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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
SMOKING ARTICLE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURING A SMOKING ARTICLE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2013/045911
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Smoking Article and Method of manufacturing a Smoking Article A smoking article (10, 20, 100) comprising: a sleeve (13, 113) having a first layer (201) and a second layer (211), wherein the first layer (201) comprises one or more first ventilation areas (205) and the second layer comprises one or more second ventilation areas (215), such that at least one of the first and second ventilation areas at least partially overlap to allow ventilation into the smoking article (10, 20, 100), and wherein an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers.

Inventors:
BLICK KEVIN (GB)
AUSTIN MARK (GB)
Application Number:
GB2012/052370
Publication Date:
April 04, 2013
Filing Date:
September 25, 2012
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
BRITISH AMERICAN TOBACCO (INVESTMENTS) LIMITED (Globe House, 1 Water Street, London WC2R 3LA, GB)
International Classes:
A24D3/04
Domestic Patent References:
WO2009077244A1
WO2007110650A1
Foreign References:
EP0442722A1
US4687009A
EP0102247A1
EP0797931A1
GB893790A
EP0228211A1
US2820462A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BRUCE, Alexander et al. (20 Little Britain, London GB EC1A 7DH, GB)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

1. A smoking article comprising:

a sleeve having a first layer and a second layer,

wherein the first layer comprises one or more first ventilation areas and the second layer comprises one or more second ventilation areas, such that at least one of the first and second ventilation areas at least partially overlap to allow ventilation into the smoking article, and

wherein an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers.

2. The smoking article as claimed in claim 1 comprising a first part and a second part, wherein the second part comprises the first and second layers, and wherein the second part is configured to be movable relative to the first part of the smoking article, and optionally,

the sleeve is movable rotationally and/ or longitudinally relative to the first part. 3. The smoking article as claimed in claim 1 or 2 wherein the first ventilation areas have a different configuration to the second ventilation areas.

4. The smoking article as claimed in claim 3 wherein the different configuration of the first and second ventilation areas comprises first and second ventilation areas which have one or more of: different areas, different dimensions, different longitudinal extents, different circumferential extents, different shapes and/ or different spacings.

5. The smoking article as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein the first ventilation areas are larger than the second ventilation areas, and preferably, the first ventilation areas have a greater longitudinal extent than the second ventilation areas.

6. The smoking article as claimed in claim 5, wherein the first layer is an inner layer, and the second layer is an outer layer, or the first layer is an outer layer, and the second layer is an inner layer. 7. The smoking article as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the first layer is a first layer of sheet material and/ or the second layer is a second layer of sheet material.

8. The smoking article as claimed in any one of the preceding claims comprising a first part, and a second part comprising the sleeve connected to the first part of the smoking article, wherein the first and second layers of the sleeve provide a connection to the first part of the smoking article.

9. The smoking article as claimed as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the first and second layers of the sleeve extend longitudinally beyond an inner component to which the sleeve is affixed and/ or movably connected.

10. The smoking article as claimed in claim 2, 8 or 9 wherein the second part surrounds at least a part of the first part.

11. The smoking article as claimed in 8, 9 or 10 wherein the first and second ventilation areas are aligned with the first part to provide ventilation to the first part, and/ or alignable with a chamber rearwardly of the first part to provide ventilation to the chamber.

12. The smoking article as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein a plurality of the first and second ventilation areas extend over a circumferential area in one or more rows. 13. The smoking article as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the first ventilation areas extend in a circumferentially extending row with a first regular circumferential spacing, and the second ventilation areas extend in a circumferentially extending row with a second regular circumferential spacing different to the first circumferential spacing. 14. The smoking article as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the first ventilation areas extend in two dimensions, and the second ventilation areas extend in substantially only one dimension.

15. The smoking article as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein the first ventilation areas have a greater circumferential extent than the second ventilation areas.

16. The smoking article as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein the first ventilation areas are formed independently of the second ventilation areas.

17. A component of a smoking article comprising:

a sleeve comprising:

a first layer and a second layer,

wherein the first layer comprises one or more first ventilation areas and the second layer comprises one or more second ventilation areas, such that at least one of the first and second ventilation areas at least partially overlap to allow ventilation into the smoking article, and

wherein an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers.

18. The component as claimed in claim 17 wherein the component is configured to be movable relative to the first part of the smoking article. 19. A method of manufacturing a smoking article comprising:

forming a sleeve by attaching a first layer having one or more first ventilation areas and a second layer having one or more second ventilation areas, connecting the first and second layers to a first part of the smoking article to provide a connection, and

wherein the first layer and the second layer are attached such that at least one of the first and second ventilation areas at least partially overlap to allow ventilation into the smoking article, and

wherein an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers. 20. The method as claimed in claim 19 comprising providing a first part of the smoking article, and

providing a second part of the smoking article comprising the sleeve, attaching the first and second parts such that the second part is movable relative to the first part.

21. The method as claimed in claim 19 or 20 wherein the first and second ventilation areas have different configurations.

22. The method as claimed in any one of claims 19 to 21, wherein the different configuration of the first and second ventilation areas comprises first and second ventilation areas which have one or more of: different areas, different dimensions, different longitudinal and/ or circumferential extents, different shapes and/ or different spacings. 23. A method according to any one of claims 19 to 22, wherein the first layer and second layer are formed of separate sheets, and forming a sleeve comprises forming an inner cylindrical tube with the first layer of sheet material, and then forming an outer cylindrical tube with the second layer of sheet material around the inner cylindrical tube.

24. A method according to any one of claims 19 to 23 wherein the first ventilation areas are formed by a different process to the second ventilation areas.

