Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
PROCESSES OF DISPERSING A FLAVOR IN A CONFECTION AND PRODUCTS PRODUCED THEREFROM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2016/164774
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Processes for dispersing a flavors in confections are disclosed. Once process includes heating an oligosaccharide to a temperature sufficient to melt the oligosaccharide, thus producing a melted mass, dispersing a flavor in the melted mass, and allowing the melted mass to harden to a solid. Products produced by the processes and uses thereof are further disclosed.

Inventors:
BUCK, Allan (526 Ridge Ave, Decatur, Illinois, 62521, US)
GOTTEMOLLER, Tom (1565 Alexander Drive, Mt. Zion, Illinois, 62549, US)
PRICE, Mike (1100 Finley Ave, Mt. Zion, Illinois, 62549, US)
ZEEVAART, Jaco (1261 Pacific Ave, Erlanger, Kentucky, 41018, US)
MAYBERRY, Jay (1261 Pacific Ave, Erlanger, Kentucky, 41018, US)
CHAMBERS, Tim (1261 Pacific Ave, Erlanger, Kentucky, 41018, US)
Application Number:
US2016/026721
Publication Date:
October 13, 2016
Filing Date:
April 08, 2016
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
WILD FLAVORS (Wild Flavors, Inc.1261 Pacific Ave, Erlanger Kentucky, 41018, US)
International Classes:
A23G3/42; A23G4/10; A23L2/52; A23L2/56
Foreign References:
US20010038879A12001-11-08
US20050069628A12005-03-31
US5792505A1998-08-11
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LAKSHMANAN, Alexandra (4666 Faries Parkway, Decatur, Illinois, 62526, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed is:

1. A process, comprising:

heating an oligosaccharide to a temperature sufficient to melt the oligosaccharide, thus

producing a melted mass;

dispersing a flavor in the melted mass; and

allowing the melted mass to harden to a solid.

2. The process according to claim 1, further comprising comminuting the solid into particles.

3. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, further comprising mixing a polyol with the oligosaccharide.

4. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, further comprising mixing water with the oligosaccharide before the oligosaccharide melts.

5. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, further comprising mixing a colorant with the oligosaccharide. 6. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, further comprising mixing an emulsifier with the oligosaccharide.

7. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the polyol is selected from the group consisting of sorbitol, isomalt, erythritol, maltitol, xylitol, mannitol, arabitol, hydrogenated starch hydrolysates, and combinations of any thereof.

8. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the oligosaccharide is selected from the group consisting of maltodextrin, polydextrose, isomalto-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharide, soluble corn fiber, indigestible dextrin, dextrin, a low dextrose equivalent starch hydrolysate, inulin, fructo-oligosaccharide, oligofructose, sucromalt, isomaltodextrin, dextran and combinations of any thereof.

9. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the flavor is selected from the group consisting of mint oil, peppermint, spearmint, a fruit flavor, a butterscotch flavor, a cinnamon flavor, a root beer flavor, vanilla flavor, chocolate flavor, caramel flavor, herbal flavor, tea flavor, coffee flavor, licorice flavor, energy flavor, savory flavor, and combinations of any thereof.

10. The process according to claim 2 or claim 3, further comprising sieving the particles to a desired size.

11. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, further comprising dissolving the oligosaccharide in water.

12. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the process is a batch process. 13. The process according to claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the process is a continuous process.

14. A product produced by the process of claim 1 or claim 2. 15. The product of claim 14, wherein the product is sugar free.

16. A pressed confection or a chewing gum comprising the product of claim 14 or

15. 17. A process, comprising:

dissolving an oligosaccharide in water, thus producing a slurry;

heating the slurry to a temperature sufficient to melt the oligosaccharide, thus producing a melted mass;

dispersing a flavor in the melted mass; and

allowing the melted mass to harden to a solid.

