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Title:
TRIGGERING ACTIONS BASED ON SHARED VIDEO FOOTAGE FROM AUDIO/VIDEO RECORDING AND COMMUNICATION DEVICES
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/187167
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Systems and methods for communicating in a network using share signals in accordance with various embodiments of the present disclosure are provided. In one embodiment, a method for communicating in a network may include receiving, from a first client device, a share signal including first image data captured by a camera of a first audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device and a command to share the first image data with a network of users; processing the share signal by comparing the first image data to second image data captured by a camera of a second A/V recording and communication device; and generating and transmitting an alert to a second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when comparison of the first image data with the second image data indicates a person of interest is depicted in both the first image data and the second image data.

Inventors:
SIMINOFF, James (16543 Akron Street, Pacific Palisades, CA, 90272, US)
TROUGHTON, Mark (455 Upper Mesa Road, Santa Monica, CA, 90402, US)
ZAVALA, Jeff (278 West Woodbury Road, Altadena, CA, 91001, US)
Application Number:
US2018/025285
Publication Date:
October 11, 2018
Filing Date:
March 29, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
RING INC. (1523 26th Street, Santa Monica, CA, 90404, US)
International Classes:
H04N7/18; G06F17/28; G06K9/00; G08B13/196; G10L25/57; H04N5/77; H04N5/91
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CHONG, Eugene K. (Chong IP Law, 261 E. Colorado Blvd. Suite 20, Pasadena CA, 91101, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:

1. A method for communicating in a network, the method comprising:

receiving, from a first client device, a share signal that includes a first description of a perpetrator and a command to share the share signal with a network of users;

processing the share signal, wherein the processing of the share signal includes determining whether a match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and a second description of a perpetrator received from at least one second device in network communication with a backend device; and

determining and executing at least one further action when the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator.

2. The method of Claim 1, wherein the share signal is received at the backend device in network communication with the first client device.

3. The method of Claim 2, wherein the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

4. The method of Claim 3, wherein the second description of the perpetrator is stored in a database in network communication with the backend device.

5. The method of Claim 1, wherein the share signal includes first audio data that provides the first description of the perpetrator.

6. The method of Claim 5, wherein the first audio data is captured by a microphone of a first audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device associated with the first client device.

7. The method of Claim 6, wherein the second description of the perpetrator includes second audio data captured by a microphone of the at least one second device in network communication with the backend device.

8. The method of Claim 7, wherein processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by comparing the first audio data to the second audio data.

9. The method of Claim 8, wherein the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

10. The method of Claim 8, wherein the comparing of the first audio data with the second audio data is performed by comparing a spectrogram of the first audio data with a spectrogram of the second audio data.

11. The method of Claim 1, wherein the share signal includes first text data that provides the first description of the perpetrator.

12. The method of Claim 11, wherein the first text data is textual information provided by a first user associated with the first client device.

13. The method of Claim 12, wherein the second description of the perpetrator includes second text data that is textual information generated by the backend device.

14. The method of Claim 12, wherein the second description of the perpetrator includes second text data that is textual information provided by a second user associated with the at least one second device.

15. The method of Claim 14, wherein the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by comparing the first text data to the second text data.

16. The method of Claim 15, wherein the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

17. The method of Claim 14, wherein the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by performing natural language processing on the first text data to extract the first description of the perpetrator and comparing the extracted first description of the perpetrator to the second text data.

18. The method of Claim 17, wherein the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

19. The method of Claim 1, wherein the share signal includes first text data and first audio data, wherein the first text data and the first audio data provide the first description of the perpetrator.

20. The method of Claim 19, wherein the first text data is textual information provided by a first user associated with the first client device and the first audio data is captured by a microphone of a first audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device associated with the first client device.

21. The method of Claim 20, wherein the second description of the perpetrator includes second text data and second audio data.

22. The method of Claim 21, wherein the second text data is textual information provided by a second user associated with the at least one second device and the second audio data is captured by a microphone of the at least one second device in network communication with the backend device.

23. The method of Claim 22, wherein the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by comparing the first text data to the second text data and the first audio data to the second audio data.

24. The method of Claim 23, wherein the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

25. The method of Claim 1, wherein the share signal includes first image data that provides the first description of the perpetrator.

26. The method of claim 25, wherein the first image data is captured by a camera of the first client device.

27. The method of claim 25, wherein the first image data is captured by a camera of an audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device associated with the first device.

