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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
RADIATOR VALVE AND TOOLS FOR SEALING RADIATOR VALVES
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1998/019089
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The invention concerns a radiator valve (1) with a housing (2, 3), a closure element (5) movable in the axial direction (6) towards or away from a valve seat (4) and a tappet (8) movable in the axial direction, which is led to the outside through an opening (9) in the housing (2), by which the opening (9) is sealed through by sealing (10) arranged in the housing (2) and enclosing the tappet (8). On one hand the embodiment of a valve of this kind must be simple, on the other hand it must enable inexpensive and simple repairing when leakages occur. For this purpose sealing room (12) surrounding the tappet (8) is arranged outside the housing (2), in which an additional sealing (16) can be placed. The housing (2) has a projection (14) providing a fixing for a sealing holder (17).

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Inventors:
Larsen, Arne B�rge (Hvedev�nget 1, Virring, Skanderborg, DK-8660, DK)
Larsen, Hans Erik (Lin� Bygade 32, Silkeborg, DK-8600, DK)
Application Number:
PCT/DK1997/000487
Publication Date:
May 07, 1998
Filing Date:
October 29, 1997
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
Danfoss, A/s (Nordborg, DK-6430, DK)
Larsen, Arne B�rge (Hvedev�nget 1, Virring, Skanderborg, DK-8660, DK)
Larsen, Hans Erik (Lin� Bygade 32, Silkeborg, DK-8600, DK)
International Classes:
F16K41/04; (IPC1-7): F16K41/04
Foreign References:
CH608286A51978-12-29
DE3246446A11983-08-11
CH579735A51976-09-15
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Danfoss, A/s (Patent Dept, Nordborg, DK-6430, DK)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Patent Claims
1. Radiator valve with a housing, a closure element mov able in the axial direction towards or away from a valve seat and a tappet movable in the axial direction, which is led to the outside through an opening in the housing, by which the opening is sealed through a seal ing arranged in the housing and enclosing the tappet, characterised in that a sealing room (12) surrounding the tappet (8) is arranged on the outside of the hous ing (2), in which an additional sealing (16) can be placed, and that the housing (2) has a projection (14, 36, 37, 43) providing a fixing for a sealing holder (17, 31, 40).
2. Valve according to claim 1, characterised in that a housing insert (2) is arranged in and protruding to wards the outside from an external housing (3), by which the projection is arranged in the protruding (13) area.
3. Valve according to one of the claims 1 or 2, character ised in that the projection (14, 36, 37, 43) has a sur face with a component arranged vertically to the axial direction (6).
4. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 3, character ised in that the sealing holder (17, 31, 40) is arrest able through a movement in one plane, to which the ax ial direction (6) is lying vertically.
5. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 4, character ised in that the sealing holder (17) is made as a pin arrangement, fixable in a corresponding opening ar rangement (14) in the housing (2) forming the projec tion.
6. Valve according to claim 5, characterised in that the pin arrangement is made as a Ushaped split pin.
7. Valve according to claim 5 or 6, characterised in that a supporting disc (24) is arranged between the pin ar rangement and the additional sealing (16).
8. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 4, character ised in that the sealing holder (31) is made as a disc with radially extending projections (32), by which the projection (36, 37) has a first section (36) in the housing, in which a first recess is provided, running substantially in the axial direction (6), and a second section (37), in which a second recess is provided, ex tending across said second section and being covered, at least partly, in the axial direction.
9. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 4, character ised in that the sealing holder (40) is shaped as a ring with sections (41) yielding radially outwards.
10. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 4, charac terised in that the sealing holder (44) is made as a resilient ring.
11. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 4, charac terised in that part of the housing is resilient, and the sealing holder is a plate engaging behind this part.
12. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 11, charac terised in that the additional sealing (16) is fixed on the sealing holder (31, 40) by means of a nonheat re sistant adhesive.
13. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 12, charac terised in that the additional sealing (16) is made as an Oring.
14. Valve according to one of the claims 1 to 13, charac terised in that the outer end of the opening (9) com prises a lubricant storage chamber (15) open towards the outside.
15. Tool for the sealing of a radiator valve according to one of the claims 1 to 14, characterised in that an ad ditional sealing (16) is arranged on a first slide (23) movable in the axial direction.
16. Tool according to claim 15, characterised in that a pin arrangement is arranged on a second slide (25) mov able across the first slide (23).
17. Tool according to claim 15, characterised in that the width of the first slide (23) is reduced in a direction across the movement directions of the two slides (23, 25).
18. Tool according to one of the claims 15 to 17, charac terised in that a lubricant storage is provided the first slide (23).
19. Tool according to one of the claims 16 to 18, charac terised in that the second slide is shaped as a sledge (29) mounted displaceably on a tool housing (30).
20. Tool according to one of the claims 15 to 19, charac terised in that the tool is made of plastic.
21. Tool according to one of the claims 15 to 20, charac terised in that a wall (38) surrounding the slide (47) narrows to a funnel shape.
Description:
Radiator valve and tools for sealing radiator valves The invention concerns a radiator valve with a housing, a closure element movable in the axial direction towards or away from a valve seat and a tappet movable in the axial direction, which is led to the outside through an opening in the housing, by which the opening is sealed through a sealing arranged in the housing and enclosing the tappet.

