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Title:
RAZOR HANDLE WITH MOVABLE MEMBERS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/191178
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A handle for a shaving razor in which the handle comprises a frame and a movable member assembly operably coupled to the frame such that the frame is disposed between the movable member assembly and where the movable member assembly upper and lower portions are configured to move both above and below the frame. The movement can be linear or rotational. The movable member assembly comprises one or more springs.

Inventors:
JOHNSON, Robert, Harold (One Gillette Park, Boston, MA, 02127, US)
BAUER, Matthew, Stephen (One Procter & Gamble Plaza, Cincinnati, OH, 45202, US)
WASHINGTON, Jack, Anthony (One Gillette Park, Boston, MA, 02127, US)
BASSETT, Charles, James (One Gillette Park, Boston, MA, 02127, US)
RAMM, Christopher (One Gillette Park, Boston, MA, 02127, US)
BOURQUE, Steven, Michael (One Gillette Park, Boston, MA, 02127, US)
BRIDGES, Kelly, Daniel (One Gillette Park, Boston, MA, 02127, US)
PATEL, Ashok, Bakul (One Gillette Park, Boston, MA, 02127, US)
LITTERST, Christian, Arnold (Frankfurter Strasse 145, Kronberg, Kronberg, DE)
ZEGULA, Christoph (Frankfurter Strasse 145, Kronberg, Kronberg, DE)
Application Number:
US2019/024204
Publication Date:
October 03, 2019
Filing Date:
March 27, 2019
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
THE GILLETTE COMPANY LLC (One Gillette Park, Boston, MA, 02127, US)
International Classes:
B26B21/40; B26B21/52
Domestic Patent References:
WO1997037819A21997-10-16
Foreign References:
US7197825B22007-04-03
US20170173806A12017-06-22
US20120311865A12012-12-13
US9498892B22016-11-22
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KREBS, Jay, A. (Global IP ServicesOne Procter & Gamble Plaza, C, Cincinnati OH, 45202, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed is:

1. A method of manufacturing a razor structure comprising the steps of:

a) providing a rigid member;

b) providing an upper portion and a lower portion;

c) securing said upper portion to said lower portion within said rigid member, said rigid member extends between said upper portion and said lower portion.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein said rigid member further comprises a rigid member location feature.

3. The method of claim 1 or 2 wherein in said securing step (c) an element of the upper portion, an element of the lower portion, or a combination thereof, pass through or around said rigid member location feature.

4. The method of any of claims 1 to 3 wherein said upper portion comprises one or more upper elements or said lower portion comprises one or more lower elements, or both said upper and lower portions comprise one or more elements.

5. The method of any preceding claim wherein said upper portion comprises one or more

location features, said lower portion comprises one or more location features, or both upper and lower portions comprise one or more location features.

6. The method of any preceding claim wherein said rigid member, said upper and lower

portions each comprise one or more location features.

7. The method of any preceding claim wherein said location features are substantially similarly shaped.

8. The method of any preceding claim wherein said location features comprise an aperture, a slot, one or more protrusions, or any combination thereof.

9. The method of any preceding claim further comprising, after step (c), the step (e) of aligning rigid member location features with upper and lower portion location features.

10. The method of any preceding claim wherein said securing step (c) further comprises

mechanical engagement, chemical engagement, frictional engagement, or any combination thereof.

11. The method of any preceding claim wherein said frictional engagement comprises ultrasonic welding, said mechanical engagement comprises snap-fitting, and said chemical engagement comprises gluing.

12. The method of any preceding claim wherein said upper portion, said lower portion, or combination thereof comprises a spring mechanism, wherein said spring mechanism comprises a spring member, further comprising, prior to step (c), the step (d) of mounting said spring member to said rigid member, to said upper or lower portion, or any combination thereof.

13. The method of any preceding claim wherein said spring member is a loop shape spring or a V-shaped spring.

14. The method of any preceding claim wherein at least one or more elements of said upper or lower portions do not move relative to the rigid member, one or more elements of said upper portion and one or more elements of said lower portion move relative to each other, or any combination thereof.

15. The method of any preceding claim wherein said razor structure is a razor handle; said rigid member comprises a rigid member platform having a width to thickness ratio from about 7 to about 60, said rigid member comprising one or more metals, impact resistant alloys, metal diecast alloys, glass reinforced polymers, plastic, glass, stainless steels, or combinations thereof.

Description:
RAZOR HANDLE WITH MOVABLE MEMBERS

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention generally relates to handles for razors, more particularly to handles with movable portions.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Since the invention of the safety razor in the l850’s, four main design architectures of razors- the safety razor, the disposable edge safety razor, the modern cartridge system razor, and the disposable razor - have dominated the market. During this time, both the razor handle and the razor cartridge/blade provide benefits to the shaver.

In the last fifty years, the premium wet shave market has been dominated razors using replaceable cartridges, which are the only component that touches the skin during shaving. The consumer benefits of these cartridge razors have been limited to mainly safety, convenience, ergonomics, and/or control of blade geometry and have been driven mainly by improvement to the cartridges.

Handles for razors that use replaceable cartridges have improved by better ergonomics of handle grips, better cartridge attachment and detachment mechanisms, and the utilization of multiple axes of rotation of the cartridge relative to the handle. Typically, these improvements require additional components, including some of them that have prescribed motion. These additional components often require tight tolerances with little room for error. As a result, current approaches introduce complexities, costs, and durability issues for manufacturing, assembling, and using such razors.

Additionally, recent advances in shaving razor handles that use replaceable cartridges have enabled the delivery of other consumer experiential benefits from the handle close to or onto the shaved surface. Such razor handles include liquid dispensing razors and heated razors. Most of these razor handles have been adapted to fit cartridges like those currently manufactured for existing premium system handles. These handle and cartridge systems have many disadvantages, including being expensive to manufacture - e.g. need heating elements in the cartridge and having poor handle ergonomics and shave performance due to the interfaces between handle and cartridge and the large contact area of shaving surfaces. What is needed, then, is a better design or architecture of a cartridge and a razor handle system that enables good core shaving performance, good product integrity and safety, multiple axes of cartridge motion relative to the handle, easy attachment and detachment of cartridge from the razor handle, and simple, reliable, and cost-effective manufacturing when compared to existing razors. Such a design architecture would apply to both powered and unpowered razors suitable for wet or dry shaving and to both durable and disposable razor handles. Such a design may also apply to razors that delivery of benefits from the handle close to or onto the skin.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a manufacturing a razor structure including the steps of providing a rigid member, providing an upper portion and a lower portion, securing the upper portion to the lower portion within the rigid member, the extends between the upper portion and the lower portion.

The rigid member includes a rigid member location feature. In the securing step, an element of the upper portion, an element of the lower portion, or a combination thereof, pass through or around the rigid member location feature. The upper portion includes one or more upper elements or the lower portion includes one or more lower elements, or both the upper and lower portions comprise one or more elements. The upper portion includes one or more upper portion location features, the lower portion includes one or more lower portion location features, or both upper and lower portions comprise one or more location features.

The rigid member, the upper and lower portions each comprise one or more location features. The at least one or more elements of the upper or lower portions do not move relative to the rigid member. The one or more elements of the upper portion and one or more elements of the lower portion move relative to each other. An element of the upper portion moves and the lower portion is stationary. One or more elements of the upper portion can move relative to each other. The movement is a first movement, a second movement type or both. The one or more elements of the lower portion move relative to each other.