25. An apparatus for manufacturing smoking articles according to the method a claimed in any of claims 19 to 24, wherein the apparatus is configured to receive a first layer of sheet material pre-formed with first ventilation areas and a second layer of sheet material pre-formed with second ventilation areas.

Description:
Smoking Article and Method of manufacturing a Smoking Article

Description

The present invention(s) relate to smoking articles and methods of manufacturing smoking articles. In particular, embodiments of the invention relate to a ventilated smoking article having a first part connected to a second part.

An extendable cigarette is known, such as is described in US 2,820,462. Some such cigarettes may be telescopic.

Embodiments of the present invention provide, in a first aspect, a smoking article comprising: a sleeve having a first layer and a second layer, wherein the first layer comprises one or more first ventilation areas and the second layer comprises one or more second ventilation areas, such that at least one of the first and second ventilation areas at least partially overlap to allow ventilation into the smoking article, and wherein an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers. Thus, the smoking article has reliably formed ventilation areas.

Embodiments of the present invention provide, in a second aspect, a component of a smoking article comprising: a sleeve comprising: a first layer and a second layer, wherein the first layer comprises one or more first ventilation areas and the second layer comprises one or more second ventilation areas, such that at least one of the first and second ventilation areas at least partially overlap to allow ventilation into the smoking article, and wherein an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers.

Embodiments of the present invention provide, in a third aspect, method of manufacturing a smoking article comprising: forming a sleeve by attaching a first layer having one or more first ventilation areas and a second layer having one or more second ventilation areas, connecting the first and second layers to a first part of the smoking article to provide a connection, and wherein the first layer and the second layer are attached such that at least one of the first and second ventilation areas at least partially overlap to allow ventilation into the smoking article, and wherein an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers.

Embodiments of the present invention provide, in a fourth aspect, an apparatus for manufacturing smoking articles, wherein the apparatus is configured to receive a first layer of sheet material pre-formed with first ventilation areas and a second layer of sheet material pre-formed with second ventilation areas.

Embodiments of the present invention will now be described, by way of non- limiting example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure 1 is a perspective view of a first embodiment of the smoking article;

Figure 2 is a cut-away side elevation view of the smoking article of Figure 1 in a retracted state;

Figure 3 is a cut-away side elevation view of the smoking article of Figure 1 in an extended state;

Figure 4 is an exploded perspective view of the smoking article;

Figure 5 is a cut-away perspective view of a part of the smoking article;

Figure 6 is an enlarged perspective view of the part of Figure 6;

Figure 7 is an perspective view of a second embodiment of smoking article in a partially formed state;

Figure 8 is a cut-away side elevation view of a third embodiment of smoking article; Figure 9a is a plan view of a part of a smoking article according to any embodiment; and

Figure 9b is a plan view of a further part of a smoking article present in

combination with the part shown in Figure 9a.

Figures 1 to 3 show a first embodiment of a smoking article 10. The smoking article may be an article such as a cigarette, cigar or cigarillo, whether based on tobacco, tobacco derivatives, expanded tobacco, reconstituted tobacco or tobacco substitutes and also heat-not-burn products (i.e. products in which flavour is generated from a smoking material by the application of heat without causing combustion of the material). For convenience, these will be referred to as

"smoking articles" in this specification.

The smoking article 10 comprises a first part having a source of smokable material, which is preferably a tobacco rod 11. The first part preferably comprises a first filter section 12 attached to the tobacco rod 11. The tobacco rod 11 and first filter section 12 are connected with a covering layer of sheet material, which will be described in more detail below. The covering layer is preferably formed of paper, and preferably tipping paper. The material of the covering layer is substantially impermeable to air flow.

A second part of the smoking article comprises a sleeve 13 in the form of a cylindrical tube. The sleeve 13 extends around the circumference of the tobacco rod 11 and/or first filter section 12. The tobacco rod 11 and first filter section 12, are dimensioned to slide as a unit longitudinally within the sleeve 13. The tobacco rod 11, and optionally the first filter section 12, may be referred to as a tobacco unit, or as the body of the first part of the smoking article.

In some implementations, the second part further comprises a second filter section 14 at a mouthpiece end of the sleeve 13, separate from the first filter section 12. The second filter section 14 is securely attached within the sleeve 13. The first and/or second filter sections 12, 14 are preferably made of a conventional cellulose acetate tow.

A chamber 15 may be defined in the sleeve 13 between the first filter section 12 and second filter section 14. The chamber 15 has a variable length, and hence volume, as the first filter section 12 slides axially within the cylindrical sleeve 13. The chamber 15 has a length varying from zero to a predetermined maximum length. Relative movement of the first and second parts, i.e. sleeve 13 and tobacco rod 11 beyond the maximum length is prevented by a restraining means, preferably abutting surfaces on or adjacent to the tobacco rod 11 and sleeve 13, as will be described later.

Figure 2 shows the smoking article 10 in a retracted state, with the tobacco rod 11 and first filter section 12 moved up to the second filter section 14. The length of the chamber 15 has been reduced to zero. The smoking article 10 is at its shortest overall length. The smoking article 10 may be packaged in the retracted state prior to use. The smoking article 10 may be returned to the retracted state after use, once the tobacco rod 11 has been partially or fully combusted.

Figure 3 shows the smoking article 10 in an extended state, with the tobacco rod 11 and first filter section 12 moved as far as possible away from the second filter section 14. The length of the chamber 15 has been increased to its maximum. The smoking article 10 is at its longest length. The smoking article 10 may be in the extended state during use. The tobacco rod 11 and first filter section 12 are continuously positionable within the sleeve 13 to be in any partially extended position between the retracted and extended states.

