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Title:
A STEAM CONDENSATE DRAINER
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2014/025246
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention relates to a steam condensate drainer (10). The steam condensate drainer (10) includes a housing (12) formed by an inlet cavity (20) at one end, an outlet cavity (30) at the opposite end, and a third cavity (40) protruding substantially perpendicular to the axis of the inlet cavity (20), wherein a flow conduit is formed between the inlet cavity (20) and third cavity (40) through a nozzle aperture (42) and between the third cavity (40) and the outlet cavity (30) through a drain aperture (46), a nozzle (50) having a nozzle passage (52) removably inserted into the nozzle aperture (42), a removable cap (60) attached to the third cavity (40) and sealing said third cavity (40) apart from the nozzle aperture (50) and the drain aperture (46).

Inventors:
TAN, Sing Hong (Lot 346, No. 18 Jalan Pelangi Pagi,Country Heights, Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan, 43000, MY)
Application Number:
MY2012/000226
Publication Date:
February 13, 2014
Filing Date:
August 09, 2012
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
TAN, Sing Hong (Lot 346, No. 18 Jalan Pelangi Pagi,Country Heights, Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan, 43000, MY)
International Classes:
F16T1/34
Foreign References:
US5137556A
US5948128A
US2783770A
US4171209A
GB2088246A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAMODHARAN, Ramakrishna (Adipven Sdn. Bhd, A-33-3A Menara UOA Bangsar,No., Jalan Bangsar Utama 1 Kuala Lumpur, 59000, MY)
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Claims:
CLAIMS

1. A steam condensate drainer (10), the steam condensate drainer (10) includes a housing (12) formed by an inlet cavity (20) at one end, an outlet cavity (30) at the opposite end, and a third cavity (40) protruding substantially perpendicular to the axis of the inlet cavity (20), wherein a flow conduit is formed between the inlet cavity (20) and third cavity (40) through a nozzle aperture (42) and between the third cavity (40) and the outlet cavity (30) through a drain aperture (46), a nozzle (50) having a nozzle passage (52) removably inserted into the nozzle aperture (42), a removable cap (60) attached to the third cavity (40) and sealing said third cavity (40) apart from the nozzle aperture (50) and the drain aperture (46).

2. The steam condensate drainer (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the cap (60) has a threaded wall (62) that is screwed into a matching threaded wall located on the third cavity.

3. The steam condensate drainer (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the inlet cavity (20) has an opening (22) and lip of the opening (22) is conical.

4. The steam condensate drainer (10) as claimed in claim 3, wherein the inlet cavity (20) has an entrance and the entrance is flanged.

5. The steam condensate drainer (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the outlet cavity (30) has an opening (32) and lip of the opening (32) is conical.

6. The steam condensate drainer (10) as claimed in claim 5, wherein the outlet cavity (30) has an entrance and the entrance is flanged.

7. The steam condensate drainer (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the drainer (10) includes a filter chamber (70) comprising a filter (72), said filter chamber located between said inlet cavity (20) and said nozzle aperture (42) such that flow of steam condensate from the inlet cavity (20) to the nozzle aperture (42) flows through the filter (72).

8. The steam condensate drainer (10) as claimed in claim 7, wherein the filter (72) is a stainless steel wire mesh.

Description:
A STEAM CONDENSATE DRAINER

FIELD OF INVENTION The present invention relates to a steam condensate drainer. BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Condensate will be generated from steam when heat is transferred away from steam along steam pipes. The accumulated condensate inside the pipes will degrade the system significantly. Therefore, condensate should be removed from steam as it forms. In steam piping system, the condensate which accumulates is drained from the steam lines and generally returned to the steam boiler through condensate-return lines. The condensate return lines usually include a debris strainer device which filters particulate debris. Conventionally, the condensate is discharged from the low points into a condensate return system by means of mechanical steam traps which open in the presence of condensate but close in the presence of steam. These traps should be regularly replaced to avoid production problems or energy loss, or monitored. A steam trap is a device used to discharge condensate and non condensable gases while not permitting the escape of live steam. The earliest and simplest form of steam trap is the orifice trap. It consists of simply a disc or short solid pipe nipple with a small hole drilled through it installed at the lowest point of the equipment, also known as a nozzle. Since steam condensate will collect at the lowest point and this hot liquid is about 1200 times smaller in volume and denser than live steam, condensate is effectively removed and steam is blocked.

