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Title:
A SEAFOOD BUTTER PRODUCT AND MANUFACTURING METHOD
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2014/184182
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A method of producing a seafood butter includes freezing pieces of seafood such as mussels, drying the pieces, grinding or blending the dried pieces to provide a powder, and mixing the powder into a butter carrier. The pieces are freeze-dried. The protein is dried to a moisture content of less than 0.0155% moisture w/w. The protein may be mussels. The butter has a long shelf life, not limited by the presence of seafood. It has a structure and consistency suitable for cooking as it "silts" on a piece of fish or meat, leaving a tasty dressing on top and oils melt to assist cooking.

Inventors:
ROSS, Colin (55 Rosewood, Ballincollig, County Cork, IE)
GRIMES, James (31 Oakfield Avenue, Riverstown, Glanmire ., IE)
Application Number:
EP2014/059744
Publication Date:
November 20, 2014
Filing Date:
May 13, 2014
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
IASC ATLANTIC SEAFOOD COMPANY OF IRELAND LIMITED (Unit E5, Grange Industrial Estate,,Ballycurreen, Cork ., IE)
International Classes:
A23C15/12; A23L17/00; A23L27/10
Foreign References:
US4820529A1989-04-11
US20070087085A12007-04-19
US4759933A1988-07-26
JPS58152468A1983-09-10
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WELDON, Michael et al. (John A. O'Brien & Associates, Third Floor,,Duncairn House,,14 Carysfort Avenue,,Blackroc, County Dublin 01, IE)
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Claims:
A protein butter comprising a butter and a dried seafood or animal protein in particulate form dispersed in the butter, wherein the protein particle size is in the range of 20μηι to ΙΟΟμηι.

A protein butter as claimed in claim 1, wherein the protein particles have a moisture content of less than 0.5% w/w.

A protein butter as claimed in claim 2, wherein the protein particles have a moisture content of less than 0.0155% w/w.

A protein butter as claimed in any preceding claim, wherein the protein particle size is in the range of 50μιη to ΙΟΟμηι.

A protein butter as claimed in any preceding claim, wherein the protein is predominantly dried shellfish protein.

A protein butter as claimed in claim 5, wherein the protein is predominantly dried mussel protein.

A protein butter as claimed in any preceding claim, further comprising additional particulate ingredients dispersed in the butter carrier.

A protein butter as claimed in claim 7, wherein said additional ingredients include marine algae.

A protein butter as claimed in claims 7 or 8, wherein said additional ingredients include herbs such as paprika.

A protein butter as claimed in any of claims 7 to 9 wherein said additional ingredients are dry. 1. A method of producing a protein butter, the method comprising the steps of:

freezing pieces of seafood or animal protein,

drying the protein pieces, grinding or blending the dried pieces to provide a protein powder with a particle size range of from 20μη to ΙΟΟμιτι,

tempering a butter, and

mixing the dried protein powder into the tempered butter.

12. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claim 11 , wherein the protein is at least partly seafood.

13. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claim 12, wherein the protein is at least partly shellfish.

14. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claim 13, wherein the protein is at least partly mussels. 15. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 1 1 to 14, wherein the protein pieces are cooked before freezing.

16. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claim 15, wherein the protein pieces are at least partly shellfish and the shellfish are cooked in their shells and removed from their shells prior to freezing.

17. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 11 to 16, wherein the protein pieces are dried by freeze-drying. 18. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 1 1 or 17, wherein the drying and grinding or blending takes place in a period of less than 25 hours.

19. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 11 to 18, wherein the protein is dried to a moisture content of less than 0.5% and preferably less than 0.0155% moisture w/w.

20. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 11 to 19, wherein the protein pieces are blast chilled after cooking and before freezing.

21. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claim 20, wherein the protein is at least partly shellfish, and wherein the shellfish are cooked in their shells, extracted from their shells after cooking, and the extracted pieces are blast frozen after extraction, by subjecting them to a food-safe gas such as nitrogen, to individually freeze each piece.

22. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claims 20 or 21, wherein the time period between blast chilling and freezing is less than five hours.

23. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 15 to 22, wherein the protein pieces are blast chilled to less than 4°C for less than 90 minutes after cooking.

24. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claim 23 wherein, after blast chilling, the pieces are blast frozen at less than or equal to [minus] -18°C for less than 60 minutes.

25. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 15 to 24, wherein there is a time period of less than five hours between cooking and blast freezing.

26. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 11 to 25, wherein the butter is tempered at a temperature above 25 °C and below 40°C before mixing with the protein particles.

27. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 1 1 to 26, wherein additional dry ingredients are mixed in the mixing step.

28. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claim 27, wherein the dry ingredients include marine algae.

29. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in claims 27 or 28, wherein the dry ingredients include paprika.

30. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 27 to 29, wherein at least some of the additional dry ingredients are filtered to a size of about 20μπι to ΙΟΟμιη before mixing.

31. A method of producing a protein butter as claimed in any of claims 1 1 to 30, wherein the protein is at least partly shellfish, and shells, if present, are removed by shaking on a vibrating support table.

Description:
"A Seafood Butter Product and Manufacturing Method"

INTRODUCTION Field of the Invention

The invention relates to butter products and their manufacture. More specifically, the invention relates to butters with protein additives. Prior Art Discussion

US4759933 (Taiyo Fishery Co) describes protein food products in a paste state in which fish meat and/or animal protein is ground to provide a starting material and this is treated with a melting agent including components such as sodium phosphate.

RU2137404 (Sova Vjacheslav) describes production of caviar butter in which caviar and vegetable oil are mixed in a homogenizer at a speed of 2500-3000 rpm.

EP381259 (Procter & Gamble) describes a nut butter in which nut particles are provided at a size of 80% being less than 18μιη, and peanut oil of 25% to 40% is included. In general, with nut butters, the inherent oils and moisture of the nuts are squeezed out to provide a large portion of the bulk of the butter and achieve the desired viscosity.

A problem with addition of seafood or animal protein to butter is that the shelf life is reduced because it is only as good as that of the added protein. Another problem is that the consistency can be variable and not suited to some uses such as spreading or cooking.

An object of the invention is to achieve a butter product with a high quality seafood or animal protein to provide a distinctive taste but with a uniform physical consistency, and/or a long shelf life.

Another object is to achieve a protein butter product which is particularly suited to cooking by having a desired silting effect of assisting frying or baking by flow of oils around the food being cooked and leaving a desired dressing-like sediment on the food after cooking. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to the invention, there is provided a protein butter comprising a butter and a dried seafood or animal protein in particulate form dispersed in the butter, wherein the protein particle size is in the range of 20μιη to ΙΟΟμηι.

In one embodiment, the protein particles have a moisture content of less than 0.5% w/w. Preferably, the protein particles have a moisture content of less than 0.0155% w/w.

Preferably, the protein particle size is in the range of 50μιη to ΙΟΟμηι.

Preferably, the protein is predominantly dried shellfish protein. Preferably, the protein is predominantly dried mussel protein.

In one embodiment, the protein butter further comprises additional particulate ingredients dispersed in the butter earner. Preferably, said additional ingredients include marine algae. Preferably, said additional ingredients include herbs such as paprika. Preferably, said additional ingredients are dry.

In another aspect, the invention provides a method of producing a protein butter, the method comprising the steps of:

freezing pieces of seafood or animal protein,

drying the protein pieces,

grinding or blending the dried pieces to provide a protein powder with a particle size range of from 20μιη to ΙΟΟμιη,

tempering a butter, and

mixing the dried protein powder into the tempered butter. Preferably, the protein is at least partly seafood. Preferably, the protein is at least partly shellfish. Preferably, the protein is at least partly mussels.

Preferably, the protein pieces are cooked before freezing. In one embodiment, the protein pieces are at least partly shellfish and the shellfish are cooked in their shells and removed from their shells prior to freezing.

Preferably, the protein pieces are dried by freeze-drying. Preferably, the drying and grinding or blending takes place in a period of less than 25 hours.

Preferably, the protein is dried to a moisture content of less than 0.5% and preferably less than 0.0155% moisture w/w. Preferably, the protein pieces are blast chilled after cooking and before freezing.

In one embodiment, the protein is at least partly shellfish, and wherein the shellfish are cooked in their shells, extracted from their shells after cooking, and the extracted pieces are blast frozen after extraction, by subjecting them to a food-safe gas such as nitrogen, to individually freeze each piece.

Preferably, the time period between blast chilling and freezing is less than five hours.

