiment, the status of  the  patient, i.e., trauma or non‐trauma, is irrelevant  and the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of  eotaxin, GM‐CSF, IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐13, IP‐10,  MCP1 and RANTES.    [0034] The present invention also relates to methods of det ecting elevated levels of a specific  collection of analytes in one or more samples obtain ed from a subject.  In one embodiment, the  collection of analytes comprises serum levels of at  least one of eotaxin, granulocyte‐macrophage  colony‐stimulating factor (GM‐CSF), interleukin‐8  (IL‐8), interleukin‐12 (IL‐12), interleukin‐13 ( IL‐13),    interferon gamma induced protein 10 (IP‐10), monocyt e chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP‐1),  RANTES, interferon gamma (IFN‐γ), interleukin‐1a ( IL‐1a), interleukin‐2 (IL‐2), interleukin‐17 (IL ‐17),  interleukin‐1RA (IL‐1RA), interleukin‐4 (IL‐4),  interleukin‐10 (IL‐10), macrophage inflammatory  protein‐1b (MIP1b) and vascular endothelial growth f actor (VEGF).    [0035] In one embodiment, the human subject is a trauma pa tient.  In another embodiment, the  subject is not a trauma patient.  In still another embodiment, if the subject is a trauma patient the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of eotaxin,  GM‐CSF, IFN‐γ, IL‐1a, IL‐2, IL‐17 and MCP1.   In  still another embodiment, if the subject is not a t rauma patient, the biomarker profile comprises  serum levels of IL‐1RA, IL‐4, IL‐10, MIP1b and VEGF.  In still another embodiment, the status of  the  patient, i.e., trauma or non‐trauma, is irrelevant  and the biomarker profile comprises serum levels of  eotaxin, GM‐CSF, IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐13, IP‐10,  MCP1 and RANTES.    [0036] The term acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS , is used herein to mean a subject  with a PaO 2 /FiO 2  of < 300 mmHg.    [0037] As used herein, the term means “increased risk”  is used to mean that the test subject has an  increased chance of developing ARDS compared to a no rmal individual.  The increased risk may be  relative or absolute and may be expressed qualitative ly or quantitatively.  For example, an increased  risk may be expressed as simply determining the subj ect’s biomarker profile and placing the patient  in an “increased risk” category, based upon previ ous population studies.  Alternatively, a numerical  expression of the subject’s increased risk may be  determined based upon the biomarker profile.  As  used herein, examples of expressions of an increased risk include but are not limited to, odds,  probability, odds ratio, p‐values, attributable risk,  biomarker index score, relative frequency, positive  predictive value, negative predictive value, and relat ive risk.    [0038] For example, the correlation between a subject’s bi omarker profile and the likelihood of  developing ARDS may be measured by an odds ratio (O R) and by the relative risk (RR).  If P(R + ) is the  probability of developing ARDS for individuals with t he risk profile (R) and P(R ) is the probability of  developing ARDS for individuals without the risk prof ile, then the relative risk is the ratio of the tw o  probabilities: RR=P(R + )/P(R ).    [0039] In case‐control studies, however, direct measures of  the relative risk often cannot be  obtained because of sampling design.  The odds ratio  allows for an approximation of the relative risk  for low‐incidence diseases and can be calculated: O R=(F + /(1‐F + ))/(F /(1‐F )), where F +  is the frequency  of a risk profile in cases studies and F  is the frequency of risk profile in controls.   F +  and F  can be  calculated using the risk profile frequencies of the study.     [0040] The attributable risk (AR) can also be used to expr ess an increased risk.  The AR describes the  proportion of individuals in a population exhibiting  ARDS to a specific member of the biomarker  profile.  AR may also be important in quantifying t he role of individual components (specific  member) in condition etiology and in terms of the p ublic health impact of the individual risk factor.  The public health relevance of the AR measurement li es in estimating the proportion of cases of  ARDS in a population of subjects that could be prev ented if the profile or individual factor were  absent.  AR may be determined as follows: AR=P E (RR‐1)/(P E (RR‐1)+1), where AR is the risk  attributable to a profile or individual factor of th e profile, and P E  is the frequency of exposure to a  profile or individual component of the profile within  the population at large.  RR is the relative risk ,  which can be approximated with the odds ratio when  the profile or individual factor of the profile  under study has a relatively low incidence in the g eneral population.     [0041] In one embodiment, the increased risk of a human su bject can be determined from p‐values  that are derived from association studies.  Specifica lly, associations with specific profiles can be  performed using regression analysis by regressing the risk profile with the presence or absence of  ARDS.  In addition, the regression may or may not  be corrected or adjusted for one or more factors.  The factors for which the analyses may be adjusted  include, but are not limited to age, sex, weight,  ethnicity, type of wound if present, number of wound s if present, trauma, number of days from  injury, geographic location, fasting state, state of  pregnancy or post‐pregnancy, menstrual cycle,  general health of the subject, alcohol or drug consu mption, caffeine or nicotine intake and circadian  rhythms, to name a few.   [0042] Increased risk can also be determined from p‐values  that are derived using logistic  regression.  Binomial (or binary) logistic regression is a form of regression which is used when the  dependent is a dichotomy and the independents are of  any type.  Logistic regression can be used to  predict a dependent variable on the basis of continu ous or categorical or both (continuous and  categorical) independents and to determine the percent  of variance in the dependent variable  explained by the independents; to rank the relative  importance of independents; to assess  interaction effects; and to understand the impact of covariate control variables.  Logistic regression  applies maximum likelihood estimation after transformin g the dependent into a “logit” variable (the  natural log of the odds of the dependent occurring  or not).  In this way, logistic regression estimates   the probability of a certain event occurring. These  analyses may be conducted with virtually any  statistics program, such as not limited to SAS, R p ackage available through CRAN repository.  [0043] SAS (“statistical analysis software”) is a general  purpose package (similar to Stata and SPSS)  created by Jim Goodnight and N.C. State University c olleagues.  Ready‐to‐use procedures handle a    wide range of statistical analyses, including but not  limited to, analysis of variance, regression,  categorical data analysis, multivariate analysis, survi val analysis, psychometric analysis, cluster  analysis, and nonparametric analysis.  R package is  free, general purpose package that complies with  and runs on a variety of UNIX platforms.    [0044] Accordingly, select embodiments of the present inventi on comprise the use of a computer  comprising a processor and the computer is configured  or programmed to generate one or more risk  profiles and/or to determine statistical risk from a biomarker profile.  The methods may also  comprise displaying the one or risk profiles on a s creen that is communicatively connected to the  computer.  In another embodiment, two different compu ters can be used:  one computer configured  or programmed to generate one or more risk profiles and a second computer configured or  programmed to determine statistical risk.  Each of t hese separate computers can be 

