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Title:
RUBBER TILE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2014/013487
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The presently disclosed subject matter provides a rubber tile comprising a first segment of a tread portion of a tire stackingly mounted on a second segment of tread portion of a tire wherein each of the first and second segments having a tread surface and an inner surface.

Inventors:
SHIFRON, Ayal (149 Emek Ayalon Street, Shoam, 60850, IL)
Application Number:
IL2013/050604
Publication Date:
January 23, 2014
Filing Date:
July 17, 2013
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SHIFRON, Ayal (149 Emek Ayalon Street, Shoam, 60850, IL)
International Classes:
E01C5/18; B29B17/00; E01B3/44; E01F15/04
Foreign References:
US6316069B1
US5834083A
US6372069B1
US20030010421A1
US7931210B1
DE9101959U1
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
REINHOLD COHN AND PARTNERS (P.O.Box, 61131 Tel Aviv, 13239, IL)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS:

1. A rubber tile comprising a first segment of a tread portion of a tire stackingly mounted on a second segment of tread portion of a tire wherein each of said first and second segments having a tread surface and an inner surface.

2. The rubber tile according to claim 1 wherein each of said first and second segments includes an inward curvature; and wherein said first and second segments are coupled to one another through, thereby canceling out the opposing inward radial forces causing said inward curvature thereof.

3. The rubber tile according to claim 2 wherein said first and second segments are coupled to one another through the inner surfaces thereof.

4. The rubber tile according to claim 2 wherein said first and second segments are coupled to one another through the tread surface thereof.

5. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 1 to 4 wherein the dimensions of said first segment are the same as the dimensions of said second segment.

6. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 1 to 4 wherein the dimension configured in accordance with the area of inner surface required in order to obtain a durable bond between said first segment and second segment.

7. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 1 to 5 wherein said first segment is made from a tread portion having same properties as that of the tread portion out of which said second segment is made.

8. The rubber tile according to claim 1 wherein said first segment is made from a tread portion having properties different than that of the tread portion out of which said second segment is made and wherein the dimension of said first segment and the dimensions of said second segment are configured such that the inward radial forces of said first segments are equal to the inward radial forces of said second segments.

9. The rubber tile according to any of the previous claims further comprising attaching means configured for attaching said rubber tile to an adjacent rubber tile.

10. The rubber tile according to claim 9 wherein said attaching means includes an interlocking arrangement.

11. The rubber tile according to claim 10 wherein said interlocking arrangement includes at least one recess defined along at least one side of the rubber tile configured to interlock with a corresponding protrusion defined along at least one side of an adjacent rubber tile.

12. The rubber tile according to claim 11 wherein said first and second segments define a flat side configured to abut a wall.

13. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 911to 12 wherein said interlocking arrangement further includes at least one protrusion defined along at least one side of the rubber tile configured to interlock with a corresponding recess defined along at least one side of an adjacent rubber tile.

14. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 10 to 13 wherein said interlocking arrangement is configured to lock the rubber tile to more than one adjacent rubber tiles.

15. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 11 to 14 wherein said protrusion is a dovetail protrusion and said recess is a dovetail recess configured to releasably attach to said dovetail protrusion.

16. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 1 to 15 wherein said tread surface includes a tread pattern.

17. The rubber tile according to claim 16 wherein said pattern is configured for shock absorbing.

18. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 16 to 17 wherein said pattern is configured for anti-slip.

19. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 16 to 18 wherein said pattern is configured for noise reduction.

20. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 16 to 19 wherein said pattern is configured for thermal insulation.

21. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 1 to 20 wherein said tread portion is an anti bacterial surface.

22. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 1 to 21 wherein first and second segments are configured as a bullet proof surface.

23. The rubber tile according to any one of claims 1 to 21 further comprising one or more segments of a tread portion of a tire being attached to said first segment.

24. The rubber tile according to claim 23 wherein an inner surface of said third segments is coupled to said tread surface of said first segment.

