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Title:
SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR ILLUMINATING ARTICLES OF ADORNMENT
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/208865
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An article of adornment has a body, a translucent decorative element with reverse and obverse sides set in the body, and an illumination source in the body at the reverse side, providing decorative functionality. A variety of articles of adornment are described and enabled, and specific functionality is provided.

Inventors:
MARTINEZ, Paul Aurelio (365 Calle Viento, Morgan Hill, CA, 95037, US)
WANG, Albert (645 Kirkland #3, Sunnyvale, CA, 94087, US)
TSAI, Ming, Yuan (850 Basking Lane, San Jose, CA, 95138, US)
Application Number:
US2018/031706
Publication Date:
November 15, 2018
Filing Date:
May 08, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
PRYMMO GROUP (365 Calle Viento, Morgan Hill, CA, 95037, US)
International Classes:
A44C17/02; A44C9/00; A44C17/04; B44F1/06; B44F9/08; F21V5/06; F41G1/01; F41G1/32
Foreign References:
US20060049365A12006-03-09
US20100088944A12010-04-15
US20160353847A12016-12-08
US20030167795A12003-09-11
US6659617B12003-12-09
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LAMON, Cynthia et al. (Lamon Patent Services, P.O. Box 1770Willits, CA, 95490, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. An article of adornment comprising:

a body;

a translucent decorative element including a reverse and an obverse side, the translucent decorative element set in the body; and

an illumination source in the body, illuminating the translucent decorative element providing decorative functionality.

2. The article of adornment of claim 1, wherein the translucent decorative element is a gemstone and the illumination source illuminates the reverse side of the gemstone.

3. The article of adornment of claim 2, wherein between 0.01 percent and 99.9 percent of luminous flux from the illumination source strikes the reverse side of the gemstone and is transmitted to the obverse side.

4. The article of adornment of claim 2, wherein the illumination source comprises an electroluminescent, phosphorescent, radio-luminescent, or laser source.

5. The article of adornment of claim 1, including an interface enabled to coupling the illumination source to the translucent decorative element.

6. The article of adornment of claim 5, wherein the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone comprises a material with index of refraction between 1 and 10.

7. The article of adornment of claim 5, wherein the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone comprises a material with maximum transmittance over the wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum between .01 and 99.9 percent.

8. The article of adornment of claim 5, wherein the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone comprises a composite interface material that contains a distinct optical element.

9. The article of adornment of claim 8, wherein the optical element can refract, reflect, transmit, scatter, filter, disperse the light of the illumination source.

10. The article of adornment of claim 5, wherein the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone generates a directed luminous intensity distribution at the reverse of the gemstone.

11. The article of adornment of claim 9 wherein the interface coupling, the body, the optical element and the composite interface are manufactured of a material capable of translucence enabled to present as an integral article of adornment. 12. The article of adornment of claim 5, wherein the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone is a lens element with focal length between -1 and +1 meter.

13. The article of adornment of claim 5, wherein the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone alters at least one wavelength of incident light by between 0. lnm and lOum.

14. An article of adornment comprising a translucent decorative element, an illumination source, an interface coupling the illumination source to the translucent decorative element, and a component maintaining the position of the source relative to the translucent decorative element.

15. The article of adornment of claim 14, wherein the component maintaining the position of the source relative to the translucent decorative element has a maximum reflectance over a wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum between 0.1 and 99.9 percent.

16. The article of adornment of claim 14, wherein the translucent decorative element and/or the component maintaining the position of the light source is a gemstone and/or a glass enamel body. 17. A decorative module for an article of adornment comprising:

a translucent decorative element;

an illumination source;

an interface coupling the illumination source to the translucent decorative element;

a first component maintaining the position of the translucent decorative element relative to the light source;

a second component closing a body at a rear side with an inside surface facing the light source and translucent decorative element, and

an interface coupling the second component and the light source;

wherein the illumination source and translucent decorative element may be oriented in different shapes, colors and types and enabled to be removed and replaced within a body of an article of adornment.

18. The decorative module of claim 17 wherein the inside surface has a maximum reflectance over a wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum, and between 0.1 and 99.9 percent.

19. The decorative module of claim 17, wherein the interface coupling elements have an index of refraction between 1 and 10.

20. The decorative module of claim 17, wherein the first and second components contain the light source and interface coupling elements and join together to form a housing having an inner volume.

Description:
SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR ILLUMINATING ARTICLES OF ADORNMENT

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED DOCUMENTS

The instant application claims priority to Provisional Patent Application

62/503,278, filed 08 May, 2017, and all disclosure of the parent application is incorporated herein at least by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is in the field of articles of adornment and pertains particularly to methods and apparatus for illuminating such articles.

2. Discussion of the State of the Art

Rings, bracelets, pendants and other jewelry articles of adornment may include items such as precious or semiprecious gemstones for the purposes of subjectively elevating the perceived level of aesthetic beauty of the article of adornment. These gemstones may act as decorative parts of a whole article of jewelry that are integrated such that they create a distinct aesthetic appearance to a viewer. The gemstones used in these articles may be cut or polished to improve their appearance and to create specific desirable aesthetics. For example, a stone may be polished into a given shape to enhance its ability to refract, reflect, transmit, scatter, filter, disperse, and generally alter the behavior of light striking it to improve its decorative appeal. Typically, articles of jewelry that contain gemstones depend on ambient light sources to achieve the aesthetic appeal of the specific gemstones set within that article.

Manufacturers have attempted to integrate sources of illumination to enhance visual aesthetics of an article of adornment, such as adding light emitting diodes (LEDs), and laser emitters. However, such efforts typically fall short because of predisposed tendencies of the light source being overbearingly luminous for the piece or causing distraction from the characteristic aesthetics of the stones.

