Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
PROCESS FOR THE HIGH-EFFICIENCY HYDRATION OF GUT FLORA IN THE COLON
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2017/141064
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention pertains to a process for the high-efficiency hydration of gut flora in the colon (large intestine). In the course of the process, an arbitrary mass of homogenous, compact, rubbery prepared kombucha fungal culture is cleaned, then placed in a blending device with a blade suited to mincing the culture into smaller pieces, into which a quantity of water equal to the mass of the original kombucha culture is also poured. The process is characterised in that, depending on the water content required, the kombucha fungal culture is ground or minced into pieces on the order of a millimetre in size using a high-speed blending device, then pulped until a gel of a maximum water content of 95% (g/lOOg) is obtained, which gel, when passed into the colon, is used to cleanse the intestinal tract and promote absorption. After this, a quantity of water equal to the mass of the initial kombucha culture is added to the gel produced as above and the mixture pulped using a blending device for at least a half an hour until the aqueous phase disappears. At this point, using the sharp blades of the blending device rotating at a speed of at least 2000 rotations per minute, gaps on the order of tenths or hundredths of a millimetre in size are created in the fibrous structure of the kombucha culture into which water is absorbed on the basis of the principle of capillary action. Thus, a fine, pulpy gel having a water content of more than 95% and no separate aqueous phase or remaining substance to be gelatinated or pulped is obtained, which gel is used to hydrate existing gut flora or, in the event of a probiotic therapy, when passed into the colon, to supply water to the microbes taken with the probiotics.

Inventors:
HUMMEL, Zoltan (7627 Pécs, Veterán Utca 5/3., HU)
Application Number:
HU2017/000010
Publication Date:
August 24, 2017
Filing Date:
February 16, 2017
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
HUMMEL, Zoltan (7627 Pécs, Veterán Utca 5/3., HU)
International Classes:
A61K36/00; A23F3/16
Foreign References:
HU0401378A22006-10-28
US20060165643A12006-07-27
Other References:
GOH, W. N. ET AL.: "Microstructure and physical properties of microbial cellulose produced during fermentation of black tea broth (Kombucha). II", INTERNATIONAL FOOD RESEARCH JOURNAL, vol. 19 . 1, 2012, pages 153 - 158, XP055409708
K ESHK, S, M. ET AL.: "Bacterial cellulose production and its industrial applications", J BIOPROCESS BIOTECH, vol. 4.02, 2014, XP055409709
KOZYROVSKA ET AL.: "Kombucha microbiome as a probiotic: a view from the perspective of post- genomics and synthetic ecology", BIOPOLYMERS AND CELL, vol. 28, no. 2, 2012, pages 103 - 113, XP055409714
EUN-YOUNG KIM ET AL.: "Structural features of glycoprotein purified from Saccharina japonica and its effects on the selected probiotic properties of Lactobacillus plantarum in Caco-2 cel", J APPL PHYCOL, vol. 27, 2015, pages 965 - 973, XP035477861
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KORMOS, Ágnes (1132 Budapest, Váci ÚT 66. FSZT.3, HU)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. A process for the high-efficiency hydration of gut flora in the colon (large intestine), whereby an arbitrary mass of homogenous, compact, rubbery prepared kombucha fungal culture is cleaned by washing, then placed into a blending device fitted with a mincing blade, after which a quantity of water is added that is equal to the mass of the kombucha culture, characterised in that, depending on the water content desired, the kombucha culture is ground or minced using a high-speed blending device into pieces on the order of a millimetre in size, then pulped until a gel of maximum 95% (g/lOOg) water content is obtained, which gel, when passed into the colon, will cleanse the intestinal tract and promote absorption, after which a quantity of drinking water equal to the mass of the initial kombucha culture is added to the gel thus produced and the mixture is pulped using the blending device for at least a half an hour until the aqueous phase is eliminated, at which point, using sharp blades rotating at a minimum speed of 2000 rotations/minute, gaps are created in the fibrous structure of the kombucha culture on the order of tenths or hundredths of a millimetre in size, into which gaps water is absorbed on the basis of capillary action, thus producing a fine, pulpy, homogenous, exclusively cellulose-based gel with a water content exceeding 95% and no aqueous phase, such that the gel produced in this way hydrates existing gut flora or, in the event of a probiotic therapy, when passed into the colon, supplies water to the microbes taken with the probiotics.