25. The rubber tile according to claim 1 wherein said inner surface of said second segment is coupled to said tread surface of said first segment.

26. The rubber tile of Claim 25 further comprising a third segment of a tread portion of a tire having a tread surface and an inner surface, wherein said inner surface of said third segment is coupled to said tread surface of said second segment.

27. A rubber coating for coating a surface, the coating comprising a plurality of rubber tiles each having at least a first segment of a tread portion of a tire a stackably coupled to a second segment of a tread portion of a tire wherein each of said first and second segments having a tread surface and an inner surface.

28. The rubber coating of Claim 27 wherein said inner surface of said second segment is coupled to said tread surface of said first segment.

29. The rubber coating according to any one of claims 27 to 28 further comprising a third segment of a tread portion of a tire having a tread surface and an inner surface, wherein said inner surface of said third segment is coupled to said tread surface of said second segment.

30. The rubber coating according to Claim 27 wherein said inner surface of said second segment is coupled to said inner surface of said first segment.

31. The rubber coating according to any one of claims 27 to 30 wherein said plurality of rubber tiles are arranged on the surface in an interlocking arrangement with respect to one another.

32. The rubber coating according to claim 31 wherein said interlocking arrangement includes a herringbone pattern.

33. The rubber coating according to claim 31 wherein said interlocking arrangement includes an offset pattern.

34. The rubber coating according to claim 33 wherein said tiles are elongated tiles.

35. The rubber coating according to any one of claims 27 to 34 wherein each of the rubber tiles in said plurality of rubber tiles includes a similar tread pattern.

36. The rubber coating according to claim 35 wherein the orientation of said tread pattern of each of said rubber tiles when disposed on the surface forms a coating pattern.

37. The rubber coating according to claim 36 wherein said rubber tiles are disposed on the surface such that the direction of said tread pattern varies from tile to tile.

38. The rubber coating according to any one of claims 36 to 37 wherein said coating pattern is configured for anti-skid.

39. The rubber coating according to any one of claims 27 to 38 wherein each rubber tile of said plurality of tiles includes a rounded protrusion formed on a first side of the tile, and a corresponding rounded depression formed on another side thereof, wherein said rounded protrusion of each one of said rubber tile is disposed in said rounded depression of an adjacent rubber tile.

40. The rubber coating according to any one of claims 27 to 38 wherein said plurality of rubber tiles includes octagonal rubber tiles and square rubber tiles arranged in an interlocking pattern.

41. A parking stopper formed of a plurality of rubber tiles each being in accordance with claims 25 to 26.

42. The parking stopper of claim 41 wherein said plurality of rubber tiles includes rubber tiles of different dimensions, said rubber tiles being disposed one on top of the other and form together a trapezoidal stopper.

43. A method for forming a rubber tile the method comprising:

providing a vehicle tire

removing the side walls of said tire;

dividing the tread portion of said tire to at least one first segment;

attaching said at least one first segment to a second segment of a tread portion of a tire.

44. The method of claim 43 wherein said at least one first segment is attached to said second segment by attaching the inner surface thereof to an inner surface of said second segment.

45. The method of claim 44 wherein each of said first and second segments includes an inward curvature; and wherein said first and second segments are matched to one another such that by coupling the first and second segments together the opposing inward radial forces thereof are canceled out.

Description:
RUBBER TILE

FIELD

This relates to the tiles in general and in particular to rubber tiles made from used tires for forming a shock absorbing, anti skid, acoustic and thermal insulation surface.

BACKGROUND

Fig. 1 illustrates a conventional tire 10 having a tread portion 12, a side wall 14 and a shoulder portion 16 therebetween. The tread portion 12 includes a pattern 20 having plurality of grooves, lugs, and voids which are configured to provide the vehicle with the necessary traction, in accordance with the intended use of thereof. As the tire wears down, the traction provided by the tread portion 12 is reduced, and the tire must be replaced.

