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Title:
A PROCESS FOR PRODUCING A BUTTER-LIKE FOOD FAT
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1992/019111
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A butter-like food fat being directly spreadable at refrigeration temperature, i.e. 4 to 5 �C, and preferably containing 80 to 83 % fat is produced by addition of vegetable oil, water, and salt. Initially conventional butter is produced, which preferably contains 80 to 83 % fat and which is made exclusively from milk. Subsequently, the conventional butter is passed continuously through a tight, closed plant, whereby the butter initially passes through a kneading station followed by addition of half the total amount of added vegetable oil. Then the butter mixture passes through a mixer, whereafter the remaining portion of the amount of added vegetable oil and water and salt are added. In this manner buttermilk results exclusively as a by-product from the production of the conventional butter and contains thererefore nothing but pure milk fat. Accordingly, the buttermilk can be used as market milk and sold at the highest possible market price. In addition, a particularly high production flexibility is obtained during the production of butter.

Inventors:
Berntsen, Sten
Application Number:
PCT/DK1992/000152
Publication Date:
November 12, 1992
Filing Date:
May 08, 1992
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
Apv Pasilac, A/s Berntsen Sten
International Classes:
A01J15/00; A23C15/12; A23D7/02; (IPC1-7): A23C15/12; A23D7/02
Domestic Patent References:
Foreign References:
GB2130232A
GB2021140A
EP0421504A2
US4350715A
US4112132A
US4716047A
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims .
1. A process for producing a butterlike food fat, which is directly spreadable at refrigeration tempera¬ ture, i.e. 4 to 5°C, and which preferably contains 80 to 83% fat, said process including addition of vegetable and/or animal oil, where buttermilk is produced as a by¬ product, c h a r a c t e r i s e d by continuously passing conventional butter preferably containing 80 to 83% fat and exclusively being produced from milk through a tight, closed plant, whereby the butter initially pas¬ ses through a kneading station and subsequently through a mixing station, where the vegetable and/or animal oil as well as water are added.
2. A process as claimed in claim 1, c h a r a c t e r— i s e d by adding the first portion of the total amount of added vegetable and/or animal oil before the butter mixture passes through a first mixing means, and by the remaining portion of the vegetable and/or animal oil being subsequently added before the butter mixture pas ses through a readymixing means .
3. A process as claimed in claim 1 or 2, c h a r a c ¬ t e r i s e d by adding the water to the butter mixture immediately before said mixture passes through the read¬ y—mixing means .
4. A process as claimed in one or more of the preceding claims l to 3, c h a r a c t e r i s e d by adding salt to the butter mixture immediately before said mix¬ ture passes through the readymixing means.
5. A process as claimed in one or more of the preceding claims , c h a r a c t e r i s e d by adding 15 to 30% of vegetable fat, 16% of water, and 0.8 to 1.2% of salt to the butter mixture .
6. A process as claimed in claim 5, c h a r a c t e r¬ i s e d by adding half the total amount of added vege¬ table oil before the butter mixture passes through the first mixing means .
Description:
Title: A process for Producing a Butter-like Food Fat

Technical Field

The invention relates to a process for producing a but¬ ter-like food fat, which is directly spreadable at re- frigeration temperature, i.e. 4 to 5°C, and which pre¬ ferably contains 80 to 83% fat, said process including addition of vegetable and/or animal oil, where butter¬ milk is produced as a by-product.

Background Art

For instance Danish Printed Accepted Application No. 152.245 discloses a process of the above type, where the main portion of the total amount of added vegetable and/or animal oil is added and mixed with conventionally soured or unsoured cream before the churning, whereafter the remaining amount of vegetable and/or animal oil is added at the kneading station of the butter machine. The resulting ready— ade butter—like food fat contains an amount of 15 to 30% of vegetable and/or animal oil. The addition of the major portion of the vegetable and/or animal oil to the cream before the churning has the ef¬ fect that some of the oil is lost in the buttermilk al¬ ways being a by-product of the butter production. There¬ fore, the buttermilk contains vegetable and/or animal fat not being butter fat. In addition, it is necessary to reduce the churning temperature to 5 to 6°C , which is too low for ensuring the lowest possible consumption of energy in the butter machine and the lowest possible loss of fat in the buttermilk. The content of foreign fat/oil in the buttermilk prevents said buttermilk from being used as a market product, and therefore it can only be used as a feedstuff product. Accordingly, the market price of the buttermilk is reduced to a minimum.

The consistency of the butter-like food fat is softer

than the consistency of conventional butter, and there¬ fore it is necessary to use plastic cups as packing for the butter—like food fat, other materials, such as an aluminium sheet, being unacceptable as packing. In order to utilize the total capacity of a butter machine it is therefore necessary that the same capacity applies to the succeeding cup-filling line for the butter-like food fat as the capacity applying to the aluminium sheet- packing line for the conventional butter, only one line being usable at a time by such a procedure.

