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Title:
SCREW-TYPE FASTENER
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/089273
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A screw includes: a head end, a shank and a tapered end, the head end including a tool engaging part, the head end located at one end of the shank and the tapered end located at an opposite end of the shank, wherein a thread is formed along the shank, the thread begins on the tapered end, extends onto the shank and terminates at a set location short of the head end, the thread being a right-hand thread and having a peripheral edge, at least a first helical portion of the peripheral edge includes a plurality of notches and a second helical portion of the thread lacks any notches, wherein the first helical portion is closer to the tapered end than the second helical portion, wherein the head includes an underside formed by a frustoconical part with a plurality of nibs. The head may also include an outer ledge.

Inventors:
LAJEWARDI, Farhad (Inc.10590 Hamilton Avenu, Cincinnati OH, 45231, US)
FALKENSTEIN, Michael, K. (Inc.10590 Hamilton Avenu, Cincinnati OH, 45231, US)
MAHADEO, Beesham (Inc.10590 Hamilton Avenu, Cincinnati OH, 45231, US)
Application Number:
US2018/057003
Publication Date:
May 09, 2019
Filing Date:
October 23, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
THE HILLMAN GROUP, INC. (10590 Hamilton Avenue, Cincinnati, OH, 45231, US)
International Classes:
F16B25/00; F16B25/08; F16B25/10
Foreign References:
US20170284447A12017-10-05
US20160265578A12016-09-15
GB1357720A1974-06-26
US8192123B22012-06-05
US9145911B22015-09-29
US4655661A1987-04-07
US7604445B12009-10-20
US9581183B22017-02-28
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
NIEBERDING, Michael, J. et al. (Thompson Hine LLP, 10050 Innovation Drive Suite 40, Dayton OH, 45342-4934, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

What is claimed is:

1. A screw, comprising:

a head end, a shank and a tapered end,

the head end including a tool engaging part, the head end located at one end of the shank and the tapered end located at an opposite end of the shank,

wherein a thread is formed along the shank, the thread begins on the tapered end, extends onto the shank and terminates at a set location short of the head end, the thread being a right-hand thread and having a peripheral edge, at least a first helical portion of the peripheral edge includes a plurality of notches and a second helical portion of the thread lacks any notches, wherein the first helical portion is closer to the tapered end than the second helical portion,

wherein the head includes an underside formed by a frustoconical part with a plurality of nibs.

2. The screw of claim 1 wherein the thread is symmetric and includes a leading flank and a trailing flank that each form a respective flank angle of between about eighteen to twenty -two degrees.

3. The screw of claim 1 wherein the thread is symmetric and includes a leading flank and a trailing flank that collectively form a total thread angle of between about thirty and forty-five degrees for increasing pull-out force and reducing required driving torque.

4. The screw of claim 1 wherein the thread is asymmetric and includes a leading flank and a trailing flank, the trailing flank forms a flank angle of between about eleven to eighteen degrees, the leading flank forms a flank angle of between about twenty -three to thirty-five degrees for increasing pull-out force and improving joint assembly strength.

5. The screw of claim 1 wherein the tapered end defines a taper angle of between about nineteen and about twenty-eight degrees.

6. The screw of claim 5 wherein the tapered end terminates in a tip having a maximum radius of 0.014 inches.

7. The screw of claim 1 wherein the frustoconical part defines a total head angle of between about eighty -five degrees and about one-hundred degrees for increasing pull- through force and enhancing joint assembly strength.

8. The screw of claim 1 wherein a frustoconical neck connects the head to the shank, and the frustoconical neck defines a total neck angle of between about eighteen degrees and about twenty -five degrees.

9. The screw of claim 1 wherein each nib includes a concave leading face and a concave trailing face.

10. The screw of claim 1 wherein the head further includes an annular ledge extending radially outward beyond a perimeter of the frustoconical part for increasing pull-through force.

11. The screw of claim 1 wherein each nib spirals in a direction with a rotational installation direction of the screw when moving along the frustoconical part toward the shank of the screw.