The inner portion of the tread 12 includes steel belts integrated therein, which can be in a form of a belt supporting the entire width of the tread, or a plurality of steel wires providing the tread with its radial shape. The belt extends around the outer circumference of the tread. It acts like an iron hoop in improving the stiffness of the tread area. In the case of truck and bus tires, the belt is more heavily reinforced compared to passenger car tires.

In addition the tread 12 includes a reinforcing plies which are layers of relatively inextensible cords embedded in the rubber to hold its shape by preventing the rubber from stretching in response to the internal pressure.

Used old tires are a health hazard and constitute a serious environmental problem. Tims, recycling and using portions of worn tires are of utmost public interest.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The presently disclosed subject matter provides a rubber tile comprising a first segment of a tread portion of a tire stackingly mounted on a second segment of tread portion of a tire wherein each of the first and second segments having a tread surface and an inner surface.

Each of the first and second segments can include an inward curvature and the first and second segments can be coupled to one another through the inner surfaces thereof or through the tread surface thereof, thereby canceling out the opposing inward radial forces causing the inward curvature thereof.

The dimensions of the first segment can be the same as the dimensions of the second segment. The dimension can be configured in accordance with the area of inner surface required in order to obtain a durable bond between the first segment and second segment.

The first segment can be made from a tread portion having same properties as that of the tread portion out of which the second segment is made. The first segment can be made from a tread portion having properties different than that of the tread portion out of which the second segment is made and the dimension of the first segment and the dimensions of the second segment can be configured such that the inward radial forces of the first segments are equal to the inward radial forces of the second segments.

The rubber tile can further comprise attaching means configured for attaching the rubber tile to an adjacent rubber tile. The attaching means can include an interlocking arrangement. The interlocking arrangement can include at least one recess defined along at least one side of the rubber tile configured to interlock with a corresponding protrusion defined along at least one side of an adjacent rubber tile.

The first and second segments can define a flat side configured to abut a wall. The interlocking arrangement can further include at least one protrusion defined along at least one side of the rubber tile configured to interlock with a corresponding recess defined along at least one side of an adjacent rubber tile.

The interlocking arrangement can be configured to lock the rubber tile to more than one adjacent rubber tiles.

The protrusion can be a dovetail protrusion and the recess can be a dovetail recess configured to releasably attach to the dovetail protrusion.

The tread surface can include a tread pattern. The pattern can be configured for shock absorbing. The pattern can be configured for anti-slip, and/or for noise reduction and/or for thermal insulation. The tread portion can further be an anti bacterial surface. The first and second segments can be configured as a bullet proof surface. The rubber tile can further comprise one or more third segments of a tread portion of a tire being attached to the first segment. An inner surface of the third segments can be coupled to the tread surface of the first segment. The inner surface of the second segment can be coupled to the tread surface of the first segment. The rubber tile can further comprise a third segment of a tread portion of a tire having a tread surface and an inner surface, and the inner surface of the third segment can be coupled to the tread surface of the second segment.

According to another aspect of the presently disclosed subject matter there is provided a rubber coating for coating a surface, the coating comprising a plurality of rubber tiles each having at least a first segment of a tread portion of a tire a stackably coupled to a second segment of a tread portion of a tire wherein each of the first and second segments having a tread surface and an inner surface.

The inner surface of the second segment can coupled to the tread surface of the first segment. The rubber coating can further comprise a third segment of a tread portion of a tire having a tread surface and an inner surface, and the inner surface of the third segment can be coupled to the tread surface of the second segment. The inner surface of the second segment can be coupled to the inner surface of the first segment.

The plurality of rubber tiles can be arranged on the surface in an interlocking arrangement with respect to one another. The interlocking arrangement can include a herringbone pattern and/or an offset pattern. The tiles can be elongated tiles.