communicatively linked to its own display or to t he same display.    [0045] As used herein, the phrase “risk profile” means  the combination of a subject’s risk factors  analyzed or observed from a biomarker profile.  The terms “factor” and/or “component” are used to   mean the individual constituents that are assessed wh en generating the profile. The risk profile is a  collection of measurements, such as but not limited  to a quantity or concentration, for individual  factors taken from a test sample of the subject.   Examples of test samples or sources of components  for the risk profile include, but are not limited t o, biological fluids, which can be tested by the  methods of the present invention described herein, an d include but are not limited to whole blood,  such as but not limited to peripheral blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, amniotic fluid,  lymph fluids, various external secretions of the resp iratory, intestinal and genitourinary tracts, tears,  saliva, white blood cells, myelomas and the like.     [0046] The risk profile can include a “biological effector ” or aspect and/or a non‐biological effector  aspect.  As used herein, the term “biological effe ctor” is used to mean a molecule, such as but no t  limited to, a protein, peptide, a carbohydrate, a fa tty acid, a nucleic acid, a glycoprotein, a  proteoglycan, etc. that can be assayed.  Specific ex amples of biological effectors can include,  cytokines, growth factors, antibodies, hormones, cell  surface receptors, cell surface proteins,  carbohydrates, etc.  More specific examples of biolog ical effectors include analytes such as  interleukins (ILs) such as IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL‐1 receptor antagonist (IL‐1RA), IL‐2, IL‐2 recepto r (IL‐2R), IL‐3,  IL‐4, IL‐5, IL‐6, IL‐7, IL‐8, IL‐10, IL‐ 12, IL‐13, IL‐15, IL‐17, as well as growth fac tors such as tumor  necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), granulocyte colony stim ulating factor (G‐CSF), granulocyte macrophage  colony stimulating factor (GM‐CSF), interferon alpha (INF‐α), interferon gamma (IFN‐γ), epithelial  growth factor (EGF), basic endothelial growth factor  (bEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF),    vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and chemoki nes such as monocyte chemoattractant  protein‐1 (CCL2/MCP‐1), macrophage inflammatory prot ein‐1 alpha (CCL3/MIP‐1α), macrophage  inflammatory protein‐1 beta (CCL4/MIP‐1β), CCL5/RAN TES, CCL11/eotaxin, monokine induced by  gamma interferon (CXCL9/MIG) and interferon gamma‐ind uced protein‐10 (CXCL10/IP10).    [0047] Techniques to assay levels of individual components o f the biomarker profile from test  samples are well known to the skilled technician, an d the invention is not limited by the means by  which the components are assessed.  In one embodimen t, levels of the individual factors in the  serum of the biomarker profile are assessed using ma ss spectrometry in conjunction with ultra‐ performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), high‐perform ance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas  chromatography (GC), gas chromatography/mass spectroscop y (GC/MS), and UPLC to name a few.   Other methods of assessing levels of some of the in dividual components include biological methods,  such as but not limited to ELISA assays, Western Bl ot and multiplexed immunoassays etc.  Other  techniques may include using quantitative arrays, PCR,  Northern Blot analysis.  To determine levels  of components or factors, it is not necessary that  an entire component, e.g., a full length protein or an entire RNA transcript, be present or fully sequen ced.  In other words, determining levels of, for  example, a fragment of protein being analyzed may be  sufficient to conclude or assess that an  individual component of the biomarker profile being a nalyzed is increased or decreased.  Similarly,  if, for example, arrays or blots are used to determ ine component levels, the 

