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Title:
TAP TOOL
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2011/092477
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An unfastening tool comprises tubular sheath adapted to engulf a water tap's spout. It has a rigid elongate link member, preferably threaded, that is moveably disposable to be slidably rotatable relative to the tubular sheath. The tool is provided with an adjusting nut, disposable at a proximal end of the link member, that is manually operable to effect movement of the link member. The link member is adapted to engage a shank of a spanner or wrench at its distal end, so as to form a draw link with the spanner and the tubular sheath. The tool may be made using a plastics material in combination with an elongate metal bar. In use, the adjusting nut is manually operable to effect movement of the link member means so as to urge the shank of a spanner engaged by the link member, towards or away from the tubular sheath.

Inventors:
DOWNEY, Graham, Anthony (15 Alma Road, Heaton Moor, Stockport SK4 4PU, GB)
Application Number:
GB2011/000117
Publication Date:
August 04, 2011
Filing Date:
January 31, 2011
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
DOWNEY, Graham, Anthony (15 Alma Road, Heaton Moor, Stockport SK4 4PU, GB)
International Classes:
B25B13/48; B25B23/00
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MANCUNIUM IP (10th Floor, 3 Hardman Street, Manchester M3 3HF, GB)
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Claims:
Claims

1. An unfastening tool comprises a substantially tubular means adapted to engulf the or a portion of a tap's spout; a rigid elongate link member means moveably disposable to be slidably rotatable relative to the tubular means; adjusting means disposable adjacent the link member means; and connection means adapted to cooperatively engage a shank of a spanner with the link member means, so as to form a draw link therebetween, wherein, in use, the adjusting means is manually operable to effect movement of the link member means so as to urge a shank of a spanner engaged by the link member means using the connection means, towards or away from the tubular means.

2. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1 , wherein, the tubular means comprises a tubular member or sheath made of substantially rigid material, preferably made from a plastics material.

3. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1 and claim 2, wherein tubular member comprise at a proximal end, a handle means, graspable by the digits.

4. An unfastening tool as claimed in claims 1 , 2 and 3, wherein the tubular member comprise at a distal end a crevice means adapted to firmly grasp a tap's spout .

5. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1 , wherein the crevice means is adapted to engulf a portion of a tap's spout, preferably fully engulf a tap's spout.

6. An unfastening tool as claimed in claims 1 , 4 and 5, wherein the crevice means is adapted to firmly grasp different sized tap spouts.

7. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1, wherein the link member means comprises an elongate substantially rigid bar, for example a metal bar or one manufactured from a reinforced plastics material.

8. An unfastening tool as claimed in claims 1 and 7, wherein the link member means is adapted to rotatably cooperate with the tubular means through an aperture means or hole in the tubular means, thereby allowing the link member means to readily move rotatably through the aperture means.

9. An unfastening tool as claimed in claims 1 , 7 and 8, wherein the link member means is provided with threading means.

10. An unfastening tool as claimed in claims 1 , 7, 8 and 9, wherein the link member means is adapted to convert rotational motion of the adjusting means into linear motion, thereby urging a shank of a spanner to move relative the tubular means.

11. An unfastening tool as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein the link member means comprises a threaded bolt means manually operable to rotatably cooperate with the the connection means so as to effect a "push" or "pull" force on a conventional tightening device such as a spanner or wrench.

12. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1 , wherein the connection means may be screw threaded to cooperate with threads on the link member means.

13. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1 , wherein the adjusting means is manually operable to effect movement of the link member means.

14. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1 , wherein the adjusting means is automatically operable to effect movement of the link member means.

15. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1, wherein the link member means is adapted, at a distal end to engage a conventional tightening device such as a spanner or wrench using the connection means.

16. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1 , wherein the tool is adapted to fit taps whose spout is angled upwardly or downwardly of the hexagonal portion of the tap head.

17. An unfastening tool as claimed in claims 1 , 13 or 14, wherein the adjusting means comprises a threaded nut means.

18. An unfastening tool as claimed in claims 17, wherein the nut means is couplable with the link member means slidably rotatably along the length of the link member means.

19. An unfastening tool substantially as described herein, with reference to the figures of the accompanying drawings.

20. An unfastening tool as claimed in claim 1 , wherein the the link member comprise a ratchet mechanism manually operable to effect a "push" or "pull" force on a conventional tightening device such as a spanner or wrench.