The tobacco rod and attached filter are connected by the covering layer 16. The covering layer may be standard tipping paper, or a relatively thick tipping paper, or a board type tipping paper. Alternatively, the covering layer may be a tube formed of any material surrounding the tobacco unit, and preferably attaching the first filter to the source of smokable material. In particular, such a tube may be made of a plastics material, for example, a plastic made from corn starch. Alternatively, the tube may be made from a ceramic material. Alternatively, the tube may be formed from foil, metal or metallised paper.

Figures 4 to 6 show further details of the construction of a smoking article according to an embodiment of the invention. The smoking article 10 comprises a restraining means to control longitudinal movement between the first and second parts. Preferably, the restraining means prevents separation of the first and second part of a smoking article. The restraining means limits relative longitudinal movement between the first and second parts (source of smokable material and movable sleeve). The restraining means allows relative rotation between the sleeve and source of smokable material. The restraining means maintains the sleeve 13 attached to the tobacco unit 11. The restraining means comprises a first engaging surface 32 on the first part, and attached to the tobacco unit. The first engaging surface 32 is engagable with a second engaging surface 31 attached to the second part i.e. located on the sleeve 13.

Figure 4 shows an exploded view of smoking article 10, in which a tobacco rod 11 and first filter section 12 are joined by a covering layer 16 in the form of a strip of sheet material, preferably tipping paper, as is conventionally known and described above. The covering layer 16 is preferably made of a relatively heavy weight paper. The covering layer 16 may have an overlapping section 16a which is affixed to an overlapped part of the covering layer 16, for example with an adhesive. The tobacco rod 11, first filter section 12 and covering layer 16 are substantially formed as a conventional cigarette, with further details of the covering layer 16 described below. The first and second filter sections are preferably harder than a typical cigarette filter. Preferably, the smoking article includes either a first filter or any other relatively hard substance at the end of the tobacco rod 11. The sheet material of the covering layer 16 is wrapped around the body of the tobacco unit, and extends radially outwardly from the source of smokable material and/or first filter. The covering layer 16 which connects the tobacco rod 11 and first filter section 12 defines the first engaging surface 32 of the restraining means. The first engaging surface 32 is the surface of the wrapped sheet material which extends radially outwardly from the source of smokable material, and faces in an axially forward direction.

Alternatively, the first engaging surface may be formed on a folded section of sheet material, wrapped around the tobacco unit. A fold is formed adjacent a rearward end of the sheet material, such that a folded section extends outwardly and forwardly. The first engaging surface is formed on a forward facing edge of the folded section. The first filter 12 or other hard substance adjacent to the tipping paper 16 assists in creating or maintaining the first engaging surface 32 onto which the sleeve 13 can abut to prevent the tobacco rod 11 from separating from the sleeve 13. Figure 5 shows a perspective sectional view of sleeve 13. The sleeve 13 has a forward end 17a which surrounds the tobacco unit when assembled. The sleeve 13 has a rearward end 17b, for receiving the second filter 14, and forming a

mouthpiece end of the smoking article. The sleeve 13 is preferably formed from a sheet material, and in particular, a paper material. In particular, the sleeve 13 may be formed of a relatively heavy weight paper.

At the forward end 17a of the sleeve 13, a projecting section 18 extends radially inwardly. The projecting section 18 is preferably formed by folding inwardly the sleeve material at the forward end 17a to form an overlap. In particular, the projecting section 18 is formed by a fold in the material of the sleeve 13, in a radially inward direction, such that the folded sheet material is adjacent to an interior surface of the sleeve 13. The projecting section is preferably folded by approximately 180 degrees.

The second engaging surface 31 of the restraining means is formed on the projecting section 18. The second engaging surface 31 is the surface extending radially inwardly from the cylindrical sleeve, and facing in an axially rearward direction. The second engaging surface 31 is within the cylindrical sleeve.

Figure 6 is an enlarged view of the forward end 17a of the sleeve 13. The projecting section 18 is shown in more detail. The projecting section 18 extends around substantially the whole circumference of the sleeve, providing a continuous second engaging surface around the circumference. The sleeve 13 is formed of a strip of material which is curled into a cylinder. The long sides of the sleeve 13 are brought together and overlapped to form an overlap section 19. The overlap section 19 of the sleeve 13 overlies and is affixed to the opposite side of the sheet material forming the sleeve. Preferably, the overlap section 19 is affixed with adhesive. The overlap section 19 does not provide material for the projecting section 18 at the forward end 17a of the sleeve. The position or movement of the first part relative to the second part, e.g.

longitudinal position or movement, may determine one or more of the filtration attributes or ventilation of the smoking article, or release of a smoke modifying agent (e.g. flavourant). Alternatively, any one or more of the ventilation, filtration attributes or release of smoke modifying agent may be independent of the position or movement of the first part relative to the second part.

Figure 7 shows a second embodiment of the smoking article 20. The smoking article 20 comprises a source of smokable material, for example, a cylinder of tobacco 21 surrounded by, and attached to, a sleeve 23 to form a tobacco rod. The cylinder of tobacco 21 does not move relative to the sleeve 23. The sleeve 23 has a section 23a extending rearwardly of the tobacco rod 21. A filter 24 is longitudinally slidable within the sleeve section 23a. A chamber 25 is formed by the tubular section 23a, between the tobacco rod 21 and the filter 24. The smoking article 20 functions in a similar manner to the smoking article 10 of Figure 1. Smoking article 20 differs in that the sleeve forming the chamber 25 is rigidly attached to the tobacco rod, not the mouthpiece filter 24. The smoking article 20 also differs by not having a filter attached directly to the tobacco rod 21. A further embodiment of the present invention may have only one of these features or differences. For example, a further filter may be attached to the tobacco rod 21.