18. The process according to claim 17, further comprising mixing a colorant with the slurry.

19. The process according to claim 17 or 18, further comprising mixing a polyol with the oligosaccharide in the water.

20. The process according to claim 19, wherein the polyol is sorbitol and the oligosaccharide is maltodextrin.

21. The process according to claim 17 or claim 18, wherein the flavor is selected from the group consisting of mint oil, peppermint, spearmint, a fruit flavor, a butterscotch flavor, a cinnamon flavor, a root beer flavor, vanilla flavor, chocolate flavor, caramel flavor, herbal flavor, tea flavor, coffee flavor, licorice flavor, energy flavor, savory flavor, and combinations of any thereof.

22. The process according to claim 17 or claim 18, further comprising

comminuting the solid into particles.

23. The process according to claim 17 or claim 18, further comprising reducing a moisture content of the slurry to less than 5% by the heating.

24. A product produced by the process of claim 17 or claim 18.

25. The product of claim 24, wherein the product is sugar free.

26. A pressed confection or a chewing gum comprising the product of claim 24 or

25.

27. A process, comprising:

dissolving an oligosaccharide in water, thus producing a slurry;

heating the slurry to a temperature sufficient to boil off some of the water and form a molten mass of the oligosaccharide;

dispersing a flavor in the melted mass; and

cooling the melted mass to harden to a solid.

28. The process according to claim 27, further comprising mixing a colorant with the slurry.

29. The process according to claim 27 or claim 28, further comprising mixing a polyol with the oligosaccharide in the water.

30. The process according to claim 27 or claim 28, wherein the flavor is selected from the group consisting of mint oil, peppermint, spearmint, a fruit flavor, a butterscotch flavor, a cinnamon flavor, a root beer flavor, vanilla flavor, chocolate flavor, caramel flavor, herbal flavor, tea flavor, coffee flavor, licorice flavor, energy flavor, savory flavor, and combinations of any thereof.

31. The process according to claim 27 or claim 28, further comprising

comminuting the solid into particles.

32. The process according to claim 27 or claim 28, wherein the water is removed to a moisture content of less than about 5%.

33. A product produced by the process of claim 27 or claim 28.

34. The product of claim 33, wherein the product is sugar free.

35. A pressed confection or a chewing gum comprising the product of claim 33 or

34.

Description:
TITLE

PROCESSES OF DISPERSING A FLAVOR IN A CONFECTION AND PRODUCTS PRODUCED THEREFROM INVENTORS

Allan Buck

Tom Gottemoller

Travis Nelson

Michael Price

Matt Dyer

Jaco Zeevaart

Jay Mayberry

Tim Chambers

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/145,971, filed April 10, 2015, the contents of the entirety of which are incorporated by this reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0002] The present invention relates generally to confections. More particularly, the present invention relates to processes for dispersing a flavor in a confection and the products produced therefrom.

BACKGROUND

[0003] A wide variety of artificial sweeteners are commercially available. This is, in part, due to an awareness of consumers of the need to reduce sugar consumption. Compared to sugar (sucrose), artificial sweeteners have been developed to be much sweeter while lower in calories, such as aspartame (180 times as sweet) and sucralose (600 times as sweet).

[0004] As described by PCT Application WO2012/042229 Al to Fusion Neutraceuticals Ltd., a problem with many commercially available top artificial sweetener products is that they are produced in granular form by foam spray drying methods, which as a result, leads to those artificial sweetener products fizzing (release of entrapped residual gas from within the hollow spheres formed during the spray drying manufacturing process) when dissolved into a beverage along with leaving a scum (delay in dispersion/dissolution of the artificial sweetener) in the beverage.

[0005] In addition to artificial sweeteners, flavoring ingredients can be added to food and beverage products to increase palatability. As described by US Patent 6,607,778 to Mutka et al., one problem with achieving consistent flavor quality is that many flavoring products include volatile components, which can be lost from the food and beverage products during storage, mixing with other food ingredients, and during food processing such as cooking or baking. As a result, techniques for producing solid essential oil compositions have been developed, relying on the use of carbohydrate matrix materials, especially sucrose, for incorporation of essential oils and flavor ingredients.