Description:
Tap tool

The present invention relates to tightening and unfastening tools. More particularly, but not exclusively, it relates to tightening and unfastening tools for use in undoing working heads of water taps, for example while changing a water seal washer.

Unfastening tools for use with taps are known and are often used when it is difficult or impossible to unfasten the working heads of water taps serving baths and sinks using conventional, spanners or pliers.

There are many different types of unfastening tools. The most common comprise some form of gripping mechanism that are provided with one or more of engaging means in the form of adjustable jaws, teeth and suchlike to enable them to firmly grasp the working heads of water taps.

In order to change a worn out tap washer, it is common to hire a plumber or other workman who must first remove the tap handle or knob followed by unscrewing the tap head using a spanner, wrench or other grasping tool; the tap washer is located inside the tap unit. For the purpose of clarity, the tap head is defined here to be the working part of the tap, which contains the tap washer. A problem that often arises when unscrewing the tap head is when the tap head becomes "seized up" such that it becomes difficult to unscrew or unfasten. This is usually because left unchanged over many years, tap heads can become stuck as a result of limescale, water conditions (for example warm temperature or humidity) that may have caused corrosion due to mechanical damage in its threadings. Thus, when a need to replace a washer arises, for example, due to "dripping" or "leaking" of the tap while in a fully shut state, it becomes desirable to unscrew the tap head and replace the washer, as this is the most likely cause of dripping taps. However, to unscrew a stuck tap head, it is often required to apply considerable rotational force or pressure than can be afforded by the hand, yet doing may cause the tap body itself to rotate in its fixing hole, leading to the tap connector located underneath the bath or sink to come undone and also begin leaking. Thus, since taps are often set in hardened filler when first fitted, damage to the bath or sink can occur if the tap connector is rotated in its fixing hole. It then becomes necessary to undertake further work to rectify the leakage and damage, incurring further expense.

Over the years, various solutions aimed at overcoming the problem have been suggested. One method involves using a tool such as stillson wrench or a gripper type tool to try and hold the tap steady, so as to counter the rotational force that is then applied to the tap head, using a second tool. Since taps are by nature awkward in shape, and come in different sizes, such shapes being infinitely varied, achieving this solution can be extremely difficult.

A further problem that arises is that since most taps are made from soft metals such as brass, embellished with chrome finishes, using conventional tools has the disadvantage of causing unsightly damage to the tap surface. GB2167988 A discloses a tool for dismantling water taps without the risk of damage to the tap finish or damage to the basins to which they are mounted. It comprises a flexible strap 20, formed into a loop carried on the end of a lever. It has a lever which is formed at one end to fit over and surround a tap body. It has an internal formed shape is made of a resilient material and a separate screw threaded link 30 that is used to connect to the lever at one end and to a conventional spanner at the other. The opposite end of the spanner is applied to the water seal unit on the tap and a screw adjustment is applied to the link to move the spanner and thus rotate and unscrew the seal unit.

GB 2249509A discloses a locking or unlocking device that has a pair of opposed spanner retaining carriers 5 mounted on a common support 1 , one of the carriers being fixedly retained relative to support 1 , and the other of the carriers being driven towards or away from the first carrier by a drive means 10 whereby in use a pair of spanners 14 retained respectively in the carriers can be driven through respective arcs to lock or unlock a pair of nuts by actuation of the drive means.

However, the devices described in these prior art disclosures are not ideally suited for unfastening or dismantling water taps for a number of reasons. Firstly, the device of GB2167988A will have difficulty fitting in corners having insufficient space, especially in tight spaces or if the tap is located near to a wall on its left side, such that it will be difficult to fit the separate link member 30 and side elongations 38 that holds the spanner. Thus, since it appears asymmetrical, it would not be possible to use it while turned upside down, such that the link member 30 is on the right hand side of the tap and not on the left. This means the device will probably be unusable in certain instances, for example where the tap is fitted with a wall or other obstacle next to it, on its left hand side. In addition, a number of the prior art disclosures have no mechanism of tightening the nuts of the taps, for example, the nut 38 in the device of GB2167988A can only work to urge the spanner towards the lever member 8, and not away from it. Further since most of the devices have metallic parts that are adapted to make contact with the surfaces of the tap, which are often polished and coated in chrome or other aesthetically pleasant metal, using these devices will pose a greater risk of damage to the tap body finish or the basin.

