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Title:
TEMPORARY POOL CUE HOLDERS FOR TABLE MOUNTING
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2000/043086
Kind Code:
A2
Abstract:
A pool cue holder (30, 130, 230, 330, 430, 530, 630) which mounts temporarily onto tables (20) or other suitable furniture. A pool cue (21) stands in position leaning against the cue holder (30, 130, 230, 330, 430, 530, 630). The cue holder (30, 130, 230, 330, 430, 530, 630) is preferably formed with a main body (31, 531) made from a panel of heavy paperboard. The panel has an engagement portion (41, 141, 241, 341, 441, 541, 641) with a bottom face (39, 139, 239, 339, 439, 539, 639) that is provided with adhesive (641) to temporarily hold the unit in position. The cue holder includes one or more cue rests (45, 46, 145, 146, 245, 246, 345, 346, 445, 446, 545, 546, 645, 646) which are open receptacles that receive and laterally support a pool cue (21). The rests have an open side which allows easy installation and removal of pool cues during play of a game. The top face (38, 138, 238, 338, 438, 538, 638) of the cue holder can be printed with advertising (43, 143, 243), such as for soft drinks or beer.

Inventors:
Sines, Randy D. (S. 4056 Madelia Spokane, WA, 99203, US)
Fuller, Stephen D. (6222 N. Cedar Street Spokane, WA, 99205, US)
Application Number:
PCT/US2000/001782
Publication Date:
July 27, 2000
Filing Date:
January 20, 2000
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
Sines, Randy D. (S. 4056 Madelia Spokane, WA, 99203, US)
Fuller, Stephen D. (6222 N. Cedar Street Spokane, WA, 99205, US)
International Classes:
A63D5/10; (IPC1-7): A63D/
Foreign References:
US5255799A1993-10-26
US4953770A1990-09-04
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Gregory, Randy A. (Suite 1300 601 West First Avenue Spokane, WA, 99201-3828, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS
1. A cue holder for mounting upon furniture, such as a table, to facilitate holding a pool cue in a standing position adjacent to the furniture, comprising: a panel having an obverse face and a reverse face, said reverse face being substantially opposite to said obverse face; at least one adhesive section upon at least the reverse face for adhesion to a surface of the furniture; at least one rest formed upon the cue holder for receiving a portion of a shaft of the pool cue to provide lateral support to the pool cue; whereby the cue holder can be temporarily placed against the furniture to provide a cue support position against which a standing pool cue engages said at least one rest and is restrained from falling.
2. A cue holder according to claim 1 wherein said at least one rest includes a plurality of rests.
3. A cue holder according to claim 1 wherein said at least one rest includes at least one rest which is concave.
4. A cue holder according to claim 1 wherein said at least one rest includes at least one rest which is asymmetrically concave.
5. A cue holder according to claim 1 wherein: said at least one rest includes a plurality of rests; at least one intermediate section interposed between at least two of the plurality of rests.
6. A cue holder according to claim 1 wherein: said at least one rest includes a plurality of rests; at least one intermediate section interposed between at least two of the plurality of rests, said at least one intermediate section being configured to cantilever over the side of the furniture to provide flexibility when engaged by a pool cue being installed or removed from said at least one rest.
7. A cue holder according to claim 1 and further comprising a folded portion wherein a portion of the panel is folded over to change the configuration for mounting upon the furniture.
8. A cue holder according to claim 1 and further comprising at least one folded portion wherein a portion of the panel is folded over to change the configuration for mounting upon the furniture, said at least one folded portion including at least one rest.
9. A cue holder according to claim 1 and further comprising at least one folded portion wherein a portion of the panel is folded over to change the configuration for mounting upon the furniture, said at least one folded portion including at least one rest.
10. A cue holder according to claim 1 and further comprising at least one folded portion wherein a portion of the panel is folded over to change the configuration for mounting upon the furniture, said at least one folded portion including at least one lateral stabilizer for bearing upon the furniture to provide lateral restraint between the at least one lateral stabilizer and said furniture.