12. The screw of claim 1 wherein each nib spirals in a direction counter to a rotational installation direction of the screw when moving along the frustoconical part toward the shank of the screw.

13. The screw of claim 1 wherein each nib extends onto a neck part of the screw and tapers into the shank.

14. A screw, comprising:

a head end, a shank and a tapered end,

the head end including a tool engaging part, the head end located at one end of the shank and the tapered end located at an opposite end of the shank, wherein a thread is formed along the shank, the thread begins on the tapered end, extends onto the shank and terminates at a set location short of the head end, the thread being a right-hand thread and having a peripheral edge, at least a first helical portion of the peripheral edge includes a plurality of notches and a second helical portion of the thread lacks any notches, wherein the first helical portion is closer to the tapered end than the second helical portion,

wherein the head includes an underside formed by a frustoconical part, and further includes an annular ledge extending radially outward beyond a perimeter of the

frustoconical part.

15. The screw of claim 14 wherein the frustoconical part defines a total head angle of between about eighty -five degrees and about one-hundred degrees for increasing pull- through force and enhancing joint assembly strength.

16. The screw of claim 15 wherein a frustoconical neck connects the head to the shank, and the frustoconical neck defines a total neck angle of between about eighteen degrees and about twenty -five degrees.

17. The screw of claim 14 wherein each nib includes a first segment primarily on the annular ledge and a second segment primarily on the frustoconical part.

18. The screw of claim 17 wherein each nib extends along only part of a length of the frustoconical part.

19. A screw, comprising:

a head end, a shank and a tapered end,

the head end including a tool engaging part, the head end located at one end of the shank and the tapered end located at an opposite end of the shank,

wherein a thread is formed along the shank, the thread begins on the tapered end, extends onto the shank and terminates at a set location short of the head end, the thread being a right-hand thread and having a peripheral edge, at least a first helical portion of the peripheral edge includes a plurality of notches and a second helical portion of the thread lacks any notches, wherein the first helical portion is closer to the tapered end than the second helical portion,

wherein the head includes an underside formed by a frustoconical part with a plurality of nibs;

wherein the shank includes an unthreaded portion between the set location and the head end, wherein an axial length of the unthreaded portion is no more than about ninety percent of a combined axial length of the tapered end and the threaded portion of the shank.

20. The screw of claim 19 wherein the axial length of the unthreaded portion is no more than about eighty percent of the axial length of the combined axial length of the tapered end and the threaded portion of the shank.

21. The screw of claim 19, further comprising:

the thread is a main thread;

a set of flute threads are also located on the shank, each flute thread overlapping with multiple turns of the main thread and extending toward the head end.

22. The screw of claim 21 where between about forty percent and sixty percent of an axial length of each flute thread overlaps with the main thread.

Description:
SCREW-TYPE FASTENER

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0001] This application relates generally to threaded fasteners, and more particularly, to a threaded wood screw.

BACKGROUND

[0002] A typical screw configuration includes an elongated shank that extends between a driving head of the screw and a pointed end of the screw. At least part of the shank is helically threaded. Wood screws with a variety of configurations are known. However, improvements upon self-drilling speed, torque to seat and removal torque are continuously sought.

[0003] It would be desirable to provide a cost-effective wood screw configuration that facilitates quick and effective installation.

SUMMARY

[0004] In one aspect, a screw comprises: a head end, a shank and a tapered end, the head end including a tool engaging part, the head end located at one end of the shank and the tapered end located at an opposite end of the shank, wherein a thread is formed along the shank, the thread begins on the tapered end, extends onto the shank and terminates at a set location short of the head end, the thread being a right-hand thread and having a peripheral edge, at least a first helical portion of the peripheral edge includes a plurality of notches and a second helical portion of the thread lacks any notches, wherein the first helical portion is closer to the tapered end than the second helical portion, wherein the head includes an underside formed by a frustoconical part with a plurality of nibs.