Preferably, the protein pieces are blast chilled to less than 4°C for less than 90 minutes after cooking.

Preferably, after blast chilling, the pieces are blast frozen at less than or equal to [minus] -18°C for less than 60 minutes.

In one embodiment, there is a time period of less than five hours between cooking and blast freezing. Preferably, the butter is tempered at a temperature above 25°C and below 40°C before mixing with the protein particles.

Preferably, additional dry ingredients are mixed in the mixing step. Preferably, the dry ingredients include marine algae. Preferably, the dry ingredients include paprika.

Preferably, at least some of the additional dry ingredients are filtered to a size of about 20μηι to ΙΟΟμηι before mixing.

Preferably, the protein is at least partly shellfish, and shells, if present, are removed by shaking on a vibrating support table. In one aspect the invention provides a protein butter comprising butter and a protein in particulate form dispersed in the butter. In one embodiment, the particle size is in the range of 20μηι to ΙΟΟμιη, and preferably 50μηι to ΙΟΟμιη.

In one embodiment, the protein is dried to a moisture content of less than 0.5% and preferably less than 0.0155% moisture w/w.

In one embodiment, the butter further comprises dispersed particulate seaweed and herbal ingredients. In one embodiment, the protein particles are seafood particles.

In another aspect, the invention provides a method of producing a protein butter as defined above in any embodiment, the method comprising the steps of freezing pieces of protein, drying the pieces, grinding or blending the dried pieces to provide a powder, and mixing the powder into butter.

In one embodiment, the pieces are freeze-dried. In one embodiment, the drying and grinding or blending takes place in a period of less then 25 hours. In one embodiment, the protein is dried to a moisture content of less than 0.5% and preferably less than 0.0155% moisture w/w.

In one embodiment, the protein particles comprise seafood, such as mussels. In one embodiment, the seafood pieces are blast chilled after cooking.

In one embodiment, the pieces are blast frozen after extraction.

In one embodiment, the time period between blast chilling and freezing takes place in less than five hours. In one embodiment, the seafood is prepared by washing with high pressure water and pressure-cooking them. In one embodiment, the seafood is blast chilled to less than 4°C for less than 90 minutes after cooking.

In one embodiment, shells if present are removed by shaking on a vibrating support table, or by hand. In one embodiment, after blast chilling the seafood is blast frozen at less than or equal to 18°C for less than 60 minutes. In one embodiment, there is a time period of less than five hours between cooking and blast freezing.

In one embodiment, the butter is tempered at a temperature above 25°C and below 40°C before mixing with the protein particles and additional dry ingredients may be added such as paprika and seaweed.

In one embodiment, at least some of the additional dry ingredients are filtered to a size of about 20μιπ to ΙΟΟμηι before mixing. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Brief Description of the Drawings

The invention will be more clearly understood from the following description of some embodiments thereof, given by way of example only with reference to the accompanying drawings in which :-

Fig. 1 is a flow diagram illustrating a manufacturing method of the invention. Description of the Embodiments

Referring to Fig. 1 a protein butter, referred to herein as a "seafood butter" is produced in a method 1 having the following steps.

2. Fresh mussels are washed in a high pressure salt water jet.

3. Batches of washed mussels are pressure-cooked to ensure thorough cooking with shell opening. The typical batch size is 100 kg in shell. 4, The cooked mussels (still in shells) are blast chilled to less than 4°C for less than

90 minutes.

5 The shells are removed by shaking on a vibrating support table designed to remove the meats from the shells, the shells being eventually discarded to a shell bin and the meats moving to a meats bin. The meats can also be removed from the shells by hand.

6 The mussels are blast frozen at less than or equal to -18°C for less than 60 minutes This provides individual mussel pieces, without shells. The mussel pieces are subjected to a food-safe gas, such as nitrogen, to freeze each piece individually and rapidly.

Steps 3 to 6 are performed in a time period of less than five hours, to ensure that the mussels retain their freshness and nutritional value.

There is then a freeze-drying stage, in step 7: the mussel pieces are freeze dried to 0% to 0.5% w/w moisture content, at temperatures of between +40°C and -40°C, for a period of 20 hours to 24 hours. The moisture content after drying may be up to 1%, but is preferably below 0.5% w/w, and most preferably at or below 0.155% w/w.

