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Title:
SMART EMERGENCY EXIT WINDOW
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/042453
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A device 100 for enabling firefighting comprising a smart emergency exit window 110 and a smart controller 220 is disclosed. The smart emergency exit window 110 comprises of one or more spacers 120 embedded with light source 140 and a frame 130 comprising of a processing unit 170, a driver 150, a wireless communication protocol 160, a sensor 180 and at least a power source. The smart controller 220 is placed remotely and communicates with the smart emergency exit window 110 and a central station 330. A system 400 and a method 500 for identifying activated smart emergency exit windows 110 are also disclosed.

Inventors:
T, Arunvel (14 3rd cross street extension, Vijayanagar Velachery, Chennai – 8, Tamil Nadu, India, Chennai 600048, 600048, IN)
A, Rathish (E1 CEE DEE YES Avenue, 10/4 Cart Track road, Velachery, Chennai-2, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600042, 600042, IN)
PATTERY, John Jose (Pattery House, West Kombara Irinjalakuda P.O., Thrissur, Kerala-1, Kerala 680121, 680121, IN)
THIRUMALAI, Kumaran (No. 1/1 Dhandu mari amman kovil Street, Durganagar Tambaram Sanatorium,Chennai- 7, Tamil Nadu, India, Chennai 600047, 600047, IN)
Application Number:
IN2017/050365
Publication Date:
March 08, 2018
Filing Date:
August 29, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SAINT-GOBAIN GLASS FRANCE (18 Avenue D'alsace, Courbevoie France, Courbevoie, 92400, FR)
T, Arunvel (14 3rd cross street extension, Vijayanagar Velachery, Chennai – 8, Tamil Nadu, India, Chennai 600048, 600048, IN)
International Classes:
E05F15/72
Foreign References:
US20120239209A12012-09-20
US8376567B12013-02-19
GB2263930A1993-08-11
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KUMAR, Giriraj (Saint-Gobain Research India Pvt. Ltd, Intellectual Property Law DepartmentNo: 1 FA, Phase-II, “C” Block, Kanagam Roa, Tharamani ., Chennai-600 113, IN)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims claimed is:

1. A device 100 for enabling firefighting comprising:

a. a smart emergency exit window 110 comprising:

one or more spacers 120 embedded with a light source 140 for activating the emergency exit window 110; and a frame 130 comprising:

a processing unit 170 for transmitting and receiving signals;

a driver 150 for controlling the light source 140; a wireless communication protocol 160; and at least one power source, and b. a smart controller 220 placed remotely and in communication with the smart emergency exit window 110 and a central station 330.

2. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1, wherein the smart emergency exit window 110 includes double glazed units and triple glazed units.

3. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1, wherein the light source 140 is selected from a series of laser, LED, OLED or electroluminescent (EL) wire.

4. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1, wherein the processing unit 170 receives signals from the smart controller 220 through the wireless communication protocol 160.

5. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 4, wherein the processing unit 170 actuates the driver 150.

6. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1, wherein the wireless communication protocol 160 is a low power wide area network protocol.

7. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1 optionally comprises a gyro sensor 180 for determining one or more predetermined conditions.

8. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1, wherein the at least one power source comprises a primary replaceable battery 190a and/ or a secondary battery 190b.

9. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1, wherein the smart controller 220 receives data signals from the central station 330 through a wired communication protocol and transmits the same to the processing unit 170 via the wireless communication protocol 160.

10. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 9, wherein the wired communication protocol can be BACNet or Ethernet.

11. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1, wherein the smart controller 220 is further configured to receive data commands from a user.

12. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 1, wherein the central station 330 receives signal comprising at least one predetermined condition and transmits the same to the smart controller 220.

13. The device 100 for enabling firefighting of claim 12, wherein the signal is from a smoke detector or a carbon monoxide alarm system detector.

14. A system 400 for enabling firefighting personnel and building occupants in identifying one or more emergency exit windows 110 of a building, the system comprising:

a device 100 as claimed in claim 1 connected to a central station 330.