[0005] In another aspect, a screw, comprises: a head end, a shank and a tapered end, the head end including a tool engaging part, the head end located at one end of the shank and the tapered end located at an opposite end of the shank, wherein a thread is formed along the shank, the thread begins on the tapered end, extends onto the shank and terminates at a set location short of the head end, the thread being a right-hand thread and having a peripheral edge, at least a first helical portion of the peripheral edge includes a plurality of notches and a second helical portion of the thread lacks any notches, wherein the first helical portion is closer to the tapered end than the second helical portion, wherein the head includes an underside formed by a frustoconical part, and further includes an annular ledge extending radially outward beyond a perimeter of the frustoconical part. [0006] In a further aspect, a screw comprises: a head end, a shank and a tapered end, the head end including a tool engaging part, the head end located at one end of the shank and the tapered end located at an opposite end of the shank, wherein a thread is formed along the shank, the thread begins on the tapered end, extends onto the shank and terminates at a set location short of the head end, the thread being a right-hand thread and having a peripheral edge, at least a first helical portion of the peripheral edge includes a plurality of notches and a second helical portion of the thread lacks any notches, wherein the first helical portion is closer to the tapered end than the second helical portion, wherein the head includes an underside formed by a frustoconical part with a plurality of nibs; wherein the shank includes an unthreaded portion between the set location and the head end, wherein an axial length of the unthreaded portion is no more than about ninety percent of a combined axial length of the tapered end and the threaded portion of the shank.

[0007] The details of one or more embodiments are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0008] Fig. 1 shows a side elevation of one embodiment of a screw;

[0009] Fig. 2 shows another side elevation of the screw;

[0010] Fig. 3 shows a perspective view of the screw;

[0011] Fig. 4 shows a partial perspective view of the screw;

[0012] Fig. 5 shows a point end view of the screw;

[0013] Fig. 6 shows a head end view of the screw;

[0014] Fig. 7 shows a partial perspective view of the screw;

[0015] Fig. 8 shows a cross-section view taken along a plane perpendicular to the axis of the screw and looking at the underside of the head end of the screw;

[0016] Fig. 9 shows a partial side elevation of the screw;

[0017] Fig. 10 shows a partial perspective view of the screw;

[0018] Fig. 11 shows a partial perspective view of the screw thread with notches;

[0019] Fig. 12 shows a partial perspective of the underside of the screw head;

[0020] Figs . 13-19 show views of another embodiment of a screw;

[0021] Figs . 20-23 show views of another embodiment of a screw;

[0022] Figs . 24-27 show views of another embodiment of a screw;

[0023] Figs . 28-31 show views of another embodiment of a screw; and [0024] Figs. 32 shows another embodiment of a screw.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0025] Referring to Figs. 1-12, one embodiment of a screw 10 is shown. The screw includes a head end 12, a shank or core 14 and a tapered end 16. The head end 12 includes a tool engaging part 18 (e.g., in the form of a drive receiving recess) and is located at one end of the shank 14. As used herein the term shank refers to the elongated core or shaft or the screw, which can include threaded and unthreaded portions. The tapered end 16 is located at an opposite end of the shank 14 and terminates in a point 20. By way of example, the taper angle al defining the point 20 may be between about nineteen and about twenty-eight degrees (such as about twenty to twenty-five degrees, such as about twenty- one to twenty-three degrees). This angle range provides a good start for initial penetration into wood material when driving the screw. To further enhance the performance of the pointed tip, the tip may be formed with a maximum radius of 0.008 inches (e.g., typically in the range of 0.001 to 0.014 inches, such as the range of 0.003 to 0.008 inches). This tip configuration provides easier engagement into the substrate and faster penetration, resulting in overall less effort for a contractor to install the screw.