Each of the rubber tiles in the plurality of rubber tiles can include a similar tread pattern. The orientation of the tread pattern of each of the rubber tiles when disposed on the surface can form a coating pattern. The rubber tiles can be disposed on the surface such that the direction of the tread pattern varies from tile to tile. The coating pattern can be configured for anti-skid.

Each rubber tile of the plurality of tiles can include a rounded protrusion formed on a first side of the tile, and a corresponding rounded depression formed on another side thereof, and the rounded protrusion of each one of the rubber tile can be disposed in the rounded depression of an adjacent rubber tile.

The plurality of rubber tiles can include octagonal rubber tiles and square rubber tiles arranged in an interlocking pattern. Any one or more of the following examples and designs can be configured with the rubber tile according to the presently disclosed subject matter, individually or in combinations thereof:

• A parking stopper formed of a plurality of rubber tiles;

• The plurality of rubber tiles can include rubber tiles of different dimensions, the rubber tiles being disposed one on top of the other and form together a trapezoidal parking stopper;

• A wall coating for shock absorbing;

• A railroad tie for train tracks formed with one or more layers of tread portion of a tire;

• The railroad tie can include a bottom layer and two pairs of elongated narrowed tire segments each disposed one on top of the other;

• A rubber stopper formed as a graded layout of partially overlapping layers, each including one or more laterally disposed rubber tiles;

• A rubber stopper configured for use in shipyards for engaging the bow of the hull.

According to another aspect of the presently disclosed subject matter there is provided a method for forming a rubber tile. The method comprising providing a vehicle tire, removing the side walls of the tire, dividing the tread portion of the tire to at least one first segment, and attaching the at least one first segment to a second segment of a tread portion of a tire. The at least one first segment can be attached to the second segment by attaching the inner surface thereof to an inner surface of the second segment. Each of the first and second segments includes an inward curvature; and wherein the first and second segments are matched to one another such that by coupling the first and second segments together the opposing inward radial forces thereof are canceled out. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In order to understand the disclosure and to see how it may be carried out in practice, embodiments will now be described, by way of non-limiting example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is perspective view illustration of a conventional tire;

Fig. 2 is the tire of Fig. 1 with the side walls thereof being removed;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view illustration of segments of a tread portion of a tire;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of rubber tile, in accordance with an example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of two rubber tiles attached to one another, in accordance with an example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of two rubber tiles attached to one another in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of three rubber tiles attached to one another in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a coating surface made of a plurality of rubber tiles attached to one another in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 9A is a perspective view of a rubber coating for coating a surface in accordance with one example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 9B is a perspective view of a rubber coating for coating a surface in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 10 is a perspective view of a rubber coating for coating a surface in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 11A is a perspective view of a rubber tile in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 1 IB is a perspective view of a rubber protector formed a the rubber tiles of Fig. 11 in accordance with an example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 12A is a perspective view of a rubber stopper in accordance with an example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 12B is a perspective view of a rubber stopper in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter; Fig. 13A is a side view of a rubber stopper in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 13B is a perspective view of the rubber stopper of Fig. 13 A;

Fig. 14A is a perspective view of a rubber coating for coating a surface in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 14B is a top view of the rubber coating of Fig. 14A;

Fig. 14C is an exploded view of the rubber coating of Fig. 14A;

Fig. 15A is a perspective view of a rubber railroad tie in accordance with an example of the presently disclosed subject matter;

Fig. 15B is a perspective view of a rubber railroad tie in accordance with another example of the presently disclosed subject matter; and

Fig. 15C is a perspective view of a rail track having the rubber railroad tie of Fig. 15A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS

The presently disclosed subject matter relates to a rubber tile made of a tire portion. The rubber tile includes first and second segments of a tread portion of a tire, typically a used tire, each having a tread surface and an inner surface and being inwardly curved. The first and second segments are coupled to one another through the inner surfaces thereof, thereby canceling out the opposing inward radial forces causing the inward curvature of the segments.