Unless otherwise defined, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. Although methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can be used in the practice or testing of the present invention, suitable methods and materials are described below. All publications, patent applications, patents, and other references mentioned herein are incorporated by reference in their entirety. In case of conflict, the present specification, including definitions, will control. In addition, the materials, methods, and examples are illustrative only and not intended to be limiting.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description, and from the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

While the specification concludes with claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter which is regarded as forming the present invention, it is believed that the invention will be better understood from the following description which is taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which like designations are used to designate substantially identical elements, and in which:

FIG. 1 A is a perspective bottom view of a shaving razor in accordance with an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 1B is a perspective top view of a front of the shaving razor of FIG. 1 A;

FIG. 1C is a front view of a blade cartridge unit shown in FIG. 1A and 1B;

FIGs. 1D-1E are graphical schematics of the handle and the blade cartridge unit of the present invention;

FIGs. 1F-1H are schematic layouts of axes of motion in a perspective view of a razor of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective top view of an embodiment of a handle of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a perspective bottom view of the handle of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective top view of an alternate embodiment of a razor of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective bottom view of the razor of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a close-up view of a proximal end of a handle of the present invention;

FIG. 7A is a perspective top view of an embodiment of a handle of the present invention;

FIG. 7B is an exploded view of a razor of FIG. 7A;

FIG. 8A is a perspective top view of an embodiment of a handle of the present invention;

FIG. 8B is an exploded view of a razor of FIG. 8A; FIG. 9A is a perspective top view of a portion of a frame of a handle according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 9B is a perspective bottom view of FIG. 9A;

FIG. 9C is an exploded view of FIG. 9A;

FIG. 9D is a close-up side view of a portion of the proximal end of a handle of the present invention;

FIG. 9E is a close-up side view of a portion of the proximal end of a handle of the present invention;

FIG. 9F is an exploded view of an embodiment of a movable member assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 10 depicts lower elements of the movable member assembly of FIG. 9F;

FIGs. 11A-11B depict an upper element of the movable member assembly of FIG. 9F;

FIG. 12 depicts a portion of the movable member assembly of the present invention;

FIGs. 13A-13B depicts schematic views of embodiments of a frame of the present invention;

FIGs. 14A-14F depicts schematic views of an embodiment of a rigid member platform of FIGs. 7 A and 7B;

FIGs. 15A-15G depicts schematic views of an embodiment of a rigid member platform of FIGs. 8 A and 8B;

FIGs. 16A-16D depicts schematic views of embodiments of location features and their use in accordance with the present invention;

FIGs. 17A-24B depicts a process of assembly of a portion of a handle according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIGs. 25A-25D shows schematic representations of a trapezoidal prism-shaped element of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Except as otherwise noted, the articles“a,”“an,” and“the” mean“one or more.”

The present invention described herein involves a novel razor structure and method of manufacturing such structure. The razor structure relates to the layering of functional components, and the layering of one or movable members and assemblies, above and below, a member of the handle that is made from a more rigid material than other portions of the handle. Preferably, this rigid member forms a relatively thin and wide section of the handle at least one or more of the functional assemblies above the rigid member are connected directly to the member below through holes, openings or o a thin and relatively wide section of the razor handle. This thin and relatively wide section of the razor handle is typically more rigid than other large components in the handle through choice of material and design. Functional assemblies of components such as cartridge eject mechanisms and pivot mechanism can be attached above and below this rigid member.

Existing razor designs place functional components within an internal cavity of a rigid component of the razor handle. The advantage of the present invention’s layering of functional components and assemblies above and below a relatively wide and relatively thin rigid member over existing razors includes the ability to incorporate large and more complex functional components within those functional components and to manufacture razors with a larger variety of improved consumer benefits in a simple, reliable, and cost-effective manner.

This razor structure is also advantageous in providing consumers with a safe product with good product integrity in case of accidental drops. Most existing handles weight less than 56 grams and the majority weight less than 40 grams. As handles become more complex and more premium in market tier, they tend to weigh more. The razor structure of the present invention is well suited for handles that are two to three times heavier than most razors commonly found on the market, specifically handles from about 57 grams to about 150 grams and preferably about 80 grams. Such a handle is considered a“heavy” handle in the present invention.

The razor structure and methods of manufacturing the razor structure of the present invention are also advantageous for non- limiting embodiments of razors described herein that can provide benefits to a consumer’s skin using a razor handle, where the razor handle has a skin interconnect member through which benefits can be provided and such that the skin interconnect member is in a pivotal relationship to the main body of the handle. This skin interconnect member can be joined or fixed to the razor cartridge.

Other embodiments of razor structures and methods of manufacturing are contemplated in the present invention such as those without skin interconnect members or pivoting mechanisms.

The movable member or portion of the present invention is desirably disposed on a razor structure or a component of a razor, preferably a handle. The“main body” of the handle as used herein signifies the razor handle of the present invention without the skin interconnect member 22. As shown in FIG. 2, the main body 16 includes a handle main section 21 and a handle transition section 23. The handle transition section and a handle main section are coupled together to form a majority of the main body of the handle. The handle transition section 23 can include a skin interconnect member 22 which may not be part of the main body. The handle main section can comprise a longitudinal section of the handle.

A“movable member” or“movable member assembly” as used herein signifies a member comprised of one or more portions on the razor which are capable of moving or providing a motion functionality for the razor. For instance, the movable member of the present invention may preferably comprise portions which provide a pivot mechanism or a release or ejection mechanism.

The term“spring”,“spring mechanism”, or“spring member” as used herein, signifies any type of mechanical spring, such as a compression spring, a leaf spring, or any feasible spring or combination thereof. A spring member of the present invention generally has a loop shape. The term“loop” as used herein signifies a generally curved, circular shape, which may form a loop. Non-limiting loops of the present invention comprise oval, circular, elliptical, ring shape, substantially a V-shape, tear drop shape, or any modification or combination thereof. The loop may be split and the loop itself, the end portions or distal ends of the loop can be unconnected or free, unsupported, connected or mounted, or overlap each other. The distal ends can be facing towards each other or can be facing away from each other. A loop spring member of the present invention, when straightened, desirably has an overall length of about 30 mm to about 90 mm.

The spring mechanism of the present invention is based on an interaction between the portions of the movable member assembly (whether disposed on the cartridge or the handle of the razor) and the spring member. During the pivot or eject functions, the spring member offers a resistance that is a function of its preload compression, its geometry and material, and the geometry of the carrier structure, and depending on the intensiveness of that resistance, the effect will be larger or smaller.

The term“rigid member” as used herein signifies a member comprised of a hard metal that can include a rigid member platform. The terms frame and rigid member of the present invention can be used interchangeably herein. However, a secondary frame is generally not a part of the rigid member of the present invention. The rigid member can be a longitudinal portion in a handle main section. The rigid member platform can accommodate a movable member assembly with one or more movable members disposed thereon or therethrough. The frame 18 is desirably comprised of a hard metal. The hard metal may be comprised of a diecast material. A nonlimiting example of a diecast material of the present invention is zinc. Die-cast zinc materials include ZAMACK3, ZAMACK5, and ZA8. Other suitable materials include glass fiber reinforced plastics such as IXEF, stainless steel, aluminum, aluminum diecast, and magnesium diecast. The rigid member or frame may be comprised of one material, preferably a strong metal, but may be formed as two bodies that are then connected. In this case, it is preferable that the rigid member platform is made of hard metal that is necessarily harder than that of the rest of the frame.

The rigid member platform of the present invention can be a section of the rigid member having a wide and thin profile relative to the overall rigid member. The movable member assembly can be mounted above and below the rigid member platform. In the present invention, a maximum width to median thickness ratio of the platform itself is about 7 to 60, and preferably about 20. The median thickness of the platform ranges from about 0.5 mm to about 2.5 mm, and preferably about 1 mm. The area of the rigid member platform including the area from features such as openings and pockets ranges from about 50 mm 2 to about 700 mm 2 , and is preferably about 300 mm 2 . The rigid member platform has a hydraulic diameter, (e.g., in standard engineering this diameter can be defined as about four times the area divided by the perimeter) from about 8mm to about 50 mm, and preferably about 20 mm. The width of the rigid member platform ranges from about 10 mm to about 50 mm. The length to thickness ratio of the rigid member platform itself is 7 to 60, and preferably about 20.

Rigid members and rigid member platforms of the present invention are shown and described with respect to FIGs. 13-15.

The term“location feature” as used herein signifies a feature such as an aperture or opening, a slot, one or more protrusions, or any combination thereof. These features provide a structure that enables travel of movable assemblies, to attach movable assemblies or secondary frames to the rigid member or the rigid member platform, and they provide attachment points for other rigid features to the rigid frame enhancing integrity. In one embodiment of the present invention, the location feature is an aperture. The feature may be disposed in a part of the frame (or rigid member), such as in the rigid member platform, or in one or more, or all of the portions of the movable member assembly of the razor structure present invention. In another embodiment of the present invention, the location features are protrusions and apertures. The frame may be part of a handle or may be part of a razor cartridge. The location feature is utilized for aligning and coupling portions of the razor structure together by utilizing the location feature in the frame and portions.

