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Title:
SELF-PROPELLED OPERATING MACHINE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/234535
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The invention describes a self-propelled operating machine (100) comprising: a first axle (110) equipped with wheels (120), a second axle (115) equipped with wheels (125), a support structure (105) extending longitudinally from the first axle (110) to the second axle (115), an internal combustion engine (130), and a gearbox (135) adapted for transferring torque from the internal combustion engine (130) to at least the wheels (120) of the first axle (110), wherein both said internal combustion engine (130) and said gearbox (135) are positioned closer to the first axle (110) than to the second axle (115).

Inventors:
BENASSI CLAUDIO (IT)
Application Number:
IB2019/054169
Publication Date:
December 12, 2019
Filing Date:
May 21, 2019
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
ARBOS GROUP S P A (IT)
International Classes:
B60K17/06; B60K5/02; B60K11/04; B62D21/02; B62D25/16; B62D25/18; B62D49/06; F16H57/025
Foreign References:
EP2977242A12016-01-27
EP3211272A12017-08-30
EP3318473A12018-05-09
DE964907C1957-05-29
US2884039A1959-04-28
US20080023174A12008-01-31
US20020053480A12002-05-09
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ING. C. CORRADINI & C. S.R.L. (IT)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. A self-propelled operating machine (100) comprising:

a first axle (1 10) equipped with wheels (120),

a second axle (1 15) equipped with wheels (125),

a support structure (105) extending longitudinally from the first axle (1 10) to the second axle (1 15),

an internal combustion engine (130), and

a gearbox (135) adapted for transferring torque from the internal combustion engine (130) to at least the wheels (120) of the first axle (1 10),

characterised in that both of said internal combustion engine (130) and said gearbox (135) are positioned closer to the first axle (1 10) than to the second axle (1 15).

2. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to claim 1 , wherein both the internal combustion engine (130) and the gearbox (135) are positioned a maximum distance from the first axle (1 10) that is less than the minimum distance that sepa rates them from the second axle (1 15).

3. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to claim 1 or 2, wherein the gearbox (135) is positioned in an intermediate space comprised between the first ax le (1 10) and the second axle (1 15), whereas the internal combustion engine (130) is positioned at least partially canti-levered outside of said intermediate space.

4. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the internal combustion engine (130) and the gearbox (135) are mu tually aligned along a longitudinal axis (A) of the support structure (105).

5. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the internal combustion engine (130) is oriented so that a crankshaft thereof is parallel to a longitudinal axis of the support structure (105).

6. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the gearbox (135) comprises an outer casing (150) that constitutes a load-bearing part of the support structure (105).

7. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to claim 6, wherein the first axle (1 10) is directly fixed to, or at least partially consists of, the outer casing (150) of the gearbox (135).

8. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to claim 6 or 7, wherein the support structure (105) comprises a connection frame (160) that is fixed canti-levered to the outer casing (150) of the gearbox (135) and that carries the second axle (1 15).

9. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to claim 8, wherein the con nection frame (160) is cradle-shaped.

10. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of claims 6 to 9, wherein the internal combustion engine (130) is directly fixed to the outer casing (150) of the gearbox (135).

11. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of claims 6 to 10, wherein the support structure (105) comprises a further connection frame (195), fixed canti-levered to the outer casing (150) of the gearbox (135), which carries the internal combustion engine (130).

12. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, comprising a wheel arch (225) that has an inner chamber (235) adapted for containing fuel and placed in communication with a feeding system of the internal combustion engine (130).

13. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, comprising a driver’s compartment (205) comprising at least one seat (210), a steering control (215) and control members of the internal combustion engine (130).

14. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to claim 13, wherein the driver’s compartment (205) is associated with the support structure (105) in an inter mediate space comprised between the first axle (1 10) and the second axle (1 15).

15. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to claim 13 or 14, wherein the driver’s compartment (205) is associated with the support structure (105) in a ro tary manner about a vertical axis.

16. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, comprising a radiator (245) for cooling a coolant fluid of the internal combus tion engine (130), which is associated with the support structure (105) close to the second axle (1 15).

17. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, comprising a power take-off (265) associated canti-levered with the support structure (105) close to the second axle (1 15).

18. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to claim 17, wherein said power take-off (265) is actuated by the internal combustion engine (130).

19. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the wheels (125) of the second axle (1 15) comprise tyres at least partially filled with a liquid.

20. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the wheels (125) of the second axle are steered wheels.

21. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the wheels (125) of the second axle (1 15) have the same radius as the wheels (120) of the first axle (1 10).

22. A self-propelled operating machine (100) according to any one of claims 1 to 20, wherein the wheels (125) of the second axle (1 15) have a smaller radius with re spect to the wheels (120) of the first axle (1 10).

Description:
SELF-PROPELLED OPERATING MACHINE

Technical field

The present invention concerns self-propelled operating machines, i.e. the particular type of vehicle that is adapted for being controlled by a driver and is capable of per forming certain operations, typically but not exclusively mechanical, for example in the field of industry, construction, roads or farming, exploiting the work produced by a motor (for example an electric, thermal, hydraulic or other motor) that is installed on board the machine and that is often also used to provide the driving force necessary for movements. Examples of self-propelled operating machines can be excavators, road work machines, construction machinery and farming machinery, including in particular farming tractors, both large ones for open fields and smaller ones used in specialist applications, for example in vineyards or orchards.

State of the art

As known, a typical constructive layout for self-propelled operating machines, like for example farming tractors, comprises a rear axle with driven wheels, a front axle with steered wheels and a support structure, typically a load-bearing frame, which extends longitudinally between the rear axle and the front axle and is adapted for carrying at least one internal combustion engine and a gearbox adapted for transmitting torque from the internal combustion engine to the driving wheels.

The internal combustion engine can be mounted between the two axles or canti levered in front of the front axle, where it is covered by a wide and long protective hood, whereas the gearbox is mounted at the rear axle close to the driving wheels. Between the internal combustion engine and the gearbox, or in a withdrawn position above the gearbox, the operating machine also comprises a driver’s compartment (e.g. a cabin), which is equipped at least with a driver’s seat, with a steering member (e.g. a steering wheel) and controls for the engine, the brakes and the gearbox (e.g. the clutch pedal and the gearshift lever).

The self-propelled operating machine can also be equipped with a series of operating members, including for example a rear power take-off, a front power take-off and rel ative lifting devices, rear and/or front, for engaging and using work tools or accesso ries that, in the case of farming tractors, can include for example ploughs, cutters or other. Although this constructive layout corresponds to an accepted standard that has now been in place for many decades, it involves some substantial drawbacks.