Some manufacturers have added light sources to articles of adornment that require battery power. The addition of batteries and maintenance issues surrounding them have devalued certain articles of jewelry, such that it is no longer considered upscale, elegant, or of heirloom quality at least as perceived by the consumer. A high-end piece of jewelry is by definition, timeless, and meant to last even beyond the original user's lifetime. An article of adornment consisting of consumable elements, such as batteries, is considered more of a consumable product rather than a piece of jewelry. Therefore, the combination of a consumable component and a valuable piece of jewelry, together, seemed to be overtaken by the consumable aspect of the piece.

Some manufacturers have provided a localized light source to articles of adornment having gemstones by using radio-luminescent light sources such as a gaseous tritium light source (GTLS). A GTLS, also known as a beta light, is provided in the form of a glass vial filled with a certain amount of radionuclide tritium gas. The vial is coated on the inside with a phosphor-based coating that interacts with beta particles released during decay of the radioactive gas. Light is emitted whenever the beta particles strike the phosphorous coating on the inside of the vial. The emitted light may pass into a gemstone to provide illumination to the stone in its setting.

Efforts to integrate radio-luminescent light sources into jewelry pieces have been fraught with other problems. Among these, gemstone-based jewelry designs using GTLS may not produce enough of a light output. The gemstone or stones selected for a piece may have too many or not enough inclusions or they may be too dark in color to allow enough light to transmit through it or a facet of that gemstone.

Therefore, what is clearly needed is a system and method for illuminated articles of adornment that reduces or eliminates the problems described above. BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In an embodiment of the invention a jewelry piece is provided, comprising a body, a gemstone set in the body, and an illumination source in the body, behind the gemstone, providing decorative functionality.

In one embodiment the illumination source illuminates the reverse side of the gemstone. Also, in one embodiment between 0.01 percent and 99.9 percent of the luminous flux striking the reverse of the gemstone is transmitted to the obverse. Also, one embodiment is provided wherein the illumination source comprises an

electroluminescent, phosphorescent, radio-luminescent, or laser source.

In one embodiment a jewelry piece comprising a gemstone is provided, having an illumination source, and an interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone. In one embodiment the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone comprises a material with index of refraction between 1 and 10. Also, in one

embodiment the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone comprises a material with maximum transmittance over the wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum between 0.01 and 99.9 percent. Also, in one embodiment the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone comprises a composite interface material that contains a distinct optical element. And in one embodiment the optical element can refract, reflect, transmit, scatter, filter, or disperse the light of the illumination source.

In one embodiment the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone generates a directed luminous intensity distribution at the reverse side of the gemstone. Also in one embodiment, the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone is a lens element with focal length between -1 and +1 meter. Also in one embodiment the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone alters at least one wavelength of incident light by between 0. lnm and lOum.

In another embodiment of the invention, a jewelry piece is provided, comprising a gemstone, an illumination source, an interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone, and a component maintaining the position of the source relative to the gemstone. In one embodiment the component maintaining the position of the source relative to the gemstone has a maximum reflectance, over the wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum and between 0.1 and 99.9 percent. In one embodiment the component maintaining the position of the source relative to the gemstone is a second gemstone. And in one embodiment the component maintaining the position of the light source is a gemstone or glass enamel body.

In one embodiment of the invention a jewelry piece is provided, comprising a gemstone, an illumination source, an interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone, a first component maintaining the position of the gemstone relative to the light source, a second component closing a body at a rear side with an inside surface facing the light source and gemstone, and an interface coupling the second component and the light source.

In one embodiment the inside surface has a maximum reflectance, over a wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum, between 0.1 and 99.9 percent. Also in one embodiment the interface coupling elements have an index of refraction between 1 and 10. And in one embodiment the first and second components contain the

light source and interface coupling elements and join together to form a housing having an inner volume.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

Figs. 1 A, IB, 1C and ID depict a teardrop pendant in various stages of assembly in one embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 2A, 2B, 2C and 2D depict a teardrop pendant similar to the pendant depicted in Figs. 1 A through ID in an alternative embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 3A, 3B, 3C and 3D depict a teardrop earring with a dual gemstone setting in various states of assembly in one embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D depict a ring with a uni-gemstone setting in various stages of assembly in an embodiment of the invention. Figs. 5A, 5B, 5C and 5D depict a cufflink in perspective views with a uni- gemstone setting in various stages of assembly in an embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 6A, 6B, 6C and 6D depict a round pendant in perspective views with a uni- gemstone setting in various stages of assembly in an embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 7 A, 7B, 7C and 7D depict a solid bracelet in perspective views in various stages of assembly in an embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 8A, 8B, and 8C depict an enclosed body bracelet head assembly in perspective views in various stages of assembly in an embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 9 A, 9B and 9C illustrate a ring in an alternative embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 10A, 10B and IOC illustrate a gemstone and an illuminated window module assembly in an embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

In various embodiments described in enabling detail herein, the inventor provides a unique system and method for illuminating articles of adornment that enables more control of and direction of the source of illumination used than in the conventional art. The present invention is described using the following examples, which may describe more than one relevant embodiment falling within the scope of the invention.

Fig. 1 A through Fig. ID depict a teardrop pendant in various stages of assembly. Referring now to Fig. 1 A, an article of adornment 12e (assembled) is in the form of a closed teardrop-style pendant depicted in perspective view, the pendant including an opening 10 placed therethrough at an upper portion thereof for accepting a chain for hanging the pendant. The pendant body included a set stone or gemstone 16F (front side) with a burnished bezel 14b holding the gemstone in its setting. In this case and other cases the gemstone may be a cabochon having a measure of translucency to allow light to pass through the stone. Referring now to Fig. IB, the teardrop pendant depicted in Fig. 1 A is depicted in a disassembled exploded view exposing individual components of the system of the present invention. It will be apparent to one with skills in the art of lighted jewelry that gemstones provide the transmissivity medium through which light will pass through. One goal of the invention is to expose as much of the rear portion of the gemstones surface area to the light source as is possible. In a preferred implementation, more than 20% of the unexposed portion of the gemstone may be exposed to the light source, which may be a Tritium light source.