[0026] A thread 22 begins on the tapered end 16 (e.g., either at the very tip or slightly short of the tip), extends onto the shank 14 and terminates at a set location 24 short of the head end 12. The thread 22 is a right-hand thread as shown, and has a peripheral edge 30 formed where a leading flank 26 meets a trailing flank 28. In one implementation, the thread is symmetric, with a leading flank angle and a trailing flank angle that are both in the range of about eighteen to twenty-two degrees (e.g., about twenty degrees), for a total thread angle of between thirty-sic to forty -four degrees. Other variations are possible. Generally, a total thread angle of between thirty and forty-five degrees will provide a screw with higher pull-out force and reduction in required driving torque, which consumes less drill battery energy. In another implementation, the thread is asymmetric with leading angle bigger than the trailing angle. Designing the thread angle to this specification will increase joint strength in wood assembly. The asymmetric thread angle will provide for higher pull-out force and provide a joint assembly with better strength.

[0027] A helical portion or extent 32 of the peripheral edge 30 includes a plurality of notch regions 34 spaced apart from each other by respective notch free regions 36. The notch-free regions may all be aligned linearly and in parallel with an axis 41 of the screw shank, or may be circumferentially offset from each other slightly with each subsequent helical turn of the thread. Each notch region 34 extends through a circumferential angle of between about two-hundred (280) degrees and about three-hundred and twenty (320) degrees (such as between about 295 degrees and 305 degrees, such as about 300 degrees) and includes a plurality of side-by-side notches 38 (e.g., V-notches) formed in the peripheral edge 30 of the thread, where the notches are spaced apart equally from each other. Here, nine or ten notches 38 may be included in each region 34, but the number could vary higher or lower.

[0028] In one example, the notches may be formed as substantially V-shaped notches that are oriented substantially perpendicular to the thread helix angle Φ3 of the thread 22, which angle Φ3 may be between about ten degrees and about twenty-five degrees (e.g. about eighteen to twenty-two degrees), where the helix angle is the cut angle of the thread relative to a plane 39 perpendicular to the central axis 41 of the thread.

Alternatively, the V-notches may be oriented to run parallel to the central axis 41. In this regard, in the context of the present application the term "V-shaped" as used in relation to thread peripheral edge notches means that the notch is formed as a V-shaped recess or cutout along the peripheral edge, which may have a sharp point at the bottom of the V- shape, a flat at the bottom of the V-shape or a curvature at the bottom of the V-shape. The orientation of a V-shaped notch 38 is defined as the direction of a line formed by the base or bottom 43 of the V-shape of the notch (which line runs parallel to the sides 45 of the V- shape of the notch). The term "substantially perpendicular to the helix angle" means oriented at 90 degrees relative to the helix angle, ± 5 degrees for tolerance. The V-shaped notches may enhance the cutting action of the primary thread as the screw is rotated into a material. The V-shaped notches may also reduce the resistance and torque to seat the screw.

[0029] Each notch free region 36 may extend through a circumferential angle of between about forty (40) degrees and about eighty (80) degrees (such as between about 55 and 65 degrees, such as about 60 degrees) and lacks any notches (such that the edge 30 is continuous in such regions 36). Notably, the notch free regions 36 may be distributed linearly along the helical portion 32 in parallel with central axis, or alternatively may be distributed such that a line sequentially traversing a mid-point of each of the V-notch free regions 36 extends in a left-hand helical path about the shank 14 (e.g., and at a helix angle which may be between about eighty (80) degrees and about sixty-five (65) degrees (e.g., 90 degrees minus the angle Φ3)). [0030] In the illustrated embodiment, the thread 22 includes another helical portion or extent 42 extending from helical portion or extent 32 to the set location 24, where helical portion 42 is completely free of any notches along the peripheral edge. However, in other variations the notch arrangement (i.e., repeating sequence of notch regions 34 and notch- free regions 36) could run substantially the full length of the thread 22 (e.g., encompassing the length of both illustrated extents 32 and 42, or encompassing at least 80% of the full length of the thread 22, such as 90% or more) or could run from a location on or near the tapered end and substantially to the set location 24.