15. The system 400 of claim 14, wherein the central station 330 receives signal comprising at least one predetermined condition and transmits the same to the smart controller 220.

16. The system 400 of claim 15, wherein the signal is from a smoke detector or a carbon monoxide alarm system detector.

17. The system 400 of claim 14, wherein the smart controller 220 receives data signals from the central station 330 through a wired communication protocol and transmits the same to the processing unit 170 via the wireless communication protocol 160.

18. The system 400 of claim 17, wherein the wired communication protocol can be BACNet or Ethernet.

19. The system 400 of claim 12, wherein the wireless communication protocol 160 receives data signals from the smart controller 220 and actuates the processing unit 170.

20. The system 400 of claim 12, wherein the processing unit 170 actuates the driver 150 for controlling the light source 140.

21. The system 400 of claim 12, wherein the activated one or more smart emergency exit windows 110 enable the emergency response personnel and building occupants in identifying one or more emergency exit windows 110.

22. A method 500 of identifying one or more emergency exit windows 110 in a building, the method 500 comprising the steps of:

a. detection of an emergency condition by a central station 330 of a building;

b. activation of a smart controller 220;

c. transmission of signal to one or more smart emergency windows;

d. activation of one or more smart emergency windows; and e. identification of one or more activated smart emergency windows by emergency response personnel outside the building and building occupants inside the building.

Description:
SMART EMERGENCY EXIT WINDOW

Technical Field

The present disclosure relates, in general to a device for enabling firefighting, and more specifically to a smart emergency exit window. Background

During emergency situations such as fire, smoke event from smoldering materials or other perilous situations, building occupants face difficulty in locating emergency exit windows of the building. In a severe fire, the whole process of finding the emergency exit windows may become even more difficult if thick smoke starts to fill the entire building. The difficulties can be further aggravated if the fire spreads rapidly that the access to emergency exit windows are blocked or cut off by the fire.

In conditions where it might be difficult to locate emergency exit windows of a building, indications of where the exits are would be very helpful. First responders, especially fire fighters, often have considerable difficulty in navigating through the buildings during an emergency. Fire fighters have a hard time seeing where they are, and where they can go when smoke is thick. Fire fighters often do not know the building layout well and do not have good directions for navigating towards an emergency exit window, and often get lost. There continues to be a need for solutions that can help building occupants get out of the building, and also help fire fighters get into the building and locate the most affected areas that need their prime attention. Preferably such systems can help them navigate into and through the building with a separate set of indicators than those used by the public.

Currently, there are no specialized solutions that enable effective identification of emergency exit windows for the firefighting personnel stationed outside the building. Also for occupants trapped inside the building, the thickening smoke, failure of electricity, reduced visibility and anxiety make it difficult to locate emergency exit windows. Digital solutions in glass products providing smart facade systems and intelligent windows are known prior arts. For reference, Chinese patent no. 103470133 is generally related to an intelligent window and control systems, and more particularly to intelligent windows that detect indoor and outdoor information, control state of the window, send messages to a higher-level control system and also receive control commands in return.

For reference, Japanese application no. 1700337048 is generally related to control of blinds and curtains of a building and more particularly to the integration of temperature and light sensor in double-glazing for control of various air-conditioning equipment's in the building.

For reference, US patent no. 8,376,567 is generally related to a system and method for helping evacuees exit a residential building in an event of emergency by providing emergency illumination around the periphery of an exit door and/or an alternative safe exit portal together with floor/ground level iUumination along the path to the portal, and by providing an audible tone or voice recording to guide occupants to the exit portal.