The term“benefit” or“benefit delivery assembly” or“benefit delivery system” as used herein signifies something delivered to a user that is perceived to be advantageous. In the case of a razor or hair removal device, the term benefit refers to a skin benefit. Such a skin benefit cane be a heating or cooling of the skin. Another benefit to the user is fluids (e.g., liquids) or waxes to the skin. Further, benefits may be provided in combination, such as a benefit of heat and fluids. These may be advantageous to a user by enhancing their shaving experience.

Referring to FIGS. 1A-1C, a shaving razor 10 of the present invention comprises a handle 12 and a blade cartridge unit 15, which removably connects or releasably attaches to the handle 12 and contains one or more blades 17 having cutting edges 33. The handle 12 can comprise a handle main section 21 that is used to grip the handle. The handle 12 can comprise a handle transition section 23 that connects the handle main section 21 to the blade cartridge unit 15. The blade cartridge unit 15 can be configured to rotate about an axis of rotation Al that is substantially parallel to the blades 17 and substantially perpendicular to the handle 12. As shown in the illustrated embodiments, the razor can be configured to deliver benefits to the skin of the user by extending the handle 12 through an opening 100 in the blade cartridge unit 15 to enable handle benefit delivery components to be close to the skin.

In FIGS. 1D-1E, a graphical layout of the handle 12 and the blade cartridge unit 15 of the present invention is shown in a rest, undeflected, unloaded rest position. In general, the skin contacting surface of the blade cartridge unit 15 usually lie on or within a few millimeters of a cartridge plane Pl when the blade cartridge unit 15 is at its rest position. In general, a plane P2 may be oriented at an angle to the cartridge plane Pl that lies along an approximate mid-plane of the handle main section 21. This Pl-to-P2 included angle between planes Pl and P2 may range from -60 degrees to +90 degrees. A narrower preferential range of the Pl-to-P2 included angle is -25 degrees to +25 degrees. The figures of the present invention show a Pl-to-P2 included angle around +16 degrees. In general, a plane P3 may be oriented at an angle to the main handle section midplane P2 that lies along an approximate mid-plane of the handle transition section 21. This P2- to-P3 included angle between planes P2 and P3 may range from -90 degrees to +90 degrees. A narrower preferential range of the P2-P3 included angle is -90 degrees to + 45 degrees. The figures of the present invention show a P2-to-P3 included angle of +21 degrees. In general, a plane P4 can be defined perpendicular to planes Pl, P2, and P3 that lies longitudinally along the handle 12 at the approximate mid-plane of the handle 12 and the blade cartridge unit 15.

Referring to FIGs. 1F, 1G, and 1H, additional axes of rotation or directions of linear motion for various components of the handle can be generally defined using planes P2, P3, and P4 as described in FIGs. 1D and 1E. An axis A2 along the handle main section 21 can be defined as the intersection of planes P2 and P4; and an axis A3 along the handle transition section 23 can be defined as the intersection of planes P3 and P4. Another axis A4 within the handle transition section 23 can be defined perpendicular to plane P3 and laying upon plane P4. Another axis A5 within the handle main section 21 can be defined perpendicular to plane Pl and laying upon plane P4.

Two types of non- limiting embodiments of razors providing for a skin benefit are disclosed herein. The first razor embodiment provides a benefit to the user by heating or cooling the skin. The second razor embodiment provides a benefit to the user by fluids (e.g., liquids) or waxes to the skin. It should be noted that many of the components described in relation to the razor providing a benefit by heating and cooling the skin can also be incorporated into a razor providing benefits by delivering fluids and waxes to the skin. Both embodiments share common problems and have similar solutions including the structural elements of the handle 12, the handle main section 21, the handle transition section 23, and the skin interconnect member 22, the mechanisms that enable skin interconnect member 22 to rotate about different combinations of axes A1-A5, and the manufacturing of these components.

As shown in FIG. 1A, 1B, and 1C, this first razor embodiment can have a handle 12, a blade cartridge unit 15 that can releasably attach to the handle 12 and can contain one or more blades 17, and a heat delivery element which can deliver a heat skin benefit. A portion of the handle 12 can extend through blade cartridge unit 15 and be exposed as heating surface 82, discussed more fully below. As shown in FIG. 1A and in more details in FIGS. 2 and 3 in which the blade cartridge unit 15 has been removed, thermal surface 82 is a surface of a skin interconnect member 22 and can be used to deliver a cooling or heating benefit to the user during shaving. Heating or cooling of the skin interconnect member 22 can be achieved by pressing the skin benefit actuator 14, which can be a depressible button, a touch sensitive button, or a sliding button, and which closes a powered circuit inside handle 12 to a circuit inside the skin interconnect member 22. The handle 12 may hold a power source, such as one or more batteries (not shown) that supply power to the handle skin interconnect member 22. Heating or cooling of the skin interconnect member 22 can also be achieved passively such as by dipping the skin interconnect member 22 into water at a different temperature than ambient. In certain embodiments, the heat delivery element can comprise a metal such as aluminum or stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the heat delivery element can comprise a high capacity material such as metal or phase change materials. In certain embodiments, the heat delivery element can comprise high thermal conductivity materials such as copper, aluminum, or thermally conductive plastics such as COOLPOLY® (trademark symbol). The razor handle disclosed herein can include the heat delivery element disclosed co-owned, co-pending US Application having a Docket No. 14532FQ, which is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

In the illustrated embodiments, skin interconnect member 22 is configured to pivot about axes Al and A4. Other embodiments may be configured to move skin interconnect member 22 about axes Al, A2, A3, A4, A5 or any combination thereof. The bearings, which enable these rotary motions, may lie directly along an axis such as pin bearing or a shaft, or they may offset from the axis of rotation, creating by a virtual pivot. Virtual pivot bearings include shell bearings and linkages.

In a like manner, FIG. 4 shows another embodiment of a shaving razor that can deliver a benefit by delivering a fluid or wax to the skin of the user. As shown in FIG. 5, which shows the underside of the razor depicted in FIG. 4, a portion of the handle 12 can extend through blade cartridge unit 15 and be exposed as face 80, discussed more fully below. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 and in more detail in FIG. 6 in which the blade cartridge unit 15 has been removed, face 80 is a surface of a skin interconnect member 22 and can have openings 78 through which a fluid can be dispensed for skin comfort during shaving. Fluid flow from the reservoir in handle 12 can be achieved by pressing the skin benefit actuator 14, which can be a depressible button, a touch sensitive button, or a sliding button which activates a pumping mechanism 72 (shown in FIG. 7B) to push fluid towards and through the skin interconnect member 22. The pumping mechanism can include the compression of a flexible fluid reservoir, actuation of a manual pump, or activation of a powered pump. As shown in the illustrated embodiment of FIGS. 4-6, skin interconnect member 22 is configured to pivot about axis Al as described in FIGs. 1F-1H. Alternate embodiments can be configured to pivot about both axes Al and A2 in a manner similar to the preceding thermal benefit razor. Alternate embodiments can be configured to rotate about any combination of axes Al, A2, A3, A4, and A5 using either virtual pivots or bearings that lie directly along the axes.

The embodiments in FIGS. 1-6 show that the handle 12 can be configured to comprise of a main body 16 and a skin interconnect member 22. As shown in FIG. 6, the main body 16 and the skin interconnect member 22 may be connected by multiple components including arms 24, bearings 30, springs (not shown), circuits, wires, and tubes 27. When the skin interconnect member 22 pivots relative to the main body 16, these connecting components may be configured to be flexible.