2. The process according to Claim 1, characterised in that pulping is accomplished using a blending device, immersion mixer, or food processor with a cutter bowl having at least one sharp blade rotating at a speed of at least 2000 rotations/minute.

3. The process according to Claims 1 or 2, characterised in that production of the gel of more than 95% (g/lOOg) water content is accomplished on the basis of the principle of capillary action by creating gaps in the fibrous structure of the kombucha culture on the order of tenths or hundredths of a millimetre in size by pulping for the required amount of time, but for at least one half hour.

4. The process according to any of Claims 1-3, characterised in that adequate hydration of gut flora is ensured by taking at least one tablespoon of gel per day.

Description:
PROCESS FOR THE HIGH-EFFICIENCY HYDRATION OF GUT FLORA IN THE

COLON

The present invention pertains to a process for the high-efficiency hydration of gut flora in the colon (large intestine), whereby a kombucha fungal culture is rendered suitable for supplying gut flora in the colon with water of the necessary mass.

It is commonly known that the process of hydration in the large intestine is a special, unique one. If we imbibe a large quantity of water, either in food, or by drinking, the liquid water is all absorbed by the stomach and small intestine. Only one kind of water survives into the large intestine: namely, that which is bound to fibre.

Fruits and vegetables all contain a considerable amount of indigestible cellulose fibre. The surfaces of this fibre are hydrophilic, that is, water molecules adhere to them easily, which is why they are also known as "hydrating surfaces". If there is not enough such hydrating fibre in the contents of the colon, then neither our own microbes, nor those ingested with probiotic medicines, are able to thrive and reproduce. Medical textbooks also reveal that the role of fibre is primarily to add mass to the contents of the large intestine. This increased mass causes the walls of the intestine to stretch, which is sensed by the receptors, which pass on the stimuli that initiate intestinal movement and, finally, defecation. All of this is fine, of course, except that the undigested, hydrating fibre has yet another important biological function: to nourish intestinal flora. In order for beneficial microbes to grow and reproduce, they need water, too, and in sufficient quantities. The helpful microbes find the required quantity of water in the material which is enclosed between the strands of undigested fibre. Fibre can come in food from not only plant, but also animal sources, including gelatin, collagen, and the white fibre of muscle cells. However, these are all digestible, so that by the time intestinal contents reach the colon, they have already been absorbed. Plants, too, contain digestible, gelatinating fibre with good hydrophilic properties, but these never reach the large intestine, either. There is only one type of fibre that survives even the digestive properties of the large intestine, while also having good hydrophilic properties, and that is cellulose. The strands of cellulose in plants act as a sort of "skeletal" structure, giving plants their form. In order to give form to larger trees and provide the necessary strength to maintain that form, many strands of cellulose must stick together. However, thicker, woodier cellulose strands cannot hold as much water as thin ones are known to do. The cellulose strands of different plants all have different hydrophilic abilities. It is also common knowledge that the fewer cellulose molecules bind together, the thinner the strands, the better they are at trapping water; and that a type of cellulose of microbiological origins, produced by an acetic acid bacteria, and the cellulose fibres it produces, have the best hydrophilic properties in the world. It is this type of cellulose, known as microbial cellulose, that is found in the kombucha fungal culture. The kombucha fungal culture is a slippery, rubbery, gelatinous formation with a high water content. If a small piece is cut from the main mass, it can be swallowed. It is also edible, as kombucha tea is a kombucha product that has been consumed for thousands of years. In this rubbery form, kombucha reaches the large intestine, but once there, can only release a minimal quantity of water, as the water in question is sealed in "compartments" formed by very densely woven cellulose fibres. Indeed, to remove the water from such a dense structure would require a significant investment of time.

In addition to the above, several other uses of the kombucha fungal culture are also known. One such use is outlined in patent application no. P0401378, which describes the production of high- water-content cellulose-biocolloids and their application to food preservation, nutrition, cosmetics, and the detoxification of the human body. Although the principle aim of this known invention is to cleanse the intestines, increase absorption, and harness the preservative properties inherent in the kombucha culture's low pH, the solution does not permit high-efficiency hydration of gut flora in the large intestine.

Thus, the objective of the present invention is to eliminate the deficiencies inherent in known solutions and to develop a process that enables the high-efficiency hydration of microbes making up the gut flora in the large intestine, without a separate aqueous phase, using only cellulose passed to the large intestine such as contains the largest possible quantity of water accessible to gut flora, and that, in the event of probiotic therapy, supplies enough water to the large intestine to remedy the shortage of gut flora there and make expensive probiotics worth taking, thus conferring an economic advantage, as well.