Most of the inventions disclose systems having one or more sensors integrated into glazing units for monitoring various conditions including temperature, light, humidity, air speed etc. The US patent no. 8,376,567 provides illuminated paths that lead to emergency exit portals in a building and focuses on helping the building occupants in locating emergency exit portals in the building. However these identification means are not available for firefighting personnel stationed outside the building. Also none of the above inventions use electronic integrated glazing units as means for identifying emergency exit windows that can help firefighting personnel stationed outside the building to gain entry into the building for rescue operations, in addition to enabling occupants inside the building to locate operable emergency exit windows.

The smart emergency exit window of the present disclosure is seamlessly connected to a central station of the building and is activated (by means of flashing light sources) during emergency situations. This activated smart emergency window is available for both the building occupants and the firefighting personnel stationed outside the building for identifying emergency exit windows. Summary of the Disclosure

In one aspect of the present disclosure, a device for enabling firefighting comprising a smart emergency exit window and a smart controller is provided. The smart emergency exit window comprises one or more spacers embedded with a light source and a frame comprised of a processing unit, a driver, a wireless communication protocol, a sensor and at least one power source. The smart controller is placed remotely and communicates with the smart emergency exit window and a central station.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, a system for enabling firefighting personnel and building occupants in identifying one or more emergency exit windows of a building is disclosed. The system comprises of one or more smart emergency exit windows in seamless connection with a smart controller and a central station of the building.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, a method of identifying one or more emergency exit windows in a building is disclosed. The method includes detection of an emergency condition by a central station of a building, activation of a smart controller, transmission of signal to one or more smart emergency windows, activation of one or more smart emergency windows and identification of one or more activated smart emergency windows by emergency response personnel outside the building and building occupants inside the building.

Other features and aspects of this disclosure will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings.

Brief Description of the Drawings

Embodiments are illustrated by way of example and are not limited in the accompanying figures.

FIG. 1 illustrates a device for enabling firefighting, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2 illustrates a smart emergency exit window, in accordance with one embodiment of the present disclosure; FIG. 3 illustrates a smart controller, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 4 illustrates a system for enabling firefighting personnel and building occupants in identifying one or more emergency exit windows of a building, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 5 depicts a method of identifying one or more emergency exit windows of a building, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure; and

FIG. 6A and 6B depict determination of viewing angle and distance of a selected light source.

Skilled artisans appreciate that elements in the figures are illustrated for simplicity and clarity and have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions of some of the elements in the figures may be exaggerated relative to other elements to help to improve understanding of embodiments of the invention.

Detailed Description

Wherever possible, the same reference numbers will be used throughout the drawings to refer to the same or the like parts. Embodiments disclosed herein are related to a device and a system for enabling firefighting.

The present disclosure relates to a device for enabling firefighting that can be used by firefighting personnel stationed outside the building for identifying one or more emergency exit windows from outside. The device can also be used by building occupants trapped inside the building requiring evacuation for identifying one or more emergency exit windows that offer them a means of escape during fire or other emergency situations. The present disclosure also relates to a system for enabling firefighting through the identification of one or more emergency exit windows. A method of identifying one or more emergency exit windows in a building is also disclosed.

FIG. 1 illustrates a device 100 for enabling firefighting according to one embodiment of the invention. The device 100 for firefighting comprises of a smart emergency exit window 110 and a smart controller 220. The smart emergency exit window 110 consists of a spacer 120 and a frame 130. The spacer 120 of the smart emergency exit window 110 is embedded with a light source 140. The frame 130 of the smart emergency exit window 110 comprises of a driver 150, a wireless communication protocol 160, a processing unit 170, a gyro sensor 180, two power sources 190a and 190b. In one embodiment, the smart emergency exit window 110 is operable.

In one embodiment of the disclosure, the smart emergency exit window 110 can be a double glazed unit (DGU) or a triple glazed unit (TGU). The schematic of the device depicted in FIG. 1 is made of an insulating glass unit comprising two panes of glasses hermetically sealed using frames and fixtures. In one other embodiment, the light source 140 is hermetically sealed in the spacer between the two panes of glasses in all four directions to avoid infiltration. In one aspect of the embodiment, the light source 140 can be a series of LEDs, OLEDs or electroluminescent (EL) wire. In one other aspect of the embodiment, the power of the light source 140 ranges between 80W to 120W. In yet another aspect of the embodiment, the light source 140 is connected to the driver 150 and draws power from the power source 190a and/ or 190b. The amount of power drawn by the light source 140 is monitored by the processing unit 170.