presence/absence/strength of a detectable signal may  be sufficient to assess levels of components.    [0048] As used herein, the term non‐biological effector is  a component that is generally considered  not to be a specific molecule.  Although not a spe cific molecule, a non‐biological effector may  nonetheless still be quantifiable, either through rout ine measurements or through measurements  that stratify the data being assessed.  For example,  number or concentrate of red blood cells, white  blood cells, platelets, coagulation time, blood oxygen  content, etc. would be a non‐biological  effector component of the biomarker profile.  All of  these components are measureable or  quantifiable using routine methods and equipment.  Ot her non‐biological components include data  that may not be readily or routinely quantifiable or  that may require a practitioner’s judgment or  opinion.    [0049] In one embodiment, the mechanism of injury is includ ed in the biomarker profile.  As used  herein, the phrase “mechanism of injury” means th e manner in which the subject received an injury.  For example, the mechanism of injury may include tra uma and may be described as a gunshot  wound, a vehicle accident, laceration, etc.  In anot her embodiment, data regarding injury type is  included in the biomarker profile.  In another embod iment, data on the occurrence of multiple    wounds is included in the biomarker profile.  In an other embodiment, data on the number of days  from injury is included in the biomarker profile   [0050] To determine which of the biological effector or non ‐biological effector components may be  critical in the subjects’ biomarker profiles, routin e statistical methods can be employed.  For  example, rfImpute from the randomForest R package can  be used to impute missing data.  Up‐ sampling and predictor rank transformations can be pe rformed on the data set only for variable  selection to accommodate class imbalance and non‐nor mality in the data.    [0051] For variable selection, the constraint‐based algorith ms fast.iamb, iamb and gs and the  constraint‐based local discovery learning algorithms  mmpc and si.hiton.pc from the “bnlearn” R  package can be used to search the input dataset for  nodes of Bayesian networks.  The nodes can be  chosen as the reduced variable sets.  Before running  the data through variable selection and binary  classification algorithms, the variables may or may n ot randomly re‐ordered.  The data can be run  through the variable selection and binary classificati on algorithms more than once, for example, 10,  20, 30, 40, 50 or even more times.    [0052] For binary classification and model selection, each v ariable set can be pulled from the raw  data and run in sundry binary classification algorith ms using the train function from the R caret  package: linear discriminant analysis (lda), classifica tion and regression trees (cart), k‐nearest  neighbors (knn), support vector machine (svm), logisti c regression (glm), random forest (rf),  generalized linear models (glmnet) and naïve Bayes ( nb).  The best variable set and binary  classification algorithm combination that first produce s the highest kappa and then the highest  sensitivity with reasonable specificity can then be c hosen.    [0053] The resultant models are then examined using accuracy , no information rate, positive  predictive value and negative predictive value.  Mode l performance can be further assessed using  the plot.roc command to compute the Receiver Operator  Characteristic Curves (ROC) and area  under curve (AUC).  The dca R command from the Mem orial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center website,  www.mskcc.org, can be used to compute the Decision C urve Analysis (DCA).   [0054] Finally, for univariate analysis, a Wilcoxon rank‐su m test can be used to identify which  biomarkers from specific patient groups are were asso ciated with a specific indication.    [0055] The assessment of the levels of the individual compo nents of the biomarker profile can be  expressed as absolute or relative values and may or may not be expressed in relation to another  component, a standard an internal standard or another  molecule of compound known to be in the    sample.  If the levels are assessed as relative to a standard or internal standard, the standard may b e  added to the test sample prior to, during or after sample processing.    [0056] To assess levels of the individual components of the  biomarker profile, a sample may be  taken from the subject.  The sample may or may not  processed prior assaying levels of the  components of the biomarker profile.  For example, w hole blood may be taken from an individual  and the blood sample may be processed, e.g., centrif uged, to isolate plasma or serum from the  blood.  The sample may or may not be stored, e.g.,  frozen, prior to processing or analysis.    [0057] In one embodiment, the individual levels of each of the risk factors are higher than those  compared to normal levels.  