As shown in Figs. 2 and 3, according to one example, in order to form the rubber tile the side walls 14 of the tire 10 of Fig. 1, are removed, and the tread portion 12 is cut and divided to segments, here illustrated as segments 25a and 25b. The tread segment 25a and 25b include a tread surface having a pattern 27, and an inner surface 29, which is typically the corresponding segment of the inner liner of the tire, and one or more steel belts 31 and a reinforcing ply 32 disposed therebetween. The steel belt 31 is disposed and curved in the direction along the length each of the segments 25a and 25b, and can be in the form of a plurality of metal wires providing the segments with strength and durability. The radial ply 32 is disposed along the width of each of the segments 25a and 25b, and can be curved in same direction. The segments 25a and 25b can include other elements such as carcass, which is load-bearing framework that forms the body of the tire, and which can be curved in the direction along the width of the segments.

Due to the inward radial forces applied by the curved steel belt 31, and other elements inside the tire, the tread segments 25a and 25b are slightly inwardly curved.

Referring now to Fig. 4, in order to overcome the radial forces caused by the steel belts 31 and applied along the length of the segments, the first segment 25a is coupled to the second segment 25b through the inner surfaces 29 thereof, forming together a rubber tile 30. This way, the forces causing the curvature of the first segments 25a are substantially canceled out by the forces causing the curvature of the second segments 25b and having the opposite direction.

It is appreciated that in order to properly cancel out the opposing forces the segment 25a and 25b can be substantially the same size, and cut out of the same tire, or cut out of tires having the same characteristics. However, alternatively, the forces applied by each of the segments on the opposing segment can be substantially matched in any other way, such as using segments of different size, or segment from tires having different characteristics, etc. It is further appreciated that the radial forces of each of the segments do not have to accurately match; rather, the forces should be reduced by one another to the extent that the rubber tile formed of the two segments can be used as a flat surface without curvatures.

Coupling the first and second segments 25a and 25b to one another can be carried out by gluing the inner surfaces 29 to one another. Alternatively, coupling the first and second segments 25a and 25b can be carried out by welding, curing or by using coupling means such as nails, screws, etc.

It is appreciated that in case the first and second segments 25a and 25b are affixed to one another by means of screws, the screw thread can engage the steel belt 31, for example the steel wires thereof, thereby providing a strong bond between the two segments.

The size of the rubber tile 30 can be determined in accordance with the width of the tire, out of which the first and second segments 25a and 25b are cut. The length of the rubber tile, on the other hand, can be determined by the circumference of the tire, out of which the first and second segments 25a and 25b are cut. It is appreciated that the ratio between the width and the length of the segments can be determined by the amount of inner surface required in order to obtain a durable bond between the first and second segments 25a and 25b. That is to say, if the segment are relatively long and narrow, the opposing radial forces applied on the edges of thereof may be too strong for the counter forces applied by the coupling means between the segments to maintain a solid attachment thereof. However, it is noted that narrow long pieces can eliminate most of the curvature by weight and mass, but will be more susceptible to being flexible towards the middle if a strong force is being exerted.

The rubber tile 30 can be used as a shock absorbing floor in factories, playgrounds, or as a shock absorbing coating on walls. In addition, due to the tread pattern on the first and second tread segments 25a and 25b, as well as the material thereof, the tile 30 can be used as an anti-slip surface for work places, sidewalks pavement, and parking lots. In addition due to the multi layered nature of this material of the tire the tiles can be used for noise reduction, and can be energy efficient in thermal insulation and used as anti bacterial surface.

In order to coat a large area with the rubber surface, a plurality of tiles 30 can be attached to one another by using attaching means. According to the illustrated example, the attaching means are an interlocking arrangement 34 including a plurality of recesses 36a and protrusions 36b defined alongside the width and length of the tile 30, configured to interlock with one another tile, having corresponding recesses and protrusions.