In one embodiment, a florescent light source may be enhanced directionally by providing a highly reflective and refractive (if desired) surface 20 onto a rear pendant cover 18. A thin glass mirror or mirror coating or a highly polished (mirror finish) steel or metal surface 20 encompasses the entire footprint of the pendant cover in this example. The reflective surface helps reflect light from the light source back toward the gemstone. Open pendant body 12o includes a preassembled and strategically configured GTLS comprising two substantially parallel GTLS cylinders 28L (long) fastened or otherwise affixed (glued) together and two adjacent shorter GTLS cylinders 28 S (short) affixed, such as by an adhesive, on the outside walls of the long GTLS cylinders in the same alignment and centered with respect to the longer cylinders. GTLS cylinders may be gas cylinders coated with a phosphor coating on the inside of each vial, enabling the contact reaction (beta light particles to phosphorus) that produces the light emissions. In one embodiment the cylinders are not assembled or attached to one another but are placed in the appropriate configuration during assembly. In one embodiment the cylinders may be in differing configurations and may not be assembled or attached to one another but are placed in the appropriate configuration during assembly.

In this example, a first discrete light amplification medium as film coating 26 is provided to reside within the pendant in between the GTLS cylinder architecture and the rear pendant cover. Medium 26 may be a light enhancing or amplification medium such as an optical impedance matching epoxy, a light diffusing or scattering medium, a brightness supportive film, or a non-reflective coating. Medium 26 is applied over the reflective coating of the rear pendant cover and abuts against the light source GTLS architecture. The function of the coating may be twofold, to amplify or at least prevent loss of light by absorption from the GTLS cylindrical at the rear of the teardrop pendant body. As well as providing shock absorbing capabilities. Used in combination with reflective surface 20, the maximum amount of light is retained and redirected toward a rear side 16R of the gemstone.

In one embodiment an optimization medium 30 is known as a brightness enhancement film located adjacent to 16R. This film is known to be used in Laptop computer liquid crystal displays (LCDs), which is a film that may recycle any light that gets reflected down or away from the bottom of the gemstone and back into the chamber.

The cylinder architecture, which includes cylinders 28L and 28 S may be retained against the reflective surface 20 of the rear pendant cover 18 by medium 26. The gemstone may have a small convex rear (16R) and a more radiused front surface (16F). A second discrete light amplification medium 30 may be provided to partially or completely cover the rear surface (16R) of the gemstone. Surface 16R may be cut, polished, or otherwise manipulated to provide more light diffusing properties and or light scattering properties.

The function of medium 30 may be identical to that of medium 26 as allowed by properties of the medium. In one embodiment, there may be differences between the light enhancing mediums brought about by controlling the thickness of application of the medium to the respective coated surfaces. In another example, they may be different materials such as a light-optimizing film for medium 30 and an optical impedance- matching epoxy for medium 26. Light refracting or diffusing mediums may also be added as one or more layers or used in place thereof without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Referring now to Fig. 1C, the teardrop pendant is depicted in a rotated, cut view showing the inside of pendant 12e and a chamber 22 accommodating the GTLS architecture comprising cylinders 28L and 28S of Fig. IB (depicted herein as element 28) and the gemstone. The gemstone is further sectioned in this view to show the GTLS architecture and the first and second optics enhancement mediums, respectively mediums 26 and 30. It may be seen in this example that the first medium directly interfaces the reflective mirrored surface 20 of the rear pendant cover 18 and the gemstone. In one embodiment, the light optimizing mediums (26,30) can be applied to completely surround the tritium vials (28L,28S), and may also provide mechanical shock absorption protection between the tritium vials and the gemstone and rear pendant cover. In another embodiment each single tritium cylinder is completely covered or coated with a light optimizing medium such as medium 26 or medium 30.

In this sectioned view, un-burnished bezel 14u is visible along with a laser or arc weld seam 32s for sealing rear pendant cover 18. It is noted herein that during assembly the bezel 14u remains un-burnished until the last step in the assembly process. In one embodiment, a light scattering or diffusing film might be applied to gemstone surface 16F to assist in load balancing the distributed light from the light source across the face of the stone. A gemstone may be provided in a variety of shapes such as spherical, hemispherical, obtuse spheroidal, rectangular, trapezoidal, or Piano convex without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Referring now to Fig. ID, the sectioned components depicted in Fig. 1C are exploded to reveal more detail. The teardrop pendant includes lower gemstone retainers 24c and upper gemstone retainers 24a. In this section only one of each is visible. In one embodiment the first and second optical enhancement mediums 26 and 30 occupy just the footprint of the GTLS architecture. In another embodiment they are custom layered in a desired geometric shape larger than or smaller than the footprint of the GTLS

architecture. In yet another embodiment the optics enhancement mediums simply cover the maximum footprint of the mirrored or polished surface 20 of the rear pendant cover and of the rear surface area of the gemstone. In the art of gemstone cutting there are many industry-coined shapes and styles for standard faceted gemstones, such as smooth, round, oval, cushion, rectangle or square. Other styles may include double, common, short, high, bullet, hollow, cameo or intaglio. Other industry styles may include cushion, oval cushion, princess, marquise, pear, ascher, trillion, baguette, radiant, emerald, pyramid, triangle, and tapered. Fig. 2A through 2D depict a teardrop pendant similar to the pendant depicted in Fig. 1 A and in a same closed orientation. New element numbers are given to components that are reintroduced in this example, however many if not all of the components may be interchangeable. The teardrop pendant in the example includes a closed pendant body 34 and a through opening 33 for accepting a chain. The pendant includes a set gemstone having a front surface 38F and back surface 38R, the gemstone set in place by a burnished bezel 36b.