A first drawback consists of the fact that the protective hood of the internal combus tion engine, being positioned in the front part of the operating machine, in front of the driver’s compartment, and being particularly large and long due to the dimensions and the canti-levered position of the internal combustion engine, substantially ob structs the view of the driver, who is not generally able to see the tools or the acces sories that are engaged with the front power take-off, significantly limiting the control that the driver can have over the various work steps.

This drawback is sometimes also worsened by the presence of the fuel tank of the in ternal combustion engine, which generally has a standard shape, rather square and bulky, and is often located inside the protective hood or sometimes outside of it, in creasing the overall bulk of the operating machine and further limiting the view of the driver.

In particular, the fuel tank is sometimes positioned in the front part of the operating machine, where it obstructs the view of the driver when moving forwards, or in the rear part, where it obstructs the view while reversing.

A second drawback consists of the fact that the position of the internal combustion engine and of the corresponding protective hood, at the front axle, significantly limits the steering angle that can be given to the steered wheels, since the wheels could touch parts of the engine or hood, with the result that the minimum turning radius of current operating machines (especially of farming tractors) is generally very wide, making them sometimes difficult to manoeuvre in tight spaces, like for example along the rows of vineyards or orchards, inside industrial plants or in similar contexts.

In order to try to avoid or at least mitigate this drawback, in the past solutions have been proposed that foresee to also make the drive wheels of the rear axle at least partially steered or that foresee to make the support structure in two separate parts articulated to one another by a joint having vertical axis, with which suitable actuator members, for example hydraulic cylinders, are associated, which during steering al low the support structure to be rotated towards the centre of the curve.

However, it is clear that all of these solutions substantially complicate the operating machine both in terms of construction and in terms of control of its operation, conse- quently also increasing the cost in a non-negligible manner.

Another drawback of the conventional layout of operating machines consists of the fact that the kinematic connection between the internal combustion engine, posi tioned at the front axle, and the gearbox, positioned at the rear axle, must be ob tained through a long drive shaft that extends longitudinally along the entire support structure, generally passing through the driver’s compartment.

This results in the need to enclose the drive shaft in a protective central tunnel that, however, rising from the floor of the support structure and extending longitudinally through the driver’s compartment, limits the freedom of positioning of the seat and of the controls of the operating machine and also significantly reduces the space avail able for the driver and therefore comfort.

Presentation of the invention

In light of these considerations, a purpose of the present invention is to overcome, or at least positively mitigate, the aforementioned drawbacks of the prior art, with a sim ple, rational and relatively low cost solution.

This and other purposes are achieved thanks to the characteristics of the invention given in the main claim 1 , whereas the dependent claims outline preferred but not limiting aspects that can achieve advantageous effects.

In particular, an embodiment of the present invention provides a self-propelled oper ating machine (for example but not exclusively a farming tractor for open fields or for specialist uses) comprising:

a first axle equipped with wheels,

a second axle equipped with wheels,

a support structure extending longitudinally from the first axle to the second axle,

an internal combustion engine, and

a gearbox adapted for transferring torque from the internal combustion engine to at least the wheels of the first axle,

wherein both said internal combustion engine and said gearbox are positioned closer to the first axle than to the second axle.

In practice, both the internal combustion engine and the gearbox are a minimum dis tance from the first axle, for example from the rotation axis of the wheels of the first axle, which is less than the minimum distance that separates them from the second axle, for example from the rotation axis of the wheels of the second axle.

The minimum distance from the first axle can be evaluated as the distance that sepa rates the rotation axis of the wheels of the first axle from the point closest to it of the internal combustion engine and of the gearbox, respectively and, similarly, the mini mum distance from the second axle can be evaluated as the distance that separates the rotation axis of the wheels of the second axle from the point closest to it of the in ternal combustion engine and of the gearbox, respectively.

Thus, for example, the distance between the first axle and the point of the internal combustion engine, for example of the motor housing, which is closest to the first ax le, will be shorter than the distance between the second axle and the point of the in ternal combustion engine, for example of the motor housing, which is closest to the second axle.

Similarly, the distance between the first axle and the point of the gearbox, for exam ple of an outer casing that contains the gearbox, which is closest to the first axle, will be less than the distance between the second axle and the point of the gearbox, for example of said outer casing, which is closest to the second axle.

The result that is obtained is a completely new constructive layout with respect to conventional operating machines on which, as stated in the preamble, the internal combustion engine is arranged canti-levered at the front axle whereas the gearbox is arranged at the opposite rear axle.

This innovative layout advantageously makes it possible to concentrate the bulk of the internal combustion engine and of the gearbox close to the first axle, leaving the area at the second axle substantially clear, which will thus have a reduced bulk and can be covered with a smaller, shorter, narrower and lower protective hood with re spect to conventional solutions.

Thanks to the small size of this area of the operating machine and of the relative pro tective hood, the view of the driver is significantly increased.

Another advantage of the new layout consists of increasing the weight that bears down on the driving wheels of the first axle, keeping them stuck firmly to the ground in any travel condition and, in particular, even during sudden braking.

According to an aspect of the invention, both the internal combustion engine and the gearbox can be positioned a maximum distance from the first axle, for example from the rotation axis of the wheels of the first axle, which is less than the minimum dis tance that separates them from the second axle, for example from the rotation axis of the wheels of the second axle.

The aforementioned maximum distance from the first axle can be evaluated as the distance that separates the rotation axis of the wheels of the first axle from the point furthest from it of the internal combustion engine and of the gearbox, respectively. Thus, for example, the distance between the first axle and the point of the internal combustion engine, for example of the motor housing, which is furthest from the first axle, will be less than the distance between the second axle and the point of the in ternal combustion engine, for example of the motor housing, which is closest to the second axle.

Similarly, the distance between the first axle and the point of the gearbox, for exam ple of an outer casing that contains the gearbox, which is further from the first axle, will be less than the distance between the second axle and the point of the gearbox, for example of said outer casing, which is closer to the second axle.

In this way, the internal combustion engine, meaning for example the body of the en gine, and the gearbox, meaning for example the outer casing that contains the gear box, are both positioned on the same side with respect to a hypothetical middle plane of the operating machine that is equidistant with respect to the first and to the second axle.