11. A cue holder for mounting upon furniture, such as a table, to facilitate holding a pool cue in a standing position adjacent to the furniture, comprising: a body piece; a main section forming at least part of said body piece, said main section having an engagement portion which is shaped to engage with the furniture; at least one adhesive segment upon the engagement portion for adhesion to a surface of the furniture; at least one rest section connected to the main section and extending therefrom to allow at least portions of the rest section to overhang the furniture when the cue holder is properly mounted thereon; at least one rest formed by said at least one rest section for receiving a portion of a shaft of the pool cue to provide lateral support to the pool cue; whereby the cue holder can be temporarily placed against the furniture to provide a cue support position against which a standing pool cue engages said at least one rest and is restrained from falling.
12. A cue holder according to claim llwherein said at least one rest includes a plurality of rests.
13. A cue holder according to claim 11 wherein said at least one rest includes at least one rest which is concave.
14. A cue holder according to claim 11 wherein said at least one rest includes at least one rest which is asymmetrically concave.
15. A cue holder according to claim 11 wherein: said at least one rest includes a plurality of rests. said at least one rest section includes at least one intermediate section interposed between at least two of the plurality of rests.
16. A cue holder according to claim 11 wherein: said at least one rest includes a plurality of rests. said at least one rest section includes at least one intermediate section interposed between at least two of the plurality of rests, said at least one intermediate section being configured to cantilever over the side of the furniture to provide flexibility when engaged by a pool cue being installed or removed from said at least one rest.
17. A cue holder according to claim 11 wherein: said at least one rest includes a plurality of rests; at least one intermediate section interposed between at least two of the plurality of rests, said at least one intermediate section being configured to cantilever over the side of the furniture to provide flexibility when engaged by a pool cue being installed or removed from said at least one rest.
18. A cue holder according to claim 11 and further comprising a folded portion wherein a portion of the body piece is folded over to change the configuration for mounting upon the furniture.
19. A cue holder according to claim 11 and further comprising a folded portion wherein a portion of the body piece is folded over to change the configuration for mounting upon the furniture, said at least one folded portion including at least one rest.
20. A cue holder according to claim 11 and further comprising at least one folded portion wherein a portion of the panel is folded over to change the configuration for mounting upon the furniture, said at least one folded portion including at least one lateral stabilizer for bearing upon the furniture to provide lateral restraint between the at least one lateral stabilizer and said furniture.
21. A method for supporting a pool cue against furniture in a standing position adjacent to the furniture, comprising: engaging a cue holder against the piece of furniture, said engaging being performed such that an engagement portion of the cue holder is engaged against the furniture causing the cue holder to temporarily and adhesively adhere to the furniture ; said engaging being performed so as to mount the cue holder upon the furniture with at least portions of a rest section cantilevered from the furniture with at least one rest having an open mouth to allow installation and removal of a pool cue from the at least one rest.
22. A method according to claim 21 and further defined by folding a folded portion of the cue holder to reconfigure the cue holder for engaging the furniture.
23. A method according to claim 21 and further defined by: folding a folded portion of the cue holder to reconfigure the cue holder for engaging the furniture; forming a lateral stabilizer upon the cue holder; and wherein said engaging is performed so as to engaged the lateral stabilizer against nonhorizontal surfaces of the furniture.
24. A method according to claim 21 and further defined by removing an adhesive cover layer from the cue holder to expose an adhesive used to temporarily and adhesively adhere the cue holder to the furniture.
25. A method according to claim 21 and further defined by exposing an adhesive layer present upon the cue holder, said adhesive layer being used to temporarily and adhesively adhere the cue holder to the furniture.
Description:
DESCRIPTION TEMPORARY POOL CUE HOLDERS FOR TABLE MOUNTING Technical Field The field of this invention is temporary pool cue holders for temporary mounting on tables and other appropriate furniture, particularly for temporary mounting upon the top surface of such tables or similar horizontal surfaces.

Background Art Pocket billiards (usually called"pool"), billiards and snooker are games played with pool cues. Pool in particular is a very popular game and is found in many homes and entertainment related businesses. The game of pool is played upon a pocketed billiard table.

Pool tables are frequently found in bars, taverns, restaurants and pool halls.