28. The method of Claim 25, wherein the second description of the perpetrator includes second image data.

29. The method of claim 28, wherein the second image data is captured by a camera of the at least one second device in network communication with the backend device.

30. The method of Claim 29, wherein the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by comparing the first image data with the second image data.

31. The method of Claim 30, wherein the comparing the first image data with the second image data is performed using computer vision.

32. The method of Claim 30, wherein the comparing the first image data with the second image data is performed using facial recognition.

33. The method of Claim 1, wherein the at least one further action includes notifying a first user associated with the first client device of the match between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator.

34. The method of Claim 33, wherein the at least one further action includes notifying the first user associated with the first client device of an approximate location where the second description of the perpetrator was captured.

35. The method of Claim 1, wherein the at least one further action includes notifying a second user associated with the at least one second device of the match between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator.

36. The method of Claim 35, wherein the at least one further action includes notifying the second user associated with the at least one second device of an approximate location where the first description of the perpetrator was captured.

37. The method of Claim 1, wherein the at least one further action includes notifying a law enforcement agency by forwarding the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator.

38. The method of Claim 37, wherein the notification to the law enforcement agency includes approximate locations where the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator, respectively, were captured.

39. The method of Claim 1, wherein the at least one further action includes transmitting at least one alert to at least one additional A/V recording and communication device located within a pre-determined radius of a location where the first description of the perpetrator was captured.

40. The method of Claim 39, wherein the at least one alert includes sounds or messages that may be broadcast from at least one speaker of the at least one additional A/V recording and communication device.

41. The method of Claim 1, wherein the further action includes identifying at least one additional A/V recording and communication device in proximity to the location where the first description of the perpetrator was captured and triggering the at least one identified A/V recording and communication device to record additional image data and/or audio data.

42. The method of Claim 1, wherein the share signal includes image data and/or audio data that is received from the first client device in real-time or near real-time.

Description:
TRIGGERING ACTIONS BASED ON SHARED VIDEO FOOTAGE FROM

AUDIO/VIDEO RECORDING AND COMMUNICATION DEVICES

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a PCT international application claiming priority to U.S. application Serial No. 15/480,214, filed on April 5, 2017, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Serial No. 15/431,607, filed on February 13, 2017, and U.S. application Serial No.

15/431,275, filed on February 13, 2017, each of which claims priority to provisional application

Serial No. 62/376,826, filed on August 18, 2016, and provisional application Serial No.

62/300,547, filed on February 26, 2016. The entire contents of the priority applications are hereby incorporated by reference as if fully set forth.

Technical Field

[0002] The present embodiments relate to audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices, including A/V recording and communication doorbell systems. In particular, the present embodiments improve the functionality of A/V recording and communication devices by facilitating easy sharing of video footage recorded by such devices. Background

[0003] Home safety is a concern for many homeowners and renters. Those seeking to protect or monitor their homes often wish to have video and audio communications with visitors, for example, those visiting an external door or entryway. Audio/Video (A/V) recording and communication devices, such as doorbells, provide this functionality, and can also aid in crime detection and prevention. For example, audio and/or video captured by an A/V recording and communication device can be uploaded to the cloud and recorded on a remote server. Subsequent review of the A/V footage can aid law enforcement in capturing perpetrators of home burglaries and other crimes. Further, the presence of one or more A/V recording and communication devices on the exterior of a home, such as a doorbell unit at the entrance to the home, acts as a powerful deterrent against would-be burglars.

SUMMARY

[0004] The various embodiments of the present apparatus, systems, and methods for sharing video footage from audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices have several features, no single one of which is solely responsible for their desirable attributes. Without limiting the scope of the present embodiments as expressed by the claims that follow, their more prominent features now will be discussed briefly. After considering this discussion, and particularly after reading the section entitled "Detailed Description," one will understand how the features of the present embodiments provide the advantages described herein.

[0005] One aspect of the present embodiments includes the realization that users of audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices may from time to time desire to share video footage recorded by their devices. For example, when an A/V recording and communication device records video footage of suspicious activity, or even criminal activity, a user viewing the footage may desire to alert his or her neighbors to the possible danger posed by the person(s) involved in the suspicious or criminal activity. It would be advantageous, then, to enhance the functionality of A/V recording and communication devices by facilitating easy sharing of video footage recorded by such devices with one's neighbors. In another example, an A/V recording and communication device may record video footage of activity that may be of interest to the user's friends and family (e.g., images of children playing in the yard). It would be advantageous, then, to enhance the functionality of A/V recording and communication devices by facilitating easy sharing of video footage recorded by such devices with one's friends and family. The present embodiments, as described in detail below, provide these, and other, enhancements. In particular, the present embodiments enable video footage captured by A/V recording and communication devices to be readily uploaded to the cloud and shared with anyone of the user's choosing, including neighbors, friends, and family. In addition, the present embodiments improve upon and solve the problem of video footage captured by A/V recording and communication devices being accessible only to the owner of the A/V recording and communication device, which limits the ability of such devices to help stop crime.