Referring now to FIGS. 7A-7B and 8A-8B respectively, an embodiment of a razor handle which provides a benefit to the user by delivering fluids or waxes close to the skin and an embodiment of a razor handle which provides a heat or cooling benefit is described in more detail. It should be noted that many of the components described in relation to the razor 10 providing a benefit from delivering fluids or waxes to the skin can also be incorporated into a razor 10 providing for heating and cooling to the skin, as they relate to the handle 12, the handle main section 21, the handle transition section 23, and the skin interconnect member 22 pivoting about axis Al, described herein, including their structural features, their connection features, their product safety and integrity features, their manufacturing, their pivot motions, the spring mechanisms that urge the pivots into a rest position and limit the range of motion, and the shape of the pivoting handle head.

In FIGs. 7A-7B and 8A-8B, the handle 12 can comprise a main body 16 that can include a main frame 18 and a secondary frame 20. The main body 16 including its component main frame 18, an upper secondary frame 19, and lower secondary frame 20 members can comprise durable materials such as metal, cast metal, plastic, impact-resistant plastic, and composite materials.

The main frame 18 can be made of metal and can provide a significant portion of the structural integrity of the handle. Preferably, the component main frame is made from a light, stiff (high elastic modulus) and impact resistance material to minimize its volume and maximize volume for other components while still providing product integrity and safety. In an embodiment the frame 18 is made of zinc. In an embodiment the main frame 18 is made of die-cast zinc. Die- cast zinc materials include ZAMACK3, ZAMACK5, and ZA8. Other suitable materials include glass fiber reinforced plastics such as IXEF, stainless steel, aluminum, aluminum diecast, and magnesium diecast. The secondary frame 20 can be made of a plastic material and can overlie most of the main frame 18 and provide for a significant portion of the size and comfort of the handle 12. As shown in FIGs. 7A-7B and 8A-8B, the handle 12 can also comprise one or more movable elements of a movable member assembly 44a mounted on the frame 18 that serve as a cartridge eject mechanism. To enhance product integrity and safety of both the handle and the cartridge during accidental drops, this cartridge eject mechanism is designed to move in more than one direction from an initial rest position. Preferentially, this movement type is a linear motion along an axis A2 or A3 towards the razor cartridge to eject the cartridge and a linear motion along the same axis away from the cartridge to mitigate damage and absorb energy during an accidental drop.

Continuing to refer to FIGs. 7A-7B and 8A-8B, a skin interconnect member 22 can be connected to the main body 16 by one or more arms 24. Skin interconnect member 22 can pivot about an axis of rotation A4 that is defined by the connection of the skin interconnect member 22 to pins 30 disposed at distal portions of arms 24. Blade cartridge unit 15 attaches to the skin interconnect member 22 such that the blade cartridge unit 15 can pivot on handle 12 to provide more skin contact area on the skin of a user during shaving.

A benefit delivery system may be disposed above, below or through the frame. As shown for instance in FIGs. 7B and 8B the benefit delivery systems 72, 201, and 14, 301 respectively are disposed in sections below the rigid member or frame 18. Advantageously, the benefit delivery system is disposed between the rigid member and the secondary frame. The secondary frame can be mounted to the frame.

The skin interconnect member 22 can have a shape beneficially conducive to both attaching to the blade cartridge unit 15 and facilitating the delivery of a skin comfort benefit from the handle 12 to and through the blade cartridge unit 15 attached to the handle 12.

The shape of the skin interconnect member 22 can alternatively be described as a“funnel,” or as“tapered,” or a“trapezoidal prism-shaped.” As understood from the description herein, the description“trapezoidal prism” is general with respect to an overall visual impression the skin interconnect member. For example, a schematic representation of a trapezoidal prism-shaped element is shown and described in more detail below with respect to FIG. 25.

The description“trapezoidal prism” is used herein as the best description for the overall visual appearance of the skin interconnect member 22, but the description does not imply any particular geometric or dimensional requirements beyond what is described herein. That is, the skin interconnect member 22 need not have complete edges or surfaces. Further, edges need not be unbroken and straight, and sides need not be unbroken and flat.

The skin interconnect member 22 can have a shape beneficially conducive to both attaching to the blade cartridge unit 15 and facilitating the delivery of a skin comfort benefit from the handle 12 to and through the blade cartridge unit 15 attached to the handle 12.

As shown in FIGs. 9A-9B, a frame 18 and a fully assembled movable member assembly 44 operably coupled thereto are shown.

Various elements such as the grip members 39 and other features are removed from the frame and/or handle, showing the frame 18 as a skeleton- like structure upon which the movable member assembly 44 is disposed.

The frame desirably provides a base upon which other elements of a razor may be disposed. The frame may be located substantially in the center of the handle 12. As shown in the figures herein, ergonomic elements such as grip portions 39, protrusions or buttons, and benefit-dispensing structures such as electronics, fluids, thermal elements, and the like, may all be disposed on any side of the frame or within the frame 18 or within the handle transition section 23.

The movable member assembly 44 is configured to have a rotational movement about an axis of rotation A4 that is substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation Al and substantially perpendicular to a longitudinal axes A2 or A3 of the razor 10. The movable member assembly 44 or a portion thereof may be configured to have a linear motion substantially parallel to the longitudinal or linear axes of movement A2 or A3 that are substantially parallel to the frame 18. Linear axis of movement A3 is substantially parallel to the handle transition section 23 and linear axis of movement A2 is substantially parallel to the handle main section 21. When the blade cartridge unit 15 is attached to the handle 12, the blade cartridge unit 15 is configured to rotate about multiple axes of rotation, for example, a first axis of rotation Al and a second axis of rotation A4.

The movable member assembly 44 is configured to move in a first movement type and/or a second movement type. A first movement type of the present invention comprises a rotational movement and a second movement type comprises a non-rotational or linear movement. Preferably, the rotational movement is about an axis of rotation A4 or axis of rotation Al or both (as shown in FIGs. 1F-1H), that is substantially perpendicular to the frame 18 and the linear movement is along axes of movement A2 or A3 (as shown in FIGs. 1F-1H) that is along a substantially straight or linear path which is substantially parallel to the frame 18.

The frame 18 may be of any suitable size, shape, or configuration. Though shown as being a part of the razor handle, the frame of the present invention may or may not be part of the razor handle. If the frame 18 is part of the razor handle as shown for instance in FIG. 1B, the frame 18 can desirably comprise a longitudinal member. If the frame 18 is part of the handle transition section 23, the frame 18 can comprise a member of any shape. If the frame 18 is a part of a razor cartridge or other component (not shown), the frame may or may not be longitudinal. The frame preferably comprises a rigid member and is preferably made of hard metal. The movable member assembly is substantially comprised of plastic though some elements (e.g., spring members) may be comprised of metal such as steel or stainless steel.

In FIGs. 9A to 9C, it is noted that the frame has an upper side 92a and a lower side 92b, a proximal end 96 and a distal end 98. Frame 18 is disposed in a novel manner such that it extends between the movable member assembly 44 as will be described in more detail below. In a preferred embodiment, upper and lower portions of the movable member assembly are coupled to each other and within the frame.

FIG. 9A depicts a front perspective view showing the frame 18, frame upper side 92a, and the upper portion 44a of the movable member assembly 44 along with arm portions 52 of the second lower element 49b. FIG. 9B depicts a rear perspective view showing the frame 18, the frame lower side 92b and the lower portion 44b of the movable member assembly 44 along with second and third lower elements, 49a and 49b, respectively, along with arm portions 52 of the second lower element 49b.

The frame 18 also comprises a frame location feature 43. The rigid member or frame location feature 43 of the present invention preferably comprises an aperture, though a slot or other feasible structure or configuration or combination thereof is contemplated.

Aperture 43 shown in FIG. 9C is disposed at a proximal end 96 of the frame 18 and serves as the location feature whose function will be described in further detail below. The aperture 43 desirably comprises a circular shape, though any shape is contemplated in the present invention. Accordingly, the aperture shape provides an aesthetic or design element in addition to its utility. Further, though other apertures 45 are present in the frame 18, the present invention describes the frame location feature aperture 43 towards the proximal end 96.

In FIG. 9C, the frame 18 and the movable member assembly 44 are splayed out or disassembled for purposes of showing various components and their arrangement together. The movable member assembly 44 comprises an upper portion (44a) and a lower portion (44b). Upper and lower portions may be an integral unit or they may be two or more units that are coupled together. An upper portion 44a of the movable member assembly 44 is substantially disposed on the upper side 92a of the frame and a lower portion 44b of the movable member assembly 44 is substantially disposed on the lower side 92b.