In addition, while tap spouts come in generally more consistent sizes, most tap bodies come in a variety of shapes and sizes and are known to have different thickness including many which can be flared. Using the above devices ( for example the device of GB2167988A) can mean that a user would have great difficulty using a single lever to dismantle different sized taps, especially those which are slightly larger or those much smaller than the U-shaped size of the lever respectively. Thus, it would be required to either have each device to be adapted for a varying range of sizes or instead to use a larger device for a larger tap or a smaller device for a smaller tap body, which is undesirable and not cost effective as it would mean, a plumber would have to purchase a number of bulky devices for the same job.

In addition, some of the above devices will still require a second tool to hold the tap body steadfast, while a rotational force is being applied to try and undo the tap head.

Further, most of the devices described in the prior art will require considerable force to be applied to unfasten a tight tap head nut, once a wrench or spanner has securely gripped the tap head nut. This is undesirable in the least. Also, if there are no visible flats to grip a nut with, slippage will most likely occur. Further, the device of GB 2249509A is likely to suffer space constraints such that it will be difficult to use in tight spaces, or areas where the tap or tap basin is located right next to a wall.

Another problem with a number of the prior art devices is that they are made from materials that are bulky and likely to be expensive.

Finally, a user with poor hand strength may find it extremely difficult to change a tap washer using such tools as it would generally be required for a user, commonly a plumber, to turn the tap head in one direction, while holding the tap body steady in the other direction. This is particularly difficult to achieve and often results in the tap head to jolt, or "crack" causing the whole tap body to turn one way, resulting in the aforementioned leakages and/ or damage to surfaces.

Accordingly, it would be desirable to have an unfastening tool that obviates one or more of the disadvantages and limitations described above and provides a more effective alternative that is user friendly, relatively affordable and economical to manufacture. For consistency we herein refer to an "unfastening tool" instead of "a fastening and unfastening tool".

According to a first aspect of the present invention, there is provided an unfastening tool comprising a substantially tubular means adapted to engulf the or a portion of a tap's spout; a rigid elongate link member means moveably disposable to be slidably rotatable relative to the tubular means; adjusting means disposable adjacent the link member means; and connection means adapted to cooperatively engage a shank of a spanner with the link member means, so as to form a draw link therebetween, wherein, in use, the adjusting means is manually operable to effect movement of the link member means so as to urge a shank of a spanner engaged by the link member means using connection means, towards or away from the tubular means.

Preferably, the tubular means comprises a tubular member or sheath made of substantially rigid material.

Advantageously, the tubular member is made from a reinforced plastics material.

Alternatively, the tubular member is made from a metallic material or other suitable material.

Preferably, the tubular member comprise at a proximal end, a handle means.

Advantageously, the tubular member comprise at a distal end a crevice means.

Preferably, the crevice means is adapted to engulf a portion of a tap's spout.

Advantageously, the crevice means is adapted to fully engulf a tap's spout.

Preferably, the crevice means is adapted to firmly grasp a tap's spout.

Advantageously, the crevice means is adapted to immoveably engage a taps spout. The crevice means may be adapted to correspond to different sized tap spouts, whereby a spout that is considered to be a match for a particular sized tap will firmly grasps such a tap.

Preferably, the link member means comprises an elongate substantially rigid bar, for example a metal bar.

Advantageously, the link member means may comprise a substantially stiff bar, for example one manufactured from a reinforced or "high-impact" plastics material such as a polypropylene copolymer. It is desirable for the link member means to be rigid so that any force applied does not cause it to break or snap.

Preferably, the link member means is adapted to moveably cooperate with the tubular means.

Advantageously, the link member means may be adapted to rotatably cooperate with the tubular means. The link member means may be moveably received through an aperture means in the tubular means.

Preferably, the link member means is provided with external threading

Advantageously, the external threading allows conversion of rotational motion into linear motion.

Preferably, the link member means is provided with internal threading

Advantageously, the internal threading allows conversion of rotational motion into linear motion.

Preferably, the tubular means has an aperture means.

Advantageously, the tubular means allows the link member means to readily move rotatably through the aperture means.

Preferably, the link member means is disposable adjacent the tubular means, generally tangentially of the tubular means.

Advantageously, the link member means is disposable within a bore or slit means within the tubular means. The link member means may extend from the tubular means to the connection means.

Preferably, the link member means is adapted, in use, to moveably cooperate with the handle means of the tubular means.

Advantageously, the link member means, in use, is adapted to translate the rotational movement effected by the adjusting means along its length, into lateral movement relative to to the tubular means, thereby effecting a movement of a shank of a spanner or gripper tool.