Referring now to Fig. 2B, the teardrop pendant of Fig. 2 A is depicted in exploded perspective view or state of disassembly. In this implementation pendant body 34 is depicted open into a gemstone chamber 40 adapted to also contain a light source such as a GTLS architecture 50, and associated components that are sealed once the gemstone is set within the chamber. Gemstone retainers 42a and 42c are visible in this perspective view.

In this embodiment a separate reflective medium 44 is provided and shaped, in this case annular, to seat at the floor of chamber 40. Medium 44 may be a thin reflective disc with a highly polished surface 46 facing toward the gemstone. In one embodiment, the polished surface may be worked relative to the level of polish to reflect light at wavelengths of more interest. In one implementation medium 44 is a small steel plate having a mirror finish on at least one side. In another implementation medium 44 may be reflective glass mirror coated with a thin highly reflective material. In the case of thin film technology used to coat medium 44, thicknesses might be controlled, and film may be deposited such that desired optical effects may be produced in the reflection of the light such as diffusing the reflected light or scattering the light, as well as focusing the reflected light in a strategic manner.

A first light optimization medium 48, such as an impedance-matching epoxy, analogous to medium 26 of Fig. IB in one embodiment, may be provided on top of polished surface 46 of medium 44 as a coating or a placed material. GTLS architecture 50 may be laid directly on to first optimization medium 48 followed by a second light optimization medium 52 analogous to medium 30 of Fig. IB. It is noted herein that the exact configuration of and number of GTLS cylinders may vary from piece to piece based on requirement for light, color scheme, the translucency of the gemstone, and the presence of inclusions in the stone without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

In one implementation, a virtual inclusion may be projected into the gemstone by providing a pattern or shape or symbol that is not reflective and therefore may be defined within the emitted light into the gemstone. In another embodiment, light emitted from the GTLS or other radiative source may be directed more to certain areas of a gemstone that might be naturally darker than another section of the same gemstone. An example would be to use light to disguise or mask or otherwise reduce the aesthetic effect of an undesirable inclusion or perhaps to even out the overall translucent appearance of a gemstone that otherwise is two-tone or lighter and fading to darker in any particular color.

In one implementation, a reflective medium, such as medium 44, may be placed closer to or further away from the light source thereby changing the reflective angles and other effects. This capability may be engineered into the pendant chamber and be made externally adjustable by a consumer in some instances. It will be appreciated by one with skills in the art that the properties of the components of Fig. 2B having counterparts described further above with respect to Fig. IB shall be defined by the same description and detail attributed to their counterparts further above in an effort to avoid redundancy.

Fig. 3 A through 3D depict a teardrop earring with a dual gemstone setting in various states of assembly. Referring now to Fig. 3 A a closed earring body 56 supports a first gemstone the front surface 62F (front) visible in this side elevation/perspective view. Earring body 56 supports a second gemstone the front surface 60F (front) visible in this view.

Gemstone having surface 62F is retained in body 56 via a burnished rear bezel 59BR. It may be assumed that the side of earring body 56 has a front and rear wherein the rear portion supports the first gemstone and the front portion thereof supports the second gemstone. However, asymmetry is not required with respect to the features of the earring in this embodiment as body 56 may be symmetrical such that the dimensions and features are identical on opposing ends. Earring body 56 includes a loop 54 for accepting an earring hook.

Referring now to Fig. 3B, the pendant of Fig. 3 A is depicted in a perspective and exploded view to illustrate internal components. The first gemstone having surfaces 62F and 62R comprises the rear of the piece and is first set into the internal gemstone chamber 64 through an un-burnished rear bezel 59UR. The rear surface 62R of the gemstone may be cut, shaped, polished, diffused, or mechanically altered to optimize light entry from an internal light source 74 comprising at least one GTLS cylinder.

One goal of the invention relative to the use of diffusers is for the user to not to be able to see the tritium vials through the gemstone in their jewelry piece. Various techniques can be used to diffuse the light. In one implementation natural diffusion through the gemstone is employed by allowing the natural imperfections, crystalline structures and inclusions to diffuse and disperse the light within the gemstone. Artificial diffusion may also be applied to the outer exposed surface of a gemstone, however, this may not be optimal for the stone looking good both in ambient daylight and at night because it may dull the clarity of the gemstone under brighter light conditions.

Therefore, when using colors closer to the green wavelength, such as green, yellow, aqua blue or light blue, the rear of the gemstone may be diffused by adding a layer of diffusing film directly to the gemstone by UV epoxy, application to the rear un-exposed portions of the stone. Polarizing materials may also be used to add additional capability to pieces of jewelry such as dimming light, blocking light, allowing certain wavelengths of color to come through and even creating effects behind the gemstones if desired, not excluding different and unique shapes and symbols.

Once the first gemstone is inserted into body 56, bezel 59UR may be burnished. A first light optimizing medium 72 may then be applied or otherwise inserted through the bezel opening. Medium 72 may be analogous to counterpart components introduced and discussed further above in this specification. In this implementation, light source 74 includes at least one GTLS cylinders arranged side by side. They may or may not be secured to one another. A second light optimizing medium 70 is provided and may be placed or otherwise applied over the GTLS light source architecture 74.

The second gemstone having front surface 60F and rear surface 60R may be placed through the un-burnished front bezel 58UF. Surface 60R is analogous to counterpart rear surfaces introduced relative to the gemstones described in Fig.1 Band 2B. To seal the earring, the front bezel 58UF is burnished. Left and right-side front gemstone stand offs such as front right standoff 66FR visible in this view help position and retain in place the second gemstone.

Referring now to Fig. 3C, the earring of Fig. 3 A is depicted in a perspective sectioned view to illustrate component position within chamber 64. Earring body 56 is rotated in perspective to reveal internal gemstone chamber 64. Chamber 64 opens out through the front and through the rear of the body. GTLS architecture occupies the center portion of chamber 64 and is bounded by first light optimizing medium 72 facing the rear side and the second light optimizing medium 70 facing the front side of the earring body. The first gemstone and the second gemstone sandwich the internal components. Referring now to Fig. 3D, the sectioned view of the earring body is slightly rotated and exploded to reveal the individual components and implying order of insertion or application in assembly.