[0031] In one implementation, the thread 22 has a pitch P of between about 0.065 inches and 0.070 inches, a major diameter D M of between about 0.180 and about 0.190 inches and a minor diameter D m of between about 0.115 and 0.125 inches. In another implementation, the thread 22 has a pitch P of between about 0.105 inches and 0.115 inches, a major diameter D M of between about 0.180 and about 0.190 inches and a minor diameter D m of between about 0.115 and 0.125 inches. In another implementation, the thread 22 has a pitch P of between about 0.105 inches and 0.115 inches, a major diameter D M of between about 0.190 and about 0.210 inches and a minor diameter D m of between about 0.125 and 0.140 inches. In another implementation, the thread 22 has a pitch P of between about 0.105 inches and 0.115 inches, a major diameter D M of between about 0.165 and about 0.185 inches and a minor diameter D m of between about 0.100 and 0.120 inches. These values can vary according to screw diameter.

[0032] The tapered end 16 includes a ninety degree axial cut 100 running from the tip 20.

[0033] Here, the unthreaded portion 75 of the shank 14 includes a diameter D 75 that is slightly larger than the diameter Dm of the threaded portion 77 of the shank. For example, diameter D75 may be between about 0.130 and about 0.140 inches. Here, an axial length L 75 of the unthreaded portion 75 is less than the combined axial length L 77 of the threaded shank portion 77 and tapered end 16. For example, in one embodiment L 77 may be in the range of between about 1.350 and about 1.450 inches, and L 75 may be in the range of between about 0.880 and about 1.120 inches. In another embodiment. L 77 may be in the range of between about 1.440 and about 1.480 inches and L 75 may be in the range of between about 1.360 and about 1.430 inches. However, other variations are possible. The axial length L75 of the unthreaded portion 75 may be no more than about ninety percent (such as no more than eighty-five percent or no more than eighty percent) of the combined axial length L77.

[0034] The head end 12 includes an underside with a frustoconical part 70, which joins to the shank 14 via an intermediate frustoconical part and 72. Frustoconical part 70 tapers from the face in which tool engaging recess is located 18 toward the shank 14 at a head angle a2. In one embodiment head angle a2 may be between about forty-four (44) degrees and about forty-eight (48) degrees, such as between about forty -five (45) and forty- six (46) degrees) relative a central axis 41 of the screw shank, which results in a total head angle a2T of twice a2 (e.g., between about eighty-five and one-hundred degrees, such as between about eighty-eight degrees and about ninety-six degrees, such as between about ninety and ninety-two degrees). The larger head angle will provide an increase in pull- through force, resulting better joint strength assembly and preventing loosening. This enables the drive recess to be made deeper for better drive engagement, but still provides sufficient head wall thickness. In another embodiment head angle a2 may be between about thirty-nine and forty-one degrees. Frustoconical neck part 72 tapers from the edge of frustoconical part 70 to the shank 14 at a neck angle a3, which may be between about ten (10) and about 12 (12) degrees), relative to the central axis 41, which results in a total neck angle of twice a3 (e.g., between about eighteen degrees and about twenty-five degrees). Notably, the axial length of neck part 72 is substantially less than the axial length of head part 70, such as less than 50% of the axial length of head part 70. The relatively small neck length and neck angle increases the strength of the joint between the head and the shank inside wood assembly.

[0035] A plurality of outwardly protruding spaced apart nibs 80 are located at the underside of the head along frustoconical part 70. Here, six nibs 80 are shown, but other variations are possible, such between as four and eight nibs. Each nib 80 has one end 82 proximate the face of the head end (or proximate the tool engaging part) and extends toward the shank 14 to an opposite end 84. In the illustrated embodiment the nib end 84 is located along the line or plane of intersection of the frustoconical part 70 with frustoconical part 72. Each nib 80 has opposite sides or faces 86 and 88 that meat at an intersection line or ridge 90.