Preferably, the connection means may be screw threaded to cooperate with threads on the link member means.

Advantageously, the link member means is, in use, adapted to moveably cooperate with the tubular means.

The link member means may, in use, be adapted to translate the rotational movement of adjusting means, into lateral motion of its member relative to the tubular means and the connection means.

The tubular means may be sectioned or truncated to present a surface onto which, in use the adjusting means is in communication with.

Preferably, the adjusting means is manually operable to effect movement of the link member means.

Advantageously, the adjusting means is automatically operable to effect movement of the link member means. Optionally, the adjusting means is both manually and automatically operable to effect movement of the link member means.

Preferably, the link member means is adapted, at one end to moveably cooperate with a conventional tightening device such as a spanner , wrench or gripper type tool.

Advantageously, the link member means may be adapted to cooperate with the connection means, the connection means being so adapted to cooperate with a conventional tightening device such as a spanner , wrench or gripper type tool.

Alternatively, the link member means may comprise a bolt means with a bolt head means. The bolt means may be manually operable to rotatably cooperate with the the connection means so as to effect a "push" or "pull" force on a conventional tightening device such as a spanner or wrench.

Preferably, the tool is adapted for use with conventional spanners.

Advantageously the tool is adapted for use with specially adapted spanners.

Preferably, the tool is adjustable to fit different size tap heads.

Advantageously the tool is adapted to fit taps where the tap spout is angled upwardly or set higher than the hexagonal portion of the tap head. The tool may be adjustable to fit taps where the tap spout is angled downwardly or set lower than the hexagonal portion of the tap head.

Preferably, the adjusting means comprises a threaded nut means.

Advantageously, the nut means is couplable with the link member means slidably rotatably along the length of the link member means. An embodiment of the present invention will now be more particularly described by way of example, and with reference to the figures of the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a top elevation of the present invention showing the arrangement of the unfastening tool engaging a water tap's spout.

Figure 2 is a perspective side view of the present invention showing, in use, the position of the spanner, the link member and tap.

Figure 3 is a top elevation of an alternative embodiment of the present invention showing the arrangement of the unfastening tool engaging a water tap's spout.

Figure 4 is a side view of the present invention showing, in use, the position of the spanner, the levers and handle.

Figure 5 & 6 are perspective views of 2 types of adapted spanners suitable for use with the present invention

Referring now to the figures, and to figure 1 in particular, an unfastening tool for use in fastening or unfastening water taps, has a rigid, substantially tubular sheath 1 or sleeve adapted to engulf the or a portion of a tap's spout 5. The tool has a rigid elongate link member 3 that is moveably located to be slidably rotatable relative to the tubular sheath 1. The link member 3 may comprise for example a steel rod or other material of high tensile strength. Preferably, the link member 3 has a threaded section that allows it to cooperate with a connection means or bracket 2 that "links" the link member with a shank of a spanner 4. Alternatively, the link member is completely threaded and may comprise a bolt having a bolt head 6, or receiving a nut 6. Alternatively, the bolt may have threadings on both ends, or be substantially threaded along its length.

Further, the tool has an adjusting mechanism disposable adjacent the link member comprising a threaded nut or screw that is couplable onto the link member. Alternatively, the tool may comprise an elongate bolt, whereby rotating the bolt will cause it to move through the connection means, pulling or pushing it one way or another, depending on whether the bolt head is rotated clockwise or anticlockwise.

Additionally, the tool is provided with connection means adapted to cooperatively engage a shank of a spanner with the link member means, so as to form a "draw- link" therebetween, wherein, in use, the adjusting means is manually operable to effect movement of the link member means so as to urge a shank of a spanner engaged by the link member means using connection means, towards or away from the tubular sheath. Thus, one end of the tool is connected to the end of the spanner by either suitable purpose made adaptor / bracket that will accommodate a standard type spanner or the spanner can be purpose made to fit the bracket. The other end of the device can be connected or anchored to the tap spout by placing a tube over the spout of suitable length and width., the point of connection with the link member means will be at the end of the tube by way of for instance, a hole, threaded aperture or slot.