In another embodiment, o ne, two, three, four, five, six or seven of the  levels of each of the factor are higher than normal  levels while others, if any, are lower than or th e  same as normal levels.    [0058] The levels of depletion of the factors or components  compared to normal levels can vary.  In  one embodiment, the levels of any one or more of t he factors or components is at least 1.05, 1.1,  1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 2, 3, 4,  5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17,  18, 19, 20 higher  than normal levels (where, for sake of clarity, a m arker a level of “1” would indicate that the  component is at the same level in both the subject and normal samples).  For the purposes of the  present invention, the number of “times” the leve ls of a factor are higher over normal can be a  relative or absolute number of times.  In the alter native, the levels of the factors or components may be normalized to a standard and these normalized lev els can then be compared to one another to  determine if a factor or component is lower, higher or about the same.    [0059] For the purposes of the present invention the biomar ker profile comprises at least one, two,  three, four, five, six, seven or eight of the facto rs or components for the prediction of ARDS.  If o ne  factor or component of the biological effector aspect  of the biomarker profile is used in generating  the biomarker profile for the prediction of ARDS, th en any one of the listed factors or components  can be used to generate the profile.  If two facto rs or components of the biological effector aspect o f  the biomarker profile are used in generating the bio marker profile for the prediction of ARDS, any  combination of the two listed above can be used.   If three factors or components of the biological  effector aspect of the biomarker profile are used in  generating the biomarker profile for the  prediction of ARDS, any combination of three of the factors or components listed above can be used.   If four factors or components of the biological effe ctor aspect of the biomarker profile are used in  generating the biomarker profile for the prediction o f ARDS, any combination of four of the factors  or components listed above can be used.  If five f actors or components of the biological effector    aspect of the biomarker profile are used in generati ng the biomarker profile for the prediction of  ARDS, any combination of five of the factors or com ponents listed above can be used.  If six factors  or components of the biological effector aspect of t he biomarker profile are used in generating the  biomarker profile for the prediction of ARDS, any co mbination of six of the factors or components  listed above can be used.  If seven factors or com ponents of the biological effector aspect of the  biomarker profile are used in generating the biomarke r profile for the prediction of ARDS, any  combination of seven of the factors or components li sted above can be used.  Of course all members  of the biological effector aspect of each biomarker  profile panel can be used to generate a  biomarker profile for the prediction of ARDS.    [0060] The subject’s biomarker profile is compared to the profile that is deemed to be a normal  biomarker profile.  To establish the biomarker profil e of a normal individual, an individual or group  of individuals may be first assessed to ensure they have no signs, symptoms or diagnostic indicators  of ARDS.  Once established, the biomarker profile of  the individual or group of individuals can then  be determined to establish a “normal biomarker prof ile.”  In one embodiment, a normal biomarker  profile can be ascertained from the same subject whe n the subject is deemed as healthy with no  signs, symptoms or diagnostic indicators of ARDS.  I n one embodiment, a biomarker profile from a  “normal subject” e.g., a “normal biomarker profi le” is a human subject that does not exhibit or  display ARDS, but may still may not be considered a s healthy.    [0061] In one embodiment, a “normal” biomarker profile i s assessed in the same subject from  whom the sample is taken prior to the onset of any  signs, symptoms or diagnostic indicators that  they may exhibit ARDS.  That is, the term “normal ” with respect to a biomarker profile can be used   to mean the subject’s baseline biomarker profile pr ior to the onset of any signs, symptoms or  diagnostic indicators of potential ARDS.  The biomark er profile can then be reassessed periodically  and compared to the subject’s baseline biomarker pr ofile.  Thus, the present invention also includes  methods of monitoring the progression of ARDS in a  subject, with the methods comprising  determining the subject’s biomarker profile at more than one time point.  