[0036] As used herein the terminology "proximate the tool engaging part" when referring to the end of the nib means within an axial distance of 0.05 inches of the face in which the tool engaging recess is located. As shown in the drawings, each nib extends both in a direction that includes a component parallel to an axis of the screw and a component radially inward toward a center axis of the screw

[0037] Each nib 80 has a base width (i.e., a width at the surface of frustoconical part 70) that varies from a larger width W82 at end 82 and tapers to a lesser width W84 at end 84. In one example, width W84 is no more than fifty percent of width W82. Each nib 80 has a leading face 86 and a trailing face 88 that meat to define a nib ridge 90. The leading face is defined as the nib face that faces toward the rotational direction for driving the screw into a material (in this case the clockwise direction when looking at the end face of the head end of the screw). The nib ridge 90 has a height (measured orthogonal to the frustoconical surface of tapered portion 70) that varies from a larger height R82 at end 82 and decreases to a lesser height R84 at end 84. In one example, height R84 is no more than fifty percent of height R82.

[0038] As shown, the configuration of leading face 86 and trailing face 88 may be different. In particular, the leading face 86 is substantially concave and the trailing face 8 is substantially convex.

[0039] The nibs 86 provide a self-countersink operation prior to full seating of the screw. The nibs can also assist in locking the screw into place, increasing break away torque.

[0040] It is to be clearly understood that the above description is intended by way of illustration and example only, is not intended to be taken by way of limitation, and that other changes and modifications are possible. For example, while certain relative dimensions have been provided by example above, variations are possible.

[0041] Further, and referring to Figs. 13-19 another embodiment of a screw 110 is shown, which includes a shank 114, tapered end 116 and thread 122 configuration similar to that of above screw 10. In the case of screw 110, the head end 112 is configured differently. In particular, the head end 112 includes an annular ledge 150 about its perimeter at the face end, and the frustoconical part 170 of the head does not extend to the radially outer edge of the ledge 150. The ledge configuration increase pull-through force and provides a unique feature for framing in construction, which requires higher joint strength. The ledge feature provides a more flat surface area of engagement between the underside of the screw head and the substrate, and thus increases resistance force against the substrate. In one implementation the annular dimension D 150 of the ledge may be between about 5% and 20% of the total head diameter Dl 12. Ledge 150 may provide a resistance toward pull-through loading conditions of the screw, and stronger head design for holding higher loads. The head end 112 includes a combination of a countersunk head portion (formed primarily by part 170) and a wafer head portion (formed primarily by ledge 150). The total head angle a5 may be similar to that described above for screw 10, and the neck part 172 may be of similar angle and axial length to the described above for neck part 72.

[0042] The nibs 180 are different in configuration than nibs 80 above. In particular, nibs 180 only extend a slight distance down the head part 170 toward the neck part 172. Here, nib length L180 in a direction parallel with the surface of head part 170 is no more than one-half the length L170 (e.g., no more than one-third the length L170). Each nib also includes a segment 180-1 that extends along the ledge 150 as shown. The leading face 200 of nib segment 180-1 is concave and the trailing face 202 convex. With respect to nib segment 180-2, which is located primarily on head part 170, the leading face 204 and trailing face 206 may both be substantially planar or only slightly curved.

[0043] In one implementation, the thread 22 has a pitch P of between about 0.105 inches and 0.115 inches, a major diameter D M of between about 0.180 and about 0.190 inches and a minor diameter D m of between about 0.115 and 0.125 inches. In another implementation, the thread 122 has a pitch of between about 0.105 inches and 0.115 inches, a major diameter of between about 0.190 and about 0.210 inches and a minor diameter of between about 0.125 and 0.140 inches. In another implementation, the thread 122 has a pitch of between about 0.105 inches and 0.115 inches, a major diameter of between about 0.165 and about 0.185 inches and a minor diameter of between about 0.100 and 0.120 inches.