Figs. 4A through 4D depict a ring with a uni-gemstone setting in various stages of assembly. Referring to Fig. 4A, the ring includes a central through opening 76 to accept a person's finger. In this implementation, a ring body 78 includes a gemstone chamber not visible in this view. The ring further includes a welded and burnished bezel 80WB that retains a gemstone having a front surface 84F. In this embodiment of a ring, the bezel may be attached to the ring body via welding depicted herein by a welding seam 82.

Referring now to Fig. 4B, the ring of Fig. 4A is depicted in a perspective exploded view to reveal internal components and their assembled positions. Ring body 78 includes a top surface 102, relatively flat surface that may interface with the bottom surface 98 of bezel 80U that may be un-welded and un-burnished. In this example, a highly-polished surface 86 is provided directly on top of a substantially flat base surface or floor of the chamber 88. The surface may be a mirror metallic finish, a glass mirror, or another highly reflective medium. Modifications or alterations might be made part of the design of the base surface of chamber 88 to help optimize and direct light reflection in the wavelengths of interest as described further above with counterpart reflective surfaces or mediums.

In this implementation, a light source architecture or configuration includes three adjacent GTLS cylinders 94L occupying the center of the architecture and two shorter GTLS cylinders 94S one at either side and centered in position relative to the longer cylinder. A first light optimizing medium 92 may be placed on or otherwise applied to the base reflective surface of gemstone chamber 88. In one embodiment, light- optimizing medium may consist of highly reflective micro-beads suspended in an optically matched epoxy/resin. Other previously described attributes of counterpart light optimization mediums may also apply in this example. Chamber 88 is formed to include four gemstone retainers 90a through 90d arranged in a square pattern, with one retainer at each corner.

It is noted for the purposes of discussion that the texture of a stone may be taken into account when determining whether to reflect and or diffuse or scatter light through the gemstone. For example, if the stone has a visible to very visible amount of inclusions, a refractive index matching epoxy directly between the rear of the stone and the tritium vials. If the stone is translucent, a refractive index matching epoxy may be placed directly between the rear of the stone and the tritium vials. If the stone is largely transparent (small number of inclusions), a diffusing element may be placed directly on the stone before applying a refractive index matching epoxy directly between the diffuser and the tritium vials. The rear surface of the gemstone 84R or 84F may also be made a diffusing surface by sandblasting, rough polishing, specialized cuts, facets, and carvings.

One purpose of a light source may be to help create a color viewing experience when the piece of jewelry is present under low lighting conditions. The Tritium sources may provide light to the gemstone for a period of time greater than 20 years. The light source may be selected to provide a single-color viewing experience where the light source and the stone are of similar color such as green light through greenish chalcedony, or an emerald or chrisoprase, or yellow light through perdot or blue light through a sapphire or royal blue quartz or pink light through a ruby or pink sapphire, etc. Another purpose of a light source may be to provide a strategic pallet of colors through a gemstone, such as back lighting an Ethiopian opal with light blue, green, yellow and white tritium vials. Still another purpose of a light source may be to provide a

complimentary color hue through a gemstone such as blue light behind a pink stone that may result in a purplish stone at night that becomes pink during the day. Moreover, the color selection of a source of light used to color a gemstone may produce one color in the stone during the day and a contrasting color in the stone under lower light conditions. For example, for a light green chalcedony gemstone or gemstone, a red tritium light source may be provided behind it so that during the day it may look green while at night it may glow red.

The light source architecture is placed directly into chamber 88 on top of first light optimization medium 92. The shorter cylinders on the outside allow the light source to fit within the boundaries of the retainers 90a through 90d. A second light optimization medium 96 may be placed directly over the light source architecture. The gemstone having a rear surface 84R and a forward or front surface 84F abuts directly against medium 96 and bezel 80U is placed over the gemstone. The gemstone passes through opening 100 of the bezel until contact is made between top surface 102 and the bottom surface of the bezel 98. The cabochon may be aligned to fit snugly against retainers and is held in position by the bezel. The bezel is welded via TIG or laser and retains the cabochon securely within chamber 88 after it is welded to the ring body and burnished at the top of the bezel. The weld seam or bead 82 may be subsequently polished away after welding. The assembly of a bezel to the body is not limited to welding, riveting, sonic bond, means for screwing or snapping, foil process solder, diffusion band, or assembled together by any other mechanical means known in the art. Assembly of coversl76 and 18 to the body of their respective jewelry piece is also accomplished by anyone or more of welding, riveting, sonic bond, means for screwing or snapping, foil process solder, diffusion band, or assembled together by any other mechanical means known in the art.

One with skills in the art will recognize that optical impedance matching does not necessarily need to occur in order to successfully practice the present invention. For example, using small amounts of tritium or tritium that is in colors that are further away from the green color of wavelength, impedance matching is optimal. Impedance matching may be accomplished by using crystal clear epoxies, preferable

of the ultraviolet (UV) curable type that are used in optics in order to devise a medium between the light source and the gemstone where the index of refraction is the median between that of the index of refraction of the gemstone and the index of refraction of the tritium vial itself (typically glass).

Referring now to Fig. 4C, the ring of Figs. 4 A and 4B is depicted in a perspective sectioned view to illustrate position of internal components in an assembled ring. It may be seen that first light optimization medium 92 abuts directly against the bottom surface of internal gemstone chamber 86 followed by the light source architecture (cylinders 94L and 96S) and the second light optimization medium 96 and capped off by the gemstone and bezel 80. Referring now to Fig. 4D, the section view of Fig. 4C is exploded to illustrate the sectioned components un-nested and in order of assembly. Gemstone retainers 90a and 90b are seen in this view along with the top surface 102 of ring body 78. The bottom surface 98 of bezel 80W and the central bezel opening 100 are also visible in this view.