The smoking article of Figure 7 has a restraining means analogous to the

embodiment of Figures 4 to 6, preventing relative movement of the sleeve 23 and filter 24 beyond a maximum extent. Preferably, the restraining means comprises engaging surfaces (not shown) on or adjacent to the sleeve 23a and filter 24. The sleeve 23a defines a first engaging section formed on an inwardly folded section. The folded section is preferably folded by approximately 180 degrees. The filter 24 defines a second engaging surface which can abut the first engaging section and limit movement. The second engaging surface is formed adjacent the forward end of the filter 24, and may be formed by an outwardly folded over section of filter wrapping material. The folded section is preferably folded by approximately 180 degrees. Alternatively, the second engaging surface may be formed on or one or more layers of sheet material (e.g. tipping paper) wrapped around a part of the filter 24. The second engaging surface may extend from the sheet material containing and directly surrounding the filter material, i.e. the plugwrap.

Figure 8 shows a third embodiment of smoking article 100. The smoking article 100 has substantially the same construction as the smoking article 10 described in

Figures 1 to 6, with the difference that the smoking article 100 is not extendable. The smoking article 100 comprises a first part which is rotatable relative to the first part without longitudinal movement. The smoking article 100 is configured to stop relative longitudinal movement between the first and second parts.

The smoking article 100 comprises a first part having a source of smokable material, which is preferably a tobacco rod 111. The first part preferably comprises a first filter section 112 attached to the tobacco rod 111. The tobacco rod 111 and first filter section 112 are connected with a covering layer of sheet material 116, which will be described in more detail below. The covering layer 116 is preferably formed of paper, and preferably tipping paper. The material of the covering layer is substantially impermeable to air flow.

A second part of the smoking article comprises a sleeve 113 in the form of a cylindrical tube. The sleeve 113 extends around the circumference of the tobacco rod 111 and/or first filter section 112. The tobacco rod 111 and first filter section 112, are dimensioned to rotate as a unit longitudinally within the sleeve 113. The tobacco rod 111 and first filter section 112 may be referred to as a tobacco unit, or as the body of the first part of the smoking article.

The second part preferably further comprises a second filter section 114 at a mouthpiece end of the sleeve 113, adjacent to the first filter section 112. The second filter section 114 is securely attached within the sleeve 113. The first and/or second filter sections 112, 114 are preferably made of a conventional cellulose acetate tow.

The first and second filter sections 112,114 are preferably abutting, such that no chamber is defined in the sleeve 113 between the first filter section 112 and second filter section 114.

The tobacco rod and attached filter are connected by the covering layer 116. The covering layer may be standard tipping paper, or a relatively thick tipping paper, or a board type tipping paper. Alternatively, the covering layer may be a tube formed of any material surrounding the tobacco unit, and preferably attaching the first filter to the source of smokable material. In particular, such a tube may be made of a plastics material, for example, a plastic made from corn starch. Alternatively, the tube may be made from a ceramic material. Alternatively, the tube may be formed from foil, metal or metallised paper.

The restraining means comprises a first engaging surface 132 on the first part, and attached to the tobacco unit. The first engaging surface 132 is engagable with a second engaging surface 131 attached on the second part i.e. located on the sleeve 113.

The tobacco rod 111 and first filter section 112 are joined by a covering layer 116 in the form of a strip of sheet material, preferably tipping paper, as is conventionally known and described above. The covering layer 116 is preferably made of a relatively heavy weight paper. The covering layer 116 may optionally have an overlapping section which is affixed to an overlapped part of the covering layer 16, for example with an adhesive, substantially as described above. The tobacco rod 111, first filter section 112 and covering layer 116 are substantially formed as a conventional cigarette, with further details of the covering layer 116 described below. The first and second filter sections are preferably harder than a typical cigarette filter. Preferably, the smoking article includes either a first filter or any other relatively hard substance at the end of the tobacco rod 111. The first engaging surface 132 is the surface which extends radially outwardly from, and faces in an axially forward direction. The sheet material of the covering layer 116 is wrapped around the body of the tobacco unit, and extends radially outwardly from the source of smokable material and/or first filter. The covering layer 116 which connects the tobacco rod 111 and first filter section 112 defines the first engaging surface 132 of the restraining means. The first engaging surface 132 is the surface of the wrapped sheet material which extends radially outwardly from the source of smokable material, and faces in an axially forward direction. Alternatively, the first engaging surface may be formed on a folded section of sheet material, wrapped around the tobacco unit. A fold is formed adjacent a rearward end of the sheet material, such that a folded section extends outwardly and forwardly. The first engaging surface is formed on a forward facing edge of the folded section.

The first filter 112 or other hard substance adjacent to the tipping paper 116 assists in creating or maintaining the first engaging surface 132 onto which the sleeve 113 can abut to prevent the tobacco rod 111 from moving longitudinally relative to the sleeve 113.

At a forward end of the sleeve 113, a projecting section 118 extends radially inwardly. The projecting section 118 is preferably formed by folding inwardly the sleeve material at the forward end to form an overlap. In particular, the projecting section 118 is formed by a fold in the material of the sleeve 113, in a radially inward direction, such that the folded sheet material is adjacent to an interior surface of the sleeve 113. The projecting section is preferably folded by approximately 180 degrees.