Fig. 5 illustrates two rubber tiles 40a and 40b, substantially similar to the rubber tile 30 of Fig. 4, and having an interlocking arrangement 42 with a plurality of recesses 44a and corresponding protrusions 44b. According to this example the recesses 44a and corresponding protrusions 44b include a shape of a dovetail joint configured to releasably attach rubber tiles 40a and 40b to one another.

It is appreciated that rubber tile 40a can be made of a tire different than the one which rubber tile 40b is made of. For example tile 40a can be made of a tire having a first tread pattern 41a while tile 40b is made of a tire having a second tread pattern 41b.

It is further appreciated that selecting the appropriate tread pattern can be carried out by taking into account the intended use of the tiles. For example, tiles for a room with heavy machinery can be formed from tires of heavy duty vehicles, such as trucks and tractors. In addition, by choosing tire types to be cut, factories can design a floor plan with different patterns to correspond with industrial needs, such as to allow flow of liquids on the floor.

Referring now to Fig. 6, the rubber tiles can have attaching means on all four sides thereof, so as to allow for attaching additional tiles to each of the sides. According to another example the rubber tile 50 can be provided with attaching means only on three sides thereof 55, for example when the attaching means are interlocking arrangement 52 having recesses 54a and corresponding protrusions 54b defined alongside the width and length thereof, one side of the rubber tile 50 can be a flat side 56 formed without any recesses. The flat side 56 can be used for disposing the tile 50 adjacent a wall, thus allowing the tile 50 to abut the wall along the entire flat side 56, without gaps there between, for example, in case other sides 55, having recesses 54a formed therealong, are abutting the wall. Accordingly, in case the flat side 56 is defined along the length of the tile 50, a recesses 54a defined along the width of the tile, can be configured to interlock with a corresponding protrusion 54b defined along a width of a second tile 58, which can include a flat side 56 along the length thereof. The two tiles 50 and 58 attached to one another form together a long flat side which can abut a wall portion, thus allowing forming a coating surface therealong.

It is noted that the rubber tiles can be used to form a wall surface and can used as a bullet proof surface which can be installed on home windows, building sidewalls and armored vehicles.

Figs. 7 and 8 illustrate a method of attaching a plurality of rubber tiles 62 to one another, thereby forming a coating surface 60. A first tile 62a having a recesses 64a defined along the width thereof, is attached to a second tile 62b having a corresponding protrusion 66b defined long the width thereof. A third tile 62c having two or more protrusions 66c defined along the length thereof is attached to the first and second tiles 62a and 62b, by interlocking at least one protrusion 66c with at least one recess 64a defined along the length of the first tile 62a and interlocking at least one protrusion 66c with at least one recess 64b defined along the length of the second tile 62b. This way the third tile 62c locks the first and second tiles 61a and 62b together. As shown in Fig. 8, a plurality of tiles 62 can be attached to one another in such a way that each tile 62 locks along the length thereof two adjacent tiles thereby forming a coating surface 60, the size of which can be changed by adding tiles as required.

It is appreciated that the rubber tiles can be formed in different shapes, such as a rectangular tile, triangular tile etc. and can be painted in different colors, so as to form together a coating surface with a desired design or pattern.

In addition, the rubber tiles can be cut in different shapes, and used as a game in which the user has to put together different shapes of the tiles together.

According to another example the rubber tiles are configured without an interlocking portion, however are disposed on the surface to be coated in an interlocking arrangement. For example, rubber tile 70 illustrated in Figs. 9A and 9B includes three tire segments 72a, 72b and 72c stackably coupled to one another. The segments 72a, 72b and 72c can be coupled to one another by affixing the inner surface 74 of one segment to the tread portion 76 of another segment. This rubber tile 70 according to this example can serve as a shock absorbing elements. It is appreciated that the rubber tile 70 can includes more than three segments, as many as required for providing the appropriate shock absorbent. In accordance with the required shock absorbent properties, the tire from which the segments are cut can be selected.