One advantage of using the tool is that the force required to undo or tighten the tap head will be held or contained in the tap unit itself and will not require an external anchorage point (i.e. a human being standing on the ground or an additional wrench gripping the bottom half of the tap). The directing pushing and pulling forces required to unscrew the tap head will only be contained in the tap body, such that the force will be applied and controlled indirectly by the user. Essentially, this is achieved by connecting the opposite end of the spanner or tool being used on the hexagonal part of the tap head, to another part of the tap body, ideally but not essentially, the tap spout. In this manner it will be possible to effect a pushing or pulling action between the spanner and the tap spout, said pulling or pushing action can be achieved by connecting the end of the spanner and spout by for instance nut and bolt, in this case rotation of the nut or bolt will cause a pulling or pushing of the spanner relative to the spout, resulting in rotation of the tap head relative to the tap body. While one mechanism has been employed, it will be appreciated by the man skilled in the art, that different variations may readily replace a number of the integers, to achieve largely the same effect. For example, instead of the connection means, a cam type device, gears, ratchet, belt, chains, hydraulic, levers, hand clamps , hand grips or vacuum devices having pushing or pulling arrangements can be employed to obtain the pushing or pulling action between the spanner and the spout.

Thus, in use, it then becomes apparent that rotation of the nut and/or bolt will cause the spanner to travel towards the tap spout and rotation of the tap head will take place in a steady controllable manner, thereby unfastening a ceased tap since the distal end of the link member 3 is attached to the bracket of 2 for fitting onto the handle end of the wrench or spanner 4. Adjacent the bracket 2, is placed a nut 7 onto the link member 3, while the working head of the spanner 4 is placed over the hexagonal portion of the tap head 8

In an alternative embodiment, (figure 3), an unfastening tool an unfastening tool 10a comprises a sleeve or tubular sheath 9a adapted to engulf a portion of a tap's spout 2a; a first lever member 11a is moveably disposable adjacent the tubular sheath 9a. A second lever member 4a is adapted to engage a spanner 5a. In a preferred embodiment, the second lever member 4a is connectable to a distal end 8a of the first lever member 11a, so as to be generally parallelly to the tubular member 9a and form a draw link between the spanner 5a and the first lever member 11a. A handle 12a is pivotably connected to a proximal end 3 of the first lever member 11a, so that in use, the handle 12a is manually operable to cause movement of the second lever member 4a using the rotation of first lever member 11a.

The tubular member 9a may be made of substantially rigid material, for example of a plastics material made by extrusion. Alternatively, the tubular member 9a may be made from a metallic material, although this may need an inside layer or coating within the crevice or internal lining of the tubular member 9a, so as to prevent causing scratches to the coating of the spout. Further a reinforced or "high-impact" plastics material such as a polypropylene copolymer may be used in injection moulding to form the tubular member. It is desirable for the tubular sheath 9a to be rigid so that any force applied does not cause it to break or snap. The tubular member 9a has at a proximal end, a handle portion 7a, which is held by a user, when inserting a tap's spout 2a into it. The tubular member 9a has at a distal end a crevice 13 , which is the part that engulfs a tap's spout 2a. The crevice 13a must firmly grasp the spout so as to create an anchorage point through which , in use, the forces created by the manually operable first lever member 1a will be aligned. This is also important as it means that the tubular member 9a will fit most taps.

The first lever member 11a comprises an elongate rigid bar, made from a tough material, for example a plastics or metallic material for example it could be made from chromium-vanadium alloys, or tool steels. The first lever member 11a is adapted to moveably and rotatably cooperate with the tubular member 9a, so that the first lever member 11a is retained within the tubular member 9a or adjacent it (figure 4) and may not slide out. The arrangement is such that the bar may rotate in the direction of the arrows (shown both on figure 3 & 4 for illustration) but is connected to the second lever member 4a at a distal end 8a, and to the handle 12a at proximal end 3a, and thus may not move out of the tubular member 9a. This is possible because first lever member 11 a is moveably received through an aperture in the tubular device (not shown). Thus, as can be seen in figures 3 & 4, it appears substantially perpendicular to the tubular member 9a, which is important because it allows the first lever member 11a to moveably cooperate with the handle 12a, while being able to translate any movement of the handle 12a, into movement of the second lever member 4a. This means that in use the first lever member 11 is adapted to translate the rotational movement of the handle 12, along its length, generally perpendicular to the tubular member 9a, thereby effecting a movement of the second lever member 4.

This is important because, the second lever member 4a is adapted, at a distal end 8a to moveably cooperate with a conventional tightening device such as a spanner 5a and it means a tap head nut can be unfastened by applying a force onto the handle 12, which is then transferred to the spanner 5 using the lever member arrangement by translating the rotational movement of first lever means, into horizontal movement of the second lever member 4a and spanner 5a.