Such radiator valves must be operable from the outside, e.g. by means of a thermostatic element or another operat- ing element. For this purpose the tappet is displaced from the outside. It is either fixedly connected with or lying adjacent to the closure element. In the opening direction the closure element is normally loaded by a spring.

The opening through which the tappet is protruding from the housing is often a weak point. In case of sealing failure, water may escape to the outside through this opening.

Therefore, this sealing is often made double, e.g. by using two O-rings or round cord sealing rings arranged after each other between tappet and housing. When one sealing is dam- aged, the second sealing is still there to prevent the escape of water.

However, the fixing of two sealings is expensive for the construction, thus increasing the production costs. When, on the contrary, only one sealing ring is provided, it must be arranged in a way that it is easy to replace. However, this also requires measures, which make the production of the valve more expensive. Besides, the replacement of the sealing ring is also rather expensive, and should thus be avoided. Further, a replaceable sealing ring requires ac- cess from the outside. However, this access makes it diffi- cult to make the valve construction tight with simple means.

Thus it is the task of the invention to provide a valve, which is easy to produce and involves less problems at the occurrence of a leakage.

In a radiator valve as mentioned in the introduction, this is solved in that a sealing room surrounding the tappet is arranged on the outside of the housing, in which an addi- tional sealing can be placed, and that the housing has a projection providing a fixing for a sealing holder.

When the valve gets leaky, i.e. water is escaping past the tappet, an additional sealing can easily be fixed. For this purpose two features are provided, which enable a fast and unproblematic fixing of the additional sealing. Firstly, a sealing room is provided, in which the sealing can be placed. Due to the sealing room, the additional sealing is placed in the correct position. Secondly, the housing is made so that a sealing holder can be fixed. This sealing holder retains the additional sealing, also against fluid which is pressed out. According to the invention, it is thus possible to use a relatively simple radiator valve with only one internal sealing ring. In many cases, this sealing ring will last for the whole life of the valve. In case that it gets leaky, the valve can be sealed from the outside requiring no dismounting or mounting measures. The valve can remain on the radiator. Production costs will be saved, as only one sealing ring is required. Valves remain- ing tight will require no further measures anyway. Only the valves which actually get leaky will require additional costs, meaning that statistically the total costs will reduce. Of course, also the new sealing ring can become leaky. However, it can be reached from the outside, and can thus be replaced.

In a preferred embodiment a housing insert is arranged in and protruding towards the outside from an external hous- ing, by which the projection is arranged in the protruding area. This gives improved access to the place for the fix- ing of the additional sealing. When the sealing holder must not be fixed from the same side as the sealing, but from a direction displaced by 90°, the placing of the additional sealing in the housing insert also facilitates the fixing of the sealing holder, as the housing insert then has a smaller diameter, and the travel of the sealing holder in the housing is shorter.

Preferably, the projection has a surface with a component arranged vertically to the axial direction. Thus the seal- ing holder is retained in the housing by form fitting, and the sealing cannot be pressed out.

Preferably, the sealing holder is arrestable through a movement in one plane, to which the axial direction is lying vertically. Thus the sealing holder can be moved immediately under the surface of the projection, causing stable conditions to rule immediately after the fixing.

Here it is especially preferred that the sealing holder is made as a pin arrangement, fixable in a corresponding open- ing arrangement in the housing forming the projection. The insertion of the pin arrangement, i.e. one or more pins, across the axial direction of the housing requires only little effort. Thus the additional sealing is arrested in the housing. The pins of the pin arrangement may be barbed to impede or prevent the drawing out, or they can be fixed in the housing by press fitting.

In this connection it is especially preferred that the pin arrangement is made as a U-shaped split pin. Thus two pins can be fixed simultaneously. The U-shape secures that the pins are not pressed through, as in the fixed state the bottom of the U rests on the housing and prevents a further pressing in. However, normally two pins will be sufficient to hold the additional sealing.

It is also advantageous to arrange a supporting disc be- tween the pin arrangement and the additional sealing. The forces exerted on the sealing by the sealing holder can then be equalised.