For example, some  embodiments of the methods of the present invention  will comprise determining the subject’s  biomarker profile at two, three, four, five, six, se ven, eight, nine, 10 or even more time points over a  period of time, such as a week or more, two weeks or more, three weeks or more, four weeks or  more, a month or more, two months or more, three m onths or more, four months or more, five  months or more, six months or more, seven months or  more, eight months or more, nine months or  more, ten months or more, 11 months or more, a yea r or more or even two years.  The methods of  monitoring a subject’s risk of developing ARDS woul d also include embodiments in which the    subject’s biomarker profile is assessed before and/o r during and/or after treatment of ARDS.  In  other words, the present invention also includes meth ods of monitoring the efficacy of treatment of  ARDS by assessing the subject’s biomarker profile o ver the course of the treatment and after the  treatment.  In specific embodiments, the methods of  monitoring the efficacy of treatment of ARDS  comprise determining the subject’s biomarker profile at at least one, two, three, four, five, six,  seven, eight, nine or 10 or more different time poi nts prior to the receipt of treatment for ARDS and subsequently determining the subject’s biomarker prof ile at at least one, two, three, four, five, six,  seven, eight, nine or 10 or more different time poi nts after beginning of treatment for ARDS, and  determining the changes, if any, in the biomarker pr ofile of the subject.  The treatment may be any  treatment designed to cure, remove or diminish the l ikelihood of developing ARDS.    [0062] In another embodiment, a normal biomarker profile is assessed in a sample from a different  subject or patient (from the subject being analyzed) and this different subject does not have or is not   suspected of developing ARDS.  In still another embo diment, the normal biomarker profile is  assessed in a population of healthy individuals, the constituents of which display no signs, symptoms  or diagnostic indicators that they may have or will develop ARDS.  Thus, the subject’s biomarker  profile can be compared to a normal biomarker profil e generated from a single normal sample or a  biomarker profile generated from more than one normal  sample.    [0063] Of course, measurements of the individual components, e.g., concentration, ratio, log ratios  etc., of the normal biomarker profile can fall withi n a range of values, and values that do not fall  within this “normal range” are said to be outsid e the normal range.  These measurements may or  may not be converted to a value, number, factor or score as compared to measurements in the  “normal range.”  For example, a measurement for  a specific factor or component that is below the  normal range, may be assigned a value or ‐1, ‐2 , ‐3, etc., depending on the scoring system devise d.    [0064] In another embodiment, the measurements of the indivi dual components themselves are  used in the risk profile, and these levels can be  used to provide a “binary” value to each compone nt,  e.g., “elevated” or “not elevated.”  Each of the binary values can be converted to a number, e. g., “1”  or “0,” respectively.    [0065] In one embodiment, the “risk profile value” can  be a single value, number, factor or score  given as an overall collective value to the individu al components of the biomarker profile.  For  example, if each component is assigned a value, such  as above, the component value may simply be  the overall score of each individual or categorical  value.  For example, if five components of the  biomarker profile for predicting ARDS are used and t hree of those components are assigned values    of “+2” and two are assigned values of “+1,”  the risk profile in this example would be +8, wit h a  normal value being, for example, “0.”  In this  manner, the biomarker profile value could be a usefu l  single number or score, the actual value or magnitud e of which could be an indication of the actual  risk of developing ARDS, e.g., the “more positive  the value, the greater the risk of developing ARD S.    [0066] In another embodiment the “risk profile value” ca n be a series of values, numbers, factors or  scores given to the individual components of the ove rall biomarker profile.  In another embodiment,  the “risk profile value” may be a combination of  values, numbers, factors or scores given to  individual components of the profile as well as valu es, numbers, factors or scores collectively given  to a group of components, such as a biological effe ctor portion.  In another example, the risk profile value may comprise or consist of individual values,  number or scores for specific component as well  as values, numbers or scores for a group of compone nts.    [0067] In another embodiment individual values from the biom arker profile and/or the mechanism  of injury can be used to develop a single score, s uch as a “combined risk index,” which may utiliz e  weighted scores from the individual component values  reduced to a diagnostic number value.  