The upper portion 44a of the movable member assembly 44 may move in both a first movement type and a second movement type. In a second movement type (e.g., non-rotational, linear), the upper portion may be comprised of a button such as an eject button which serves to remove the blade cartridge unit 15 from the handle 12 when pushed.

In one embodiment, an upper portion 44a comprises a first upper element 47a, second upper element 47b, a third upper element 47c and a fourth upper element 47d, all of which are operably coupled to each other. The upper portion 44a may be comprised of more or fewer elements and may be of any suitable size, shape or configuration in accordance with the present invention. Additionally, or alternatively the upper portion 44a includes upper portion location features 46 in one or more of each upper element, and preferably in each upper element where these features are all apertures, and more preferably these apertures are substantially similar to the rigid member location feature 43, and most preferably substantially circular shaped, though any feasible configuration of location features and shapes are contemplated.

The first upper element 47a functions as a base structure for the upper portion 44a. It preferably includes rails, tracks and/or projections. Desirably it is coupled to one or more of the upper elements such as the second and third upper elements but also one or more of the lower elements as will be described below. In one embodiment, the first upper element 47a is comprised of a material that is less expensive and more flexible to design with enabling more intricate features (e.g., snap fits, bearing surfaces, etc.) in smaller volumes than would be possible if a rigid member were used by itself without such an interface. Plastics or other flexible materials are contemplated in the present invention for any elements that are most proximal or contacting a metal rigid member. For instance, first upper element 47a can be made of plastic while the rigid member is made of die-cast zinc material.

The second upper element 47b is preferably a spring member disposed in between a first and third upper element 47c. The spring member is desirably disposed within one or both first and third upper elements. As shown, the spring member can be a loop or generally circular shape. This spring assists in providing a first or second movement type. Preferably, element 47b provides a second movement type (e.g., linear).

The spring member of the present invention can be attached to the frame or rigid member to provide for motion of the upper portion, lower portion, or a combination thereof.

A spring member can have points of attachment between any elements within the movable assembly 44 - i.e. any elements of the upper portion, any element of the lower portion, and any combination thereof. At least one connection of the spring member is desirably connected to either the frame 18, the first upper element 47a, or the first lower element 49a. Connection to the rigid frame can provide a simpler design in smaller volumes while connection to the either the first upper element or the first lower can provide flexibility in design by allowing construction of complex mechanisms in less room and at less cost than mounting them directly onto the frame 18. A connection of the spring member directly to the frame 18 can provide smoother motions and a less complex design when the upper portion 44a and the lower portion 44b are connected and move together relative to the frame 18. A preload of the spring member can be used to provide a better consumer experience by preventing the upper portion 44a and the lower portion 44b from rattling within the handle 12 and by either pushing either the upper portion, lower portion, or combination thereof against a bearing surface on the rigid member or by maintaining a clearance between the rigid member and the upper portion and lower portion.

The third upper element 47c is preferably an eject button which desirably, coupled with one or both of the second upper element 47b (e.g., spring member) and the first upper element 47a (e.g., base structure), desirably provides a second movement or a linear movement in a forward path along axes A2 or A3 (as shown in FIGs. 1F-1H) to eject or separate the blade cartridge unit (e.g., unit 15 in FIGs. 1F-1H) from the razor handle. A fourth upper element 47d comprises an outermost upper element, and may be a dome shaped feature. The fourth upper element 47d generally provides a finger pad area for comfortable placement of a user’s finger for use with third upper element (e.g., eject button) 47c, along with an aesthetic outer decor enhancement. The fourth upper element may be a dome shape.

The lower portion 44b comprises a first lower element 49a, a second lower element 49b, and a third lower element 49c. The lower portion 44b may be comprised of more or fewer elements and may be of any suitable size, shape or configuration.

Additionally, or alternatively, the lower portion 44b includes lower portion location features 48 in one or more of each lower element, and preferably in each lower element where these features are all apertures, and more preferably these apertures are substantially similar to the rigid member location feature 43 and/or the upper portion location features 46 and most preferably substantially circularly shaped, though any feasible configuration of location features and shapes are contemplated.

First lower element 49a of the lower portion 44b is preferably comprised of a spring member which is disposed in between a lower side of said frame or a lower side of said first upper portion 47a and second lower element 49b. The spring member is desirably disposed on the underside 92b of the upper frame 18a and/or within any of the elements disposed on a lower side of said frame, such as the second lower element 49b but also may be disposed on the lower side of said first upper element 47a (not shown). As depicted, the spring member is comprised of a loop, V-shape, or a generally circular shape.

Second lower element 49b of the lower portion 44b is preferably comprised of a bottom base structure having tracks, rails, and/or projections and a pair of arms 52. The pair of arms are preferably connected to an interconnect member for connection to a blade cartridge unit or directly to a blade cartridge unit. When coupled with spring member of first lower element 49a, the arrangement assists in providing a first or second movement type, preferably, a first movement type (e.g., rotational). This first movement type allows the blade cartridge unit 15, when connected to the handle 12, to move or pivot in a rotational or side-to-side manner along axis of rotation A4.

Third lower element 49c comprises an outermost lower element, and may be a dome shaped feature similar to fourth upper element 47d. The third lower element 49c generally provides a bottom finger pad area for comfortable placement of a user’ s finger along with an aesthetic outer decor enhancement.

FIG. 9D is a close-up side view showing the frame 18 disposed in between the movable member upper and lower portions. Upper portion 44a is shown having dome 47d and eject button 47c disposed on first upper element or a top pod 47a. First lower element 49a and second upper element 47b (e.g., spring members) are not shown but are disposed within lower and upper portions respectively. Second lower element 49b is disposed below the frame 18.

FIG. 9E is a close-up perspective view of the movable member assembly 44 just prior to being coupled together. All the elements of the upper portion 44a and lower portion 44b of the movable member assembly 44 are depicted without the frame 18. The elements as they would be attached within the frame are shown clearly.

It should be noted that the bottom part 92 of first upper element 47a and the top part 94 of the second lower element 49b are generally encompassed or covered by a frame 18 towards proximal end 96 of the frame 18 as shown in FIG. 7. FIG. 9F is a close-up exploded side view of the movable member assembly 44 without the frame 18. The upper portion 44a is shown just as it would be coupled to the lower portion 44b. Lower portion 44b is shown having a first lower element 49a, second lower element 49b and arms 52 and upper portion 44a is shown having first upper element 47a and third upper element 47b. Second upper element 47b (e.g., spring member) and fourth upper element (e.g., outer dome) are not shown in this view but are disposed within the upper portion 44a.

FIG. 10 shows a top view 100 of the upper surface 101 of the second lower element 49b. As shown, the upper surface 101 of the second lower element 49b comprises one or more tracks 102, projections 104, recesses 106, and rims 108. A first lower element 49a, which comprises a loop shaped spring member, is shown partially disposed within a pair of curved tracks 102 of second lower element 49b. Third lower element 49c is partly shown at the outer surface of the aperture 48.

FIGs. 11A and 11B depict upper and lower surfaces 111 and 112, respectively, of first upper element 47a which is comprised of a base structure. These surfaces are comprised of one or more tracks 113, projections 114, recesses 116, notches 117, and rims 118.

Desirably, the upper and lower portions 44a and 44b, respectively, are coupled to each other. The engagement of the upper and lower portions may be achieved by mechanical engagement such as a snap-fit engagement, chemical engagement such as adhesive or glue, frictional engagement such as welding comprising ultrasonic welding such as energy director or pinch-off welding, or torsional, spin, laser or hot-plate (e.g., mirror-imaged) type welding, or by any other feasible manner or any combination of the foregoing, thereof.