The second engaging surface 131 of the restraining means is formed on the projecting section 118. The second engaging surface 131 is a surface extending radially inwardly from the cylindrical sleeve, and facing in an axially rearward direction. The second engaging surface 131 is within the cylindrical sleeve. The first and second parts may be rotated without allowing or actuating a change in the length of the smoking article. The restraining means allows rotation of the sleeve, and does not allow relative longitudinal movement between the sleeve and a source of smokable material. The restraining means may be arranged such that the chamber is of a fixed length, which may be zero. Preferably, the smoking article 100 is configured to maintain the first and second parts in a single longitudinal relative position or formation. The first and second engaging surfaces of the restraining means are configured to substantially prevent extension of the smoking article. The first and second engaging surfaces abut when the first filter section is abutting the second filter section. The first and second engaging surfaces stop extension or longitudinal movement in a first longitudinal direction, and the abutting first and second filter sections stop longitudinal movement in an opposite second direction, allowing rotation and preventing longitudinal movement. The restraining means may allow relative rotation between two adjacent filter sections.

The position or movement of the first part relative to the second part, e.g. by rotational movement, may determine one or more of the filtration attributes or ventilation of the smoking article, or release of a smoke modifying agent (e.g.

flavourant).

The sleeve 113 is preferably formed from a sheet material, and in particular, a paper material. In particular, the sleeve 113 may be formed of a relatively heavy weight paper.

The smoking article 10,20,100 of any embodiment is configured to provide ventilation between the first and second parts. The sleeve is provided with one or more ventilation apertures, allowing ventilating air into the chamber and/ or one or more filter section. The first and/ or second filter section receiving the ventilating air may comprise filtration material wrapped in an air permeable material (e.g.

plugwrap), or material having ventilation apertures, which is separate to the sleeve. Figures 9a and 9b show blanks for a first layer 201 and a second layer 211 of a sleeve 13,113. The smoking article of any embodiment comprises a sleeve formed from first and second layers, for example, of sheet material. The first layer of sheet material 201 as an inner layer and the second layer of sheet material 211 as an outer layer. The inner layer 201 may have the same construction, and be formed with the same method, as the sleeve 13 described with respect to figures 1 to 6 or the sleeve 113 described with respect to figure 8. The inner layer 201 and outer layer 211 together form the sleeve 13,113 described in the first or second embodiments above. Alternatively, the inner and outer layers may form the sleeve 23 or only the sleeve section 23a, of the embodiment of Figure 7.

The inner layer 201 and outer layer 211 are substantially the same length (i.e. in a longitudinal direction). The inner layer 201 and outer layer 211 are substantially the same width (i.e. in a circumferential direction. The inner layer 201 and outer layer 211 are dimensioned to each provide one complete layer around rod articles of the smoking article, with a small circumferential overlap to seal the layer as a tube. The inner layer 201 and outer layer 211 provide a tubular connection having two layers between the second filter section 14 and the first part of the smoking article. The second engaging surface extends radially within the sleeve comprising the inner layer 201 and outer layer 211. The layer defining the second engaging surface is in addition to the inner layer 201 and outer layer 211. The inner layer 201 and outer layer 211 are fixed together, such that there is no movement between the inner layer 201 and outer layer 211. The inner layer 201 and outer layer 211 together form a single or unitary tube (in particular a cylindrical tube) having a plurality of layers. The inner layer 201 and outer layer 211 are permanently affixed to each other.

The inner layer 201 comprises one or more first, or inner, ventilation areas 205, and preferably a plurality of inner ventilation areas 205. In some aspects, the first ventilation areas are ventilation apertures, in particular, discrete ventilation apertures. A plurality of inner ventilation apertures 205 are preferably arranged in a pattern extending circumferentially around the inner layer 201 , and preferably in one or more rows around at least a part of the circumference of the inner layer. The outer layer 211 comprises one or more second, or outer, ventilation areas 215, and preferably a plurality of outer ventilation areas 215. In some aspects, the second ventilation areas are ventilation apertures, in particular, discrete ventilation apertures. The outer ventilation apertures 215 are preferably arranged in a pattern extending circumferentially around the outer layer 211, and preferably in one or more rows around at least a part of the circumference of the outer layer.

The inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 may be formed in the inner and outer layers 201,211 before the inner and outer layers 201,211 are affixed together, or attached to any other part of the smoking article. The inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 are formed independently. The inner and outer layers are considered as pre-formed or pre-perforated with the ventilation apertures. The use of sheet material with pre-formed ventilation apertures avoids the need to form the ventilation apertures on-line, e.g. using a laser.

At least one of the inner ventilation apertures and outer ventilation apertures is located to at least partially overlap when the inner layer 201 is affixed to the outer layer 211. Ventilation air can enter the smoking article through the overlapping areas of the inner and outer ventilation apertures. The overlapping areas are configured to allow ventilation air into one or more of the first and second filter sections and chamber (if present).

The first and second ventilation areas are configured such that an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers. Any variation in alignment is from the initial attachment of the first layer to the second layer. Since the first and second layers are fixed in position relative to each other to define the tubular sleeve, no further variation in alignment occurs. In some aspects, the inner ventilation apertures 205 are configured differently to the outer ventilation apertures 215. In particular, the inner and outer ventilation apertures have a different configuration which may comprise one or more of different areas, different dimensions in a longitudinal and/ or circumferential direction, different shapes and/or formed by different processes. In some aspects, the configurations of the first and second ventilation apertures allows attachment of sheets with pre-formed apertures, such that any variation in alignment of the sheets does not substantially affect the ventilation provided. In particular, the different configurations of the first and second ventilation apertures may allow for a difference in alignment to have a negligible, or small, effect on ventilation. In some examples, the ventilation is substantially independent of a longitudinal and/ or circumferential variation in alignment of the first and second layers. In some examples, the ventilation area is approximately constant with a small perturbation in alignment (longitudinal and/or rotational). The first and second ventilation areas may be configured such that an overlapping area of the first and second ventilation areas is substantially independent of a variation of alignment between the first and second layers. The longitudinal extent (i.e. in a longitudinal direction of the sleeve) over which the inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 extend is significantly smaller than the longitudinal length of the inner and outer layers 201,211.

The inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 are formed in separate processes. The inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 are formed to be aligned when the inner and outer layers are attached together. Manufacturing tolerances in the location of the inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 on the respective layer and/or location tolerances in positioning the outer layer on the inner layer may introduce a variation in alignment between the inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215. For example, if the inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 were the same size, variation in alignment may have a significant effect on the overlapping area, and hence the ventilation provided.

Preferably, the inner apertures 205 each have a different area to the outer apertures 215. As shown, the inner ventilation apertures 205 are larger than the outer ventilation apertures 215. In particular, the inner ventilation apertures 205 have a longitudinal extent (i.e. in a longitudinal direction of the sleeve) which is larger than the longitudinal extent of the outer ventilation apertures 215. In addition, the inner ventilation apertures 205 may have a circumferential extent (i.e. in a circumferential direction of the sleeve) which is larger than the circumferential extent of the outer ventilation apertures 215. Preferably, the inner ventilation apertures 205 have an extent which is at least two times, three times, or at least five times, larger than the outer ventilation apertures 215 in a longitudinal direction.

A longitudinal variation of the inner ventilation apertures 205 and outer ventilation apertures 215 may have a relatively small, or zero, effect on the overlap area of the inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215. In particular, the ventilation is determined solely by the smaller of the inner or outer ventilation apertures. This is the case when the smaller ventilation apertures are aligned longitudinally within the larger ventilation apertures, or within a particular part of the larger ventilation apertures, which provides the limits of variation of longitudinal alignment. Thus, the longitudinal tolerance of positioning of the inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 to obtain the required ventilation is increased. The ventilation is

substantially independent of the longitudinal alignment of the inner and outer layers, within a longitudinal range. The longitudinal range over which the ventilation is substantially constant may depend on the relative size and shape of the apertures. In some aspects, the inner ventilation apertures 205 may be any shape, for example, circular. In some aspects, the outer ventilation apertures 215 may be any shape, for example, circumferentially extending slits. Alternatively, the inner and/ or outer ventilation apertures may be any shape, for example, circular, oval, rectangular, square, triangular, narrow slits (perforations), in any combination. In particular, one of the inner ventilation apertures and outer ventilation apertures may extend in two dimensions, i.e. longitudinally and circumferentially, e.g. as a circle, rectangle or square. The other of the inner ventilation apertures and outer ventilation apertures may extend substantially in only one dimension, i.e. circumferentially, e.g. narrow slit or a line of perforations. The perforations may be a series of narrow slits arranged in a line, e.g. extending and arranged in a line extending circumferentially. The apertures may be formed by any suitable method, for example, mechanical cutting or a laser. The inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 preferably comprise a large number of apertures in the circumferential direction, for example, more than 10 or more than 20 apertures. The inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 are each substantially uniform in a circumferential direction. In particular, the

circumferential spacing between the inner ventilation apertures and/ or between the outer ventilation apertures is substantially constant, and/ or the shape and/ or dimensions of the inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 are uniform in a circumferential direction. The inner and outer ventilation apertures may be regularly spaced. For example, the inner and/ or outer ventilation apertures may be spaced apart by a distance less than the extent of a corresponding one of the apertures. The circumferential spacing of the inner ventilation apertures may be different to the spacing of the outer ventilation apertures. The different spacings mean that some, but not all, of the areas are overlapping. The different spacings avoid the overlap area of all of the apertures increasing or decreasing simultaneously due to a circumferential change in alignment. The inner and outer ventilation apertures may alternatively or in addition have different circumferential extents. In some aspects, the inner ventilation apertures each have the same orientation, and spacing from an adjacent aperture, and are formed in a single row or ordered array. The large number of apertures, and uniformity of the apertures in the circumferential directions and/ or different spacings, provides for the ventilation to be substantially independent of variation in the circumferential alignment of the inner and outer layers.

The ventilation areas are formed on a hollow tubular body, i.e. the sleeve. The ventilation areas allow ventilating air into the hollow sleeve. The ventilation areas are located such that the ventilating air may pass into a part of the tobacco unit, in particular, the first filter, or rearwardly of the first filter, in particular, into a chamber. Alternatively, alignment of the ventilation areas with the tobacco unit may cover the ventilation areas, and inhibit ventilation. In some aspects, the sleeve is formed of a first and second layer over its whole area such that the sleeve is relatively rigid. The first and second layers may have substantially the same length. The sleeve may form a structure or component in addition to a conventional smoking article comprising a tobacco rod and connected filter. For example, the sleeve may be movable relative to the first part of the smoking article. In some aspects, the sleeve with ventilation areas described provides a component having the desired structural properties which also reliably defines a pre-determined ventilation area to allow ventilating air into the sleeve.

The sleeve may be movably connected to the first part of the smoking article, wherein the first and second layers of the sleeve provide a connection to the first part of the smoking article. The connection may be to a component of the second part, e.g. the second filter section. Alternatively, the sleeve may be the only component of the second part, and so may provide a multi-layer sleeve surrounding and connected to the first part.