The  combined risk index may also be generated using non weighted scores from the individual  component values.  When the “combined risk index”  exceeds a specific threshold level, determined  by a range of values developed similarly from contro l (normal) subjects, the individual has a high  risk, or higher than normal risk, of developing ARDS , whereas maintaining a normal range value of  the “combined risk index” would indicate a low o r minimal risk of developing ARDS.  In this  embodiment, the threshold value would be or could be  set by the combined risk index from one or  more normal subjects.    [0068] In another embodiment, the value of the biomarker pr ofile can be the collection of data  from the individual measurements and need not be con verted to a scoring system, such that the  “risk profile value” is a collection of the indi vidual measurements of the individual components of  the biomarker profile.    [0069] In specific embodiments, a human subject is diagnosed  of having an increased risk of  suffering from ARDS if the subject’s eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two or even one of the  components or factors herein are at abnormal levels.    [0070] If it is determined that a human subject has an in creased risk of developing ARDS, the  attending health care provider may subsequently prescr ibe or institute a treatment program.  In this  manner, the present invention also provides for metho ds of treating individuals for ARDS.  The    attending healthcare worker may begin treatment, based  on the subject’s biomarker profile, before  there are perceivable, noticeable or measurable signs of ARDS in the individual.    [0071] Accordingly, the invention provides methods of treatin g ARDS in a subject in need thereof.   The treatment methods include obtaining a subject’s biomarker profile as defined herein and  prescribing a treatment regimen to the subject if th e biomarker profile indicates that the subject is  at risk of developing ARDS.    [0072] The methods of treatment also include methods of mon itoring the effectiveness of a  treatment for ARDS.  Once a treatment regimen has b een established, with or without the use of the  methods of the present invention to assist in a dia gnosis of a risk of developing ARDS, the methods  of monitoring a subject’s biomarker profile over ti me can be used to assess the effectiveness of  treatments for ARDS.  Specifically, the subject’s b iomarker profile can be assessed over time,  including before, during and after treatments for ARD S.  The biomarker profile can be monitored,  with, for example, the normalization or decline in t he values of the profile over time being indicative that the treatment may be showing efficacy of treatm ent.   [0073] The present invention also provides kits that can be  used in the methods of the present  invention.  Specifically, the present invention provid es kits for assessing the increased risk of  developing ARDS, with the kits comprising one or mor e sets of antibodies that are immobilized onto  a solid substrate and specifically bind to at least one of the factors or components listed herein.  I n  specific embodiments, the kits comprise at least two,  three, four, five, six or seven sets of antibodies   immobilized onto a solid substrate, with each set co rresponding to a factor.    [0074] The antibodies that are immobilized onto the substrat e may or may not be labeled.  For  example, the antibodies may be labeled, e.g., bound  to a labeled protein, in such a manner that  binding of the specific protein may displace the lab el and the presence of the marker in the sample is   marked by the absence of a signal.  In addition, t he antibodies that are immobilized onto the  substrate may be directly or indirectly immobilized o nto the surface.  Methods for immobilizing  proteins, including antibodies, are well‐known in th e art, and such methods may be used to  immobilize a target protein, e.g., IL‐12, or anothe r antibody onto the surface of the substrate to  which the antibody directed to the specific factor c an then be specifically bound.  In this manner, the   antibody directed to the specific biomarker is immobi lized onto the surface of the substrate for the  purposes of the present invention.    [0075] The kits of the present invention may or may not i nclude containers for collecting samples  from the subject and one or more reagents, e.g., pu rified target biomarker for preparing a    calibration curve.  The kits may or may not include  additional reagents such as wash buffers, labeling  reagents and reagents that are used to detect the p resence (or absence) of the label.    [0076] All patents and publications cited herein are incorpo rated by reference to the same extent  as if each individual publication was specifically an d individually indicated as having been  incorporated by reference in its entirety.    Examples 