In one embodiment of the present invention, the coupling is preferably achieved by engaging one or more features of the lower surface of first upper element 47a with one or more features of the upper surface of the second lower element 49b. For instance, projections 104 on upper surface 101 of the second lower element 49b desirably engage with recesses or notches in the lower surface 112 of first upper element 47a as shown in a top view of a coupled arrangement 120 of second lower element 49b engaged with first upper element 47a in FIG. 12. Additionally, or alternately, a preferred embodiment of the present invention comprises welding, more preferably ultrasonic welding, and most preferably pinch off type ultrasonic welding. The area of engagement (e.g., a welding area or a mechanical engagement area) can be located on external surfaces of upper and lower elements, can be located internal to the elements (as shown in FIG. 18 below), or can be a combination. In one embodiment, the area of engagement is not in contact with the frame 18. By not being in contact with the frame, the portions of the movable member assembly can move independently of the frame.

Once upper and lower portions are engaged and secured to each other, the movable member assembly 44 can substantially function as an integral unit.

In the present invention, a single component, such as the upper portion 44a or the lower portion 44b serves multiple functions. For instance, the lower portion 44b facilitates an axis of rotation in a razor handle, namely an axis of rotation substantially perpendicular to one or more blades when a razor is assembled and substantially perpendicular to a frame of a handle. When rotated from an at rest position, the lower portion 44b and for instance, the second lower element 49b can generate a return torque to return to the rest position by way of the spring member 49a, such shown as a loop shaped spring but may comprise a cantilever spring or a leaf spring. The return torque is generated by the spring member of the second lower element 49b. Additionally, the upper portion 44a also serves as a carrier for an ejector button assembly and may also serve as a carrier for other components of a razor such as a docking structure (not shown), and/or a blade cartridge unit (e.g., via the docking structure). In this embodiment, the first lower element 49a (the spring member), can be attached to the frame 18 providing optimal motion and clearances for the assembly.

In an alternate embodiment, the movable member assembly 44 is unitary and, optionally, formed from a single material.

In FIG. 13A and 13B, location features of two embodiments l30a and l30b of frame 18 of the present invention are shown. In embodiment l30a, a frame 18 comprises a rigid member platform l32a corresponding to the views shown in FIGs. 7A, 7B. In embodiment l30a, bottom side 92b of frame 18 comprises a rigid member platform l32a in the handle transition section 23. The location feature of rigid member or frame 18 is an opening 43 in the rigid member platform 132. Protrusions 134 are disposed in the rigid member platform 132. The protrusions can engage with other features such as arms 24 which can be made of metal. Protrusions 134 of frame l30a can be used to attach a secondary frame 20 to the frame 18. As noted, the frame 18 of the present invention can be comprised of die-cast zinc such as ZAMACK3, ZAMACK5, and ZA8. Other suitable materials include glass fiber reinforced plastics such as IXEF 1032, stainless steel, aluminum, aluminum diecast, and magnesium diecast.

Arms 24 of the present invention are shown in FIG. 6, 7A, 7B, 8A, 8B, and 16. With a rigid member or frame 18 made of hard metal such die-cast zinc having features which are coupled with hard metal arms (e.g., stainless steel), a robust product can be made especially for a heavy handle and damage can be mitigated in case of accidental drops.

In embodiment l30b, a frame 18 comprises a rigid member platform l32b corresponding to the views shown in FIGs. 8A, 8B. In embodiment l30b, bottom side 92b of frame 18 comprises a rigid member platform l32b in the handle transition section 23. The location feature of rigid member or frame 18 is an opening 43 in the rigid member platform 132. Protrusions 134 are disposed in the rigid member platform 132. Protrusions 134 of frame 130A can attach to a secondary frame 20 or components such as circuits or benefit delivery systems. FIG. 15A-G shows close-up views of the rigid member platforms l32a and l32b.

In FIGs. 14-15, perspective and cross-sectional views of the rigid member platforms l32a and l32b of frame l30a and l30b, respectively, of FIG. 13 showing the thickness and width of the rigid member platform of the present invention is depicted.

As shown in FIG. 14A, rigid member platform l32b has a top surface 142, bottom surface 143, walls 146, and location features including opening 43 and one or more slots 144. The rigid member platform can be enclosed or partially enclosed by walls 146 (e.g., side walls).

As shown in FIG. 15, rigid member platform l32a has a top surface 142, bottom surface 143, walls 146, and location features including opening 43, one or more pockets 152, and one or more protrusions 134. The rigid member platform can be enclosed or partially enclosed by walls 146 (e.g., side walls).

FIG. 14 detail A shows a median thickness Tl of top and bottom surfaces 142 and 143 of the rigid member platform l32a and l32b. Tl is depicted in cross-sectional view B-B taken down the midline of the rigid member platform as shown in detail A of FIG. 14. FIG. 15 shows cross-sectional views A- A, C-C and D-D corresponding to the embodiments of FIGs. 8A and 8B. In views A-A and C-C, median thicknesses Tl and T2 can be seen, along with widths Wl and W2. In this embodiment, Wl represents the maximum width of the rigid member platform and W2 is smaller than Wl. In both cases, the maximum width to median thickness ratio exceeds 20.

A maximum length Ll across the rigid member platform across cross-sectional view E-E is shown parallel to the longitudinal axis of the razor handle. A maximum width Wl across the rigid member platform is shown transverse to the longitudinal axis of the razor handle. The rigid member platform 132 can be partially surrounded by walls 146 having a height T2. These walls provide additional product integrity to the rigid member and allow for flexibility in design aesthetics. Embodiments of FIGs. 7A and 7B have a rotation pivot in the handle that passes or extends through the rigid member platform. Bearing surfaces 149 are also depicted in detail A of FIG. 14. A clearance C, of from about 0.1 mm to about 1 mm, is a distance between a bearing surface 149 and the top surface 142 or the bottom surface 143 of the rigid platform member. Bearing surfaces 149 are located within a distance of about 1 mm from the location feature such as slots, apertures, openings about which the movable member assembly travels.

Upper and lower portions of a movable member assembly are coupled together by passing through the aperture 43 of the rigid member platforms and are held in position and clearance by a spring member mounted to the rigid member. This spring member of the present invention, while flexible in the desired direction of motion, is stiff enough in other directions of motion to maintain sufficient clearance between portions of the movable member assembly and the rigid member and rigid member platform. The spring member may be preloaded as described herein.

In the present invention, a median thickness Tl of the platform l32a or l32b ranges from about 0.5 mm to about 2.5 mm, preferably about 1 mm. A maximum width Wl to median thickness Tl ratio of the platform itself is about 7 to 60, and preferably about 20. The area of the rigid member platform including the area from features such as openings and pockets ranges from about 50 mm 2 to about 700 mm 2 , and is preferably about 300 mm 2 . A perimeter of the rigid member platform can be about 40 mm to about 90 mm, and preferably 63 mm. The rigid member platform has a hydraulic diameter, (e.g., in standard engineering this diameter can be defined as about four times the area divided by the perimeter) from about 8mm to about 50 mm, and preferably about 20 mm. The maximum width Wl of the rigid member platform ranges from about 10 mm to about 50 mm. The maximum length Ll to median thickness Tl ratio of the rigid member platform itself is 7 to 60, and preferably about 20. The height T2 of the walls ranges from about 1.5 mm to about 18 mm, and preferably about 4 mm.

Thus, the present invention comprises a relatively thin rigid member platform which is beneficial because it provides a robust support for complex functional members above or below it, and an ease of manufacturing or assembly including flexibility for use of other manufacturing techniques such as additive manufacturing, while also providing space for benefit delivery system components.

FIG. 16A-B show views l69a and l69b depict the use of location features to attach other components to the frame 18. Protrusion 161 in view l69a and l69b attach to locking structures 162 in rigid arms 24 extending the rigidity of the frame 18 beyond the main body 16. In view l69b, protrusions 163 of the rigid member platform assist in locating and locking the secondary frame 20 to the rigid member platform l32a or l32b utilizing secondary frame structures 164.

In a preferable embodiment of the present invention, these upper and lower elements are coupled together by securing one to the other with the rigid member location feature 43. This may desirably be achieved by utilizing the rigid member location feature aperture 43 of the frame 18 for alignment with the upper aperture 46 and lower aperture 48, as will be described in more detail below.