In an alternative embodiment it is provided that the seal- ing holder is made as a disc with radially extending pro- jections, by which the projection has a first section in the housing, in which a first recess is provided, running substantially in the axial direction, and a second section, in which a second recess is provided, extending across said second section and being covered, at least partly, in the axial direction. The projections of the disc, having in the middle a hole for the tappet, can then be fixed in the first recess and be moved towards the sealing in the axial direction. As soon as a certain depth has been reached, in which the projections reach below the cover of the second recess, the disc can be turned. I.e. the disc is fixed in the housing with a sort of bayonet lock, and then retains the additional sealing. In this connection it is advanta- geous that if one component is sufficient, an additional supporting disc is no longer required. Torque application means may be provided in the disc, e.g. holes, to enable a turning of the disc in the suppressed state. Like other sealing holders, the disc will be pressed outwards by the elasticity of the additional sealing, and is therefore fixed in the housing. This embodiment is especially advan- tageous in limited spaces, where the valve can only be reached axially.

In a third embodiment it may be provided that the sealing holder is shaped as a ring with sections yielding radially outwards. In this case the housing must be made with a corresponding recess. Thus the ring can simply be pressed onto the additional sealing and thus engages in the hous- ing. In fact this is the most simple fixing opportunity.

Also here the space requirement for fixing is small. Only an axial movement is required.

In a fourth alternative embodiment the sealing holder can be made as a resilient ring. For the fixing, the ring is compressed to reduce its diameter. After fixing in the recess the ring reexpands. Also here an access is only required in the axial direction. Parts customary in the trade can be used.

Finally, part of the housing can be made resilient, and the sealing holder is then simply a plate. This plate is then fixed axially and engages behind the resilient housing parts.

Advantageously, the additional sealing is fixed on the sealing holder by means of a non-heat resistant adhesive.

This facilitates fixing, as additional sealing and sealing holder can be axially displaced and fixed together. During operation, when the valve gets hot, the connection between additional sealing and sealing holder dissolves(???).

Preferably the additional sealing is an O-ring. Such seal- ings are also called round cord sealing rings. They can be arranged relatively tight around the tappet and are thus easy to fix.

In a preferred embodiment the outer end of the opening comprises a lubricant storage chamber open towards the outside. This lubricant storage chamber may be filled with grease or another lubricant. However, this lubricant may already be available on fixing the additional sealing. In this case it serves the purpose of lubricating the tappet and thus of relieving the sealing inside the housing of frictional forces. However, it is especially advantageous to fill this storage chamber for the first time or again on or shortly before the fixing of the additional sealing, in order to facilitate the tappet movement in relation to the additional sealing. This embodiment prevents a too high increase in the operational force due to the fixing of the additional sealing.

The invention also concerns a tool for the sealing of a radiator valve by which an additional sealing is arranged on a first slide movable in the axial direction.

Such a tool enables the sealing of a leaky valve at low cost. The tool is placed on the leaky valve. The first slide is operated. As the additional sealing is arranged on this slide, e.g. on the front, the additional sealing is thus pushed onto the tappet and into the sealing room.

In a preferred embodiment the tool has a pin arrangement on a second slide movable across the first slide. The first slide retains the additional sealing in the valve. Then the second slide is operated, and the pin arrangement, e.g. the U-shaped split pin mentioned above, is pushed into the housing across the first slide. Thus the sealing is se- cured. As it is not necessary for the second slide to in- trude the valve, the tool can be removed from the valve immediately after this operation. The complete auxiliary sealing arrangement, i.e. the additional sealing, the seal- ing holder and the support disc, if any, can be pre- installed in the tool. As often small parts are concerned here, this will facilitate the handling. Their position is automatically set correctly. This especially applies when the housing is unsymmetrically shaped, so that the tool can only be placed in a predetermined angle position.

Preferably, the width of the first slide is reduced in a direction across the movement directions of the two slides.

Thus the first slide can press the sealing into the sealing room and hold it there, while the pin arrangement can be pushed sidewards past it.

Advantageously, a lubricant storage is provided on the first slide. On fixing the lubricant is then brought into the valve.

Advantageously, the second slide is shaped as a sledge mounted displaceably on a tool housing. This especially enables the installation of a U-shaped split pin.

Preferably the tool is made of plastic. The production is then relatively cheap and it can be made as a one way tool.

In the following the invention is described on the basis drawings of a preferred embodiment, showing.