[0006] There exists a need for flavoring products which utilize non-traditional sweeteners as well as provide effective release of flavor.

SUMMARY

[0007] In one embodiment, a process for producing a product comprises heating an oligosaccharide to a temperature sufficient to melt the oligosaccharide, thus producing a melted mass, dispersing a flavor in the melted mass, and allowing the melted mass to harden to a solid.

[0008] In a further embodiment, a process for producing a product comprises dissolving an oligosaccharide in water, thus producing a slurry, heating the slurry to a temperature sufficient to melt the oligosaccharide, thus producing a melted mass, dispersing a flavor in the melted mass, and allowing the melted mass to harden to a solid.

[0009] Products produced by the processes of the present invention and uses of the products are further disclosed. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0010] Figure 1 shows sugar free granules produced using one embodiment of the present invention.

[0011] Figure 2 shows incorporation of flavor crystals produced using one embodiment of the present invention into a white chocolate.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0012] Processes for producing products are disclosed. The processes may be used to produce confections such as sugar free granules for incorporation into certain confections, such as pressed confections or chewing gum.

[0013] In one embodiment, a process includes heating an oligosaccharide to a temperature sufficient to melt the oligosaccharide, thus producing a melted mass, dispersing a flavor in the melted mass, and allowing the melted mass to harden to a solid. The process may further include comminuting the solid into particles, mixing a polyol with the oligosaccharide, mixing water with the oligosaccharide before the oligosaccharide melts, mixing a colorant with the oligosaccharide, mixing an emulsifier with the oligosaccharide, sieving any comminuted particles to a desired size, and/or dissolving the oligosaccharide in water.

[0014] In a further embodiment, a process includes dissolving an

oligosaccharide in water, thus producing a slurry, heating the slurry to a temperature sufficient to melt the oligosaccharide, thus producing a melted mass, dispersing a flavor in the melted mass, and allowing the melted mass to harden to a solid. The process may further include mixing a colorant with the slurry, mixing a polyol with the

oligosaccharide, comminuting the solid into particles, and/or reducing a moisture content of the slurry with the heating to a moisture content of less than about 5%.

[0015] In yet a further embodiment, a process includes dissolving an oligosaccharide in water, thus producing a slurry, heating the slurry to a temperature sufficient to boil off some of the water and form a molten mass of the oligosaccharide, dispersing a flavor in the melted mass, and cooling the melted mass to harden to a solid. The process may further include mixing a colorant with the slurry, mixing a polyol with the oligosaccharide in the water, and/or comminuting the solid into particles. [0016] In some embodiments, the processes may be batch processes. In other embodiments, the processes may be continuous processes.

[0017] In one embodiment, the oligosaccharide is maltodextrin. In other embodiments, the oligosaccharide may be FIBERSOL brand maltodextrin,

polydextrose, an isomalto-oligosaccharide, a galacto-oligosaccharide, a soluble corn fiber, an indigestible dextrin, a dextrin, a low dextrose equivalent starch hydrolysate, inulin, fructo-oligosaccharide, oligofructose, or combinations of any thereof. Other oligosaccharides may be used provided that: such oligosaccharide will be molten at an acceptable temperature range to disperse the flavor and/or colorant, yet still cool to form a hard glass; and the oligosaccharide contains sufficiently low mono and/or

disaccharides (i.e., sugars) that can be used in "sugar free" confections (i.e., less than 0.5 grams of sugar per serving) when incorporated into the confection such as a pressed confection or chewing gum.