In practice, considering the middle plane as a plane perpendicular to the ground on which the wheels of the operating machine rest, parallel to the first and to the second axle (for example to the rotation axis of the wheels of the first axle and to the rotation axis of the wheels of the second axle) and equidistant from both said first and second axle, and considering that this middle plane ideally divides the operating machine into a first part containing the first axle and a second part containing the second axle, the internal combustion engine, meaning for example the body of the engine, and the gearbox, meaning for example the outer casing that contains the gearbox, can be completely contained in the first part of the operating machine.

This special arrangement has the effect of freeing a lot of space in the central part of the operating machine, where other components can be installed, like for example an electric motor for a possible hybrid traction system and the relative batteries.

The closeness of the internal combustion engine and the gearbox also makes it pos sible to significantly reduce the length of the drive shaft that connects them (or to eliminate it entirely), thereby obtaining the possibility of also eliminating the protective central tunnel, increasing the space available for the driver’s compartment, which can be larger to increase the comfort of the driver and can have a more rational and con venient arrangement of the control members.

The aforementioned arrangement of the internal combustion engine and of the gear box also makes it possible to reduce the pitch of the operating machine, i.e. the dis tance between the first axle and the second axle, consequently also decreasing the maximum length thereof, to the benefit of handling and manoeuvrability.

According to a particular aspect of the present invention, the gearbox can be posi tioned in an intermediate space comprised between the first axle and the second ax le, for example between the rotation axis of the wheels of the first axle and the rota tion axis of the wheels of the second axle, whereas the internal combustion engine can be positioned at least partially canti-levered outside of said intermediate space.

In other words, the internal combustion engine, meaning for example the body of the engine, can be arranged so as to be completely or at least partially outside of the aforementioned intermediate space, whereas the gearbox, meaning for example the outer casing that contains the gearbox, can be arranged so as to be entirely or at least partially contained in the aforementioned intermediate space.

Thanks to this solution it is advantageously possible to free more space at the centre of the operating machine, consequently increasing the volume available for the driv er’s compartment and/or for other components, without however increasing the total length.

However, this does not rule out the possibility that, in other embodiments, both the internal combustion engine and the gearbox can both be mounted completely outside of the intermediate space between the first and the second axle of the operating ma chine.

According to an aspect of the invention, the internal combustion engine and the gearbox can be aligned with one another along a longitudinal axis of the support structure. In this way, it is advantageously possible to reduce the transversal bulk of the operat ing machine, making it possible to make operating machines with narrow gauge, for example suitable for working in tight spaces.

According to another aspect of the invention, the internal combustion engine can be oriented so that its crankshaft is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the support struc ture.

Thanks to this solution it is advantageously possible to connect the internal combus tion engine to the gearbox in a simple manner and without increasing the transversal bulk of the operating machine.

However, this does not rule out the possibility that, in other embodiments, the internal combustion engine can be mounted transversally, i.e. with the crankshaft oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the support structure.

A further aspect of the invention foresees that the gearbox can comprise an outer casing that constitutes a load-bearing part of the support structure.

In other words, it is foreseen for the support structure to be able to not be a self- supporting structure on which the outer casing of the gearbox is mounted and fixed but for said casing to be able to be a structural portion of the support structure, i.e. on which the tensions and the mechanical stresses transmitted to the support structure are at least partially discharged.

In some embodiments, the first axle can for example be directly fixed to, or at least partially consist of, the outer casing of the gearbox.

In this and other cases, the outer casing can thus contain not only the gearbox but also other functional members of the transmission system that connects the internal combustion engine to the driving wheels of the first axle, including for example a clutch, functionally arranged between the engine and the gearbox, and a differential, functionally arranged between the gearbox and the wheels of the first axle.

According to an aspect of the invention, the support structure can also comprise a connection frame that is fixed canti-levered to the outer casing of the gearbox and that carries the second axle.

Thanks to this solution it is advantageously possible to make an operating machine that is particularly compact, relatively cost-effective and has a very low bulk.

According to another aspect of the invention, this connection frame can be cradle shaped.

In this way it is possible to position the gearbox and the internal combustion engine a very short distance from the ground, consequently limiting the total height of the part of the operating machine arranged at the first axle and, therefore, ensuring that the driver has good visibility also in that area.

Moreover, the cradle shape of the connection frame provides, in the central part of the operating machine, a relatively low floor that makes it easier for the driver to enter and exit the driver’s compartment, increasing the comfort thereof.

A further aspect of the invention foresees that the internal combustion engine, mean ing for example the body of the engine, can be directly fixed to the outer casing of the gearbox, for example through flanging or other systems.

In this way it is advantageously possible to simplify the support structure, reducing bulk and costs.

Alternatively or additionally, the support structure can comprise a further connection frame, fixed canti-levered to the outer casing of the gearbox, which carries the inter nal combustion engine.

According to another aspect of the invention, the operating machine can also com prise at least one wheel arch that has an inner chamber adapted for containing fuel and arranged in communication with a feeding system of the internal combustion en gine.

Thanks to this solution it is advantageously possible, on the one hand, to significantly increase the capacity of the fuel tank, ensuring that the operating machine has great er autonomy of operation, and on the other hand, to rationalise the space that said tank occupies on board, with the result of being able to make an operating machine of smaller dimensions with respect to the prior art and with less obstructions to the view of the driver.

In particular, this solution, together with the particular arrangement of the internal combustion engine and of the gearbox, makes it possible to make an operating ma chine that ensures excellent visibility in both possible directions of travel, facilitating all of the work operations and thus improving overall ergonomics.

According to another aspect of the invention, the operating machine can comprise a driver’s compartment (for example a cabin) comprising at least one seat, a steering control and control members of the internal combustion engine.

Thanks to this solution, the driver is effectively able to control the operating machine in a simple and rational manner, remaining comfortably seated on the seat.

In particular, the driver’s compartment can be associated with the support structure in an intermediate space comprised between the first axle and the second axle, for ex ample between the rotation axis of the wheels of the first axle and the rotation axis of the wheels of the second axle.

In this way, the driver’s compartment can advantageously exploit the space left free at the centre of the operating machine by the new layout, thus being able to be, for the same global dimensions of the operating machine, larger and more comfortable than currently known solutions.

A further aspect of the invention foresees that the driver’s compartment can be asso ciated with the support structure in a rotary manner about a vertical axis.

Thanks to this solution, the driver’s compartment, with the relative seat and the con trols, can be advantageously oriented towards the second axle or, alternatively, to wards the first axle, allowing the driver to guide and control the operating machine in an extremely convenient and safe manner in both directions of travel.

In practice, thanks to this solution, the concepts of forward and reverse lose meaning, since the operating machine can be driven and controlled in the same way in both di rections, by simply rotating the driver’s compartment.