The mussels are then ground down to a particulate size of 50μηι to ΙΟΟμιη. This powder is a very pure form of protein. This is achieved without addition of anti-spoilage agents, emulsifiers, anticoagulation agents, gelling gums, or anti-moisture agents. Also, there is a very low classified microbiological count, due to the lack of moisture in the resultant protein.

The total time for steps 7 and 8 is less than 24 hours because it allows the correct time, temperature and evaporation of moisture per kilo per hour per cubic metre in order to maximise yield of powder protein product.

Separately, dairy butter (in this case Irish dairy butter) is microwave tempered to about 30°C in step 20. Also, dry ingredients such as paprika and seaweed (marine algae) are filtered to a size of about 20μιη to ΙΟΟμηι in step 30, and are mixed by an agitator in step 31. These dry ingredients are air-dried in a conventional manner for supply of such ingredients in dry form. The butter (25°C to 35°C) and the powdered mussel protein from step 8 and the dry ingredients from step 31 are mixed by way of tempered agitation and tumbling before pumped extrusion. C0 2 is added to keep the mixture cool so that it does not separate.

The mixture is then allowed settle (41) for about 2 hours at 10°C. After this, the mixture is extruded (42), moulded (43), cut (44), and then instantly frozen in step 45 with parameters of 18° C within 5 minutes A major benefit of the process is that the end product butter has a very long shelf life, at least ninety days. This is because the moisture has been extracted from the seafood protein, providing very few sites for bacterial growth. At the same time the butter product has the benefit of providing a distinctive and concentrated seafood "Umami" taste. The manner of incorporation of the mussel protein is such that the fat molecules of the butter tend to adhere to the mussel protein. This provides a "silting" effect of seafood protein, butter fat and seaweed on food such as fish as it is cooked. In this case the butter oil will tend to run off to assist with cooking. The "silt" which remains on the fish is like a dressing with the desired taste of the mussel flavour along with that of the seaweed and any other additives.

Also, the product is relatively smooth, with a texture and consistency similar to that of the carrier butter, within which the dry ingredients such as seaweed can also be clearly tasted. Hence, the product can have any of a range of uses including as a spread or for cooking or for inclusion in sauces.

The following is a table of the nutritional values of a product having 88% w/w salted butter, 1 1% w/w shellfish protein (mussels), 1% Dillisk seaweed, and trace paprika. Nutrition Information

Typical Values per lOOg %GDA per 15g serving Serving % GDA GDA

Energy kJ 2847 427

Energy Kcal 694 34.7% 104 5.2% 2000kCal

Fat 73.26g 104.7% 10.99g 15.7% 70g

Of which Saturated Fat 43.74g 218.7% 6.56g 32.8% 20g

Carbohydrates 3.4g 1.5% 0.51g 0.2% 230g

Of which Sugar 0.05g 0.1% O.Olg 0% 90g

Fibre 0.5g 2.1% 0.08g 0.3% 24g

Protein 4.75g 10.6% 0.71g 1.6% 45g

Salt 1.86g 31% 0.28g 4.6% 6g

The invention is not limited to the embodiments described but may be varied in construction and detail. For example, the mussel protein may be dried by a step other than freeze drying, such as: spray dried,

microwaved,

radiated,

convection heated,

baked,

roasted.

For aspects such as ease of manufacturing, taste, consistency, susceptibility to drying during manufacturing, and compatibility with the carrier butter it is preferred that the protein source is predominantly or even exclusively mussels. However, it is envisaged that protein other than mussels or in addition to mussels may be used, for example: prawns, prawn shells, oysters, razorfish, lobster, lobster shells, crawfish, crayfish, crawfish shells, crayfish shells, abalone, periwinkles, sea snails, limpets, sea urchins, cockles, crabmeat, crab shell, clams, scallops, and/or flesh suitable for consumption such as: poultry, game, game poultry, wild fowl, beef, equine, equine game, reptile, and/or mixtures of any of the foregoing. Where it is shellfish, any shellfish may be used, fitting the general definition of being exoskeleton-bearing aquatic invertebrates. It is preferred that the protein be of a type having an initial moisture content of at least 60%, and hence shellfish are most suited. Also, it is envisaged that butter carriers other than dairy butter may be used, such as margarine or oil-based spreads.