Figs. 5 A through 5D depict a cufflink in perspective views with a uni-gemstone setting in various stages of assembly. Referring now to Fig. 5 A, the cufflink depicted includes a retention button 104 for button hole of a garment and a retention stem 106 typical of cufflink architecture. In this example, the cufflink has a corner-rounded, rectangular body 108 having a hollow internal gemstone chamber not visible in this view.

The cufflink further includes a rectangular bezel cover welded bezel 110WB having a central opening placed therethrough to accommodate a gemstone, the top surface 114F, of which is visible in this view. A welded seam 112 marks the interface of the bezel bottom to a top surface of cufflink body 108. Referring now to Fig. 5B, the cufflink of Fig. 5 A is depicted in exploded view to further detail internal components. Body 108 has a top relatively flat surface 134. Cufflink body 108 includes a hollow gemstone lighting architecture chamber 116 that is rectangular in keeping with the overall shape of the cufflink although other geometric configurations may be implemented.

In this example piece, there are two gemstone retainers 118L and 118R.

Retainers 118 LR are shaped by cutting or machining to accept a round gemstone at the correct radius dimension provided by the diameter of the bottom surface 114R (rear) of the gemstone. Top surface 114F (front) of the gemstone is left visible through an ornate bezel opening 132.

One goal of the present invention is to control the total light output through the stone via 124, 126, 128, 122, and 120, etc. to a higher steradian count to increase the luminous intensity across an entire surface of a stone such as 84F of Fig, 4 A or 16F of Fig. IB. This may be accomplished by implementing elements as described above or altering the rear of the gemstone's radial structure, as well as by controlling the clarity of the stone and the light optimizing mediums between the stone and the light source, as well as the light reflectors, if they are used. In this specific embodiment steradiality may be manipulated to condense steradian count at the ornate opening 132 or to condense and evenly disperse the steradian count across a surface of an unornate stone such as 16F of Fig. IB.

In this configuration, a reflective medium 120 is provided that is analogous in function to reflective medium 44 described above with reference to Fig. 2B. Reflective medium 120 includes a highly polished top surface 122. In one embodiment, the bottom of chamber 116 may be highly polished to be reflective thereby eliminating the need for medium 120.

As in examples cited further above, this configuration includes a first light optimization medium 124, a light source architecture including three GTLS cylinders arranged side by side, 126 and a second light optimization medium 128 laid over the top of the light cylinders. The reflective medium, light source architecture and light optimization mediums all fit into lighting chamber 1 16 below the gemstone retention shelves. The gemstone is laid down and the bezel is placed there over and welded to the cufflink body to retain the gemstone in position. Cufflink body top surface 134 and bezel bottom surface 130 make intimate contact and the weld 112 placed around the bezel and top surface may be polished for aesthetics. Bezel 110U, un-welded, denotes a loose bezel.

Brightness enhancers allow light to enter from one side and reflect light back from the other side, typically at a different angle from which the light entered.

Brightness enhancers may be employed when working with stones whose rear unexposed surface is fairly flat. Brightness enhancers are preferred when working with low amounts of tritium and/or when working with colors of tritium that are further away from the green wavelength such as royal blue, red, pink and purple.

Reflectors or reflective substances or polishes are used to direct as much light as feasible within the jewelry chamber in which the tritium is housed. Materials and mediums may include reflective beads or flecks that bend incoming light beams to bounce off a reflective coating. A reflective coating may paint material or surface deposition film deposited on the beads. Empirically speaking, the optimum states are seen when the refractive index of the bead is significantly higher than that of the surrounding media. For example, polished silver is optimal across the entire visible spectrum from 0.45um wavelength to lum. Polished aluminum is fair from 0.4um to 0.5um wavelength. Unprotected gold is best from 0.68um to lum wavelength. Mirrored structures may be implemented that use compound parabolic concentrators within the tritium chamber that may increase intensity or increase exit angles of light through the gemstone.

Referring now to Fig. 5C, the cufflink from Fig. 5 A is depicted in a rotated perspective and sectioned view to reveal assembled positions of the internal components inside a finished cufflink. Referring now to Fig. 5D, the components depicted in view 5C are exploded out to show the individual components and the order of their placement in the assembly. It is noted herein that the attributes of each individual component are the same as described above in discussion of other ornate pieces of jewelry having identical counterpart components. Those descriptions are not reintroduced here to avoid redundancy.

Figs. 6A through 6D depict a round pendant in perspective views with a uni- gemstone setting in various stages of assembly. Referring now to Fig. 6A, the pendant has a pendant body 138 that includes a hollow gemstone chamber not visible in this view. A gemstone having a front surface area 142 that is visible in this view is set into the chamber in pendant body 138 and secured by a bezel 140b (burnished ring). Pendant body 138 includes a ring 136 for accepting a chain to hang the pendant.

Referring now to Fig. 6B, the pendant of Fig. 6 A is depicted in an exploded view to better illustrate internal components. In this view, it may be seen that the chamber within pendant body 138 includes a bottom surface 148 that is relatively flat and has a high polish to aid in reflectivity of light. Body 138 also includes a loop with opening 136 for accepting a chain to hang the pendant. A first light optimization medium 150 of the same description given previously may be laid or otherwise applied as an epoxy or material layer over the polished surface 148.

Un-burnished bezel ring 140u provides the opening at the top of the chamber for accepting the internal components and the gemstone. A light source architecture comprising three GTLS cylinders 152 is provided and is placed directly over the first light optimization medium 150. A second light optimization medium 154 may be provided and placed over the light source architecture followed by setting of the gemstone with the rear surface area 146 of the gemstone facing the polished surface 148 of the chamber bottom. In one implementation a reflective medium may be provided at the bottom of the chamber on a stock surface without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Referring now to Fig. 6C, the pendant of Fig. 6A is depicted rotated in

perspective and sectioned view to show position of the components in assembly. It may be seen that the first light optimization medium 150 sits flat against the polished surface 148 followed by the light source, followed by the second light optimization medium 154 followed by the gemstone. In this view gemstone rear base support 146 is formed after hollowing out the rear side of the gemstone to hold the gemstone level in place of using typical standoff shelves or retainer mechanisms.