According to another aspect of the invention, the operating machine can further com prise a radiator for cooling a coolant fluid of the internal combustion engine, which is associated with the support structure close to the second axle.

Since it is positioned in a relatively clear area of the operating machine, the radiator can be comparably larger with respect to the prior art and can be more exposed to the external air, ensuring better cooling and therefore better efficiency of the internal combustion engine

According to an aspect of the invention, the operating machine can also comprise a power take-off associated canti-levered with the support structure close to the second axle.

This power take-off can be advantageously used to actuate tools or accessories that can be engaged in front of the second axle, for example by means of a three-point linkage.

The power take-off can be actuated by the internal combustion engine, for example through a mechanical or hydraulic transmission system.

Another aspect of the invention foresees that the wheels of the second axle can comprise tyres at least partially filled with a liquid, for example with water or with a solution of water and antifreeze.

This provision has the effect of increasing the weight that bears down on the wheels of the second axle, in order to efficiently counterbalance the weight of the internal combustion engine and of the gearbox that bear down on the first axle, without how ever increasing the size of the operating machine.

According to a preferred aspect of the invention, the wheels of the second axle can be steered wheels.

In this way, by exploiting the free space at the second axle the size constraints that limit the steering of the wheels are reduced, with the consequence that the steering angles can reach significantly higher values with respect to conventional solutions, allowing the operating machine to complete very small turning radii comparable to those normally obtainable only through the steering of the driving wheels and/or the central articulation of the support structure.

In this case, the rotation axis of the wheels of the second axle, mentioned many times earlier, should of course be understood in the condition of straight wheels (not steered).

According to a further aspect of the invention, the wheels of the second axle can have the same radius as the wheels of the first axle.

In practice, the operating machine can be made in the form of a so-called isodiamet- ric machine, i.e. having wheels of equal diameter that make it possible to reduce the distance between the first axle and the second axle (pitch), making the operating ma chine particularly suitable for operating in confined spaces and on steep terrain.

However, this does not rule out the possibility that, in other embodiments of the pre sent invention, the wheels of the second axle can have a smaller radius than the wheels of the first axle.

Brief description of the drawings

Further characteristics and advantages of the invention will become clear from read- ing the following description provided as a non-limiting example, with the help of the figures illustrated in the attached tables.

Figure 1 is a plan schematic view of the constructive layout of a self-propelled operat ing machine according to the present invention.

Figure 2 is a side view of a self-propelled operating machine in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention.

Figure 3 is the view indicated with III in figure 2.

Figure 4 is the view indicated with IV in figure 2.

Figure 5 is the view of figure 2 shown with the driver’s compartment inverted.

Figures 6 and 7 are two isometric views of the operating machine of figure 2 shown from opposite points of view.

Figure 8 is a side view of a self-propelled operating machine in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention.

Figure 9 is the view indicated with IX in figure 8.

Figure 10 is the view indicated with X in figure 8.

Figure 1 1 is the view of figure 8 shown with the driver’s compartment inverted.

Figures 12 and 13 are two isometric views of the operating machine of figure 8 shown from opposite points of view.

Figure 14 is a side view of the support structure of the operating machine of figure 2 or of figure 8.

Figure 15 is a plan view of the support structure of figure 14.

Figure 16 is a perspective view of a frame of the support structure of figure 14.

Figure 17 is a perspective view of the internal combustion engine and of the gearbox shown in figure 14.

Figure 18 is a perspective view of a wheel arch of the operating machine of figure 2 or of figure 8.

Figure 19 is a plan view of the wheel arch of figure 18.

Figure 20 is the section XX-XX of figure 19.

Detailed description

With reference to the aforementioned figures, two embodiments relative to a farming tractor 100, typically a small sized farming tractor for specialist uses, for example for vineyards or orchards, are described. However, it should immediately be specified that the aspects of the farming tractor 100 that will be described hereinafter also extend to a large farming tractor, for ex ample for open fields, and more generally to any other self-propelled operating ma chine.

As stated earlier, the term self-propelled operating machine is meant to indicate a vehicle adapted for being controlled by a driver and capable of performing certain operations, typically but not exclusively mechanical, for example in the field of indus try, construction, roads or farming, by exploiting the work produced by a motor (for example an electric, thermal, hydraulic or other motor) that is installed on board the machine and that is often also used to supply the driving force necessary for move ment.

Having said this, the farming tractor 100 illustrated in the attached figures in general comprises a support structure 105 that extends longitudinally according to a prede termined longitudinal axis A.

The longitudinal axis A of the support structure 105 is generally an axis that is parallel to the ground on which the farming tractor 100 is arranged, at least when said ground is flat.

The support structure 105 mechanically connects together two axles spaced apart along the longitudinal axis A, including a first axle 1 10 and a second axle 1 15.

The first axle 1 10 can be equipped with a pair of driving wheels 120 aligned with each other and adapted to rotate about a rotation axis X’.

The second axle 1 15 can be equipped with a pair of steered wheels 125 that, in straight configuration (not steered), are aligned with each other and adapted to rotate about a rotation axis X” parallel and distanced with respect to the rotation axis X’ of the first axle 1 10.

The rotation axes X’ and X” can both be perpendicular to the longitudinal axis A of the support structure 105.

In the embodiment illustrated in figures 1 to 7, the steered wheels 125 of the second axle 1 15 can have a smaller radius with respect to the driving wheels 120 of the first axle 1 10.

For example, the steered wheels 125 can have a radius R” smaller than 500 mm, for example substantially equal to 450 mm, whereas the driving wheels 120 can have a radius FT smaller than 700 mm, for example substantially equal to 650 mm (see fig ure 2).

In this case, the distance J between the rotation axis X’ of the first axle 1 10 and the rotation axis X” of the second axle 1 15 in the direction parallel to the longitudinal axis A, i.e. the pitch of the farming tractor 100, can be less than 2000 mm, for example substantially equal to 1900 mm.

In the embodiment illustrated in figures 8 to 13, the steered wheels 125 of the second axle 1 15 can have a radius equal to the driving wheels 120 of the first axle 1 10, thus making a so-called isodiametric configuration.

In this case, both the steered wheels 125 and the driving wheels 120 can have a ra dius R” equal to R’ and less than 500 mm, for example substantially equal to 475 mm (see figure 8).

In this case, the distance J between the rotation axis X’ of the first axle 1 10 and the rotation axis X” of the second axle 1 15 in the direction parallel to the longitudinal axis A, i.e. the pitch of the farming tractor 100, can be less than 1800 mm, for example substantially equal to 1600 mm.