Refreshments, such as sodas, wine and beer are often served in such establishments at tables conveniently located adjacent to the pool or billiard tables. During the play of pool, each member of a player group plays sequentially in turn. The person who has just completed play frequently reaches for such refreshments which are usually located on side tables, or otherwise in close proximity to the pool table.

It is also routine for a pool player to place a pool cue in a resting location between turns at play. When it is again the player's turn, then the player returns to pick up the cue. In the past it has been common for individuals to rest their pool cues against the adjacent walls, tables, chairs and at various other locations. Although pool halls and other establishments often provide wall cue racks, such racks are not sufficiently convenient so that players routinely use them during actual play of a game.

Instead, the cues are haphazardly placed at various positions about the pool room. The cue racks are used to store the cues at night or when a player has completed his or her session.

Another important consideration to owners of commercial pool establishments is the risk of damage or theft of pool cues owned by paying customers. In many establishments security is relatively low, and it is not uncommon for a highly prized custom pool cue to be stolen. A player who is partially inebriated can sometimes be fooled, or is inattentive and this can lead to or facilitate loss of a pool cue to a thief.

In other cases theft is not intended, but a drunken player or other individual may accidentally walk away with the wrong pool cue after it has been leaned against a wall, furniture or other fixture by the true owner. Since people do not use the wall mounted

cue racks between turns during normal play, the problem continues and no satisfactory solution has been available.

A further problem is damage to pool cues. When cues are left in a leaning position against a wall, chair, table or other surface or object, then they are relatively unstable and can easily be displaced causing the cue to fall to the floor or against furniture. The availability of cue racks does little or nothing to alleviate this problem because it is inconvenient to most individuals to use such racks during play of the game.

Custom or collector pool cues are expensive, sometimes costing many thousands of dollars. The owners of both expensive and less expensive cues are also concerned about their cues being damaged by a clumsy or drunken customer of the establishment.

Thus, it is of advantage to establishments where pool is played to offer customers an improved but easy to use cue holder. It is also advantageous to provide a cue holder which is inexpensive to produce and use. It is further an advantage to have a cue holder which may in some circumstances be a convenient advertising vehicle, either for the establishment providing the cue holders, or to some other service or product.

These and other problems and considerations have been partially or fully addressed by the current invention which is described more fully below. Additional benefits and advantages of the current invention will either be given in the following description, or will be apparent from the nature of the invention and the description given herein.

Brief Description of the Drawings Preferred embodiments of the invention are described below with reference to the accompanying drawings, which are briefly described below.

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view showing a table fitted with a novel pool cue holder according to the invention. This figure also shows two pool cues which are supported by the cue holder.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view showing the cue holder of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a top view showing the cue holder of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a bottom view showing the cue holder of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a top view showing a second embodiment cue holder according to this invention.

Fig. 6 is a bottom view showing the second embodiment cue holder of Fig. 5.

Figs. 7 is a top view showing a third embodiment cue holder according to this invention.

Fig. 8 is a bottom view showing the third embodiment cue holder of Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a top view showing a fourth embodiment cue holder according to this invention.

Fig. 10 is a bottom view showing the fourth embodiment cue holder of Fig. 9.

Fig. 11 is a top view showing a fifth embodiment cue holder according to this invention.

Fig. 12 is a bottom view showing the fifth embodiment cue holder of Fig. 11. Fig. 13 is a perspective view of a sixth embodiment cue holder according to this invention. The cue holder is shown mounted upon a table and supporting a pool cue in the desired manner.

Fig. 14 is a perspective view of the sixth embodiment cue holder of Fig. 13 shown in isolation from the table and pool cue.

Fig. 15 is a top view of the cue holder of Figs. 13-14.

Fig. 16 is a end view of the cue holder of Figs. 13-15.

Fig. 17 is a bottom view of the cue holder of Figs. 13-16.

Fig. 18 is a bottom view of the cue holder of Figs. 13-17. Portions of the cue holder have been unfolded and are shown in plan view prior to folding assembly of the cue holder.

Fig. 19 is a perspective view showing a seventh embodiment cue holder according to this invention.

Fig. 20 is a top view of the cue holder of Fig. 19.