In one aspect of the embodiment, the blow up image in FIG. 1 shows an LED strip and an optical strip reflector for the shown LED. The LED strips are placed within the optical strip reflectors in such a way that the light from the LED is reflected by the strip reflector and is made visible both on the inside and outside of the building.

In another embodiment, FIG. 2 depicts a smart emergency window 110 made of a double glazed unit (DGU) having a primary spacer 120a and a secondary spacer 120b. In one aspect of the embodiment, the primary spacer 120a is hermetically sealed and the secondary spacer 120b is snap fit. In one aspect of the embodiment, the distance between the primary spacer 120a and secondary spacer 120b is X. In one aspect of the embodiment, X ranges between 50 mm to 100 mm. In another aspect of the embodiment, the light source 140 is embedded in the secondary spacer 120b. Embedding the light source 140 in the secondary spacer 120b offers the advantage of replacing the light source 140 (in the event of failure) without having to dismantle the smart emergency window 110.

In yet another aspect of the embodiment, the light source 140 can be embedded in the primary spacer 120a and the secondary spacer 120b. Light source 140 in the primary spacer 120a and the secondary spacer 120b are connected in parallel with the driver 150. In one other aspect of the embodiment, the driver 150 is programmed to preferably activate the light source 140 in the secondary spacer 120b. In one other aspect of the embodiment, the driver 150 can also be programmed to activate the light source 140 in the primary spacer 120a, when light source 140 in the secondary spacer 120b fails.

In another embodiment, the smart emergency exit window 110 can be a triple glazed unit (TGU) having two spacer panes. In one aspect of the embodiment, each of these spacer panes can have more than one spacer. In another aspect of the embodiment, at least one of the spacer panes can have more than one spacer. In yet another aspect of the embodiment, the light source 140 can be embedded in at least one spacer of each of the spacer panes. In yet another aspect of the embodiment, the light source 140 can be embedded in more than one spacer of each of the spacer panes. The driver 150 can be programmed to activate light source 140 embedded in one spacer of each of the spacer panes or more than one spacer of each of the spacer panes.

In another embodiment, the driver 150 controls the light source 140 embedded in the spacer 120. The driver 150 triggers flashing of the light source in events of any emergency and activates the emergency exit window 110. In one aspect of the embodiment, the light source 140 can be programmed to be in multiple modes viz., blink mode, continuous mode or stroboscopic mode. In the blink mode the light source 140 is programmed to continuously switch ON and OFF in a duty cycle of ½ a second. In the continuous mode the light source 140 is programmed to be permanently illuminated. In the stroboscopic mode the light source 140 is programmed to create a stroboscopic effect by flashing alternate series of light. In one other aspect of the embodiment, the driver 150 can also be programmed to actuate light source embedded in the primary spacer 120a and/ or secondary spacer 120b. In another embodiment, actuation of the light source 140 activates the smart emergency exit window 110. Such an activated smart emergency window 110 provides the means of identifying emergency exit windows in the building for both the firefighting personnel stationed outside the building and building occupants trapped inside the building, requiring evacuation.

In another embodiment, the wireless communication protocol 160 is a low power wide area network protocol. In one embodiment, the wireless communication protocol 160 is LoRa. The smart emergency exit window 110 and the smart controller 220 communicate with each other using the wireless communication protocol 160 and are provided with LoRa transmitters and receivers. LoRa offers wide area network coverage and transmits signals faster across long distances, for example 1000 m.