Returning to the general scheme of figure 1 , the support structure 105 is further as sociated with an internal combustion engine 130 and a gearbox 135, which is adapted for transferring mechanical torque from the internal combustion engine 130 to the driving wheels 120 of the first axle 110.

However, this does not rule out the possibility that, in other embodiments, the gear box 135 can be adapted for transferring mechanical torque also to the steered wheels 125 of the second axle 1 15, for example through suitable mechanical trans mission members, in this way making a four-wheel drive farming tractor 100.

The internal combustion engine 130 can comprise a motor housing 140, which can be formed by a plurality of components assembled to one another.

These components can comprise for example an upper base block, in which one or more cylinders are formed that receive respective pistons, a head adapted to close the cylinders so as to define, together with each piston, a combustion chamber, and a lower base block, in which a crankshaft is received and rotatably supported.

The pistons can be coupled with the crankshaft through respective connecting rods, so that the reciprocating motion of the pistons, caused by the combustion of an air and fuel mixture inside the combustion chambers, is transformed into a rotary move ment of the crankshaft.

The crankshaft can comprise at least one portion 145 that projects canti-levered out side of the motor housing 140 and that substantially defines the output shaft of the in ternal combustion engine 130.

The internal combustion engine 130 can for example be a three-cylinder Diesel en gine.

The gearbox 135 in turn comprises an outer casing 150, inside which a plurality of gears are generally housed, which are adapted for kinematically connecting an input shaft with an output shaft (not visible), so as to allow a variation of the transmission ratio between these two shafts and therefore of the torque transmitted.

The input shaft of the gearbox 135 can be connected to the projecting portion 145 of the crankshaft of the internal combustion engine 130, for example through the inter position of a clutch.

The output shaft of the gearbox 135 can be connected to the driving wheels 120 of the first axle 1 10, for example through a differential that distributes and splits the drive torque to two half-shafts that are singularly connected with a respective driving wheel 120.

The clutch, the differential and at least one part of the relative half-shafts can be con tained inside the same outer casing 150 that also contains the gearbox 135, which can thus enclose substantially the entire transmission system that connects the inter nal combustion engine 130 to the driving wheels 120 of the first axle 1 10.

The internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135 outlined above can be as sociated with the support structure 105 so that both are closer to the first axle 1 10 than to the second axle 1 15.

The term“closer” is meant to generally indicate that the internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135 are individually a minimum distance from the first axle 1 10, for example from the rotation axis X’ of the driving wheels 120, which is less with re spect to the minimum distance that separates them from the second axle 1 15, for ex ample from the rotation axis X” of the steered wheels 125 in straight configuration (not steered).

The minimum distance between the internal combustion engine 130 and the first axle 110 can be defined as the distance dM1 between the rotation axis X’ of the driving wheels 120 and the point of the motor housing 140 closest to said axis X’, whereas the minimum distance between the internal combustion engine 130 and the second axle 1 15 can be defined as the distance dM2 between the rotation axis X” of the steered wheels 125 and the point of the motor housing 140 closest to said rotation axis X”.

Similarly, the minimum distance between the gearbox 135 and the first axle 1 10 can be defined as the distance dC1 between the rotation axis X’ of the driving wheels 120 and the point of the outer casing 150 closest to said axis X’, whereas the minimum distance between the gearbox 135 and the second axle 1 15 can be defined as the distance dC2 between the rotation axis X” of the steered wheels 125 and the point of the outer casing 150 closest to said rotation axis X”.

In the specific example illustrated in figure 1 , the minimum distance dC1 between the gearbox 135 and the first axle 1 10 is equal to zero since the rotation axis X’ inter sects the outer casing 150.

Based on these conditions, the arrangement of the internal combustion engine 130 and of the gearbox 135 is thus devised so that the distance dM1 is less than the dis tance dM2 and, simultaneously, so that the distance dC1 is less than the distance dC2.

More preferably, the internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135 can how ever be associated with the support structure 105 so that both are (individually) ar ranged a maximum distance from the first axle 1 10 that is less than the minimum dis tance that separates them from the second axle 1 15.

The maximum distance between the internal combustion engine 130 and the first ax le 1 10 can be defined as the distance DM1 between the rotation axis X’ of the driving wheels 120 and the point of the motor housing 140 furthest from said axis X’ and, similarly, the maximum distance between the gearbox 135 and the first axle 110 can be defined as the distance DC1 between the rotation axis X’ of the driving wheels 120 and the point of the outer casing 150 furthest from said axis X’.

Based on these conditions, it is thus preferable for the arrangement of the internal combustion engine 130 and of the gearbox 135 to be devised so that the distance DM1 is less than the distance dM2 and, simultaneously, for the distance DC1 to be less than the distance dC2.

Of course, all of the aforementioned maximum and minimum distances can be measured in a direction parallel to the direction of the longitudinal axis A of the sup port structure 105.

In this way, the internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135 are both posi tioned on the same side with respect to a hypothetical middle plane H of the farming tractor 100 that is equidistant with respect to the first and to the second axle 1 10 and 115.

In practice, considering the hypothetical middle plane H to be a plane perpendicular to the ground on which the wheels 120 and 125 rest, parallel to the rotation axes X’ and X” and equidistant from them, and considering that this hypothetical middle plane H ideally divides the farming tractor 100 into a first part containing the first axle 110 and a second part containing the second axle 1 15, the motor housing 140 of the internal combustion engine 130 and the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135 are completely contained in the first part of the farming tractor 100.

In this arrangement, it is preferable for the internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135 to be aligned with each other along the longitudinal axis A of the support structure 105, for example so that the minimum distance dM2 of the internal combus tion engine 130 with respect to the second axle 1 15 is greater than the minimum dis tance dC2 of the gearbox 135 from the same second axle 1 15.

In particular, it is also preferable for the internal combustion engine 130, meaning for example the motor housing 140, to be able to be positioned so as to be entirely or at least partially outside of an intermediate space comprised between the first axle 1 10 and the second axle 1 15, i.e. between the rotation axis X’ and the rotation axis X”, whereas the gearbox 135, meaning for example the outer casing 150, can be posi tioned so as to be entirely or at least partially contained in the aforementioned inter mediate space.

However, this does not rule out the possibility that, in other embodiments, both the internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135 can both be positioned com pletely canti-levered outside of the intermediate space between the first and the sec ond axle 1 10 and 1 15.