Most condensate removal devices lack a means of inspecting the nozzle during operation. Inspection usually requires shutting down the entire system, which could be a time- consuming and costly exercise. Another device for draining steam condensate which accumulates in the steam line as heat is lost from the steam has been disclosed US Patent No. 4,171,209 wherein the condensate removal device features an orifice plate formed unitarily in the body of a fitting which can be connected directly into the steam line, preferably downstream from a conventional Y- strainer. The small orifice in the plate is required to be drilled of a fixed length and diameter. GB Patent 2,088,246 discloses a filter element within the body but interchangeable tubular nozzle structures allowing variation of orifice dimensions within a standard body. However, should the condensate load or pressures used for sizing prove to be incorrect, interchanging either the nozzle insert or the whole body of these devices requires the removal of a complete section of pipe work. Often the space in which traps are installed is limited so the provision of union fittings for the easy removal of the trap may not be practical. Also the cost or inconvenience of installation of unions means that they are not always fitted. SUMMARY OF INVENTION

Accordingly, the present invention provides a steam condensate drainer, the steam condensate drainer includes a housing formed by an inlet cavity at one end, an outlet cavity at the opposite end, and a third cavity protruding substantially perpendicular to the axis of the inlet cavity, wherein a flow conduit is formed between the inlet cavity and third cavity through a nozzle aperture and between the third cavity and the outlet cavity through a drain aperture, a nozzle having a nozzle passage removably inserted into the nozzle aperture, a removable cap attached to the third cavity and sealing said third cavity apart from the nozzle aperture and the drain aperture.

The above summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description Of the Preferred Embodiments of the Invention. The summary is not intended to identify key features or essential characteristics of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

To further clarify various aspects of some example embodiments of the present invention, a more particular description of the invention will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments thereof which are illustrated in the appended drawings. It is appreciated that these drawings depict only illustrated embodiments of the invention and are therefore not to be considered limiting of its scope. The invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 shows a top cross sectional view of an embodiment of this invention;

Figure 2 shows a front cross sectional view of an embodiment of this invention;

Figure 3 shows a rear view of an embodiment of this invention; and

Figure 4 shows a side view of an embodiment of this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a steam condensate drainer. It should be noted that the following detailed description is directed to the steam condensate drainer and is not limited to any particular size or shape of the drainer but in fact a multitude of sizes and shapes within the general scope of the following description. Reference will now be made to the figures wherein like structures will be provided with like reference designations. It is understood that the figures are diagrammatic and schematic representations of some embodiments of the invention, and are not limiting of the present invention, nor are they necessarily drawn to scale.

In the preferred embodiments of the present invention, the present invention relates to a steam condensate drainer. The drainer comprises a housing formed by an inlet cavity at one end and an outlet cavity at an opposite end of the housing, a third cavity extending from a side of the housing perpendicular from the main axis of the housing. The inlet cavity is connected to the third cavity via a nozzle aperture. The third cavity is further connected to the outlet cavity via a drain aperture. A nozzle having a narrow nozzle passage that allows fluid to flow through it is inserted into the nozzle aperture. The diameter of the passage is formed smaller than the diameter of the nozzle aperture to allow condensate to pass through the nozzle. A cap is then screwed into the third cavity thus sealing it tight apart from the nozzle aperture and drain aperture. During operation, a mixture of steam and condensate under high pressure is directed from an inlet pipe into the inlet cavity. A filter chamber may be integrally connected at an angle with the housing. The filter chamber includes a wire mesh screen filter, which is mounted cylindrically within the filter chamber. The filter chamber is located between the inlet cavity and nozzle aperture. The steam condensate passes through the nozzle passage into the third cavity, then through the drain aperture and out into the outlet cavity. The condensate may be directed to a steam boiler.

This invention also relates to a steam condensate drainer comprising a housing formed by an inlet cavity at one end, an outlet cavity at the opposite end, and a third cavity protruding substantially perpendicular to the axis of the inlet cavity, wherein a flow conduit is formed between the inlet cavity and third cavity through a nozzle aperture and between the third cavity and the outlet cavity through a drain aperture; a nozzle having a nozzle passage removably inserted into the nozzle aperture; a removable cap attached to the third cavity and sealing said third cavity apart from the nozzle aperture and the drain aperture. A filter chamber comprising a stainless steel wire mesh filter may be located between the inlet cavity and nozzle aperture so that flow of steam condensate from the inlet cavity to the nozzle aperture flows through the filter, and any debris is filtered.