Referring to FIG. 17A-D, a process of the present invention for assembling the various razor portions described above with respect to FIGs. 1 to 16 are shown and described herein. Any of the mounting steps described can be achieved by any feasible methods including, but not limited to, mechanical engagement, frictional engagement (e.g., welding), and chemical engagement (e.g., adhesives). The mechanical engagement can include one or more structures or protrusions providing rest surfaces for a portion or snap-fitting. Chemical engagement comprises gluing or adhesives.

In a preferred embodiment, at Step 1 of FIG. 17B a first lower element 49a of lower portion 44b is first mounted to the main frame 18 of the handle 12. In a non- limiting embodiment, the lower element 49a is a spring member, and can be a loop shaped spring member as shown in FIG. 17. The loop shaped spring member can have a shape that is generally oval, circular, elliptical, ring shaped, modified V-shaped, tear drop shape or any combination thereof. In the embodiment shown, the loop shaped spring member can be considered a tear drop shape. The spring member has end portions. End portions can have distal ends which can be spaced apart. The mounting of the spring member to the frame 18 can be achieved by attaching one end of the spring member amidst rest surfaces on protrusions on the frame. In one embodiment, the loop spring member is not permanently attached to the frame. The mounting of the spring member to the frame may also be achieved by any feasible means including but not limited to, mechanical engagement. The spring member can be preloaded within the second lower element and the frame. In one embodiment, the spring member 49a comprises a knob or curved structure 171 which is placed around a center protrusion 172 such that an inner surface of the knob (e.g., into the loop) rests along the outer surface of the center protrusion 172 while outer surfaces of the spring member 49a rest along surfaces of two elongated protrusions l73a and l73b on either side of the center protrusion 172 as shown in close-up views in Step 1 and Step 2. Close-up view of Step 1 depicts the center and elongated protrusions of the frame. Close-up view of Step 2 depicts the underside of the second lower element 49b, and together with FIG. 10, provide two feasible embodiments for coupling the second lower element and the spring member. Also shown in FIG. 17 at Step 1, a skin interconnect member 22 is mounted to the main frame 18.

At Step 2 shown in FIG. 17, the second lower element 49b is mounted to the resultant structure which forms a part of the lower portion, from Step 1. In one embodiment, the second lower element 49b can provide a preload force on the spring member 49a after it is mounted. The second lower element 49b can include arms which connect to a razor cartridge as will be described herein. As noted above, the second lower element 49b can provide a rotational movement type for a razor cartridge relative to the handle. In one embodiment, spring member 49a is fully encompassed or covered within lower portion 44b.

Turning to FIG. 18, a Step 3 of the present invention process to assemble the movable member 44 is shown. Step 3 depicts first upper element 47a of the upper portion 44a disposed on top of the main frame 18 of handle 12. In one embodiment shown, a thermal element 182 in the form of a flex circuit can be disposed therebetween. As shown, the flex circuit has a circular shape with a centrally located aperture to align with the location features of the other elements of the movable member assembly. The flex circuit may provide a heat or cooling benefit to the skin interconnect member 22 which can be appreciated by the user when attached to a razor cartridge. Close-up cross-sectional views (A) of the structure resulting from Step 3 is shown in FIG. 18. There, it shows that the first upper element 47a is disposed on top of second lower element 49b and extends through the main frame 18. The main frame is disposed therebetween. Thermal element 182 is disposed between the first upper element and the main frame.

At Step 4, the first upper element 47a is secured to the second lower element 49b. This securing step is preferably comprised of welding between the two elements, more preferably ultrasonic welding, and most preferably pinch off type ultrasonic welding. The welded material 184 is shown in a close-up cross-sectional view (B) of Step 4. As can be seen, the welded material 184 is disposed in area in between the first upper element 47a and the second lower element 49b. Other methods for securing these elements are also contemplated (e.g., gluing).

These elements are coupled together through the main frame which as noted herein is preferably a rigid member, and more preferably comprised of a diecast material such as zinc. Since the first upper element is a part of the upper portion and the second lower element is a part of the lower portion, in this way, the upper portion 44a can be secured to the lower portion 44b through the main frame. In the embodiment, the main frame extends between the upper and lower portions. In the embodiment, the upper and lower portions are engaged within, pass through, or around the rigid member or main frame’s location feature 43. The upper and lower elements of the upper and lower portions have location features 46, 48, respectively which are apertures of a similar size and shape as that of the rigid member, a generally circular aperture.

The upper and lower elements can also feasibly be coupled via mechanical engagement such as a snap-fit. Features on the upper surface of the second lower element 49b and features on the lower surface 47a can be engaged within, pass through or around, a rigid member location feature such as aperture 43 disposed within the rigid member. The one or more surface features can be recesses, projections, notches, or other attachment structures which can mate or engage, or any combination thereof.

Turning to FIG. 19, a Step 5 of the process of assembling of the movable member 44 is shown. At Step 5, distal ends of bracket arms 192 are mounted into skin interconnect member 22. At Step 6 shown in FIG. 19, proximal arms of bracket arms 192 are mounted to the second lower element 49b. After Step 6, the skin interconnect member 22 is mounted to the second lower element 49b. A pivot spring member (not shown) can be partially disposed within the skin interconnect member 22 to pivot in relation to arms 192. The pivot spring member can be preloaded.

Pivot spring member can be any spring member facilitating biasing and pivoting of the pivoting. Pivot spring member can be, for example, any of torsion coil springs, coil spring, leaf spring, helical compression spring, and disc spring. In one embodiment, spring member comprises one or more coil springs. In an embodiment, two coil springs can be coupled together in a spaced relationship by a main bar portion. Pivot spring members are described in co-owned co-pending US Docket Nos. 15136P, 15137P, 15138P, which are hereby incorporated herein by reference.

In FIG. 20A at Step 7, bracket arms 192 are fixed into position within the second lower element. In a non- limiting embodiment, as also shown by the direction of the arrows in the partial cut away perspective view of FIG. 20, a process of cold stamping, cold press fit, or cold heading can drive staking pins into the second lower element to fix the bracket arms 192 in position.

Portions of the main frame 18 corresponding to openings 194 of arms 192 can be permanently deformed by pressing into the openings 194. The operation, known as cold stamping or cold staking, permits secure coupling of arms 192, and therefore, skin interconnect member 22, to main frame 18 (and therefore, handle 12). Cold stamped pockets 202 can be formed after the cold stamping is completed as shown in FIG. 20.

In FIG. 21, Step 8 is shown to include the attachment of the third lower element 49c onto second lower element 49b and through the location features or apertures 48. The third lower element 49c is a dome shaped element having a rim 214 and a dome aperture 48. The dome aperture may or may not be the same size and shape as the other location features in the razor. The dome element 49c is disposed within and through location feature 48 of the second lower element 49b and the rim extends to the upper surface of the first upper element 47a as shown in cross- sectional cut out close-up view (A) in FIG. 21. At step 9, the upper rim 214 of the dome element 49c is crimped onto the first upper element 47a. Crimp areas 212 are shown by arrows in the cross- sectional cut out close-up view (B) of FIG. 21. Alternately, the rim may be crimped onto any element of the upper portion 44a or it may be otherwise attached to the frame 18. FIG. 22 shows a third upper element 47c in the form of an eject button for a razor. The top side 222 of the eject button is cleaned at Step 10. In one non-limiting embodiment, the top side of the third upper element button is cleaned using plasma. At Step 11 , the underside 224 of the fourth upper element 47d is also cleaned. In a non-limiting embodiment, the underside of the dome shaped element is cleaned with alcohol. At Step 12, the top side surface of the eject button element is prepared so that the underside of the dome shaped element can be mounted thereon. In a non limiting embodiment, Step 12 comprises an adhesive or glue applied to a gluing area 226 on the top side 222 of the third upper element eject button 47c as shown in FIG. 22. At Step 13 the underside of the dome shaped element is mounted on the gluing area 226 and once the dome element is placed on the top side of the eject button, the glue secures elements 47c and 47d together. A lower rim portion of element 47d can extend through the aperture 46 of the eject button.