In one other embodiment, the gyro sensor 180 is calibrated to teach open and closed positions of the smart emergency exit window 110. The status of the smart emergency exit window 110 is monitored by the gyro sensor 180 and the sensed signals are transmitted to the smart controller 220. The gyro sensor 180 serves two purposes. In one aspect of the embodiment, the indication of the status of the smart emergency exit window 110 is useful to identify emergency exit windows 110 in open position that can be closed after an evacuation process thereby preventing the spread of fire. In another aspect of the embodiment, the indication of the status of the smart emergency exit window 110 is useful to identify emergency exit windows in open position after an emergency situation that needs to be closed in order to reduce infiltration in a conditioned space thereby assisting in energy saving.

In another embodiment, the two power sources 190a and 190b provide power to the light source 140, the wireless communication protocol 160, the driver 150 and the processing unit 170. In one aspect of the embodiment, the power source 190a is a primary battery and the power source 190b is a secondary battery. In one aspect of the embodiment, the primary battery 190a is a removable battery with a capacity of at least about 40,000 mAh. For example, a primary battery 190a of 40,000 mAh will be sufficient to power up a light source of 100 W for a period of about 60 minutes. This primary battery 190a can power up the light source for 60 minutes for 50 cycles of occurrences. In another aspect of the embodiment, the primary battery 190a is a rechargeable battery.

In one other aspect of the embodiment, the secondary battery 190b is fixed to the electronic assembly in the frame with a capacity of at least about 20,000 mAh. In another aspect of the embodiment, the secondary battery 190b acts as a backup battery when the primary battery 190a is being recharged and replaced. In yet another embodiment, the primary battery 190a and secondary battery 190b are standard Li ion batteries.

In yet another embodiment, the processing unit 170 transmits and receives signals from the smart controller 220 through the wireless communication protocol 160. In one aspect of the embodiment, the processing unit 170 provides commands to the driver 150 to actuate the light source 140. In another aspect of the embodiment, the processing unit 170 performs the power management of the smart emergency window 110. In one embodiment of the disclosure, the smart emergency exit window 110 can be retrofit in places of existing emergency exit windows of a building.

The smart controller 220 illustrated in FIG. 3 is placed remotely and communicates with one or more smart emergency exit windows 110 and a central station 330. In one embodiment, the smart controller 220 communicates with the central station 330 through a wired communication protocol. The wired communication can be using waterproof flat connectors. In one aspect of the embodiment, the wired communication protocol can be a digital input/ output port or an analog input/ output port. In yet another aspect of the embodiment, the wired communication protocol is BACNet or Ethernet.

In another embodiment, the smart controller 220 communicates wirelessly with one or more smart emergency exit windows 110 through the wireless communication protocol 160. The provided wireless communication should not interfere with other connected devices in the building and also should be capable of transmitting signals across a wide area. And for this same reason the available communication method such as Bluetooth, WiFi cannot be used. Another constraint with all the available communication methods is that they cannot transfer data across a long distance, for example 1000 m. Hence in one embodiment of the disclosure, the communication protocol 160 is a low power wide area network specification. In one aspect of the embodiment, the communication protocol 160 is LoRa. The smart controller 220 is provided with a LoRa transmitter and receiver.

In one embodiment, the smart controller 220 acts as a Human

Machine Interface (HMI). In one embodiment, the smart controller 220 has a navigation panel 221 and a display panel 222. The navigation panel 221 shows an overview of controls available in the smart controller 220 including status of all smart emergency exit windows in the building and log of events that have occurred in the smart emergency exit windows. The display panel 222 displays details corresponding to the selected control in the navigation panel 221. The display panel 222 shows the ground plan of the building with a pictorial or list view of the locations of all smart emergency exit windows. A drop down at the far left corner of the display panel provides for selecting the portion of the building to be visualized. Each of the smart emergency exit windows is provided with a unique ID number. Each time the user selects a control on the navigation panel 221, the display panel 222 displays either a pictorial or list view of all the smart emergency exit windows present in the selected portion of the building along with the details of the selected control.