Inspections can be carried out during operation with minimal effect on production. If the cap is opened and a sharp whistling noise is audible, this could mean the nozzle passage is too big, and allowing too much steam to pass through to the outlet cavity. Another discernible result is when the temperature of the branch cavity is higher than the inlet cavity, which could mean the nozzle is blocked for some reason or too narrow. A clogged nozzle is easily replaced with this invention.

Referring to Figures 1 and 2 there can be seen a steam condensate drainer (10) of the present invention which is typically connected to a steam pipes system. The steam condensate drainer (10) has a main housing (12) having a substantially straight cylindrical shape formed by an inlet cavity (20) at one end and an outlet cavity (30) at an opposite end. The inlet cavity (20) bends and extends beyond the main housing (12) into a filter chamber (70). A filter (72) is placed in the filter chamber (70) and is adapted to restrict particulates and debris flowing from the inlet cavity (20). This filter chamber (70) is enclosed with a removable filter cap (80) to allow easy replacement of the said filter (72). The filter chamber (70) is then connected to a nozzle aperture (42), said nozzle aperture (42) leading into a third cavity (40), connecting the inlet cavity (20) to the outlet cavity (30). This third cavity (40) protrudes perpendicularly from the axis of the main housing (12). A nozzle (50) having a narrow nozzle passage (52) is fitted into the nozzle aperture (42). The third cavity (40) is further connected to the outlet cavity (30) via a drain aperture (46). A removable cap (60) is screwed into the third cavity (40) thus sealing said third cavity (40) tight apart from the nozzle aperture (42) and drain aperture (46). The wall of the third cavity (40) is threaded for receiving the removable cap (60) having a corresponding threaded wall (62) thus forming an enclosed cavity within. The cap (60) is a nut shape having a flange (64) at the top for sealing the branch cavity (40). Referring now to Figures 3 and 4, there is shown a steam condensate drainer (10) having a housing (12) comprising an inlet cavity (20) at one end. Within the housing (12), this inlet cavity (20) joins to a filter chamber (70) that branches off and is located at an angle from said inlet cavity (20). The filter chamber has a removable filter cap (80) during normal operation. The filter chamber (70) goes through a nozzle aperture (not shown in any of the Figures) into a third cavity (40). This third cavity (40) has a removable cap (60), which during normal operation of the steam condensate drainer (10) seals the third cavity via a threaded screw (62). The third cavity (40) then leads to an outlet cavity (30) via a drain aperture (46).

With reference to any of Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4, the operation of the steam condensate drainer (10) will now be described. A mixture of steam and condensate under pressure is channeled into the inlet cavity (20). This mixture then follows the curvature into a filter chamber (70), subsequently flowing through a wire mesh filter (72), which traps debris. This filter is an integral strainer with a unique design of 40 x 40 mesh 0.0254 cm (0.010 inch) diameter stainless steel wire mesh. The filtered mixture of steam and condensate then encounters a nozzle (50) via a narrow nozzle passage (52). The nozzle passage (52) allows predominantly liquid or steam condensate to flow through, from the inlet cavity (20) to the third cavity (40). The condensate then enters a third cavity (40), and flows out to an outlet cavity (30) via a drain aperture (46). The condensate may then be delivered to a steam boiler (not shown in any of the Figures). The cap (60) is easily removable to observe the functionality of the nozzle (50). The nozzle (50) must be checked regularly to ensure it is performing at maximum efficiency. The discharge is monitored to make sure that the installed nozzle (50) is functioning properly by removing all the condensate completely and immediately. A trace of live steam also guarantees that all condensate is being removed.

Inspections can be carried out during operation with minimal effect on production. If the cap (60) is opened and a sharp whistling noise is audible, this could mean the nozzle passage (52) is too big and allowing too much steam to pass through to the outlet cavity (30). Another discernible result is when the temperature of the third cavity (40) is higher than the inlet cavity (20), which could mean the nozzle (50) is blocked for some reason or too narrow. A clogged nozzle is easily replaced with this invention.

In a preferred embodiment, the steam condensate drainer (10) is constructed with a non- magnetic heavy-duty stainless steel casting. The mating seams of the caps and the main housing (12) are protected by two gaskets of stainless steel and coated with a graphite and high temperature oil mixture for sealing and lubrication

In another embodiment of this invention, the inlet (20) and outlet (30) ends are flanged and configured to be bolted with corresponding flanged inlet and outlet ends of the steam pipe. While several particularly preferred embodiments of the present invention have been described and illustrated, it should now be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. Accordingly, the following claims are intended to embrace such changes, modifications, and areas of application that are within the scope of this invention.