[0006] Another aspect of the present embodiments includes the realization that A/V recording and communication devices, such as A/V recording and communication doorbells, are very well adapted for capturing audio and/or video of criminal activity, but not every person owns such a device. Further, many people who do not own such devices do own other types of devices, including client devices such as smartphones, that are equipped with cameras and microphones and are also capable of capturing audio and/or video of criminal activity. It would be advantageous, then, to provide a network that facilitated the sharing of audio and/or video of criminal activity regardless of what type of device captured the audio and/or video. It would be even more advantageous if such a network enabled communication between users who own A/V recording and communication devices, such as A/V recording and communication doorbells, and users who do not own such devices. And it would be still more advantageous if such a network facilitated the identification of persons engaged in criminal activity. The present embodiments provide such a network.

[0007] Another aspect of the present embodiments includes the realization that sometimes criminal activity is witnessed by one or more persons, but no contemporaneous video or audio of the event is captured. It would be advantageous, then, to provide a network that facilitated the sharing of information about criminal activity even when no audio or video of the criminal activity is available to share on the network. For example, if an eyewitness were able to upload information about criminal activity to the network in the form of a text message or a voice message sent from a client device, such as a smartphone, the shared information might lead to identification of the criminal perpetrator(s). For example, other users in the network might have additional information about the criminal activity and/or perpetrator(s), and the cumulative information shared by various users might help law enforcement to identify the perpetrator(s). In another example, the network may be capable of processing the shared information, whether in the form of text and/or voice, and identifying the perpetrator(s) by reference to other information accessible by the network. For example, a user may share a textual description of a perpetrator (e.g., height, weight, hair color, clothing, etc.), and the network may perform natural language processing on the shared text, and then compare the description of the perpetrator to information stored in one or more databases accessible to the network. If a match is found, the network may transmit that information, such as a picture of the person from the database, to the user who shared the text description of the perpetrator. If the user confirms that the picture from the network is the same person that the user witnessed engaged in criminal activity, then the user and/or the network can share that picture with law enforcement, who can then use the picture to apprehend the perpetrator. The present embodiments provide these advantages, as described below.

[0008] Another aspect of the present embodiments includes the realization that A/V recording and communication devices could be enhanced by processing a user share signal to identify events, persons, and/or objects of interest to trigger one or more further actions. For example, a user may share a signal to a network that includes first image data, first audio data, and/or text data, where the network may include backend devices. In some embodiments, share signals include image data, audio data, and/or text data from various third party clients and client devices. In many embodiments, the backend devices may be configured to process the share signal to identify events such as (but not limited to) suspicious and/or criminal activity and to identify a person and/or an object of interest. Further, the backend devices may be configured to process additional image data and/or audio data captured by various second A/V recording and communication devices and third party devices for a match of the person and/or object of interest. Once a match is found, the backend devices may trigger one or more further actions such as (but not limited to) sounding warning messages from A/V recording and communication devices, causing A/V recording and communication devices to capture additional image and/or audio data, and/or to send reports of the activity to client devices and/or law enforcement. The present embodiments thus advantageously enable advanced monitoring and reduction in crime within a network of users and various third parties.

[0009] In a first aspect, a method is provided for communicating in a network, the method comprising receiving, from a first client device, a share signal including first image data captured by a camera of a first audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device associated with the first client device, the share signal including a command to share the first image data with a network of users; processing the share signal, wherein the processing of the share signal includes comparing the first image data to second image data captured by a camera of a second A/V recording and communication device in network communication with the backend device; and generating an alert and transmitting the alert to a second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when the comparison of the first image data with the second image data indicates a person of interest is depicted in both the first image data and the second image data.

[0010] In an embodiment of the first aspect, the share signal is received at a backend device in network communication with the first client device.

[0011] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0012] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the processing of the share signal further includes identifying an event depicted in the first image data using the share signal. [0013] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the method further comprises processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the event depicted in the first image data meets at least one event criteria.