The sleeve extends longitudinally beyond an inner component to which the sleeve is affixed and/ or longitudinally beyond an inner component to which the sleeve is movably connected. The inner component may be any component of the first or second parts which is within the sleeve. For example, the double-layer sleeve may be affixed to the second filter section as an inner component within the sleeve, and extends longitudinally beyond the second filter section, in order to connect with the first part. Alternatively, the double-layer sleeve may be considered as extending longitudinally beyond the connection to the first part, optionally, to connect to the second filter section or to define a chamber or hollow space. The connection to the first part may be a movable connection. The sleeve may provide a two layer connection between the first part and a component of the second part (e.g. second filter section), or may provide a two layer connection to the first part which defines a hollow space.

The outer ventilation apertures 215 have been described as smaller than the inner ventilation apertures 205. This has the advantage that the size of the inner ventilation apertures is not visible from the exterior of the sleeve. Alternatively, the outer ventilation apertures 215 are larger than the inner ventilation apertures 205. The ventilation, and independence of ventilation to longitudinal mis-alignment, is the same as described above. The size of both the inner and outer ventilation apertures 205,215 is visible from the exterior of the sleeve. The layer described as the outer layer may be the inner layer, and the layer described as the inner layer may be the outer layer. Any features of the outer layer and inner layer may be used in any combination on the other of the outer layer and inner layer. The sleeve has been described as formed from a first and second layer of sheet material. Alternatively, one or more layers may be formed by a solid tubular body, i.e. may not be a sheet material. The sleeve may be formed of a plurality of layers of sheet material, for example, two, three, four or more layers. All of the layers are provided with ventilation apertures as described above, at least one of which is different to at least one other.

The first and second layers have been described as separate pieces of material. Alternatively, the first and second layers may be integrally formed, and provided with different configurations of ventilation apertures in areas corresponding to the first and second layers.

The first and second ventilation apertures have been described as extending circumferentially, and configured to allow a variation in longitudinal alignment. Alternatively, the first and second ventilation apertures extend in one or more longitudinally extending rows. The longitudinally extending ventilation apertures have different configurations as described above, in order to allow a variation in circumferential alignment. Alternatively, the first and second ventilation apertures extend in a longitudinally and circumferentially extending array. The array of ventilation apertures has different configurations as described above, in order to allow a variation in circumferential and longitudinal alignment.

In some examples, the inner layer and outer layer of the sleeve are formed as separate, unconnected, sections of sheet material. The sheet material for the inner layer may be a different material to the sheet material of the outer layer. Preferably, the outer layer is more dense than the inner layer. The outer layer may also have a higher thickness than the inner layer. The inner layer may have an area density (grammage/weight) of 30 to 50 g/m 2 , and preferably approximately 40g/m 2 . The outer layer 523 may have an area density of 50 to 70 g/ m 2 , and preferably approximately 60 g/m 2 . In some examples, the inner layer and outer layer of the sleeve may have substantially the same size, such that cylindrical tube having two layers over its whole area may be formed. The inner layer and outer layer may be formed from an air impermeable sheet material, preferably paper, for example, a tipping paper. An adhesive is applied to one or more areas of the outer layer in order to affix the outer layer to the inner layer. The adhesive is not applied to the area of the ventilation apertures. The present invention further provides a method of manufacturing a smoking article as described above. The method substantially comprises providing a first part of the smoking article, and providing a second part of the smoking article. The first and second parts are configured and attached such that the first part surrounds at least a part of the first part, and the first part is configured to be movable relative to the second part. The second part is formed by attaching a first layer of sheet material comprising first ventilation apertures and a second layer of sheet material comprising second ventilation apertures, preferably with adhesive. The first ventilation apertures are pre-formed in the first layer of sheet material, and the second ventilation apertures are pre-formed in the second layer of sheet material, prior to attachment together. The first ventilation apertures have a different configuration to the second ventilation apertures, as described above. By preforming the apertures (i.e. pre-perforating the layers of sheet material), the ventilation apertures can be formed earlier, in a separate process, before assembling of the sleeve and smoking article.

The first layer and second layer are formed of separate sheets, and forming a sleeve may comprise forming an inner cylindrical tube with the first layer of sheet material, and then forming an outer cylindrical tube with the second layer of sheet material around the inner cylindrical tube. The sleeve may be formed by the inner layer 201 being rolled to form a cylinder around the first and second filter sections. The outer layer 211 is then rolled to form a cylinder around the formed cylinder of the inner layer 201. Alternatively, the blanks for the inner and outer layers 201,211 are affixed together , and then rolled together to form a cylinder. The first ventilation apertures are formed independently of the second ventilation apertures, and may be formed by a different process to the second ventilation apertures.

The present invention further provides an apparatus for manufacturing smoking articles as described, and preferably according to at least a part of the method described. The apparatus is configured to receive a first layer of sheet material preformed with first ventilation apertures and a second layer of sheet material pre- formed with second ventilation apertures. The first ventilation apertures have a different configuration to the second ventilation apertures. Alternatively, the apparatus may receive first and second layers of sheet material, and form the first and second ventilation apertures in each respectively, prior to affixing together the first and second layers of sheet material.

In a further aspect, the invention may provide a component for forming a part of the smoking article. The component may be the sleeve as described in any embodiment, attachable to a source of smokable material. The component may comprise a sleeve only, or may comprise the sleeve with an attached filter. The smoking article is formed by attaching the component to a source of smokable material.