FIG. 23 depicts the mounting of second upper element 47b onto the underside of the third upper element 47c. Second upper element 47b is a spring member and third upper element 47c is an eject button element. In a non-limiting embodiment, the spring member can be a loop shaped spring member as shown in FIG. 23. The loop shaped spring member can have a shape that is generally oval, circular, elliptical, ring shaped, modified V-shaped, tear drop shape or any combination thereof. In the embodiment shown, the loop shaped spring member can be considered a circular shape. The spring member has end portions. End portions can overlap as shown. The mounting of the spring member to the eject button 47b at Step 14 can be achieved by attaching one portion of the spring member amidst rest surfaces on protrusions on the button. In one embodiment, the loop spring member is not permanently attached to the eject button. The mounting of the spring member to the button may also be achieved by any feasible means including but not limited to, other types of mechanical engagement. The spring member can be preloaded within the button. In one embodiment, the spring member 47b comprises a knob or curved structure 232 which is placed around a center protrusion 234 such that an inner surface of the knob (e.g., into the loop) rests along the outer surface of the center protrusion 234 while outer surfaces of the spring member 47b rest along surfaces 235 of two elongated protrusions 236a and 236b on either side of the center protrusion 234 as shown in close-up views (A) and (B) in FIG. 23. Close- up view (B) depicts the center and elongated protrusions of the underside of the button. Close-up view (A) depicts the other rest surfaces 237 on protrusions 238 of the underside of the button 47c. Together, FIG. 23 and FIG. 23 provide two feasible embodiments for coupling the third upper element (e.g., eject button) and the spring member. FIG. 24 depicts the Step 15, a last step for the assembly of the movable member assembly. In Step 15, the resultant coupled eject button assembly, inclusive of elements 47b, 47c, and 47d, of FIG. 23 are mounted to the upper surface of first upper element 47a which was previously mounted to the frame in Steps 3 and 4 of FIG. 18. In one embodiment, the mounting Step 15 is achieved via a snap fit mechanism between features on the lower surface of eject button 47c and features on the upper surface of first upper element 47a. These features can provide proper button assembly into the razor. For instance, protrusions 242 can include chamfer surfaces 244. These chamfers 244 can apply a pre-loading force to release the spring member from the eject button assembly rest position. Other surface features 246 on the lower side of the eject button assembly, as shown in the close-up view in FIG. 24, can limit vertical or sideways movement to guide the eject button. Once the last step 15 occurs, the spring member 47b can be fully encompassed within upper portion 44a.

It should be noted that at least one or more elements of the upper or lower portions do not move relative to the rigid member. For instance, the lower portion may include an element that does not move relative to the rigid member.

The frame, movable member assembly with upper and lower portions comprising an ejector button assembly, and a rotational movement unit (second lower element 49b) are configured for simplification of assembly, for example, in high-speed manufacturing. Each component is configured to automatically align and to securely seat. In an embodiment, each component engages to another component in only a single orientation such that the components cannot be inaccurately or imprecisely assembled. Further, each component does not need an additional step of dimensional tuning or any secondary adjustment in manufacturing to ensure proper engagement with other components. The design of the handle also provides control and precision. For example, when the razor is assembled, the movable member and/or the blade cartridge unit is substantially centered, the preload of the springs may be controlled precisely over time even after repeated use, and the performance of each spring, is controlled, consistent, and robust.

FIG. 25 show schematic representations of trapezoidal prism shapes of the skin interconnect member of the present invention. The shape of the at least one skin interconnect member 22 can alternatively be described as a“funnel,” or as“tapered,” or a“trapezoidal prism shaped.” As understood from the description herein, the description“trapezoidal prism” is general with respect to an overall visual impression the pivoting head. For example, FIG. 25 shows schematic representations 123A and 123B of trapezoidal prism-shaped elements and shows a shape having a relatively wide upper face (or opening) 325, a relatively narrow lower face 324, two long major faces 326, and two end faces 328 that are generally trapezoidal-shaped. FIG. 25 also shows a close-up side view 123C of one embodiment of the skin interconnect member 22 of the handle of the present invention showing a generally trapezoidal prism or prism-like shape 345 of the skin interconnect member 22 and an isolated view 124D of components of one embodiment of skin interconnect member 320 that create a general“trapezoidal prism” shape.

The various elements of the movable member assembly are desirably formed of plastics, including thermoplastic elastomers. The spring members can be made of plastic, impact-resistant plastic, metal, and composite materials. In an embodiment, the spring member can be made from materials that are resistant to stress relaxation such as metal, polyetheretherketone, and some grades of silicone rubber. Such an embodiment of spring member, comprised of stress relaxation resistant materials, can prevent the pivot head from undesirably taking a“set,” a permanent deformation of the spring member that prevents the pivot head from returning to its rest position when unloaded. In an embodiment, spring member can be made of 200 Series or 300 Series stainless steel at spring temper per ASTM A313. In an embodiment, spring member can be comprised of stainless steel wire (e.g., 302 stainless steel wire) having an ultimate tensile strength metal greater than 1800 MPa or an engineering yield stress between about 800 MPa and about 2000 MPa.

Arms 24 or frame 18 can be made of plastic, impact-resistant plastic, metal, and composite materials. In an embodiment, arms 24 and frame 18 can be comprised of metal. Arms 24 and frame 18 can be made of a 200 or 300 Series stainless steel having an engineering yield stress measured by ASTM standard E8 greater than about 200 MPa, and preferably greater than 500 MPa and a tensile strength again measured by ASTM standard E8 greater than 1000 MPa.

Arms 24 and frame 18 can be made of a zinc die-cast with an engineering yield stress of about 200 MPa measured by ASTM standard E8 and a tensile strength again measured by ASTM standard E8 about 300 MPa.

Preferably, the assembly is formed from thermoplastic polymers. For example, nonlimiting examples of materials for the movable member with desirable properties, such as flexibility, durability (breakdown from drop impact), fatigue resistance (breakdown from bending over repeated use), and creep resistance (relaxing of the material), can include POLYLAC® 757 (available from Chi Mei Corporation, Tainan, Taiwan), HYTREL® 5526 and 8283 (available from E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Delaware), ZYTEL® 122L (available from E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Delaware), CELON® M90 (available from Ticona LLC, Florence, Kentucky), PEBAX® 7233 (available from Arkema Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), CRASTIN® S500, S600F20, S600F40, and S600LF (available from E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Delaware), CELENEX® 1400A (M90 (available from Ticona LLC, Florence, Kentucky), DELRIN® 100ST and 500T (available from E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Delaware), HOSTAFORM® XT 20 (available from Ticona LLC, Florence, Kentucky), and SURLYN® 8150 (available from E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Delaware). Furthermore, the selection of a material may affect the stiffness and yield stress of the movable member or a spring. For example, each material may have different stiffnesses depending on the temperature and rate of rotation of the upper or lower portions of the movable member relative to the frame. Dimensions of the spring elements can be varied to achieve a desired torque and/or a desired stiffness.

Other components of the handle, blade unit, and other rigid plastic parts of the shaving system can be made of any suitable material including, for example, polyethylene terephthalate (PET or PETE), high density (HD) PETE, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), thermoplastic polymer, Polypropylene, oriented polypropylene, polyurethane, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyester, high-gloss polyester, or combinations thereof.

It should be understood that every maximum numerical limitation given throughout this specification includes every lower numerical limitation, as if such lower numerical limitations were expressly written herein. Every minimum numerical limitation given throughout this specification includes every higher numerical limitation, as if such higher numerical limitations were expressly written herein. Every numerical range given throughout this specification includes every narrower numerical range that falls within such broader numerical range, as if such narrower numerical ranges were all expressly written herein.

The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the exact numerical values recited. Instead, unless otherwise specified, each such dimension is intended to mean both the recited value and a functionally equivalent range surrounding that value. For example, a dimension disclosed as“40 mm” is intended to mean“about

40 mm.” Every document cited herein, including any cross referenced or related patent or application, is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety unless expressly excluded or otherwise limited. The citation of any document is not an admission that it is prior art with respect to any invention disclosed or claimed herein or that it alone, or in any combination with any other reference or references, teaches, suggests or discloses any such invention. Further, to the extent that any meaning or definition of a term in this document conflicts with any meaning or definition of the same term in a document incorporated by reference, the meaning or definition assigned to that term in this document shall govern.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is therefore intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of this invention.