[0014] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the share signal further includes first audio data captured by a microphone of the first A/V recording and communication device associated with the first client device.

[0015] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the method further comprises processing the share signal, wherein the processing of the share signal further includes comparing the first audio data to second audio data captured by a microphone of the second A/V recording and communication device in network communication with the backend device.

[0016] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0017] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the method further comprises generating the alert and transmitting the alert to the second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when the comparison of the first audio data with the second audio data indicates the person of interest is depicted in both the first audio data and the second audio data.

[0018] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the share signal further includes text data that describes the first image data.

[0019] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the method further comprises processing the share signal, wherein the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the text data indicates that the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria.

[0020] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0021] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the method further comprises generating the alert and transmitting the alert to the second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when processing of the text data determines that the text data indicates that the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria. [0022] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the method further comprises processing the share signal, wherein the processing of the share signal further includes performing natural language processing on the text data to determine whether the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria.

[0023] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0024] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the method further comprises generating the alert and transmitting the alert to the second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when processing of the text data determines that the text data indicates that the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria.

[0025] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the at least one event criteria comprises an indication of a criminal act.

[0026] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the backend device comprises a server.

[0027] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the alert comprises information indicating that the person of interest was reported by another user in the network of users.

[0028] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the alert further comprises information indicating an approximate location where the first image data was captured.

[0029] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the method further comprises generating a report signal and transmitting the report signal to a law enforcement agency when the processing of the share signal determines that the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria, and when the comparison of the first image data with the second image data indicates a person of interest is depicted in both the first image data and the second image data.

[0030] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the report signal comprises information indicating an approximate location where the first image data was captured.

[0031] In another embodiment of the first aspect, the report signal comprises information indicating an approximate location where the second image data was captured.

[0032] In a second aspect, a backend server is provided for audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices, the server comprising a network interface; and a processing module operatively connected to the network interface, wherein the processing module is in network communication with a first client device associated with a first A/V recording and communication device configured to capture first image data and a second client device associated with a second A/V recording and communication device configured to capture second image data, the processing module comprising a processor; and a server application, wherein the server application configures the processor to receive, from the first client device, a share signal including first image data captured by a camera of the first A/V recording and communication device associated with the first client device, the share signal including a command to share the first image data with a network of users; process the share signal by comparing the first image data to second image data captured by a camera of the second A/V recording and communication device; and generate an alert and transmit the alert to the second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when the comparison of the first image data with the second image data indicates a person of interest is depicted in both the first image data and the second image data.

[0033] In an embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to process the share signal by identifying an event depicted in the first image data using the share signal.

[0034] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to process the share signal by determining whether the event depicted in the first image data meets at least one event criteria.

[0035] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the share signal further includes first audio data captured by a microphone of the first A/V recording and communication device associated with the first client device.

[0036] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to process the share signal by comparing the first audio data to second audio data captured by a microphone of the second A/V recording and communication device in network communication with the backend device.

[0037] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to generate the alert and transmit the alert to the second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when the comparison of the first audio data with the second audio data indicates the person of interest is depicted in both the first audio data and the second audio data. [0038] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the share signal further includes text data that describes the first image data.

[0039] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to process the share signal by determining whether the text data indicates that the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria.

[0040] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to generate the alert and transmit the alert to the second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when processing of the text data determines that the text data indicates that the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria.

[0041] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to process the share signal by performing natural language processing on the text data to determine whether the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria.

[0042] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to generate the alert and transmit the alert to the second client device associated with the second A/V recording and communication device when processing of the text data determines that the text data indicates that the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria.

[0043] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the at least one event criteria comprises an indication of a criminal act.

[0044] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the alert comprises information indicating that the person of interest was reported by another user in the network of users.

[0045] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the alert further comprises information indicating an approximate location where the first image data was captured.

[0046] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the server application further configures the processor to generate a report signal and transmit the report signal to a law enforcement agency when the processing of the share signal determines that the event depicted in the first image data meets the at least one event criteria, and when the comparison of the first image data with the second image data indicates a person of interest is depicted in both the first image data and the second image data. [0047] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the report signal comprises information indicating an approximate location where the first image data was captured.

[0048] In another embodiment of the second aspect, the report signal comprises information indicating an approximate location where the second image data was captured.