Fig. 21 is an end view of the cue holder of Fig. 19.

Fig. 22 is a bottom view of the cue holder of Fig. 19 with portions peeled back indicating removal of a protective film prior to installation.

Best Modes for Carrving Out the Invention and Disclosure of Invention First Embodiment Fig. 1 shows an elevational view of a first embodiment pool cue holder 30 in accordance with this invention. Cue holder 30 is shown illustrated in use with a furniture table 20. Table 20 includes a tabletop 22 having an upper or top surface 25 and plural side edges 27. Table 20 also includes a plurality of table legs 23 which rest upon a supporting floor 24 or other structure. Cue holder 30 is temporarily installed upon the table along the tabletop 22. Cue holders in accordance with this invention are

preferably used with tables, but may also be suitable for use with other types of furniture, such as chairs or others having an appropriately shaped landing or mounting area upon which the holder can be installed and held.

As Fig. 1 illustrates, the cue holder 30 holds or supports the pool or other billiard-style cues 21 in a standing position adjacent to table 20. The cue holder is advantageous in providing a temporary yet convenient holder to prevent pool cues from rolling or sliding onto the floor, walls, or other furniture or fixtures.

Cue holder 30 is shown in greater detail in Figs. 2-4 and specific description will now be given in connection therewith. Cue holder 30 includes a body piece 31 which has plural side edges, including: a front or proximate edge 35, rear or distal edge 36, and opposing end edges 37. The body piece 31 also has an upper or top surface 38 and a lower or bottom surface 39.

Cue holder 30 utilizes the top surface 38 as an obverse face and the bottom surface 39 as a reverse face. Fig. 3 illustrates the top, obverse face as advantageously having a display area 43 which can cover all or part of the obverse face. As shown, the obverse face 38 includes a display area bounded within a decorative border or other margin 44. Fig 3 also shows that the display area 43 is advantageously provided with an advertisement, such as exemplified by the soda advertisement depicted in this view.

An endless variety of advertising messages can be presented upon the obverse face to influence customers to buy refreshments, food or other goods or services.

Fig. 2 shows that the body piece 31 has a first or main section 32 and a second or rest section 34. The main section typically overlies a supporting surface, such as the top surface 25 of table 20. The second or rest section 34 typically is cantilevered into an overhanging position adjacent to the tabletop side edge surface 27 and extending therefrom. This cantilevered or overhanging installation position prevents the pool cues 21 from bearing upon side edge 27 of the tabletop when one or more cues are placed within the rests 45,46. This adds to stability of the pool cues and reduces the risk of damage to the pool cue and table.

The rest section 34 is provided with one or more rests 45,46. Rests 45,46 are preferably receptacles or other suitable features formed on the front edge 35. Rests 45, 46 can be formed by curved rest surfaces which cradle the pool cues and provide increased lateral stability. The rests have open mouths which allow easy installation and removal of pool cues 26. The rest receptacles are advantageously concave. Receptacle rests 45,46 are asymmetric relative to a central rest axis 92 (see Fig. 3). The asymmetrical receptacles 45,46 have interior edge surfaces which facilitate an orientation

of the standing pool cues which angles the cues outwardly toward the top. This configuration and resulting orientation provide additional space between the cues, which in turn facilitates handling of one cue when there are two cues present in the holder.

The outer portions of the rest section form outboard projections 52 which act to restrain pool cues in the rest receptacles.

Fig. 4 shows the cue holder 30 with a mounting and engagement layer 41. The mounting and engagement layer is an adhesive material, such as adhesives used on the popular POST-IT brand note pads. Other types of adhesive, such as provided on various automotive related parts and accessories can also be used. As shown, adhesive segment 41 is covered with a protective layer 42, which can be a plastic or coated paper, that prevents dirt and other foreign materials from adhering to the engagement layer prior to installation of the cue holder upon a table or other supporting furniture.

Cue holder 30 is used by removing the protective layer 42 and exposing the adhesive layer. The person making the installation then functions by positioning the cue holder with the reverse face directed toward a mounting area upon a supporting tabletop or other supporting surface. The mounting area is suitably selected and positioned to facilitate use of the cue holder by positioning the engagement section over the mounting area. The installer then performs by positioning the second or rest section 34 in a cantilevered position adjacent to the piece of furniture. The person making the installation then performs by depressing upon the body piece 31, forcing the adhesive segment or layer 41 against the tabletop upper surface 25.

