Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
SUSPENSION SYSTEM FOR A SPEED BOAT
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2002/051700
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A watercraft allowing relative motion of its deck (22) relative to its hull structure (20) to increase passenger comfort. The deck is mounted to the hull structure in a manner (24) which permits relative motion of the deck strucutre to the hull in at least two independent axes.

Inventors:
Ozga, John (48560 Martz Road Belleville, MI, 48111, US)
Application Number:
PCT/US2000/035232
Publication Date:
July 04, 2002
Filing Date:
December 21, 2000
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
Ozga, John (48560 Martz Road Belleville, MI, 48111, US)
International Classes:
B63B1/22; B63B39/00; (IPC1-7): B63B39/00; B63B1/22
Foreign References:
US3270701A
US3479980A
US3528380A
US2617377A
GB1254520A
US4337715A
DE4130657A1
US6019054A
FR2451312A1
US4237810A
GB560403A
US6152062A
US5603281A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Sosenko, Eric J. (Brinks Hofer Gilson & Lione P.O. Box 10087 Chicago, IL, 60610, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims
1. A watercraft having a deck (22) and a hull structure (20), the deck (22) having a bow end and a stern end, the hull structure (20) having a hull, the hull having a bow end and a stern end, characterized in that a mounting member is between the deck (22) and the hull structure (20), the mounting member having a pivot point (24) mounting the bow end of the deck (22) to the bow end of the hull structure (20), the pivot point (24) permitting movement of the deck (22) relative to the hull structure (20) about three independent axes, said three independent axes including a roll axis (34), pitch axis (36) and yaw axis (38).
2. The watercraft recited in Claim 1 characterized in that the pivot point is a universal joint.
3. The watercraft recited in Claim 2 characterized in that the mounting member including two dampers mounted to the stern end of the deck (22) to the stern end of the hull structure (20).
4. The watercraft recited in Claim 3 characterized in that one of the two dampers is a spring mass damper.
5. The watercraft recited in Claim 3 characterized in that one of the two dampers is a hydraulic dampening shock absorber.
6. The watercraft recited in Claim 3 characterized in that one of the two dampers is a pneumatic dampening shock absorber.
7. The watercraft recited in Claim 3 characterized in that one of the two dampers is oriented at an orientation other than vertical relative to the hull structure.
8. The watercraft recited in Claim 1 characterized in that the mounting member having four dampers (26,28,30,32).
9. The watercraft recited in Claim 1 characterized in that the mounting member having two dampers on each lateral side mounted to the stern end of the deck, each mounting connected at a common mounting bracket (35,37) located thereon.
10. The watercraft recited in Claim 1 characterized in that the mounting member having a damper (30,32) on each lateral side mounted to the stern end of the deck (22) and oriented generally horizontally relative to the hull structure.
11. The watercraft recited in Claim 1 characterized in that the mounting member alternates movement of the hull structure (20) relative to the deck (22).
12. The watercraft recited in Claim 11 characterized in that the hull structure (20) is a mono hull.
13. The watercraft recited in Claim 11 characterized in that the hull structure (20) is a catamaran.
14. The watercraft recited in Claim 11 characterized in that the hull structure (20) is generally rigid.
15. The watercraft recited in Claim 11 characterized in that the hull structure (20) is a trimaran.
16. The watercraft recited in Claim 11 characterized in that an airfoil (58) is mounted to the deck (22).
17. The watercraft recited in Claim 15 characterized in that the hull structure (20) is generally rigid.
18. The watercraft recited in Claim 15 characterized in that the airfoil (58) is symmetrical about a chordal axis (59).
19. The watercraft recited in Claim 16 wherein the airfoil (58) is mounted aft of the passenger compartment.
20. The watercraft recited in Claim 16 wherein the airfoil (58) is rigidly mounted to the deck (22).
Description:
SUSPENSION SYSTEM FOR A SPEED BOAT Field of the Invention This invention relates to a suspension system for a speed boat. More specifically, the invention is a suspension system in which the deck of the boat is allowed to move in a controlled manner in the pitch, yaw and roll axes to absorb shock and increase the comfort of the boat's passengers.