In this particular implementation, the gemstone is hollowed out to create a concave chamber 144 with rim 146 that adds to the internal depth of the body chamber to provide enough internal space to house the light source and accompanying components while keeping a naturally thin profile for the pendant. Referring now to Fig. 6D the sectioned view of pendant of Fig. 6C is exploded to show individual components and the order of placement thereof into the assembly. It will be apparent to one with skill in the art that the first and second light optimization mediums may or may not be implemented in any particular article of adornment and may be omitted entirely, used only on one side of a light source, or may encapsulate the light source architecture partially or completely without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Figs. 7A through 7D depict a solid bracelet in perspective views in various stages of assembly. Bracelet 158 may be a solid bracelet made from semi -precious gemstone, rock, glass enamel, or a semi-precious composite of gemstone fragments, cement, fillers or epoxies. In this embodiment, multiple light sources in the form of light emitting cylinders not visible in this view are provided and are embedded within the bracelet body. This is achieved by drilling blind openings into the bracelet on one or both sides wherein those openings and embedded cylinders are closed using plugs 166, which are visible in this view. In this example, there are 7 visible chambers for light cylinders. There may be another 7 on the opposite side and there may be fewer or a greater number of openings provided without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Bracelet 158 includes wrist opening 156.

Referring now to Fig. 7B, the cuff style bracelet of Fig. 7 A is depicted in an exploded view to illustrate internal components, which in this case are limited to the GTLS cylinders 162, which may be inserted into the drilled openings 160, which may be subsequently plugged by plugs 166. In one embodiment, openings 160 are blind openings drilled to a depth that is sufficient for embedding the light cylinders 162. In one implementation a light optimizing medium may be provided and used to line the pre- drilled openings such that when a cylinder is inserted therein, the epoxy or light optimizing material not visible in this view will partially or completely wrap around the cylinder.

Referring now to Fig. 7C, the solid bracelet of Fig. 7 A and 7B is depicted in a rotated cut view that extends through one of the drilled openings 160 to illustrate the internal components, namely the light cylinder 162 and epoxy light optimization medium 164. Plugs 166 may be provided of the same material such as a core-drilled portion of the core removed from the bracelet during drilling. In one implementation, the plugs are of a separate gemstone material or materials and may have different properties and translucency. For example, the plugs may be light reflective preventing light from the cylinder from illuminating the plug. The plugs may alternatively be translucent and of varying colors whereby the cylinder light emits into the plug along with the surrounding bracelet materials and is visible to users.

Referring now to Fig. 7D, the rotated section view of the bracelet is exploded to illustrate individual component and order of placement thereof in assembly. In this example, it may be viewed that light optimization material 164 is first placed or otherwise inserted or applied into the interior of each opening 160 followed by insertion of the light source 162 and sealing the light source inside with the external plugs 166. The plugs may, in one implementation, be small gemstones or gemstones that receive light from the light source. In this case they may be glued into the opening to cap off the opening. It will be apparent to one with skills in the art that in this embodiment material opacity may control how the light source within the opening and covered by a plug stone emits light. If the bracelet body is less translucent the light may highlight the plug stones if they are more translucent. If the plugs are reflective then they may appear dark while the rest of the bracelet glows. There are many aesthetic possibilities that might be created. Figs. 8A through 8C depict an enclosed body bracelet head assembly in perspective views in various stages of assembly. Referring now to Fig. 8A, the bracelet depicted herein is of a style that includes a region 168 that may rest on a user's wrist and displays the front surfaces 174 of multiple gemstones, in this case 6 in number, and the burnished open back bezels 172B retaining the gemstones. Bezels 172B may be laser or arc welded at their interface with bracelet body 170E wherein these welds may be polished away for aesthetic purposes. The bracelet includes a metallic rear shield cover 176 that may be laser or arc welded onto body 170 producing weld seam 178 that may also be subsequently polished.

Referring now to Fig. 8B, the bracelet of Fig. 8 A is depicted in an exploded cross section view to illustrate integral components such as the rear shield cover 176, a highly polished top surface 180 of rear shield cover 176, a rear light optimization medium 182, light source architectures comprising an arrangement of individual Tritium cylinders 184, an upper light optimization medium 186, an open bracelet head body 170O, a rear shield cover recession 198, light source and gemstone chambers 188, light emission openings 190 provided through the bracelet-head body, bezel alignment recessions 196, light emission bezel openings 192 one associated with each bezel, rear gemstone bezel retainers 194, un-burnished bezels 172U, the rear surface areas 174 R of the 6 gemstones, and the top visible surface areas of the 6 gemstones 174F.

One with skill in the art may realize that in this example, the gemstones may be set first to the bracelet body in alignment with the light source and gemstone chambers 188 and the rest of the components may be installed from the rear or underside of the bracelet.

Referring now to Fig. 8C, the bracelet of Fig. 8 A and 8B is exploded in a sectional elevation view to show detail of the placement of the components in assembly. In this view it may be seen that light source architectures comprising cylinders 184 are flanked by light optimization mediums first medium 182 and second medium 186. In this case the light source architecture includes two larger diameter cylinders adjacent to one another and nested over a third cylinder that is significantly smaller in diameter and occupies a position in line with the larger diameter cylinders and in between and just below the larger cylinders. This view clearly details the bracelet region that rests on the person's wrist via opening 168, the rear shield cover 176, the high polished surface of the inside of the rear shield cover 180, the rear light optimization medium 182, the Tritium vial clusters encompassing vials or cylinders 184, the upper light optimization medium 186, the enclosed bracelet-head body 170 E, the rear shield cover recession on the bracelet body 198, the light source chambers 188 x 6, the light emission openings of the bracelet-head body 190, the bezel alignment recessions 196, the light emission openings of the gemstone bezels 192, the rear gemstone retainers of the bezel 194, the

burnished bezels 172B, the rear or base side of the gemstones 174R (rear), the front side of the gemstones 174F (front) and the laser/arc welded or flame soldered seam 200 disposed between the burnished bezels 172B and the bracelet-head body 170 E.