Nor does it rule out the possibility that, in some embodiments, the internal combus- tion engine 130 can be closer to the second axle 1 15 with respect to the gearbox 135, i.e. so that the minimum distance dM2 of the internal combustion engine 130 is less than the minimum distance dC2 of the gearbox 135.

Irrespective of these considerations, the space occupied by the internal combustion engine 130 and by the gearbox 135, and preferably by the entire transmission sys tem towards the driving wheels 120, are localised at the first axle 1 10, leaving the ar ea at the second axle 1 15 substantially clear, which will thus have a low bulk and can be covered with a protective hood 155 that is relatively small, short, narrow and ra ther low with respect to the ground (see figures 2 and 8).

Concerning this, it is possible to note that, in some embodiments, the maximum height G of the protective hood 155 from the ground can be less than 1300mm, for example substantially equal to 1224mm for non-isodiametric versions (see figure 2) and substantially equal to 1247mm for isodiametric versions (see figure 8).

Thanks to the small size of the area at the second axle 1 15 and at the relative protec tive hood 155, the view of the driver is significantly increased and, at the same time, the dimensional constraints that could limit the steering of the steered wheels 125 are reduced, with the consequence that the latter can reach very high steering angle val ues.

For example, in some embodiments, it is possible to reach a steering angle of the in ner steered wheel 125 greater than 50° (for example equal to 55°) for non- isodiametric versions and greater than 35° (for example equal to 40°) for isodiametric versions.

In this way it is advantageously possible to allow the farming tractor 100 to perform extremely small turning radii.

In order to further decrease these turning radii, it is however also foreseen for it to be possible to also make the driving wheels 120 of the first axle 1 10 at least partially steered and/or for it to be possible to make a support structure 105 comprising at least two separate parts, respectively carrying the first axle 1 10 and the second axle 115, which are articulated to one another by a joint having vertical axis and are asso ciated with suitable actuator members, for example hydraulic cylinders, which during the steering of the farming tractor 100 allow the support structure 105 to be rotated towards the centre of the curve. The movement of the internal combustion engine 130 and of the gearbox 135 at the first axle 1 10 also means that these two devices are much closer together, freeing space in the central part of the farming tractor 100 where other component can be in stalled, like for example an electric motor for a possible hybrid traction system and the relative batteries.

Another advantage of this arrangement consists of increasing the weight that bears down on the driving wheels 120 of the first axle 1 10, keeping them firmly stuck to the ground in any travel condition and, in particular, during braking.

Remaining in the aforementioned arrangement, it is also preferable for the internal combustion engine 130 to be oriented so that the projecting portion 145 of the crank shaft to be parallel to the longitudinal axis A of the support structure 105, i.e. perpen dicular to the rotation axes X’ and X” of the first and of the second axle 1 10 and 1 15. In this way, it is indeed advantageously possible to simplify the kinematic connection between the internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135, without needing to occupy spaces that would increase the transversal space occupied by the farming tractor 100.

Concerning this, it is possible to note that, in some embodiments, the maximum width B of the farming tractor 100 measured at the driving wheels 120, can be generally kept below 1300 mm, for example substantially equal to 1 140 for non-isodiametric versions (see figure 3) and substantially equal to 1240 for isodiametric versions (see figure 9)

The maximum width C of the farming tractor 100 measured at the steered wheels 125, can also generally be kept below 1300mm, for example substantially equal to 1260mm for non-isodiametric versions (see figure 4) and substantially equal to 1240mm for isodiametric versions (see figure 10).

Other embodiments can however foresee for the internal combustion engine 130 to be oriented transversally, i.e. so that the projecting portion 145 of the crankshaft is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis A of the support structure 105, i.e. parallel to the rotation axes X’ and X” of the first and of the second axle 1 10 and 1 15.

In these cases, since the input shaft of the gearbox 135 can be perpendicular to the projecting portion 145 of the crankshaft of the internal combustion engine 130, such shafts can be kinematically connected through one or more gears, for example hav- ing conical wheels.

One of the effects of this configuration, which can be adopted especially, but not ex clusively, if the internal combustion engine 130 is positioned in the intermediate space between the first and the second axle 1 10 and 115, is that of allowing the in stallation of one or two side power take-offs (PTO), for example directly connected to the ends of the crankshaft of the internal combustion engine 130, for the actuation of possible tools or accessories able to be mounted at the side of the farming tractor 100.

Moving on to more detailed aspects, the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135 (and possibly of the entire transmission system towards the driving wheels 120) can be associated with the support structure 105 so as to constitute a load-bearing part thereof.

In other words, it is foreseen for the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135 to be able to be a structural portion, on which the tensions and the mechanical stresses to which the support structure 105 is normally subjected discharge at least in part.

In order to obtain this effect, the first axle 1 10 can be directly carried by, or at least partially consist of, the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135.

For example, the first axle 1 10 can comprise two half-axes that each carry a respec tive wheel 120 and that are fixed, or at least partially formed, on opposite sides of the outer casing 150 (see figure 1 ).

The second axle 1 15 can, on the other hand, be carried by a connection frame 160, belonging to the support structure 105, which is fixed canti-levered to the outer cas ing 150 of the gearbox 135.

In this way, the stresses to which the first axle 1 10 is subjected transmit directly to the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135, which also receives a part of the stresses to which the second axle 1 15 is subjected from the connection frame 160.

Thanks to this solution it is advantageously possible to make a very compact support structure 105 and at the same time to keep the internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135 relatively close to the ground, so as to be able to cover them with a protective hood 165 having a limited bulk and height (see figures 2 and 8).

Concerning this, it is possible to note that, in some embodiments, the maximum height K of the protective hood 165 from the ground can be less than or equal to 1300mm, for example substantially equal to 1259mm for non-isodiametric versions (see figure 2) and substantially equal to 1300mm for isodiametric versions (see figure 8).

As illustrated in figures 14 to 16, the connection frame 160 can comprise two longitu dinal beams 170, substantially parallel and opposite, one end of which is fixed, for example bolted, to the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135, whereas the opposite ends can be connected to one another.

The two longitudinal beams 170 can for example be made in a single monolithic body.

With respect to the side view of figure 14, each of the two longitudinal beams 170 can have a first substantially rectilinear segment 175, a second substantially rectilinear segment 180, parallel and offset with respect to the first, and an inclined intermediate segment 185.

In this way, the connection frame 160 substantially takes up the configuration of a cradle or, more precisely, of a double cradle.