The rubber tiles can be arranged to cover a large area, forming together a rubber coating for coating a floor area such as a floor of a room. According the present example, the rubber tiles 70 are arranged as a rubber coating 80, however in order to preclude movements of the rubber tiles 70 with respect to one another, the tiles can be arranged in a herringbone pattern or any other interlocking arrangement.

As shown in Fig. 9A the tiles are orientated with respect to at least on adjacent tile an opposite direction. In this arrangement that tiles are formed with the length thereof being twice the width thereof. Thus, when three tiles are disposed on the floor, one tile can be disposed with the length thereof disposed along the width of two parallel tiles. Fig. 9B illustrates another tile arrangement in which the tiles are disposed in an offset pattern, thus, each tile is held in place by adjacent tiles. In the latter example, the tiles can be formed as a square, however, in case the tiles used for cutting the segments are not wide enough, two rectangular rubber tiles can be parallely disposed forming together a square tile. It is appreciated that in order to further strengthen the rubber coating in addition to the offset pattern, the square tiles can be rotated with respect to one another, such that the tread pattern of one tile is disposed in a different direction with respect to the tread pattern of an adjacent pattern. It is appreciated that in some case the tiles can be disposed such that the direction of the tread pattern is consistent. In any case, disposing the tiles can be carried out such that the tread pattern of each rubber tile forms a coating pattern of the entire coated area. The coating pattern can be determined in accordance with design requirement or other requirements, such as requirement for anti-skid or anti- slip coating. Fig. 10 is another example of a rubber tile coating 85 for coating a floor area. According this example, the rubber tiles 87 are elongated tiles arranged in a offset pattern. It is noted that due to the flexibility and the length of the rubber tiles 87 according to this example, the rubber tiles can be utilized for paving roadways for example in harsh terrain.

Reference in now made to Figs. 11A and 11B, showing a rubber tiles 90 in accordance with another example. According to this example, the rubber tiles are formed by stacking two or more tire segments 92, and coupling them to one another by affixing the inner portion of one segment to the tread portion of another segment. In order to further secure the tire segment 92 to one another fastening means 94, such as nails or screws, can be used.

The rubber tiles 90 include a rounded protrusion 94a formed on a first side of the tile, and a corresponding rounded depression 94b formed on a second side of the tile. The rubber tiles 90 can be disposed one next to the other such that the rounded protrusion of a first tile is disposed in the rounded depression of a second tile. This way, the tiles can be arranged in a row each of which being retained in place by the depression protrusion arrangement.

As shown in Fig. 1 IB, the rubber tiles 90 can be used to form a rubber protector 95 for example for a wall portion 98 of a parking lot providing protection to vehicles parking next to the wall portion. The rubber protector 95 can be horizontally mounted on top of a fence wall portion 98 as shown in Fig. 1 IB, or can be vertically mounted on the side of a wall portion, such as a side wall in a parking area.

As shown in Fig. 1 IB, the rubber protector 95 can be mounted on an arched wall portion 98, by disposing one tile in a slightly different angle with respect to the other. This can be carried out by disposing the rounded protrusion 94a with an angle inside the corresponded rounded depression 94b. It is appreciated that due to the rounded shaped of the depression 94b and protrusion 94a the tiles can be disposed in a range of angle with respect to one another, thus an arched row of tiles can be formed.

The rubber protector can be utilized for reducing soil erosion in urban areas, such as gardens, parks and sidewalks.

The rubber protector according to other examples, can be formed with of any desired shape, such as curves arched portion or undulating portions. According to another example a rubber parking stopper for parking lots 100 can be formed from a plurality of rubber tiles 102 made of tire segments. The rubber tiles 102 can be disposed on top of the other as explained with regards to the previous example, so as to provide a parking stopper 100 in the appropriate height. As shown in Fig. 12A, in order to form trapezoidal stopper, such that can engage the outer surface of the wheels of parking vehicle, the rubber tiles 102 can be formed with varying width. Accordingly, the bottommost rubber tile 102a is cut with the largest width, while the rubber tiles 102b on top thereof is narrower, such that the uppermost rubber tile 102c is the narrowest. Each rubber tile 102 is centrally disposed on top of slightly wider rubber tile, forming together a trapezoidal shape from two sides of the stopper 100.