[0018] In an embodiment, the polyol is sorbitol. In other embodiments, the polyol may be isomalt, erythritol, maltitol, xylitol, mannitol, arabitol, hydrogenated starch hydolysates, or combinations of any thereof. Other polyols may be used provided that: such polyol will be molten at an acceptable temperature range to disperse the flavor and/or colorant, yet still cool to form a hard glass; and the polyol contains sufficiently low mono and/or disaccharides (i.e., sugars) that can be used in "sugar free" confections (i.e., less than 0.5 grams of sugar per serving) when incorporated into the confection such as a pressed confection or chewing gum.

[0019] In one embodiment, the emulsifier may be lecithin. In a further embodiment, the colorant may be blue FD&C #1. In yet a further embodiment, the colorant may be a natural blue colorant. It will be apparent by those of ordinary skill in the art that other emulsifiers or colorants may be used.

[0020] In an embodiment, the flavor is mint oil. In other embodiments, the flavor may be peppermint, spearmint, a fruit flavor (including without limitation citrus, berry, tropical, melon, or fantasy fruit), a butterscotch flavor, a cinnamon flavor, a root beer flavor, a sweet brown flavor (including without limitation vanilla, chocolate, or caramel) herbal, tea, coffee, licorice, energy, savory flavor, other known confection flavoring, or combinations of any thereof. The flavor may be any compound, extract, fraction, or mixture that imparts a flavor, taste, aroma, flavor modulation, taste modulation, and/or trigeminal effect (e.g., cooling, heating, burning, tingling, salivation, or mouthfeel).

[0021] In a further embodiment, other compounds that may be added to the confections of the present invention include, but are not limited to, neutraceuticals, vitamins, minerals, herbal extracts, and/or high intensity sweeteners.

[0022] In yet other embodiments, the batch processes may be achieved similarly to roping and forming of hard candy, wherein the polyol, is combined with water, heated and combined with the oligosaccharide, and folded with the flavor. In some embodiments, the colorant may be added.

[0023] The following exemplary, non-limiting example(s) are provided to further describe the embodiments presented herein. Those having ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that variations of these Examples are possible within the scope of the invention.

[0024] Example 1.

[0025] On a dry basis, 70% maltodextrin (dextrose equivalent of 18) was mixed with 30% sorbitol using a 70% sorbitol solution to produce a slurry. Water was added to the blend in an amount to achieve 70% solids and 30% water. A colorant (blue FD&C #1) was also added to the solution.

[0026] The solution was heated to about 300°F in order to totally dissolve the solids (maltodextrin and sorbitol) and lower the moisture content to about 5%. The molten maltodextrin and sorbitol were poured to cool. During cooling, 5% mint oil and lecithin (to help the mint oil disperse) were added to the molten maltodextrin and sorbitol, and folded into the cooling maltodextrin/sorbitol mass. During the cooling process, the maltodextrin/sorbitol mass goes from a liquid at 300°F to a plastic phase at around 250°F.

[0027] Once the mint oil was thoroughly incorporated into the

maltodextrin/sorbitol mass, the cooling maltodextrin/sorbitol mass was spread out into a thin layer and allowed to solidify, which formed a stable glass like product. The glass like product was milled and sieved to a desired particle size, producing the product shown in FIG. 1. The desired size may be less than about 1 mm.

[0028] The flavor may also be carried by a flavor carrier or substrate to be incorporated into the maltodextrin/sorbitol mass. For instance, the mint oil may be soaked onto or carried by powdered sorbitol or other type of suitable substrate to form a paste, and mixing the paste with the maltodextrin/sorbitol mass.

[0029] Example 2.

[0030] In a continuous process, dry ingredients were mixed to create a molten feed matrix. The equipment used was a 2-inch Readco Continuous Processor, with no back pressure applied to the processor, motor speed set to over 300 rpm (revolutions per minute), amp load = 2.8, Acrison ® feed rate of 290 grams per two minutes, and steam psi (pounds per square inch) range of 50-60 psi.