Background of the Invention Conventional boats are subject to wave action and, particularly for smaller boats or rougher water or faster boats, the resulting movements of the boat can be very uncomfortable for the passengers. In order to increase passenger comfort, some boats have incorporated suspension systems into the seating, or in the case of personal watercraft, the seating area. Other boats have used pontoon systems to control the entire boat's attitude and response to wave conditions.

One arrangement of a suspended seating area is shown in U. S. Patent 5,603,281, issued February 18,1997. In the personal watercraft shown in that patent, various arrangements of suspension which act only in the primarily vertical plane are shown. The embodiments of the suspension shown in the patent are analogous to motorcycle suspensions since they only provide travel in the plane perpendicular to the underside of the watercraft. Thus, only the pitch motion of the watercraft is controlled. When the wave motion is oblique to the boat's direction of travel, the suspension cannot act to reduce components of acceleration and shock which are not in the plane in which the suspension system acts.

Since a boat must be capable of travelling in any direction relative to the waves, there are almost always pitch, roll and yaw components of motion dynamically induced by wave interaction. All of these components of motion cannot be reduced by a single plane suspension system primarily acting in the pitch axis.

Another attempt to improve occupant comfort in watercraft has been by using adjustable or dynamic pontoon arrangements on multi-hull watercraft. These arrangements are only applicable to multi-hull boats and require large, complicated hull assemblies which move relative to each other or to a main hull and attenuate the boat's dynamic response to wave action. Typically, the pontoons move primarily in the roll axis and can produce complex dynamic response to some wave conditions.

In view of the above and other limitations of the prior art, there exists a need for a watercraft ride enhancement system which attenuate more than just pitch motion.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide for dynamic control of the deck of a boat about the pitch, yaw and roll axes.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a dynamic control system or ride enhancement for the deck of a boat which is readily adaptable to a wide variety of hull designs, including single and multi-hull boat designs.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a dynamic control system which may have different spring and damping characteristics in the substantially pitch and substantially yaw axes.

An additional object of the present invention is to further enhance dynamic control of the boat's deck through use of the aerodynamic restorative force created by an airfoil.

Summary of the Invention In achieving the above objects and overcoming the drawbacks and limitations of the prior art, the present invention provides for the dynamic isolation of the deck, relative to the hull, to increase occupant comfort in a watercraft over a wide variety of water conditions, speeds, and directions relative to the waves. The deck is mounted to the hull structure in a manner which permits relative motion of the deck structure to the hull in at least two independent axes. Generally, at the bow end of the boat the deck is mounted to the hull structure through a multiaxes pivot mounting. At the stern end of the boat, the deck and hull structure are mounted together through a series of dampers which are oriented to alternate pitch, yaw and roll motion. The suspension system provided for this purpose is extremely simple and rugged in structure and uses common, low cost components.

Still, further objects and advantages will become readily apparent to one skilled in this technology from a consideration of the ensuing description and drawings.

Brief Description of the Drawings Preferred embodiment of the invention is described in conjunction with the following drawings: Figure 1 is schematic view from the stern of a mono-hull boat incorporating the principles of the present invention; Figure 2 is a bottom view of the boat seen in Figure 1; Figure 3 is a side schematic view of the pivot joint located at the bow of the boat; Figure 4 is a schematic perspective view of the present invention as applied to a multi-hulled boat, more specifically a catamaran; Figure 5 is a rear view of the embodiment shown in Figure 4; Figure 6 shows an airfoil added to the embodiment shown in Figure 5; and Figure 7 is a side view of the embodiment shown in Figure 6.

Description of the Preferred Embodiments A watercraft or boat 10 according to the principles of the present invention has a hull 20 and a separate deck 22. The deck 22 contains the normal furnishings of a boat cockpit including steering means, a throttle and at the controls, operator seating and passenger seating. The bow of the hull 20 and the deck 22 are pivotally connected together by a pivot joint 24. As seen in Figures 1 and 2, the stern of the hull 20 and deck 22 are connected to one another by a left vertical shock assembly 28, a right vertical shock assembly 26, a right lateral shock assembly 30 and a left lateral shock absorber assembly 32. Where mounted to the hull 20, the shock absorber assemblies 26,28,30 and 32 are secured by mounting brackets 27,29,31 and 33. The mounting brackets 27,29,31 and 33 are of a variety suitable for the particular shock absorber assemblies 26,28,30 and 32 being used. Similarly, where secured to the deck 22, mounting brackets 35 and 37 of suitable style are used. As seen in Figures 1 and 2, in the first embodiment of the present invention the right side shock absorber assemblies 26 and 30 are mounted to the stern wall 21 at a common point, mounting bracket 35. The left side shock absorbers assemblies 28 and 32 are likewise mounted to the stern wall 21 at a common point, mounting bracket 37.