The status tab in the navigation panel provides links to parameters such as dashboard, battery, communication and window status. In one aspect of the embodiment, when a user clicks on the dashboard option and selects the portion of building to be visualized, the display panel 222 shows that portion of the building with an indication of all the activated smart emergency exit windows 110. In another aspect of the embodiment, when a user clicks on the battery option and selects the portion of building to be visualized, then the display panel shows the battery status of all the smart emergency exit windows 110 installed in the selected portion of the building.

In another aspect of the embodiment, where the battery level is lower than optimum an indication depicting a low battery level is shown in the display panel. The user may then locate that particular smart emergency exit window 110 and remove the replaceable primary battery 190a for recharging. In yet another embodiment, the communication status viz., operational or non- operational of all the smart emergency exit windows 110 is displayed on selecting the communication parameter in the navigation panel 221. In one embodiment, a dummy data packet will be sent to each of the smart emergency exit windows 110 from the smart controller 220 at an interval of 10 minutes. On receiving this dummy data packet, the smart emergency exit windows 110 sends back a dummy data packet to the smart controller 220 through the wireless communication protocol 160. This completes one cycle of a communication check. The successful completion of the cycle ensures seamless communication between the smart emergency exit windows 110 and the smart controller 220. Incomplete communication check cycles indicate an error in communication and triggers an alert in the display panel 222.

The window status parameter displays the open and closed positions of all smart emergency exit windows 110 using the gyro sensor 180 placed in the frame 130 of the smart emergency exit window 110. In one aspect of the embodiment, if after a given emergency situation the smart emergency exit windows 110 are not in the closed position then the smart controller 220 triggers an alert to indicate the open position of the corresponding smart emergency exit windows 110.

The history controls in the navigation panel 221 provide links to all past activities occurred in the smart emergency exit windows 110 including operational and maintenance activities. These activities include occurrences of triggered activations, battery replacement, communication errors and other maintenance related issues etc.

The described embodiments on the smart controller 220 are provided to assist in describing the teachings and should not be interpreted as a limitation on the scope or applicability of the teachings. However, other teachings can certainly be used in this application.

FIG. 4 illustrates a system 400 for enabling firefighting personnel and building occupants in identifying one or more emergency exit windows during an emergency situation requiring evacuation of the building. A schematic of the ground plan of the ground floor of a building having multiple emergency exit windows 110 is depicted in FIG. 4.The system 400 comprises of one or more emergency exit windows 110, a smart controller 220 and a central station 330. In one embodiment of the invention, one or more emergency exit windows 110 are wirelessly connected to the smart controller 220 through the wireless communication protocol 160.

In another embodiment, the smart controller 220 communicates with the central station 330 through a wired communication protocol. In one aspect of the embodiment, the wired communication protocol can be a digital input/ output port or an analog input/ output port. In yet another aspect of the embodiment, the wired communication protocol is BACNet or Ethernet. The central station 330 collates information from the emergency sensor systems installed in the building such as smoke detectors, heat detectors and/ or carbon monoxide alarm system detector and transmits the signals to the smart controller 220.

Example 1

The visibility of the light source in bright environments varies depending on the wavelength associated with each color. Typically for signaling purpose red, green, yellow and white colors are used. An optimum color suitable for the smart emergency exit window needs to be identified.

Light Source and Color: Selection Test

Light source for the smart emergency exit windows was selected based on light visibility levels and color of light source using real time experiments performed in a building during night and day time. Three types of LED lights with intensity ranging between 135 Lux to 210 Lux as per BS 1376 color specifications were selected and smart emergency exit windows fitted with the three LED lights were retrofitted on the seventh floor of a building provided with a coated glass with an external reflection of approximately 20%. Experimental measurements were conducted both in broad day light and night time.