After mounting, the cue holder then functions by adhering to the surface of the table in a relatively stable position with the second or rest section 34 suspended from the side of the table in a cantilevered condition.

Second Embodiment Figs. 5 and 6 show a second preferred embodiment of cue holder 130 made in accordance with the invention. Cue holder 130 shares most of the features of cue holder 30. Similar components have been numbered using reference numerals which are the same except that a"1"has been placed in the hundreds column. The features which are similar will not be described again since the description of features and operation given above in connection with cue holder 30 applies to holder 130. Features or functions which vary in cue holder 130 will now be described in greater detail.

The front edge 135 is shaped differently in cue holder 130 as compared to cue holder 30. Rests 145 and 146 are asymmetric about the central receptacle axis 192;

however, the asymmetry is opposite to holder 30, and is intended to bias the shafts of the pool cues so as to angle the cues together at the top rather than apart. This configuration and resulting cue orientation may be preferred by pool players in some situations. It is alternatively possible to combine the configuration of rests 45,46 with other features of cue holder 130 as will be further detailed below.

The cue holder 130 also includes an intermediate section 151 which has a convex outer edge between rests 145,146. This construction enhances easy installation and removal of the pool cues. It also minimizes the destructive effects associated with engagement of the pool cue shafts against the front edge along intermediate section 151 because the curved face tends to deflect a misdirected pool cue. The intermediate section also demonstrates flexibility when in the intended mounting position which cushions against cue engagements and further reduces wear and tear on the pool cue and cue holder. Since the cue holders are preferably made from paperboard or other relatively inexpensive materials, this increased durability is of advantage.

The cue holder 130 is installed and used in a manner similar to or the same as described above in connection with cue holder 30.

Third Embodiment Figs. 7 and 8 show another preferred embodiment of the invention in the form of a cue holder 230. Cue holder 230 shares most of the features of cue holders 30 and 130. Similar components have been numbered using reference numerals which are the same except that a"2"has been placed in the hundreds column. The features which are similar will not be described again since the description of features and operation given above in connection with cue holders 30 and/or 130 apply to holder 230. Features or functions which vary in cue holder 230 will now be described in greater detail.

Cue holder 230 has a front edge 235 and rear edge 236 which are shorter in length than the side edges 237. This is different from holders 30 and 130 which have longer length in the front and rear edges as compared to the side edges.

Cue holder 230 also differs from holders 30 and 130 with respect to the shape of the rest receptacles 245,246. In holder 230 rest receptacles 245,246 are semicircular and symmetric about a central axis (not shown). The central section 255 is curved and is shown semicircular convex outwardly. The outboard projections 252 are also formed convex outwardly and are semicircular in shape.

Other features and operation of the cue holder 230 are similar to holders 30 and 130.

Fourth Embodiment Figs. 9 and 10 show a fourth embodiment cue holder 330. Cue holder 330 shares most of the features of cue holders 30,130 and 230. Similar components have been numbered using reference numerals which are the same except that a"3"has been placed in the hundreds column. The features which are similar will not be described again since the description of features and operation given above in connection with cue holders 30,130 and/or 230 apply to holder 330. Features or functions which vary in cue holder 330 will now be described in greater detail.

Cue holder 330 is most similar to cue holder 230. Rests 345 and 346 are not semicircular and are not symmetrical about a central axis (not shown). Instead rests 345 and 346 are similar to rests 145 and 146. In this configuration the upper ends of supported pool cues 21 tend to be angled inwardly or together. Alternatively, the rests 345 and 346 can be reversed or reconfigured in the manner shown with regard to rests 45 and 46 to angle the upper ends of the pool cues 21 outwardly or apart.

Other features and operation of the cue holder 330 are similar to holders 30,130 and 230.