Fig. 1. a schematic section through a radiator valve Fig. 2. a schematic presentation from 3 sides of a part of the radiator valve with mounting tool for an addi- tional sealing, partly as section Fig. 3. a second embodiment of the tool Fig. 4. a third embodiment for fixing the additional sealing Fig. 5. a fourth embodiment for fixing the additional sealing Fig. 6. a fifth embodiment A radiator valve 1 has a housing with a housing insert 2 and an external housing 3. A valve seat 4 and a closing element 5, movable in the axial direction 6 towards or away from the valve seat, are arranged in the housing. The move- ment away from the valve seat 4 is effected by way of a pressure spring 7, and towards the valve seat by way of the pressure from a tappet, led through an opening 9 in the housing insert.

The opening 9 is sealed with an O-ring 10 or a round cord sealing ring, arranged inside 11 the housing. It surrounds the tappet 8 sealingly. When a water pressure is building up inside 11 the housing 2, 3, the O-ring 10 is pressed against both the tappet 8 and the inside of the housing insert 2, and thus seals the opening 9.

During operation, after numerous movements of the tappet 8, a leak may occur, e.g. when the O-ring 10 is worn locally.

In this case water or another heating fluid will penetrate to the outside along the tappet 8 through the opening 9.

For such a case, measures have now been taken on the radia- tor valve 1.

A sealing chamber 12 is provided around the tappet 8 in the housing insert 2. The sealing chamber 12 is also surrounded by the housing insert 2. For this purpose the housing in- sert has a projecting part 13 protruding from the external housing 3. Bores 14 are provided in this projecting part 13. The purpose is explained below in connection with the figures 2 and 3.

Further, a lubricant storage room 15 is provided between the sealing chamber 12 and the opening 9, in which a lubri- cant, e.g. grease, can be arranged. A movement of the tap- pet 8 in the axial direction 6 will cause some lubricant to adhere to the tappet, so that the O-ring 10 is only exposed to a minimum of friction.

Besides, the tappet 8 can be operated from the outside in the commonly known way, e.g. by means of a thermostatic operating element.

If the valve 1 should start leaking, an additional sealing 16 can be arranged in the sealing chamber 12, for which purpose the tool 21 shown in fig. 2 is used. To prevent this additional sealing 16 from being pressed out of the sealing chamber again, when axial forces, e.g. friction forces from the tappet or pressure from emerging water, should occur, a sealing holder 17 can be inserted in the bores 14. This sealing holder can be in the form of a pin arrangement, e.g. two parallel pins 18, 19 connected with each other to an U-shape by means of a basis 20 (fig. 2d).

In this case, the sealing holder 17 forms a U-shaped split pin.

As the handling of relatively small parts, like additional sealing 16 and sealing holder 17, especially in connection with a possibly hot radiator valve, can be rather diffi- cult, the tool 21 is provided, which can be used for the fixing of these parts. The tool 21 has a housing 22, in which a first slide 23 is arranged so that it is movable in the axial direction. The additional sealing 16 is arranged on the slide 23, if necessary through the insertion of a support ring 24. A lubricant supply, not shown, e.g. a small piece of grease may be arranged at the bottom of the additional sealing 16.

Further, a second slide 25 is arranged in the housing 22, which slide is slidable across the movement direction of the first slide 23. The sealing holder 17 is arranged on the slide 25. The fact that a part is arranged on slide 23 or 25 means that it is positioned in the housing 22 in a way that it moves when slide 23 or 25 moves, and is pressed out of the housing 22 in the desired direction.

To make sure that the split pin forming the sealing holder 17 hits the bores 14, the protruding part 13 of the housing insert 2 is flattened on one side, i.e. it has a bearing surface 26 corresponding to a similar opposing surface of the housing 22.

As appears from a comparison of figs. 2a and 2c with fig.

2b, the first slide 23 has a reduced width in a direction being vertical to the movement direction of both slides 23, 25. In the movement direction of the second slide 25, the first slide 23 has, at least with the part entering the housing 22, approximately a width corresponding to the diameter of the sealing chamber 12. For this purpose, it has a recess 27 in the middle, with which it can be pushed onto the tappet 8. Transversely, however, the first slide 23 is thinner, so that it fits between the two pins of the split pin shaped sealing holder 17.

Now, the insertion of an additional sealing in a leaking valve is relatively simple. The housing 22 of the tool 21 is placed on the protruding part 13 of the housing insert 2 and adjusted to the correct angle position by means of the bearing surface 26. Then the first slide 23 is moved in the axial direction. It then pushes the additional sealing 16 and the support ring 24 into the sealing chamber 12, by which also grease as lubricant, if any, can be passed into the lubricant store 15. The first slide is kept depressed or remains in the depressed position due to friction forces. Then the second slide 25 is activated and pushes the split pin shaped sealing holder 17 with its two pins 18, 19 into the bores 14, until the basis 20 rests against the protruding part 13 of the housing insert 2. The bores 14 in the housing insert 2 are at least so deep that the sealing holder in fig. 2b is anchored in the housing insert 2 to the right and to the left of the sealing chamber 12.