Figs. 9A through 9C illustrate an open-chambered ring body 204 with an opening 202 for a person's finger, and a gemstone module assembly chamber 223. An illuminated gemstone module assembly 222 comprises a gemstone front 21 OF, gemstone rear surface 21 OR that attaches to a gemstone module housing body 214, to a top surface 213 through means of an adhesive 216. The gemstone module housing has a chamber 215, where an upper light optimization medium 221, a Gaseous Tritium Light Source 220, a rear light optimization medium 218, and a high reflectivity medium 212, are set within and enclosed with a gemstone module housing rear cover 217.

Construction of the gemstone module assembly can be done separate prior to ring assembly, such that any different gemstone module assembly 222 can be selected to be placed within the gemstone module chamber 223 of the ring. Once the illuminated gemstone module assembly 222 is inserted into the ring's gemstone module chamber 223, the Un-welded gemstone bezel 206U may be brought down, such that the front of gemstone 21 OF passes through bezel opening 226. It is now sure that bottom side/base of bezel 224 is centered and aligned with ring-top surface 228 for the bezel. After this alignment step, a seam 208 may be laser or TIG welded along the outer visible edge where ring-top surface 228 and the bezels' bottom side/base 224 meet, then the seam may be polished away. If necessary, the already welded gemstone bezel 206WB may be burnished. The gemstone module housing body (214) can be cast, milled or, 3D printed from stainless steel, copper, silver, gold, or other metals. Gemstone module housing body 214 may also comprise 3D printed plastics or polymers. Fig. 9B shows a close up of the seating and orientation of assembly 222 in one embodiment of an assembled orientation. Fig. 9C depicts the complete assembled ring including a welded and burnished gemstone bezel 206WB.

Figs. 10A trough IOC illustrate a gemstone front 23 OF and gemstone rear surface 230R and an illuminated window 234, gaseous tritium light sources 238, a rear light optimization medium 240, a high reflectivity medium 242 and gemstone module housing 246, which houses the aforementioned elements. Illuminated window module 250 light optimization window 234 is meant to sit within module window retention bezel 243 and maintain a seal through an epoxy, cement or other adhesive 236. The entire assembly 250 may be modular enabled to sit within jewelry pieces that require the gemstone to remain free from any attachment to light sources as in previous embodiments. Another embodiment provides a module with all of the components of Fig. 10A wherein the illumination source and gemstone may be oriented in different shapes, colors and types and enabled to be removed and replaced within a body of an article of adornment, the article of adornment including any one of a group consisting of a ring, pendent, cufflinks, or earring or bracelet.

Light optimization module window 234 can be made from standard glass, gorilla glass, sapphire, quartz, b270, fused silica, optical plastic, magnesium fluoride, or calcium fluoride, and can be edge metalized and or surface coated for glare reduction and or hydrophobic purposes. Gemstone module housing 246 includes a module housing backside 248 and may be cast, milled or, 3D printed from stainless steel, copper, silver, gold, or other metals. Gemstone module housing 246 can also comprise 3D printed plastics or polymers.

In some cases of jewelry encompassing elements of this invention, the

illumination source illuminates the reverse side of the gemstone. In some embodiments between 0.01 percent and 99.9 percent of the luminous flux striking the reverse of the gemstone is transmitted to the obverse. In some cases, the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone comprises a material with index of refraction between 1 and 10. Also in some cases, the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone comprises a material with maximum transmittance, over the wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum, between .01 and one 99.9 percent.

In some embodiments of the invention the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone is a lens element with focal length between -1 and +1 meter. Also, the interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone alters at least one wavelength of incident light by between 0. lnm and lOum.

In some embodiment a component maintaining position of the source relative to the gemstone has a maximum reflectance over the wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum, between 0.1 and 99.9 percent. Also, in some cases, the component maintaining the position of the source relative to the gemstone is a second gemstone. This may also in some embodiments be a gemstone or glass enamel body.

A jewelry piece in one embodiment may have a a gemstone, an illumination source, an interface coupling the illumination source to the gemstone, a first component maintaining the position of the gemstone relative to the light source, a second component closing a body at a rear side with an inside surface facing the light source and gemstone, and an interface coupling the second component and the light source. The inside surface may have a maximum reflectance over a wavelength range from lOOnm to lOum, and between 0.1 and 99.9 percent. The interface coupling elements may have an index of refraction between 1 and 10. And in some cases the first and second components contain the light source and interface coupling elements and join together to form a housing having an inner volume.

It will be apparent to the skilled person that the arrangement of elements and functionality for the invention is described in different embodiments in which each is exemplary of an implementation of the invention. Specifically, embodiments are provided wherein all elements in all of the Figures of this specification that have an exterior facing surface are manufactured of a translucent material that refract, reflect, transmit, scatter, filter, or disperse the light of the illumination source. For example, in Fig. 3B, not only 60F and 62F are translucent, but 56, 54, bezels 59, 72, 70 and even illumination source 74 may be manufactured of translucent material. Further, exterior elements may be manufactured from a single integral translucent material having no seams with an interior illumination source. In this embodiment, a single gemstone or other material called out in this specification may be bored with a cavity to accept the illumination source and other interfacing components.

These exemplary descriptions do not preclude other implementations and use cases not described in detail. The elements and functions may vary, as there are a variety of ways the components may be implemented.