[0077] Example 1  [0078] This prospective cohort study enrolled a total of 22 6 patients ages 18 years and older with  injury or illness requiring surgical care or treatmen t in a critical care or emergency setting being  cared for at Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i)  member sites (Walter Reed National Military  Medical Center, Emory University Hospital, Grady Memor ial Hospital, Duke University School of  Medicine) between 2014 and 2017.  ARDS patients were  diagnosed according to the Berlin Definition  with a PaO 2 /FiO 2  of <300mmHg and samples were collected acco rding to our Tissue and Data  Acquisition Protocol (TDAP).    [0079] Of the 226 patients studied, 14 (6.1%) developed ARD S during hospitalization.  Of the 160  trauma patients, 11 (10.1%) developed ARDS compared t o 2 (3.1%) of the 65 non‐trauma patients.   Neither the presence or absence of trauma (p=0.43) n or blunt versus penetrating trauma (p=0.88)  were found to be significant factors in the developm ent of ARDS.  The overall hospital mortality rate  was 4% compared to the ARDS hospital mortality rate of 30.8%.  Of the 9 patients in the cohort who  died during hospitalization, 4 (45.4%) were diagnosed with ARDS.  Complication rates were  comparable between ARDS and non‐ARDS patients.    [0080] Serum samples were collected upon initial presentation  and at days 0 and 0. Inflammatory  cytokine biomarker levels were quantified in a multip lexed assay on a Luminex™ instrument using  sandwich immunoassays with a capture antibody conjugat ed to a colored bead, and a detection  antibody conjugated to a fluorophore. The combination of colored bead and fluorophore intensity  gives a concentration that derived from a calibrated to a standard curve of known analyte  concentrations. Analysis of the biomarker data with a  Wilcoxon Rank Sum test showed eotaxin, GM‐ CSF, IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐13, IP‐10, MCP1 and RANT ES (p<0.05) to be significantly different between  ARDS  and non‐ARDS patients.  Additionally, eotaxin, GM‐ CSF, IFN‐γ, IL‐1a, IL‐2, IL‐17, and MCP1 (p& lt;0.05)  were significantly different among trauma patients wit h and without ARDS.  Among non‐trauma    patients, IL‐ 1RA, IL‐4, IL‐10, MIP1b, and VEGF  (p<0.05) were significantly different between ARDS   and non‐ARDS patients.   Table 1:  Demographic characteristics of patients wit h acute respiratory distress syndrome versus  without. ARDS: acute respiratory distress syndrome.    