Brief Description of Invention

The process according to the present invention is char¬ acterised by continuously passing conventional butter preferably containing 80 to 83% fat and exclusively be— ing produced from milk through a tight, closed plant, whereby the butter initially passes through a kneading station and subsequently through a mixing station, where the vegetable and/or animal oil as well as water are added. In this manner the buttermilk results exclusively as a by— roduct from the production of a conventional butter, and accordingly it only contains pure milk fat. The resulting buttermilk can be used as a market product and sold at the highest possible market price. Further¬ more it is possible to optimize the initial production of conventional butter so as to involve the lowest pos¬ sible consumption of energy and loss of fat in connec¬ tion with a 100% butter capacity, and the conventional butter can be advanced according to desire for packing or for further processing so as to allow production of the butter—like food fat followed by packing. In this manner it is possible on the same production plant to simultaneously produce conventional butter and the but¬ ter-like food fat.

According to the invention the first portion of the to- tal amount of added vegetable and/or animal oil is added

before the butter mixture passes through a first mixing means, and the remaining portion of the vegetable and/or animal oil is subsequently added before the butter mix¬ ture passes through a ready—mixing means. As a result, a particularly lenient mixing of the butter and the oil and the water is obtained together with a particularly good and uniform distribution of the oil and the water in the butter.

Furthermore according to the invention the water may in a particularly advantageous manner be added to the but¬ ter mixture immediately before said mixture passes through the ready-mixing means .

Moreover according to the invention, salt may in a par¬ ticularly advantageous manner be added to the butter mixture immediately before said mixture passes through the ready-mixing means.

According to the invention, 15 to 30% of vegetable fat, 16% of water, and 0.8 to 1.2% of salt may be added to the butter mixture, whereby a butter-like food fat is obtained which presents a particularly good spreadabili- ty at refrigeration temperature as well as particularly good taste properties.

Finally according to the invention, half the total amount of added vegetable oil may be added before the butter mixture passes through the first mixing means, whereby a particularly advantageous mixing of the vege¬ table oil is obtained.

Brief Description of the Drawing

The invention is explained in greater detail below with reference to a particularly preferred example and the accompanying drawing, in which a flow chart is shown for the particularly preferred example of the process for

producing a butter—like food fat.

Best Mode for Carrying Out the Invention

Following the flow chart shown in the drawing the pro¬ cess according to the invention involves the steps of initially producing conventional butter preferably con¬ taining 80 to 83% fat and exclusively being made from milk. The butter is produced by means of any suited but¬ ter production machine, such as the one described in Danish Patent Application No. 5579/89. A by-product in form of buttermilk results from the butter production, the fat of said buttermilk exclusively being pure milk fat.

The freshly produced butter is then advanced con¬ tinuously either to a packing line, where the butter is packed in sheet in a conventionally known manner, or further through a tight, closed plant for the production of the butter-like food fat which is directly spreadable at refrigeration temperature, i.e. 4 to 5 °C , and pre¬ ferably contains 80 to 83% fat.

The tight, closed plant may for instance be a plant like the one described in Danish Patent Application No. 5579/89, to be used for the production of low-fat but¬ ter, said plant, however, being provided with a number of flowmeters and setting units so as to achieve the desired composition of the ready-made butter—like food fat.

By the process according to the invention, the conven¬ tional butter passes initially through a kneading sta¬ tion, whereafter a first portion of a total amount of added vegetable oil is added. The first portion amounts to approximately 80% of the total amount of added vege¬ table oil. Subsequently, the butter mixture passes through a first mixing means, preferably a known mixer,

whereafter the remaining portion of the total amount of added vegetable oil is added together with water as well as other possible additives, such as salt and possible flavours .

Then the butter mixture continues through a ready-mixing means, which may also be a known mixer. The ready-made butter-like food fat is then advanced to a packing sta¬ tion, where the butter must be filled into cups due to its softnes .

The ready-made butter-like food fat contains 80 to 83% fat, 15 to 30% thereof being vegetable fat, 16% being water and 0.8 to 1.2% being salt. Salt can, however, be added in amounts up to 2.5% according to desire. Flow- meters and setting units measure and set the first por- tion of the total amount of added vegetable oil, the remaining portion of the total amount of added vegetable oil, the amount of water, and the amount of salt, as well as the amount of ready—made butter—like food fat in order to obtain the desired proportions of vegetable fat, water, and salt in the ready-made butter-like food fat. The amount of salt is usually added to the water in an amount corresponding to the amount of salt in the water-phase of the butter mixture, and a desired salt content of for instance 1% in the ready-made butter ne- cessitates an amount of salt in the water of 6.25% rela¬ tive to an amount of water of 16%.

In this manner the buttermilk exclusively results as a by-product from the production of the conventional but¬ ter, and accordingly it only contains pure milk fat, said buttermilk always resulting as a by-product from the churning during the production of butter. Therefore the buttermilk can be used as a market product and sold at the highest possible market price. Furthermore it is possible to optimize the initial production of conven- tional butter so as to involve the lowest possible con-

sumption of energy and loss of fat in connection with a 100% butter capacity, and the conventional butter can be advanced according to desire for packing or for further processing so as to allow production of the butter—like food fat followed by packing. In this manner it is pos¬ sible on the same production plant to simultaneously produce conventional butter and the butter—like food fat.

In addition it should be mentioned, that the churning of butter during the production of the conventional butter can now be performed under the optimum temperatures usually applying to production of butter unlike the pre¬ vious processes for the production of butter—like food fat. Previously, it was necessary to reduce the tempera— ture to 4 to 5°C which involved a considerably increased consumption of energy in the butter machine.

Many modifications can be carried out without thereby deviating from the scope of the invention. Other addi¬ tives, such as lactic starters, may for instance also be added in the mixing station.