[0044] Referring now to Figs. 20-23 another embodiment of a screw 210 is shown, which includes a shank 214, tapered end 216 and thread 222 configuration similar to that of above screw 10. In the case of screw 210, the head end 212 is configured differently, particularly as to the nib configuration. The frustoconical head part 270 may form a total head angle similar to that described above for screw 10, and the neck part 272 may be of similar angle and axial length to the described above for neck part 72. In alternative implementations the frustoconical head part may include a total head angle that is between about seventy-eight and eighty-four degrees, such as between about eighty and eighty-two degrees. [0045] The nibs 280 are different in configuration than nibs 80 above. In particular, nibs 280 spiral as they extend along the frustoconical head part 270 toward the neck part 272, with the spiral running with the direction of rotational installation of the screw. The leading face 286 of each nib is generally planar and the trailing face 288 includes more curvature, which is concave in nature. The nibs 280 narrow when moving from end 282 to end 284, and the height of the nib ridge 290 shortens when moving from end 282 to end 284.

[0046] In one implementation, the thread 322 has a pitch of between about 0.105 inches and 0.115 inches, a major diameter of between about 0.165 and about 0.185 inches and a minor diameter of between about 0.100 and 0.120 inches.

[0047] Referring now to Figs. 24-27 another embodiment of a screw 310 is shown, which includes a shank 314, tapered end 316 and thread 322 configuration similar to that of above screw 10. In the case of screw 310, the head end 312 is configured differently, particularly as to the nib configuration. The frustoconical head part 370 may form a total head angle similar to that described above for screw 10, and the neck part 372 may be of similar angle and axial length to the described above for neck part 72. In alternative implementations the frustoconical head part may include a total head angle that is between about seventy-eight and eighty-four degrees, such as between about eighty and eighty-two degrees.

[0048] The nibs 380 are different in configuration than nibs 80 above. In particular, nibs 380 spiral as they extend along the frustoconical head part 370 toward the neck part 372, with the spiral running opposite to the direction of rotational installation of the screw. The trailing face 388 of each nib is generally planar and the leading face 386 includes more curvature, which is concave in nature. The nibs 380 narrow when moving from end 382 to end 384, and the height of the nib ridge 390 shortens when moving from end 382 to end 384.

[0049] In one implementation, the thread 422 has a pitch of between about 0.105 inches and 0.115 inches, a major diameter of between about 0.165 and about 0.185 inches and a minor diameter of between about 0.100 and 0.120 inches.

[0050] Referring now to Figs. 28-31 another embodiment of a screw 410 is shown, which includes a shank 414, tapered end 416 and thread 422 configuration similar to that of above screw 10. In the case of screw 410, the head end 412 is configured differently, particularly as to the nib configuration. The frustoconical head part 470 may form a total head angle similar to that described above for screw 10, and the neck part 472 may be of similar angle and axial length to the described above for neck part 72. In alternative implementations the frustoconical head part may include a total head angle that is between about seventy-eight and eighty-four degrees, such as between about eighty and eighty-two degrees.

[0051] The nibs 480 are different in configuration than nibs 80 above. In particular, nibs 380 are more block-shaped and extend onto neck part 472. The trailing face 488 of each nib is generally planar and the leading face 486 is generally planar. The nibs 480 narrow when moving from end 482 to end 484, and the height of the nib ridge 490 shortens when moving from end 482 to end 484. Here, the height at end 484 is negligible, with the nib tapering into the shank. The nib ridge 490 is also a surface portion of a frustum, rather than a simple ridge line. The frustum angle of nib parts 480-1 on head part 470 is Θ1, and the frustum angle of nib parts 480-2 on neck part 472 is Θ2, with Θ1 substantially greater than Θ2. In one example, angle Θ2 is higher than the total head angle of head part 470 and may be between about eighty and eighty-eight degrees, such as between about eighty-three and eighty-five degrees.

[0052] Referring to Fig. 32, another embodiment of a screw 510 is shown, which is similar to screw 10, but also incorporates a set of flute threads 502 (e.g., here five flue threads). The flute threads start at axial location 503 and extend toward the unthreaded portion of the shank. Here, the unthreaded portion 475 of the shank has a smaller relative length to the overall screw length than the unthreaded portion 75 in screw 10. The flute threads 502 overlap with several turns of the main thread 522 (e.g., here about three or four turns), and between about forty percent and sixty percent of an axial length of each flute thread overlaps with the main thread 522.

[0053] It is recognized that other variations, modifications and additions are possible.