While use of common mounting points is believed to offer ride enhancement benefits, it will be appreciated that individual mounting brackets on the stern for each shock absorber assembly could be employed. Also, while the shock absorber assemblies are illustrated and referred to as either vertical or horizontal, these terms are not intended to be strictly interpreted as the orientation of their respective assemblies. The assemblies 26,28,30 and 32 can be provided in other orientations so long as vertical and horizontal components of movement will be attenuated by the overall system. Depending on the boat 10 design and the water conditions in which the boat 10 is intended to be operated, other orientations may prove to be more desirable.

The mounting brackets 35 and 37 themselves may also be positioned other than on the stern wall 21. For example, the brackets 35 and 37 may be positioned on the corner where the stern wall 21 meets the side walls or gunwalls of the boat 10. Through use of the pivot joint 24 and the various shock assemblies 26,28,30 and 32, movement about a roll axis pivot 34, a pitch axis pivot 36 and a yaw axis pivot 38 (as seen in Figure 3) can be controlled.

In operation the deck 22 of the boat 10 is free to pivot about pivot joint 24 and move within the hull 20 as controlled by shock absorber assemblies 26,28,30 and 32. Relative motion between the deck 22 and hull 20 is allowed in the pitch, yaw and roll axes to account for all possible wave induced motion. Based on the desired dynamic response characteristics of the boat 10, the lateral shock absorber assemblies 30 and 32 may have different spring and damping characteristics than the vertical shock absorber assemblies 26 and 28.

In Figures 4 and 5, another embodiment of the invention is shown. The deck (not shown) is supported by a deck frame 48 mounted to a catamaran watercraft with left hull 40, right hull 42, forward transverse member 44 and rear transverse member 46 forming a rigid multi-hulled structure. The deck frame 48 pivots about pivot joint 24, which has the same configuration as shown in Figure 3 and the rear portion of the deck frame 48 is movably connected to the rear transverse member 46 by right lower shock absorber assembly 50, left lower shock absorber assembly 52, right upper shock absorber assembly 54, and left upper shock absorber assembly 56. In this embodiment, each pair of left and right side shock absorbers, 56,52, and 54 and 50 are not located on approximately orthogonal axes as in the prior

embodiment. Movement of the deck relative to the hull structure is still allowed in the pitch, yaw and roll axes.

In Figures 6 and 7, an airfoil 58 is rigidly mounted to the top of the deck frame 48 so as to be positioned above and generally aft of the occupant compartment or cockpit of the boat 10. As seen in Figure 7, the airfoil 58 is symmetrical about its chordal axis 59. When the watercraft 10 is moving forward, the aerodynamic effect of the airfoil applies a restorative force to the deck frame 48 to pivot it to a neutral position about the pitch axis. For example, when the fore end of deck frame 48 and deck are caused to be pitched upward relative to the aft end of the boat 10, the airfoil 58 is provided with an angle of attack relative to the airflow which applies an upward force to the airfoil 58 and to the deck frame 48. Likewise, when the aft end of the deck frame 48 pivots upward, a downward force is generated on the airfoil 58.

Thus, the effect of the airfoil 10 is to provide additional restorative force to the deck frame 48 when the watercraft 10 travels at higher speeds or is pitched severely.

Accordingly, the reader will see that the watercraft of the present invention provides a deck suspension system, controlling acceleration and shock, which enhances the ride comfort of the users. Furthermore, the watercraft with deck suspension system has the additional advantages in that: . It is adaptable to many configurations of watercraft; It uses readily available suspension components from other types of vehicles ; It is further adaptable to active control systems such as hydraulics or electric cylinders ; It is further adaptable to servo control.

Although the description above contains many specificities, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention by merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. For example, the suspension could use fewer or more shock absorber assembly units. The shock absorber assembly units could be user adjustable to tune the system to the wave conditions, etc.

Thus, the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalence, rather than by the examples given.