The first engaging surface of the restraining means has been described in some embodiments as formed by a sheet of material connecting the source of smokable material to a filter. Alternatively, the first engaging surface may be formed in any embodiment by any radially extending surface. In particular, the first engaging surface may be formed by a sheet of material wrapped one or more times around the source of smokable material or around the first filter, and not connecting the source of smokable material to a filter. The first engaging surface of any embodiment may be formed on a portion of sheet material which is folded radially outwardly, and folded forwardly to overlie the tobacco unit or filter. The first and/ or second engaging surface of any embodiment may be formed by an embossed surface. In particular, embossing may be used instead of folding sheet material in any embodiment, including when the first or second part is formed from a single layer only of sheet material. The grooves may be formed in the embossed surface.

Any of the features of any embodiment may be combined with any of the features of any other embodiment. In particular, any of the embodiments of smoking article may or may not have a filter section adjoining the cylinder of tobacco, or may not have a filter section at the mouthpiece end of the sleeve.

The second engaging surface has been described as formed on a folded section. Alternatively, the second engaging surface may be formed by embossing the material of the sleeve. An embossed area, substantially corresponding to projecting section 18, has an increased thickness which functions as a stop. The second engaging surface 31 may be defined by the embossed section, and engagable with the first engaging surface to restrain the first and second parts of the smoking article.

The first and second engaging surfaces preferably extend circumferentially.

Alternatively, the first and/ or second engaging surface may be angled relative to a circumferential direction. The angled first and/ or second engaging surfaces may be arranged such that relative rotation actuates relative longitudinal movement.

The first and second parts of the smoking article are preferably movable relative to each other, i.e. one or both of longitudinally and rotationally movable. Alternatively, the first and second parts may be connected without allowing any movement. For example, the first and second engaging surfaces may prevent rotation and

longitudinal movement, or the sleeve 13 may be adhered to an exterior surface of the covering layer. The sleeve 13 may not comprise a second engaging surface. The first engaging surface may then be considered as a surface defining one more channels providing for ventilation, preferably into the sleeve. The covering layer may optionally connect the tobacco rod and first filter section. One or more of the filter sections may be formed of a single segment of filter material or a plurality of segments. A filter section formed of a plurality of segments may comprise segments made of different materials or having different filtration properties. In particular, a filter section may comprise a standard segment of cellulose acetate tow and a further segment of filtration material including carbon, preferably in the form of charcoal. Alternatively, the filter section may be a single segment incorporating charcoal.

One or more additives or flavourants may be present in only one of the first or second filter sections 12,14, or in both first and second filter sections. In particular, the second filter section 14 only may comprise charcoal, and the first filter section 12 may not comprise charcoal. Alternatively, the first filter section 12 only may comprise charcoal, and the second filter section 14 may not comprise charcoal. Alternatively, the sheet material surrounding the tobacco rod, first or second filters may comprise tobacco.

The embodiments above have been described as having a filter section at the mouthpiece end of the sleeve. Alternatively, the sleeve may not contain a filter section. In this case, the sleeve defines the chamber between the tobacco unit and the mouthpiece end of the sleeve. Alternatively, the second filter section may be replaced by a stain binder. The smoking article may not have a first filter section affixed to a rearward end of the tobacco rod. The embodiments described above may have at least one filter section, attached to one or both of the source of smokable material and the mouthpiece end of the sleeve. Alternatively, the smoking article may not include any filter section.

In the embodiment shown in Figure 8, the first and second filter sections 112,114 have been described as separate filter sections. Alternatively, the first and second filter section 112,114 may be integrally formed. The first and second filter section 112,114 may be defined by a laterally extending cut or gap around a radially exterior part of the first and second filter section 112,114. A central core connects first and second filter section 112,114. The central core is formed of filtration material, integrally formed with the first and second filter section 112,114. The first and second filter section 112,114 can rotate relative to each other around the central core.

The relative longitudinal and/ or rotational position of the second part of the smoking article to the first part may control ventilation through the ventilation apertures. In particular, the ventilation apertures may be selectively covered by an underlying impermeable surface. The ventilation apertures may extend around the whole circumference of the sleeve, or around only a part of the circumference. For a smoking article in which rotation controls the level of ventilation, the ventilation apertures may extend around only a part of the sleeve, such that rotation selectively aligns the ventilation apertures in the sleeve with impermeable material, or air permeable material/ apertures in the first part.

The blanks shown in Figures 9a and 9b may be used to form a plurality of sleeves. In particular, the blanks shown are a continuous length of sheet material, which is cut laterally (i.e. horizontally) as shown, in order to produce a blank for a single smoking article. The ventilation apertures are preferably formed in the sheet material prior to the sheet material being cut to form a blank for a single smoking article. The blanks of sheet material may be formed with two sets of ventilation apertures to simultaneously form two sleeves for two smoking articles, which are then cut to form sleeves for a single smoking article.

The first and second layers have been described as having ventilation areas, which may be apertures. The ventilation areas may be any area allowing flow of air, e.g. an aperture, or an air permeable material. The permeable material may be only on a ventilation, or may form the whole layer. The layer outside of the ventilation area may be treated to be air impermeable, for example, with adhesive. Alternatively, one of the first or second layer may be air permeable over its whole area, without defined ventilation areas. The ventilation areas of the first and second layers may be arranged to always be open (i.e. uncovered) to allow a base level of ventilation into the smoking article. The ventilating air can flow into a hollow area of the sleeve, or into aligned ventilation apertures in the first part of the smoking article.

Alternatively, the ventilation areas of the first and second layers can be arranged to be selectively covered to control a level of ventilation. For example, the ventilation areas can be covered by overlying an impermeable area, for example, an impermeable exterior surface on the first part of the smoking article. In some example, the ventilation areas can be selectively aligned with one or more ventilation areas on the exterior surface on the first part of the smoking article, allowing ventilation into the smoking article. Thus, longitudinal movement of the first part within the sleeve determines a level of ventilation of the smoking article.