With respect to the plan view of figure 15, the first rectilinear segments 175 of the longitudinal beams 170 can be separated from one another by a greater distance with respect to that which separates the second rectilinear segments 180, whereas the inclined segments 185 can be shaped so as to be even closer together.

In this way, the transversal space occupied by the connection frame 160 is reduced, in the area in which the steered wheels 125 are positioned, so as not to obstruct the steering movement thereof.

The outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135 can be partially arranged between the first rectilinear segments 175 of the two longitudinal beams 170, at their free ends, which can be equipped with suitable flanges 190 adapted for being stably fixed, for example bolted, to the outer casing 150.

The first rectilinear segments 175 of the two longitudinal beams 170 can therefore be arranged so as to project canti-levered with respect to the outer casing 150, lying substantially coplanar to one another on a plane parallel to the ground on which the farming tractor 100 sits but at a lower height with respect to the second rectilinear segments 180, which are therefore raised.

In this way, the second axle 1 15 can be fixed directly below the second rectilinear segments 180, whereas the first rectilinear segments 175 can define the central part of the support structure 105, i.e. that comprised between the first axle 1 10 and the second axle 1 15 (see figures 2 and 8).

Concerning this, it should be noted that, in some embodiments, the height L from the ground of the first rectilinear segments 175 of the connection frame 160 can be less than or equal to 300mm, for example substantially equal to 280mm for non- isodiametric versions (see figure 2) and substantially equal to 300mm for isodiametric versions (see figure 8).

On the opposite side with respect to the connection frame 160, the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135 can be directly fixed to the internal combustion engine 130, i.e. to the motor housing 140.

For example, the motor housing 140 can have a flat flange adapted for being placed in direct contact, or possibly with the interposition of a suitable spacer, with a corre sponding flat flange of the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135, to which it can be stably fixed for example by bolting.

Additionally or alternatively, the motor housing 140 can be fixed to the outer casing 150 of the gearbox 135 through a further connection frame 195 of the support struc ture 105, which can be fixed canti-levered to the outer casing 150 on the opposite side with respect to the first connection frame 160.

This further connection frame 195 can comprise for example one or more side brack ets 200, each of which can be fixed, for example bolted, both to the motor housing 140 and to the outer casing 150.

As illustrated in figures 2 and 8, the farming tractor 100 also comprises a driver’s compartment, wholly indicated with 205, which can advantageously be positioned in the space comprised between the first axle 1 10 and the second axle 1 15, in particu lar between the respective rotation axes X’ and X”, for example installed above the first rectilinear segments 175 of the connection frame 160.

In this way, the driver’s compartment 205 can comprise a lower foot plate (not visi ble), adapted for being stepped on by the driver of the farming tractor 100, which can be substantially flat, i.e. without any raised central tunnel, making it easier for the driver to enter and exit and increasing his/her comfort when on board.

On this lower foot plate it is possible to install at least one seat 210 for the driver and a series of controls adapted for being actuated by the driver who is sitting on the seat 210.

These controls comprise at least one steering control 215 (for example a steering wheel) adapted for changing the steering angle of the steered wheels 125, as well as control members of the internal combustion engine 130 (for example an accelerator pedal), control members of the brakes (for example a brake pedal), and possible con trol members of the gearbox 135 (for example a clutch control/pedal and/or a con trol/lever for selecting the gear ratios).

The driver’s compartment 205 thus conceived can be enclosed inside a cabin 220, generally equipped with a support structure and with a series of transparent panels to allow the driver to see outside, which can be provided with at least one access door, positioned in the space comprised between the first axle 1 10 and the second axle 115, to allow the driver to enter and exit.

The cabin 220 can be relatively small in size which, in some embodiments, makes it possible to obtain a maximum height D of the farming tractor 100 with respect to the ground that is less than 2050mm, for example substantially equal to 1982mm for non- isodiametric versions (see figure 3) and substantially equal to 2005mm for isodiamet- ric versions (see figure 9).

However, this does not rule out the possibility that, in other embodiments, the cabin 220 can be absent.

Irrespective of this, a preferred aspect of the solution is the fact that the driver’s com partment 205 can be associated with the support structure 105 in a rotary manner about an axis perpendicular to the ground on which the farming tractor 100 sits, i.e. to a vertical axis.

In this way, the driver’s compartment 205, with the relative seat 210 and the controls, can be selectively oriented both towards the second axle 1 15 (see figures 2 and 8) and towards the first axle 1 10 (see figures 5 and 1 1 ), allowing the driver to drive and control the farming tractor 100 in an extremely convenient and safe manner in both directions of travel.

In order to allow the rotation of the driver’s compartment 205, the lower foot plate can be defined by a pivoting fifth wheel on which all of the components of the driver’s compartment 205 are mounted, including the seat 210, the steering control 215 and the other controls, and with which moving means are associated, adapted for making it rotate on itself and locking means adapted for alternately locking it in one orienta tion or in the opposite orientation.

Again for the purpose of allowing the rotation of the driver’s compartment 205 it is al so preferable for the steering control 215 and the other controls to be of the elec tric/electronic type.

For example, such controls can be made in the form of a drive-by-wire system, in which the mechanical devices of the internal combustion engine 130, of the gearbox 135 and those which determine the steering of the steered wheels 125 can be actu ated through electrical actuators that, in turn, are connected with the controls present in the driver’s compartment 205 through respective electric cables.

In this way, the electric cables can pass through the pivoting fifth wheel that supports the driver’s compartment 205, without obstructing the movements thereof and without being damaged.

As illustrated in figures 2 and 8, the driving wheels 120 of the first axle 1 10 can be at least partially covered by respective wheel arches 225, i.e. with generally arched bodies, typically made of plastic material, each of which goes around the top of a re spective driving wheel 120 with the main function of preventing sand, mud, stones, liquids and other sprays from be thrown into the air by the driving wheel 120 while rolling.

In the embodiment illustrated here, the wheel arches 225 can be made in a single body with a respective step 230, arranged outside and substantially at the same level as the first rectilinear segments 175 of the connection frame 160, so as to provide a step that makes it easier for the driver to enter and exit the driver’s compartment 205. In some embodiments, the wheel arches 225 can be made in a single body also with at least one portion of the lower foot plate of the driver’s compartment 205.

As illustrated in figure 20, one or both of the wheel arches 225 can be internally hol low so as to define an inner chamber 235 that acts as a fuel tank of the internal com bustion engine 130.