Table 2:  Demographic characteristic of patients livi ng and deceased patients with and without acute  respiratory distress syndrome. ARDS: acute respiratory distress syndrome.   

[0081] Example 2  [0082] 186 additional patients were enrolled in the prospect ive study for a total of 389 patients. 74  of these patients were diagnosed with ARDS as some  point during their in hospital recovery with a  total of 918 serum samples. Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests were performed on all serum biomarker data  (n=918, 389 patients, see Figure 4), all serum bioma rker data in the trauma cohort (n=597, 264  patients, see Figure 5), all serum biomarker data in  the non‐trauma cohort (n=321, 102 patients, see  Figure 6), all initial serum biomarker data (n=232,  232 patients, see Figure 7), all initial serum  biomarker data in the trauma cohort (n=161, 161 pati ents, see Figure 8), and all initial serum  biomarker data in the non‐trauma cohort (n=71, 71  patients, see Figure 9). Directional inferences  were made using one‐sided tests, while tests for d ifference in means were made with a two‐sided  test. Table 3.  [0083] In the all serum dataset 28 (2 borderline) biomarker s were statistically different (p < 0.05)  between ARDS/No ARDS groups (27 higher in ARDS, 3 l ower in ARDS). [0084] In the all serum trauma dataset 22 (1 borderline   0.05 > p > 0.10) biomarkers were  statistically different between ARDS/No ARDS groups (2 2 higher in ARDS, 1 lower in ARDS).  [0085] In the all serum non‐trauma dataset 20 (1 borderli ne) biomarkers were statistically different  between ARDS/No ARDS groups (17 higher in ARDS, 4 l ower in ARDS).    [0086] In the initial time point serum dataset 12 (6 borde rline) biomarkers were statistically  different between ARDS/No ARDS groups (16 higher in  ARDS, 2 lower in ARDS). Elevated levels (p <  0.05 in a two‐sided Wilcoxon Rank Sum test) were  observed for G‐CSF, GM‐CSF, IFN‐γ, IL‐1α, IL ‐1β,  IL‐1RA (aka IL‐1F3), IL‐6, IL‐8 (aka CXCL8),  IL‐10, MCP‐1 (aka CCL2), and VEGF‐A. Reduced le vels (p <  0.05) were observed for IL‐15. Borderline elevated  levels (0.05 < p < 0.10 in a two‐sided Wilc oxon  Rank Sum test) were observed for FGF basic, HGF, IF N‐alpha, IL‐9, and MIP‐1 beta (aka CCL4).  Borderline reduced levels were observed for IP‐10/CX CL10.  [0087] In the initial time point trauma serum dataset 10 b iomarkers were statistically different  between ARDS/No ARDS groups (10 higher in ARDS, 0 l ower in ARDS). Elevated levels were observed  for FGF basic, G‐CSF, IFNα, IL‐1α, IL‐1β, IL ‐1 ra/IL‐1F3, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐10, and MCP‐1 .  [0088] In the initial time point non‐trauma serum dataset 0 (2 borderline) biomarkers were  statistically different between ARDS/No ARDS groups (2  higher in ARDS, 0 lower in ARDS). Borderline  elevated levels were observed for MCP‐1/CCL2 and MI G.   

                                       

                                     

                                     

                                                                           

                                   

   

                                   

9     1                                        

         

   

   

                 

   

                 

    .1   0 O

      7 W              

7 5 7 9       0             3 5 0             7 - 9 8 / 0   1 5

B 4 D 0 4  

                                       

                                     

                                     

                                                                           

                                                                         

2 0                                              

   

   

               

 

                 

    .1   0 O

      7 W                 7 5 7 9

      0 0                         3 5

7 - 9 8 / 0   1 5

B 4 D 0 4  

                                       

                                     

                                                                           

                                     

                                     

                                   

2 1  

                                           

   

   

               

 

                 

    .1   0 O

      7 W                 7 5 7 9

      0 0                         3 5

7 - 9 8 / 0   1 5

B 4 D 0 4  

                                                                                                                   

                                                                           

                                     

                                   

2 2                                              

   

   

               

 

                 

    .1

0 O           7 W

                7 5 7 9

      0 0                         3 5

7 - 9 8 / 0   1 5

B 4 D 0 4  

 

                                                                         

2 3                                        

     

   

   

               

 

                 

    .1

0 O       7 W                     7 5 7 9

      3 0 5 0                         7 - 9 8 / 0   1 5

B 4 D 0 4