[0031] The maltodextrin (70% maltodextrin, dextrose equivalent of 18) was dry blended with the crystalline sorbitol (30% crystalline sorbitol). The resultant feed was metered through the Acrison ® feeder at a rate of 0.64 pounds (about 290 grams) per two minutes into a steam jacketed Readco processor. The retention time was about 30 seconds. The molten feed matrix exited the processor at about 125°C to about 130°C.

[0032] Mint oil was directly injected into the molten feed matrix in order to create a product with improved flavor retention. Both 5% mint oil and a combination of mint oil and lecithin (Yelkin ® SS lecithin, a fluid lecithin) were injected into samples of the molten feed matrix. The results are summarized in Table 1 below. All samples were made using the Readco processor. The samples with the Alt. ID 1529201 and 15303-01 contained mint oil without lecithin. The samples with the Alt. ID 15303-02 contained mint oil with lecithin. All samples were milled through a LI A Fitzmill™ comminuter with the following conditions: knifes forward, screen size 0.0156, 3000 rpm. After milling, all samples were screened using a Ro-Tap ® for 1 minute with sieve screens of particle ranges: above 20 mesh (914 microns) and through 20 mesh, above 60 mesh (259 microns). The results listed as percentages are the moisture corrected loss on drying (LOD). The results listed in parentheses are the moisture numbers (Karl Fisher method).

[0033] Table 1 : Results from Injecting Mint Oil into Molten Feed Matrix

15-01866-1 (L) 15303-02 - Unmilled 5.08% (0.60) 5.21 (0.73)

15-01867-1 (L) 15303-02 - > 20 Mesh 4.89% (0.42) 4.22 (0.89)

15-01868-1 (L) 15303-02 - 20 to 60 Mesh 4.58% (0.67) 4.04 (0.90)

15303-02 - < 60 Mesh 4.12% (0.98)

15-01820-1 1529201 - Unmilled 4.52% (0.41) 5.36 (0.51)

15-01821-1 1529201 - > 20 Mesh 4.49% (0.51) 3.86 (1.06)

15-01822-1 1529201 - 20 to 60 Mesh 4.18% (0.73) 3.40 (1.24)

1529201 - < 60 Mesh 4.85%

[0034] In general, the flavor load dropped slightly while the moisture increased in the samples between the testing done in November and the testing done in December. The flavor load was higher, and the moisture was lower, in the samples with bigger particles. The un-milled products of this example generally had the highest flavor load. The addition of lecithin when adding the mint oil to the molten feed matrix improved flavor load and stability.

[0035] Example 3.

[0036] In this batch process, similar to roping and forming hard candy: Add 70%) Sorbitol solution and water into heating pan; Add dye color to the Sorbitol solution and water in the pan; Turn on heat; While 70% Sorbitol solution and water are warming add the Maltodextnn CR18 to the solution and gently stir; As the Maltodextnn CR18 warms stop the stirring; Heat the Maltodextrin product till just before burning in the pan (3 OOF- 148C); Pour the hot Maltodextrin on to a greased cookie sheet and fold back and forth the hot product with a stainless utensil; Continue to fold and work the product; When the product temperature cools down to (230°F- 110°C) form a pocket in the warm product and flavor ingredients; With insulated clean rubber gloves sprayed with food grade (non- sticking grease) fold and rope the product as the color and flavor are mixing in by hand; The finished product will be in a shape of 1 inch diameter and 12 to 18 inches long for 1 lb. of product. The components used for this example are: maltodextrin CR 18 powder, sorbitol (70% solution), water, and color. The flavor components used for this example are lecithin and the flavor.

[0037] The present invention has been described with reference to certain exemplary and illustrative embodiments, processes, products, and uses thereof. However, it will be recognized by persons having ordinary skill in the art that various substitutions, modifications or combinations of any of the exemplary embodiments may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. Thus, the invention is not limited by the description of the exemplary and illustrative embodiments, but rather by the appended claims.