The inner chamber 235 can therefore be in communication with a mouth 240, formed on the respective wheel arch 225 and preferably equipped with a closing cap (not shown), which makes it possible to fill the inner chamber 235 with fuel. The inner chamber 235 can also be in (hydraulic) communication with a feeding sys tem (not shown) adapted for feeding, for example injecting, the fuel into the cylinders of the internal combustion engine 130.

The feeding system can comprise for example a pump adapted for taking fuel from the inner chamber 235 of the wheel arch(es) 225 and sending it under pressure to wards suitable valve members adapted for releasing it directly inside the cylinders of the internal combustion engine 130 or into a suction duct communicating with said cylinders.

Each inner chamber 235 can extend for the entire arc of the respective wheel arch 225 and possibly also inside the step 230 and/or the portion of the foot plate (if pre sent), in order to further increase the capacity of the tank.

In order to obtain the inner chamber 235 and ensure the hermetic seal thereof, each wheel arch 225 can be made of plastic material, for example through rotational moulding technology.

However, this does not rule out the possibility that, in other embodiments, the wheel arch 225 can be made with other types of materials, for example metallic or non- metallic materials, and consequently with other production technologies.

As well as performing the tank function, in some embodiments, the wheel arch 225 can also perform a load-bearing/structural function.

For example, the wheel arch 225 could be fixed to and/or integrated in the support structure 105 so as to be capable of supporting other components of the operating machine, like for example some components of the driver’s compartment 205 and/or of the cabin 220.

Preferably, the wheel arch can be fixed/coupled with the support structure 105 in a dismountable manner, for example through connection means that allow the dis mounting thereof in a simple and relatively quick manner, in order to make the maintenance operations of the farming tractor 100 convenient, safe and very quick. Although in the illustrated example the fuel tank is integrated in the wheel arches 225 of the wheels 120 of the first axle 1 10, this does not rule out the possibility that, in other embodiments, the fuel tank can be integrated, in whole or in part, in one or both of the wheel arches of the wheels 125 of the second axle 1 15.

The internal combustion engine 130 can also be associated with a radiator 245 adapted for cooling a coolant fluid that is circulated inside suitable cavities of the mo tor housing 140, for example through a pump, to reduce the temperature of the inter nal combustion engine 130 during its normal operation (see figure 1 ).

In particular, the hot coolant fluid coming from the motor housing 140 is cooled inside the radiator 245 through a heat exchange process with ambient air, before being sent back inside the motor housing 140.

In order to increase the efficiency of the radiator 245, the latter can be positioned on the connection frame 160 of the support structure 105, close to the second axle 1 15, for example mounted above the second rectilinear segments 180.

In this way, the radiator 245 is mounted in a very free area of the farming tractor 100, where it can be very large in size and can be more exposed to the external air, with out however being a hindrance to the steering of the wheels 125.

As illustrated in figures 2 and 8, the farming tractor 100 can also be equipped with a series of operative accessories.

In particular, the farming tractor 100 can comprise a first lifting device 250 mounted on the support structure 105 at the first axle 1 10.

This lifting device 250, which can be equipped with a three-point linkage, can be adapted for engaging and lifting from the ground possible tools or work accessories, like for example ploughs, cutters or other, which must be used by the farming tractor 100.

In order to actuate these tools, the farming tractor 100 can further comprise a first power take-off (PTO) 255, which can also be positioned at the first axle 1 10, so as to project canti-levered outwards and be able to be kinematically connected to the func tional members of the tools.

As illustrated in figure 1 , this first power take-off 255 can consist of, or be kinematical ly connected to, a second portion of the crankshaft of the internal combustion engine 130 that projects from the motor housing 140 on the opposite side with respect to the portion 145.

The farming tractor 100 can also comprise a second lifting device 260 mounted on the support structure 105 at the second axle 1 15.

This second lifting device 260, which can be equipped with a three-point linkage, can be adapted for engaging and lifting from the ground further tools or work accessories. In order to actuate these further tools, the farming tractor 100 can comprise a second power take-off (PTO) 265, which can be positioned at the second axle 1 15, so as to project canti-levered towards the outside and be able to be kinematically connected to the functional members of the tools (see figure 1 ).

This second power take-off 265 can be actuated by the internal combustion engine 130, for example through a hydraulic or mechanical transmission system.

The hydraulic transmission system can comprise for example a pump mechanically actuated by the internal combustion engine 130 and a hydraulic motor connected and set in operation by the pump, which is adapted for setting the power take-off 265 in rotation.

The mechanical transmission system can comprise a drive shaft 270 extending paral lel to the axis A of the support structure 105, which can be connected to the project ing portion 145 of the crankshaft through a first gear and with the second power take off 265 through a second gear.

Since both the internal combustion engine 130 and the gearbox 135 are arranged close to the first axle 1 10, the second lifting device 260 can have a very high load capacity, making it possible to use larger and heavier tools.

Despite this, in order to improve the stability of the farming tractor 100 in other condi tions of use, it is foreseen for the steered wheels 125 of the second axle 1 15 to be able to comprise tyres that are at least partially filled with a liquid, for example with water or preferably with a solution of water and antifreeze.

In particular, the tyres of the steered wheels 125 can be filled with liquid for a portion greater than 50% of their total volume, for example equal to 75%.

This provision has the effect of increasing the weight that bears down on the steered wheels 125 of the second axle 1 15, in order to effectively counterbalance the weight of the internal combustion engine 130 and of the gearbox 135, without however in creasing the bulk of the farming tractor 100.

Additionally or alternatively to this solution, it is also possible to mount ballasts, for example steel ballasts, directly on the rims of the steered wheels 125.

It should be specified here that, although in the above description the term“wheel” has been used to indicate a traction member, generally equipped with a rim and with a tyre, adapted for being in direct contact with the ground to allow the support and the traction of the farming tractor 100, in other embodiments the term“wheel” can be used to indicate any type of wheel, including toothed wheels, pulleys or other types of wheels adapted for transferring motion to a traction system, for example the inner wheels of a tracked traction system.

In conclusion, it should be emphasised that the special arrangement of the internal combustion engine 130 and of the gearbox 135, the arrangement of the radiator 245 and the arrangement and the integration of the tank inside the wheel arch(es) 225, are all aspects that combine and contribute to making a farming tractor 100, and more in general any self-propelled operating machine, which ensures an excellent view for the driver, both forwards and backwards, facilitating all of the work opera tions and thus improving the global ergonomics of the machine.

Of course, those skilled in the art can bring numerous technical-application modifica tions to the farming tractor 100 described above, without for this reason departing from the scope of the invention as claimed below.