Visibility Testing

Once the LEDs were switched on a qualitative survey was conducted to ensure if the lights were visible during clear sunny day with peak sun rays falling on the glass. This test is similar to test conducted by Indian railways to evaluate the LED lights used in railway signals. The visibility was tested at a distance of 5m from the building which in most cases would be the distance where the fire fighting personnel would arrive during an emergency condition. The results are tabulated in table. 1

Table 1 : Visibility Test Results

Viewing Angle Test

Viewing angle of the selected light under normal conditions (as per the manufacturer) was approximately zero degree to thirty degree. Since in most of the building coated glass would be used it in important to determine the viewing angle. Since in most cases the outside reflection of glass would be equal to or less than 20 degree the building with 20 degree external reflection was selected.

Green color light (selected from the visibility test) was visible from a distance of 3m to 17 m. This makes the angle of visibility from the light as 6 degree to 30 degree as illustrated in FIG. 6A and FIG. 6B. As per most fire departments a refugee area needs to be provided at every 24m, this visibility angle would be sufficient for a high rise of any number of floors to identify an operable smart emergency exit window.

Thus a green color light that complies with Class C of BS 1376 having an intensity range of 135 Lux to 210 Lux was selected as the ideal light source to be viewed at a viewing angle between 6° to 30°.

Industrial Applicability

With use of the device 100 for enabling firefighting of the present disclosure, identification of emergency exit windows in a building in emergency situations such as fire, smoke event from smoldering materials or other perilous situations can be done effectively and effortlessly. The activated smart emergency exit windows 110 are visible to both the firefighting personnel stationed outside the building and building occupants trapped inside the building. The firefighting personnel use the activated smart emergency exit windows 110 for rescue operations, while the building occupants use the activated smart emergency exit windows 110 for escape.

The smart emergency exit windows 110 can be retrofitted in place of existing emergency exit windows in both commercial and residential buildings. Further the system 400 for enabling firefighting can also be used in other emergency exit portals of a building including wooden/ gypsum/ fiber cement doors and windows. In such cases the electronics would be concealed in the frames and the light source 140 would be placed as a part of the exterior surface or concealed in small custom made apertures.

The smart emergency exit window 110 is provided with two power sources 190a and 190b to ensure that the system does not run short of power. The percentage of charge present in the primary and secondary battery are monitored continuously by the smart controller 220. Also the driver 150 is programmed to actuate the secondary battery in case of failure of the primary battery thus ensuring the system is always supplied with power. The communication checks run by the smart controller 220 ensure uninterrupted communication flow between the smart controller 220 and the smear emergency window 110.

The double spacer arrangement described in embodiments describing FIG. 2 depict that more than one light sources can be embedded in the spacers thereby leading to an improved extended life of the light source. The double spacer arrangements also allow for the replacement/ service of the light source without having to completely dismantle the smart emergency exit window 110. The electronics in the spacer 120 are also replaceable in case of failure. Thus these advantages provide for easy installation and maintenance of smart emergency exit windows 110.

The present disclosure is also related to an exemplary method 500 of identifying one or more activated emergency exit windows 110 in a building by firefighting personnel stationed outside the building and building occupants, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure. The method 500 will be explained in conjunction with the smart emergency exit window 110, smart controller 220 and the central station 330. The method 500 involves steps 510 to 560 as illustrated in FIG. 5A.

In step 510, one or more emergency sensor systems in the building including smoke detectors and/ or a carbon monoxide alarm system detector are activated in response to an emergency condition in the building. In step 520, data signals from one or more activated emergency sensor systems are transmitted to the central station 330. In step 530, the central station 330 receives the data signals from one or more activated emergency sensor systems and in turn transmits the received signals to the smart controller 220. In step 540, the smart controller 220 on receiving the data signal from the central station 330, transmits the data signal to the processing unit 170 in one or more smart emergency exit window 110 through the communication protocol 160. In the penultimate step 550, the processing unit 170 actuates the driver 150 that activates the light source 140 in one or more smart emergency exit windows 110 to emit bright, readily- visible light. In the final step 560, the firefighting personnel outside the building and the building occupants identify one or more activated emergence exit windows 110 using the bright, readily- visible light emitted by the smart emergency exit window 110.