The solution according to this invention is based on the recognition that if the large quantities of water enclosed in the compartments of the kombucha culture, water that is difficult to access, is made accessible by cutting said compartments open, then the structure will be loosened, liberating many strands with hydrophilic properties and producing channels and/or gaps between fibres with hydrating surfaces; water that is easier for the microbes that make up gut flora to access will be absorbed by capillary action into said channels and/or gaps; and the objective of the invention will be met.

To meet this stated objective, it is not sufficient merely to mince the kombucha culture into pieces of a diameter on the order of a millimetre in size; rather, it is necessary to make cuts in the fibres of a size on the order of tenths or hundredths of a millimetre. This may be achieved by pureeing the kombucha culture for at least one half hour in a high-speed blending device equipped with a sharp blade or blades. The more cuts that are made in the fibrous structure of the kombucha culture, the more water a single unit of culture will be able to transport into the large intestine, and the more water it will be able to hold for the use of gut flora there, thus offering high-efficiency hydration.

Thus, the subject matter of this invention is a process for the high-efficiency hydration of gut flora in the colon, in the course of which a uniform, solid, rubbery piece of prepared kombucha culture of arbitrary mass is cleaned, then placed into a blending device with a blade capable of mincing it into smaller pieces, after which water is added in a quantity equal to the mass of culture used. This process is characterised in that, depending on the quantity of water necessary, the kombucha culture is ground or pulped in a high-speed device into pieces on the order of a millimetre in size, pureeing it until a gel with a maximum water content of 95% (g/lOOg) is obtained, which, when made to pass into the large intestine, will cleanse the intestinal tract and aid in absorption. After this, the gel produced according to the above is supplemented with a quantity of water equal in mass to that of the initial kombucha culture, then pulped with a blending device for at least half an hour, until the aqueous phase is eliminated. At this point, the sharp blades of the blending device are used to produce gaps in the fibrous structure of the kombucha culture on the order of tenths or hundredths of a millimetre in size, gaps that initiate a capillary effect that causes them to absorb water. Thus, a fine, pulpy, homogenous gel is obtained that is exclusively cellulose-based, with a water content exceeding 95%, and without a separate aqueous phase, which can be used to supply water to existing gut flora or, where the user is taking a probiotic supplement, can be passed into the large intestine to hydrate the microbes contained in the probiotic. The process according to this invention is characterised in that pulping is accomplished using a blending device, immersion mixer, or food processor with a cutter bowl having at least one sharp blade and a rotational speed of at least 2000 rotations/minute. The process according to this invention is also characterised in that the gel of water content exceeding 95% (g/lOOg) is produced based on the principle of capillary action by creating gaps in the fibrous structure of the kombucha culture on the order of tenths or hundredths of millimetres in size via pulping of sufficient duration, lasting at least one half hour. The process according to this invention is also characterised in that the hydration of gut flora to the required degree is ensured by the consumption of at least one tablespoon of gel per day.