Fifth Embodiment Figs. 11 and 12 show a fifth embodiment cue holder 430. Cue holder 430 shares most of the features of cue holders 30,130,230 and 330. Similar components have been numbered using reference numerals which are the same except that a"4"has been placed in the hundreds column. The features which are similar will not be described again since the description of features and operation given above in connection with cue holders 30,130,230 and/or 330 apply to holder 430. Features or functions which vary in cue holder 430 will now be described in greater detail.

Cue holder 430 is most similar to cue holder 230. The overall shape of cue holder 430 has been changed to simulate the torso of a female human. Specifically, side edges 437 have been made into a sinuous shape with a bust line area 491, waist area 492 and hip area 493. As shown, cue holder 430 is made with the obverse side 438 free of advertising or other ornamentation. Alternatively, photographs, advertising, patterns, graphics or other decoration can be included.

Sixth Embodiment Figs. 13-18 show a sixth embodiment cue holder 530 incorporating some modified features and attributes according to another form of the invention. Cue holder 530 shares most of the features of cue holders 30,130,230,330 and 430. Similar components have been numbered using reference numerals which are the same except that a"5"has been placed in the hundreds column. The features which are similar will not be described again since the description of features and operation given above in connection with cue holders 30,130,230,330 and/or 430 apply to holder 530. Features or functions which vary in cue holder 530 will now be described in greater detail.

Fig. 16 shows the rest section 534 formed by a folded structure 533. Folded structure 533 is intended to provide a relatively rigid cantilevered rest section. This is accomplished by using a first leg or strut section 561 which is connected to the upper portion 587 of the rest section 534 at fold line 571 (Fig. 18). A second leg section 562 is connected to strut section 561 at fold line 572. A third leg section 563 is connected to second leg section 562 at fold line 573.

The rest receptacles 545 and 546 are provided by apertures 547 and 548, respectively. The rest receptacles are roughly shaped like a horseshoe. Apertures 547 and 548 are symmetric about the fold line 571 so that the edges of the rest receptacles coincide for both rest section top panel 587 and strut section 561.

Fig. 18 shows that the cue holder 530 is advantageously formed from a single panel of paperboard or other suitable materials folded into the configuration shown. To maintain the folded section 533 in the assembled configuration shown in Fig. 16, the first side 538 of the paperboard panel forming the body piece 531 is provided with an adhesive layer 593. Adhesive layer 593 serves to keep the third leg section 563 adhered to the second side 539 as shown in Fig. 16. This maintains the cantilevered rest section 534 is a structurally strong configuration. It also maintains the second leg section 562 in a secured position relative to the main section 532 of the panel. This allows section 562 to serve as a lateral abutment and positioning feature which can engage along the outer edge 27 of a tabletop or other supporting furniture.

Cue holder 530 is assembled by folding the folded section into the configuration shown. The cue holder is then installed upon a table or other piece of furniture in the manner described above in connection with other embodiments of the invention.

Seventh Embodiment Figs. 19-22 show a sixth embodiment cue holder 630 incorporating folded lateral restraint features according to another form of the invention. Cue holder 630 shares most of the features of cue holders 30,130,230,330,430 and 530. Similar components have been numbered using reference numerals which are the same except that a"6"has been placed in the hundreds column. The features which are similar will not be described again since the description of features and operation given above in connection with cue holders 30,130,230,330,430 and/or 530 apply to holder 630.

Features or functions which vary in cue holder 630 will now be described in greater detail.

Cue holder 630 has semicircular rest receptacles 645,646 which are formed by circular apertures 647 and 648 when folded along first fold line 671.

Cue holder 630 also has a folded section or structure 633 which is used to increase the rigidity of the cantilevered rest section 634. Fold structure 633 differs in construction from fold structure 533, but both function to provide increased rigidity and durability for their respective cantilevered rest sections. Fold structure 633 includes a first leg section 661 which is connected to the rest section upper segment 687 (Fig. 21) at first fold line 671 (Fig. 22). The fold structure also includes a second leg section 662 which is connected to the first leg section 661 along fold line 672.

When the fold structure 633 is configured for installation of the cue holder, the first leg section 661 extends from first fold line 671 along the underside of rest section upper segment 687 in parallel, contacting relationship therewith. One or both of the adjoining surfaces of upper segment 687 and first leg section 661 can be provided with an adhesive layer to allow the two parts to be adhered together.