This gives a very stable position of the additional sealing 16 in the sealing chamber 12. Also when axial forces occur, the additional sealing 16 can no longer be displaced from the sealing chamber 12.

Even with depressed slides 23, 25, the tool 21 can be re- moved from the valve 1. The housing 22 can be made of plas- tic, so that the tool 21 as a whole is a one-way unit.

Fig. 3 shows a modified embodiment, in which a different tool 28 is used. The same parts have the same reference numbers as in figs. 1 and 2. Compared with the embodiment according to fig. 2, the change is that the second slide 25 is made as a sledge 29 movable on the housing 30 across the movement direction of the first slide 23. The sealing holder 17 is arranged in the carriage 29 in the form of a split pin. The mode of operation is like that of the tool 21 in fig. 2. After fitting and operating the first slide 23, the carriage 29 is displaced in the direction of the first slide 23, so that the split pin can enter the bores 14 as sealing holder 17.

The bores 14 are not supposed to having circular sections, and also the pins 18 and 19 should not be round. It is not even necessary that the section shapes of the pins 18, 19 correspond to those of the bores 14. It is only required that the pins 18, 19 fit into the bores 14 and there find an abutment in the axial direction. Then the additional sealing 16 can be secured in the sealing chamber 12 by a movement of the sealing holder 17 across the axial direc- tion of the sealing chamber 12.

In fig. 4 a modified embodiment is used. In this connection fig. 4b shows a section A-A and fig. 4c shows a section B-B according to fig. 4a. A disc 31 with at least two radially protruding projections 32 (fig. 4d) is used to retain the additional sealing, not shown here, in the sealing chamber 12. This disc has a hole 33 in the middle, through which the tappet 8 fits. In the remaining ring several holes 34 are provided, with which a turning tool can engage. This tool can also be used to push the disc and the additional sealing axially into the housing insert. For this purpose the additional sealing may be fixed on the disc 31 by means of a non-heat resistant adhesive to facilitate the fixing.

During operation, when the valve gets hot, the adhesive will dissolve, and the disc becomes independent of the additional sealing, thus only retaining it in the axial direction.

A comparison of figs. 4b and 4d shows that the disc 31 fits into the modified housing insert 35, having for this pur- pose the same sectional shape as the disc 31. It can be seen that the housing insert 35 has cut-outs 36 in the shape of a recess in the axial direction, viz. one for each projection 32. Thus the disc 31 can be inserted in the housing insert 35 in a certain angle position, and then be pushed down in this position, i.e. in the direction of the sealing space 12. When a certain depth has been reached, the cut-out 36 goes into a second part 37, running in the axial direction, and at least partly covered in the axial direction, e.g. by a housing part 38. When the disc 31 is turned in this depth, e.g. by 90°, the projections 32 will get under the housing part 38. The disc 31 is then re- tained. In this embodiment an additional support disc can be avoided, as the sealing ring is supported by the disc 31.

As appears from figs. 4b and c, a tool positioning required for this purpose can also be made in that the housing in- sert 35 has a positioning projection 39.

Finally, fig. 5 shows a further alternative, by which the additional sealing 16 is held by a sealing holder 40, hav- ing sections 41 yielding radially outwards, with the sup- port ring 24 as washer. For this purpose the housing insert 42 has corresponding relief cut-outs 43. Thus the fixing can simply be made in that the additional sealing 16, the support ring 24 and the sealing holder 40 are pushed for- ward in the axial direction until the resilient sections 41 engage behind the relief cut-outs 43.

Fig. 6 shows a different embodiment in which the sealing holder 44 is made as a resilient ring. Fig. 6a corresponds the view of fig. 4c, by which, for convenience, recesses 45 have been introduced, which can be inserted in the projec- tions 46 in the resilient ring 44. For the fitting the tool 46 shown in fig. 6d is provided, in which the resilient ring 44 is arranged on a tappet 47. The support ring 24 and the additional sealing 16 are also fixed in the tool. The opening, in which the tappet 47 is arranged, narrows with a conical or funnel-shaped wall 48 in the direction of the valve. When the tappet 47 is pressed downwards, the resil- ient ring 44 is compressed radially and can then enter the opening 49 on the valve. As soon as it reaches the relief cut-outs 43, it yields radially outwards, and the addi- tional sealing 16 is retained in the valve.