[0049] In a third aspect, a method is provided for communicating in a network, the method comprising receiving, from a first client device, a share signal that includes a first description of a perpetrator and a command to share the share signal with a network of users; processing the share signal, wherein the processing of the share signal includes determining whether a match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and a second description of a perpetrator received from at least one second device in network communication with a backend device; and determining and executing at least one further action when the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator.

[0050] In an embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal is received at the backend device in network communication with the first client device.

[0051] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0052] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the second description of the perpetrator is stored in a database in network communication with the backend device.

[0053] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal includes first audio data that provides the first description of the perpetrator.

[0054] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the first audio data is captured by a microphone of a first audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device associated with the first client device.

[0055] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the second description of the perpetrator includes second audio data captured by a microphone of the at least one second device in network communication with the backend device.

[0056] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by comparing the first audio data to the second audio data. [0057] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0058] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the comparing of the first audio data with the second audio data is performed by comparing a spectrogram of the first audio data with a spectrogram of the second audio data.

[0059] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal includes first text data that provides the first description of the perpetrator.

[0060] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the first text data is textual information provided by a first user associated with the first client device.

[0061] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the second description of the perpetrator includes second text data that is textual information generated by the backend device.

[0062] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the second description of the perpetrator includes second text data that is textual information provided by a second user associated with the at least one second device.

[0063] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by comparing the first text data to the second text data.

[0064] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0065] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by performing natural language processing on the first text data to extract the first description of the perpetrator and comparing the extracted first description of the perpetrator to the second text data.

[0066] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0067] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal includes first text data and first audio data, wherein the first text data and the first audio data provide the first description of the perpetrator. [0068] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the first text data is textual information provided by a first user associated with the first client device and the first audio data is captured by a microphone of a first audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device associated with the first client device.

[0069] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the second description of the perpetrator includes second text data and second audio data.

[0070] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the second text data is textual information provided by a second user associated with the at least one second device and the second audio data is captured by a microphone of the at least one second device in network communication with the backend device.

[0071] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by comparing the first text data to the second text data and the first audio data to the second audio data.

[0072] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal is processed by a processing module of the backend device.

[0073] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal includes first image data that provides the first description of the perpetrator.

[0074] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the first image data is captured by a camera of the first client device.

[0075] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the first image data is captured by a camera of an audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device associated with the first device.

[0076] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the second description of the perpetrator includes second image data.

[0077] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the second image data is captured by a camera of the at least one second device in network communication with the backend device.

[0078] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the processing of the share signal further includes determining whether the match is found between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator by comparing the first image data with the second image data. [0079] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the comparing the first image data with the second image data is performed using computer vision.

[0080] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the comparing the first image data with the second image data is performed using facial recognition.

[0081] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the at least one further action includes notifying a first user associated with the first client device of the match between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator.

[0082] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the at least one further action includes notifying the first user associated with the first client device of an approximate location where the second description of the perpetrator was captured.

[0083] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the at least one further action includes notifying a second user associated with the at least one second device of the match between the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator.

[0084] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the at least one further action includes notifying the second user associated with the at least one second device of an approximate location where the first description of the perpetrator was captured.

[0085] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the at least one further action includes notifying a law enforcement agency by forwarding the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator.

[0086] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the notification to the law enforcement agency includes approximate locations where the first description of the perpetrator in the share signal and the second description of the perpetrator, respectively, were captured.

[0087] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the at least one further action includes transmitting at least one alert to at least one additional A/V recording and communication device located within a pre-determined radius of a location where the first description of the perpetrator was captured.

[0088] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the at least one alert includes sounds or messages that may be broadcast from at least one speaker of the at least one additional A/V recording and communication device. [0089] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the further action includes identifying at least one additional A/V recording and communication device in proximity to the location where the first description of the perpetrator was captured and triggering the at least one identified A/V recording and communication device to record additional image data and/or audio data.

[0090] In another embodiment of the third aspect, the share signal includes image data and/or audio data that is received from the first client device in real-time or near real-time.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0091] The various embodiments of the present apparatus, systems, and methods for sharing video footage from audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices now will be discussed in detail with an emphasis on highlighting the advantageous features. These embodiments depict the novel and non-obvious apparatus, systems, and methods for sharing and processing video footage from A/V recording and communication devices shown in the accompanying drawings, which are for illustrative purposes only. These drawings include the following figures, in which like numerals indicate like parts:

[0092] Figure 1 is a functional block diagram illustrating a system for streaming and storing A/V content captured by an audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device according to the present embodiments;