Fold structure 633 also includes the second leg section 662 which extends away from the main section 632 and rest section upper segment 687. Second leg section 662 can serve as a lateral abutment feature which bears upon the edge of a table to help initially position and maintain the installed position of the cue holder 630.

Fig. 22 illustrates that the entire bottom face 638 is provided with an adhesive layer 641 and peel-off protective cover layer 642. This provides adhesive along the adjoining surfaces of segment 687 and first leg section 661. The second leg section 662 also has an adhesively coated inward face which can be used to adhere the second leg to the side edge 27 of the table.

Additional Description of Methods Novel methods according to the invention include methods of supporting a pool cue in a standing position adjacent to a table or other supporting piece of furniture.

Novel methods also include providing an installed temporary cue holder. The methods include a number of steps which have been described hereinabove.

The methods can be repeatedly or additionally described as including a step of selecting a cue holder having one or more of the features described hereinabove.

Although specific structures have been described in certain combination of features, it should be fully appreciated that features shown in one embodiment can be incorporated in combination with one or more of the features shown in other embodiments, to the extent such variant combinations do not require substitution of component parts in a manner which is not operable.

The methods can also include assembling the cue holders to the extent any assembly is needed in connection with a particular holder. The first through fifth embodiments require no assembly by the user. The sixth and seventh embodiments involve assembly of the fold sections 533 and 633 as indicated and described above.

Such can include folding a folded portion of the cue holder to reconfigure the cue holder for engaging furniture. Such assembly can also include forming a lateral stabilizer upon the cue holder, such as by folding and forming lateral stabilizers 562 and 662.

Methods according to the invention can also include preparing the cue holder for mounting. Such preparing can include removing an adhesive layer cover, such as 42, 142,242,342,442,542 and 642 from the adjacent adhesive layer thereby exposing the adhesive layer, segment, or segments for adhesive contact with supporting furniture or other features of the cue holder.

Methods according to the invention can also include mounting the cue holder upon a supporting piece of furniture. This can include locating a suitable mounting area upon the furniture. Suitable mounting areas are typically along horizontal surfaces near marginal edges so that the pool cues can stand adjacent to the furniture and be supported by the cantilevered rest section. Mounting can further include engaging a cue holder against the piece of furniture. Said engaging is preferably performed such that an engagement portion of the cue holder is engaged against the furniture causing the cue holder to temporarily and adhesively adhere to the furniture.

Mounting of the preferred cue holders should also be accomplished with at least one rest having an open mouth to allow installation and removal of a pool cue from the rest.

Methods according to the invention can also include installing a pool cue within a rest feature included upon the cue holder. This can be done by leaning the pool cue with a portion of the cue being cradled within a rest, such as a rest receptacle. The cue will typically be supported along the stick at the shaft or butt portions.

Methods according to the invention provide improved ease of use of pool cues while allowing the cues to be stored close to a player for security, easy access and reinstallation.

The novel cue holders can also be used as a drinking glass coaster in the typical fashion. This use may or may not prove to be desirable or something which the pool hall or restaurant establishment can control. The possible added use as a coaster may be of advantage with regard to selling and distributing the cue holders with advertising for beer, wine or pop which can be printed upon the obverse face of the cue holders.

Manner of Making The temporary cue holders described herein are preferably made from relatively strong paperboard materials, such as used in producing breakfast cereal boxes and heavier in weight. Alternatively, they can be made from plastics or other suitable materials. Typical thicknesses are in the range of 0.02-0.080 inch (0.5-2 millimeters). The obverse will typically be printed with an ornamental or advertising theme. The paperboard can be printed in the well known manner used in a variety of paperboard manufacturing operations. It may also be desirable in some embodiments to coat the cue holders with a suitable coating to reduce damage from beer, pop or other fluids which may be spilt upon the table or other piece of furniture. This is particularly true in cases where the cue holders are configured and intended to serve the alternative purpose of a drink coaster.

Industrial Applicability The inventions are useful to hold pool cues and as otherwise explained hereinabove.




 
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