The rubber stopper can be mounted to the ground by means of a fastening means 107, such as screws, nails or pegs.

As shown in Fig. 12B the stopper can be made with a trapezoidal shape from all sides thereof. Thus, the rubber tiles 102 are formed with varying width as well as varying length. Accordingly, the bottommost rubber tile 102a is cut with the largest width and length, while the rubber tiles 102b on top thereof is narrower and slightly shorter, such that the uppermost rubber tile 102c is the narrowest and the shortest. Each rubber tile 102 is centrally disposed on top of slightly wider rubber tile, forming together a trapezoidal shape from two sides of the stopper 100.

It is appreciated that the rubber stopper can be formed as a right angle trapezoid or a left angle trapezoid, and be used for example for stopping a parking vehicle only from the angled side thereof, such as at the end of a parking area.

Figs. 13A and 13B shows yet another rubber stopper 110, such that can be used for large vehicles, planes, boats, and trucks. The rubber stopper 110 can be formed as a graded layout of partially overlapping layers, each including one or more laterally disposed rubber tiles 112. The first layer 114a includes a number of rubber tiles, and the second layer 114b includes less number of rubber tiles 112 disposed on the first layer 114a. The rubber tiles 112 of the second layer 114b are disposed such that at least one side of the first layer 114a is not covered, forming a step between the layers. The rubber stopper 110 can include as many layers as required, each layer can include less number of tiles in comparison to the number of tiles in the previous layer therebelow. A large vehicle can park with the wheel thereof engaging the rubber stopper 110, for example a wheel of a plane. The rubber stopper 110 can be used in shipyards for engaging the bow of the hull.

Reference is now made to Figs. 14A to 14C, illustrating another example of a surface coating 120, made of a plurality of octagonal rubber tiles 122 and square rubber tiles 124 arranged in an interlocking pattern. The rubber tiles 122 according to this example are formed with three segments of tire disposed one on top of the other and cut out of a tire in the form of an octagon. The rubber tiles 122 are disposed one next to the other such that each tile 122 engages four other octagonal tiles, and four square tiles 124. When the surface is coated the tiles 122 and 124 are securely held in place by one another. In addition, the tiles can be coupled to the floor or to the surface in other other way such as utilizing an adhesive material, nails, screws etc.

Figs. 15A to 15C illustrates a train track 130 having a rrailroad tie 132 formed with rubber tiles for coupling the two tracks 134. The railroad tie 132 can be formed with one or more layers 136 of tread portion of a tire. The railroad tie 132 includes a bottom layer 136 which can be one segment of a tire and two elongated narrowed tire segments 138 disposed along each side of the length of the bottom layer, for providing thereto strength and durability. As shown in Fig. 15B the railroad tie 142 can include a bottom layer 146 and two pairs of elongated narrowed tire segments 148. The segments 148 of each pair are is disposed one on top of the other, as explained with reference to previous examples of rubber tiles, so as to further strengthen the railroad tie 142. It is appreciated that more layers of tire segments can be used, such as bottom layer 142, or narrowed segments 148, in accordance with the required height of the tracks to be mounted thereon.

Utilizing used tires for forming the rubber tiles allows reusing old tires without having to process the tires through shredding and use of expensive equipment. It is appreciated that a plurality of rubber tiles as described in any one of the above examples can be disposed sidewise one adjacent the other thereby forming a rubber coated surface.

Those skilled in the art to which the presently disclosed subject matter pertains will readily appreciate that numerous changes, variations, and modifications can be made without departing from the scope of the invention, mutatis mutandis.