The tool may be adapted for use with specially adapted spanners and to fit different size tap heads. ( see figure 5 & 6). In use, the tool is adapted to fit taps where the tap spout is set higher than the hexagonal portion of the tap head. Also, the tool may be adjustable to fit taps where the tap spout is set lower than the hexagonal portion of the tap head.

In using the tool, a user must first place the tool over a tap, whose cover has been removed. Thus once the tool is firmly secured onto a tap, with the spout in tact, and the second lever member 4a (figure 3 & 4) engaging a spanner 5a, which is in turn engaging a nut 6a, a force can be applied to the handle 12a using one hand ( not shown), while the other hand is used to hold onto the handle 7a, so that the tool is kept stable. This turning of the handle 12 effects movement of the first lever member 11a, and consequently, movement of the second lever means 4a which effects movement of the spanner 5a such that it can fasten or unfasten the nut 6a.

The tool will allow easy and controlled rotation or unscrewing of the tap head in a way, which will cause minimal or no movement of the tap itself. The tool will also provide substantial rotational force on the tap head than the average person would be able to using tools from the prior art.

The tool attaches to the spout, that becomes an anchorage point on the tap, whereby using the invention will enable leverage or pulling or pushing force on the tool used to unscrew the tap head, such as a spanner. The advantage being that as all the force required to undo or tighten tap head will be held or contained in the tap unit itself and will not require an external anchorage point, i.e. The person standing on the floor. This means that the direct pushing and pulling forces required to unscrew the tap head will only be contained in the tap body, the force will be applied and controlled indirectly by the user, this will be achieved by connecting the opposite end of the spanner or tool being used on the hexagonal part of the tap head, to another part of the tap body, ideally the tap spout. In this manner it will be possible to effect a pulling or pushing action between spanner and the tap spout, which can be achieved by connecting the end of the spanner and spout, by a cam-like draw link comprising two elongate lever members, preferably moveably connectable at a right angle, so that rotational movement of one causes horizontal movement of the other. This means that, when the handle is pushed (or pulled), the first lever member, translates the resulting force that operates the second lever member, that in-turn is connected to a spanner, resulting in rotation of the tap head relative to the tap body. In this way, the pressure exerted on the tap head relative to the tap base or body can be multiplied, many times more than would be possible, if the pressure was exerted by an average user. This also means that pressure is applied in an indirect, controlled manner.

Having described and illustrated the principles of the invention with reference to preferred embodiments thereof, it will be appreciated that the invention can be modified in arrangement and detail without departing from such principles. Accordingly, in view of the many possible embodiments to which the principles may be put, it should be noted that the detailed embodiments are illustrative only and should not be taken as limiting the scope of the invention and that any suitable combination of equivalent devices can be employed to produce the pulling or pushing action. Thus, the tool is not limited to cam-type pushing / pulling or lever arrangement only but may employ screws, gears, ratchets, belts , chains and hydraulics. Hand clamps, hand grips, or vacuum devices can be used to obtain the pushing or pulling action between spanner and spout. One end of the device will be connected to the end of the spanner by either suitable purpose made adapter that will accommodate a standard spanner, or the spanner can be purpose made to fit the bracket. The other end of the device will be connected or anchored to the tap spout, ideally but not essentially by placing a tube over the spout of suitable length and width, the point of connection will be at the end of the tube by way for instance hole or slot. Preferably, the tube placed over the spout will be made for instance from hard plastics material. This will offer the benefit of preventing damage to the tap when in use. Other types of suitable materials can also be used. Ideally, the connection between the tap spout and the spanner can be by method of nut and bolt of suitable size/ material and strength. It then becomes apparent that rotation of the nut and / or bolt will cause the spanner to travel towards the tap spout and rotation of the tap head will take place in a steady controllable manner.

In a preferred embodiment, the internal diameter of the tubular sheath may be flared to correspond with the typically narrowing size of many household tap spouts, which are often wider nearer the body of the tap, and slightly narrower away from the tap body. Typical internal diameters are 30mm at the far end of the sheath, increasing gradually towards the mouth of the sheath and reaching at 36. 2mm at the mouth, so to correspond with narrowing size of most household spouts (Note most tap spouts narrows from the tap body, which is wider, narrowing along the spout outwardly to the water outlet). External diameter of the sheath may range from 36mm nearer to the handle means, to 46.12mm at the mouth of the spout. Optionally, the tubular sheath may be manufactured to user requirements, or as a set corresponding to different sized tap spouts.