After such an emergency event, the smart emergency exit windows 110 are restored using the restoration protocol of the fire alarm system in the building that is connected to the central station 330 through the smart controller 220. On restoration the smart emergency exit window 110 goes back to its native inactive state.

Note that not all of the activities described above in the general description are required, that a portion of a specific activity may not be required, and that one or more further activities may be performed in addition to those described. Still further, the order in which activities are listed is not necessarily the order in which they are performed. Benefits, other advantages, and solutions to problems have been described above with regard to specific embodiments. However, the benefits, advantages, solutions to problems, and any feature(s) that may cause any benefit, advantage, or solution to occur or become more pronounced are not to be construed as a critical, required, or essential feature of any or all the claims.

The specification and illustrations of the embodiments described herein are intended to provide a general understanding of the structure of the various embodiments. The specification and illustrations are not intended to serve as an exhaustive and comprehensive description of all of the elements and features of apparatus and systems that use the structures or methods described herein. Certain features, that are for clarity, described herein in the context of separate embodiments, may also be provided in combination in a single embodiment. Conversely, various features that are, for brevity, described in the context of a single embodiment, may also be provided separately or in a sub combination. Further, reference to values stated in ranges includes each and every value within that range. Many other embodiments may be apparent to skilled artisans only after reading this specification. Other embodiments may be used and derived from the disclosure, such that a structural substitution, logical substitution, or another change may be made without departing from the scope of the disclosure. Accordingly, the disclosure is to be regarded as illustrative rather than restrictive.

The description in combination with the figures is provided to assist in understanding the teachings disclosed herein, is provided to assist in describing the teachings, and should not be interpreted as a limitation on the scope or applicability of the teachings. However, other teachings can certainly be used in this application.

As used herein, the terms "comprises," "comprising," "includes," "including," "has," "having" or any other variation thereof, are intended to cover a non-exclusive inclusion. For example, a method, article, or apparatus that comprises a list of features is not necessarily limited only to those features but may include other features not expressly listed or inherent to such method, article, or apparatus. Further, unless expressly stated to the contrary, "or" refers to an inclusive-or and not to an exclusive-or. For example, a condition A or B is satisfied by any one of the following: A is true (or present) and B is false (or not present), A is false (or not present) and B is true (or present), and both A and B are true (or present).

Also, the use of "a" or "an" is employed to describe elements and components described herein. This is done merely for convenience and to give a general sense of the scope of the invention. This description should be read to include one or at least one and the singular also includes the plural, or vice versa, unless it is clear that it is meant otherwise. For example, when a single item is described herein, more than one item may be used in place of a single item. Similarly, where more than one item is described herein, a single item may be substituted for that more than one item.

Unless otherwise defined, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. The materials, methods, and examples are illustrative only and not intended to be limiting. To the extent that certain details regarding specific materials and processing acts are not described, such details may include conventional approaches, which may be found in reference books and other sources within the manufacturing arts.

While aspects of the present disclosure have been particularly shown and described with reference to the embodiments above, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various additional embodiments may be contemplated by the modification of the disclosed machines, systems and methods without departing from the spirit and scope of what is disclosed. Such embodiments should be understood to fall within the scope of the present disclosure as determined based upon the claims and any equivalents thereof.

List of Elements

TITLE: SMART EMERGENCY EXIT WINDOW

100 Device for firefighting

110 Smart emergency exit window

120 Spacer

120a Primary spacer

120b Secondary spacer

130 Frame

140 Light source

150 Driver

160 Wireless communication protocol

170 Processing unit

180 Gyro sensor

190a Primary battery

190b Secondary battery

220 Smart controller

221 Navigation panel

222 Display panel

330 Central station

400 System for fire fighting

X Distance between the primary and secondary spacer

500 Method

510 Step

520 Step

530 Step

540 Step

550 Step

560 Step