Utilisation of the process according to this invention begins with a prepared kombucha culture, a substance of a uniform, compact, rubbery consistency. This compact, rubbery material is cleaned, minced, than placed in a blending device with at least one blade, to which an amount of water is added that is equal to the mass of the culture. This mixture is then ground or blended using a high-speed blending device, immersion mixer, or food processor with a cutter bowl into pieces on the order of a millimetre in size, and finally pulped to produce a gel with a water content of at most 95% (g/lOOg), which, when introduced into the large intestine, can cleanse the intestinal tract and promote absorption. Next, an amount of water is added to the gel produced as described above that is equal to the original mass of the kombucha culture, and this mixture is pulped with blending device for at least half an hour, until the aqueous phase has been eliminated and a very fine, pulpy, gelatinous, homogenous substance with a water content exceeding 95% is obtained, a substance that contains neither a separate aqueous phase, nor, beyond its cellulose, any further material to be pulped or gelatinated. An important parameter within this process is the duration for which pureeing using highspeed blades is performed, creating cuts in the fibrous structure and/or body of tissue of the kombucha culture of a density on the order of tenths or hundredths of a millimetre. It is by these cuts that water is absorbed into the body of tissue via capillary action. Once absorbed, the larger part of this quantity of water enters the large intestine, where it hydrates gut flora. The great advantage of the process according to this invention is that the consumption of at least one tablespoon of gel per day can sustain hydration of gut flora in the user. Given the low-fibre dietary habits of modern consumers, the ingestion of two tablespoons of gel per day would contribute much toward the regeneration and maintenance of gut flora in the individual user. If pureeing is performed only until pieces on the order of a millimetre in size are obtained, then a gel of maximum water content 95% is obtained, which quantity of water would be either inaccessible to the microbes that make up gut flora, or accessible only after a relatively lengthy span of time. This type of process is preferably used only when the purpose is to cleanse the colon and aid in absorption. In the event that pureeing is continued until cuts are created in the fibrous structure of the kombucha culture at distances on the order of tenths or hundredths of a millimetre apart, then the absorptiveness of the fibres in the culture can be increased by 30%, thus increasing the amount of water that is readily accessible to gut flora. A further advantage of the pulpy gel produced using the process according to this invention is that it is easy to apply to the sorts of probiotic therapies used to regenerate gut flora, so that the effectiveness of such therapies is considerably increased. In one preferred embodiment of the process according to this invention, the water content of the gel produced based on the principle of capillary action by creating gaps in the fibrous structure of the kombucha culture on the order of tenths or hundredths of a millimetre via pureeing for at least one half hour is greater than or equal to 95% (g/lOOg). The gel produced in this way can be used to advantage even on its own, without accompanying probiotics, to sustain gut flora, by which it also sustains the protective abilities of the immune system.

The process according to this invention is described below by means of the following examples; Example 1 : Preparation of a gel that supports the hydration of gut flora and probiotics using an immersion mixer

The kombucha culture is cut into 5x5 cm pieces using a sharp blade and placed into a container. To this culture, an amount of water equal to the original mass is added. An immersion mixer is fitted with a pulping blade and used to pulp the mixture until the aqueous phase is eliminated, producing a homogenous, gelatinous substance. Next, the same amount of water is added as with the previous addition, that is, an amount equal to the mass of the original culture. The immersion mixer is then used to pulp the gel at a rotational speed of 2800 rotations/minute until the aqueous phase disappears entirely, thus producing the gel according to this invention.

Example 2: Preparation of a gel that supports the hydration of gut flora and probiotics using a food processor with a cutter bowl

Pieces of kombucha culture are placed in the cutter bowl and an amount of water added that is equal in mass. The food processer is then switched on and the mixture pureed until a homogenous, gelatinous substance is obtained. Then the processor is turned off and an identical amount of water is added, that is, an amount equal to the mass of the original culture. Next, the food processor, set to a rotational speed of 2600 rotations/minute, is used to puree the contents until again a uniform, homogenous gel is obtained, and the gel according to this invention has been produced.

Both of the above examples are characterised in that the gel obtained is cellulose-based, and cellulose, in turn is characterised in that it cannot be broken down by the human digestive system. The cellulose-based gel will reach the colon undigested, where it will continue to retain a large quantity of water, which even the microbes of gut flora can easily access. As gut flora cannot gain nourishment or reproduce without water, water passed to the colon in this way is essential to their regeneration and sustenance, making the solution according to this invention a significant one; specifically:

- The gels obtained using the above processes are suited, even in and of themselves, to hydration of existing gut flora; - In cases where probiotic supplements are taken, they also hydrate the microbes ingested with the probiotics; indeed, without the process according to this invention, the administration of probiotics is futile and yields no advantage, as the microbes passing from them into the colon would not have access to adequate quantities of water; thus, where probiotics are taken, use of the gels obtained using the above processes is recommended.

The process according to this invention meets the objectives set for it, while offering the following advantages:

- It provides sufficient water for the gut flora in the colon, water that is also easily accessible;

- The gel obtained in the first phase of the process has a maximum water content of 95% (g/lOOg) and is usable to advantage for cleansing the intestinal tract and promoting absorption;

- The gel produced in the second phase of the process has a water content exceeding 95%, preferably falling between 96 and 97% (g/lOOg), and contains neither a separate aqueous phase, nor any further substance, beyond cellulose, to be gelatinated or pulped; it may also be used to advantage in probiotic therapies used to regenerate gut flora, permitting a considerable increase in the efficiency of the course of probiotics, which also confers financial advantages;

- The gel according to this invention can also be used in and of itself for the sustenance of gut flora and, in this way, for the maintenance of the protective abilities of the immune system.