[0093] Figure 2 is a front view of an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[0094] Figure 3 is a rear view of the A/V recording and communication doorbell of Figure 2;

[0095] Figure 4 is a left side view of the A/V recording and communication doorbell of Figure 2 attached to a mounting bracket according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[0096] Figure 5 is cross-sectional right side view of the A/V recording and communication doorbell of Figure 2;

[0097] Figure 6 is an exploded view of the A/V recording and communication doorbell and the mounting bracket of Figure 4;

[0098] Figure 7 is a rear view of the mounting bracket of Figure 4; [0099] Figures 8A and 8B are top and bottom views, respectively, of the A/V recording and communication doorbell and the mounting bracket of Figure 4;

[00100] Figures 9A and 9B are top and front views, respectively, of a passive infrared sensor holder of the A/V recording and communication doorbell of Figure 2;

[00101] Figures 10A and 10B are top and front views, respectively, of a passive infrared sensor holder assembly of the A/V recording and communication doorbell of Figure 2;

[00102] Figure 11 is a top view of the passive infrared sensor assembly of Figure 10A and a field of view thereof according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00103] Figure 12 is a functional block diagram of the components of the A/V recording and communication doorbell of Figure 2;

[00104] Figure 13 is a flowchart illustrating a process for a A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00105] Figure 14 is a flowchart illustrating another process for a A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00106] Figure 15 is a flowchart illustrating another process for a A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00107] Figure 16 is a functional block diagram illustrating a system for sharing video footage from audio/video recording and communication devices according to the present embodiments;

[00108] Figure 17 is a top plan view of a neighborhood with a plurality of A/V recording and communication doorbells according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00109] Figure 18 is a sequence diagram illustrating a process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00110] Figure 19 is a flowchart illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00111] Figures 20-24 are screenshots of a graphical user interface (GUI) illustrating aspects of a process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication device according to an aspect of the present disclosure; [00112] Figures 25-29 are screenshots of a graphical user interface (GUI) illustrating aspects of another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication device according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00113] Figure 30 is a sequence diagram illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00114] Figure 31 is a flowchart illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00115] Figures 32-37 are screenshots of a graphical user interface (GUI) illustrating aspects of another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication device according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00116] Figure 38 is a sequence diagram illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00117] Figure 39 is a flowchart illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00118] Figure 40 is a flowchart illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00119] Figure 41 is a sequence diagram illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00120] Figure 42 is a flowchart illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00121] Figure 43 is a functional block diagram illustrating a system for sharing video footage from A/V recording and communication devices according to the present embodiments;

[00122] Figure 44 is a functional block diagram of a client device on which the present embodiments may be implemented according to various aspects of the present disclosure; [00123] Figure 45 is a functional block diagram of a general-purpose computing system on which the present embodiments may be implemented according to various aspects of present disclosure;

[00124] Figure 46 is a screenshot of a graphical user interface (GUI) illustrating aspects of another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication device according to an aspect of the present disclosure;

[00125] Figure 47 is a functional block diagram illustrating a system for communicating in a network according to various aspects of the present disclosure;

[00126] Figure 48 is a functional block diagram illustrating one embodiment of a first A/V recording and communication device according to various aspects of the present disclosure;

[00127] Figure 49 is a functional block diagram illustrating one embodiment of a second A/V recording and communication device according to various aspects of the present disclosure;

[00128] Figure 50 is a functional block diagram illustrating one embodiment of a backend device according to various aspects of the present disclosure;

[00129] Figure 51 is a flowchart illustrating an embodiment of a process for triggering an action using a share signal according to various aspects of the present disclosure;

[00130] Figure 52 is a flowchart illustrating an embodiment of a process for processing a share signal for further action according to various aspects of the present disclosure;

[00131] Figures 53 and 54 are sequence diagrams illustrating embodiments of processes for triggering an action using a share signal according to various aspects of the present disclosure;

[00132] Figure 55 is a flowchart illustrating another embodiment of a process for triggering an action using a share signal according to various aspects of the present disclosure; and

[00133] Figure 56 is a functional block diagram illustrating a system for communicating in a network using various devices according to various aspects of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[00134] The following detailed description describes the present embodiments with reference to the drawings. In the drawings, reference numbers label elements of the present embodiments. These reference numbers are reproduced below in connection with the discussion of the corresponding drawing features.

[00135] The embodiments of the present apparatus, systems, and methods for sharing video footage from audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices are described below with reference to the figures. These figures, and their written descriptions, indicate that certain components of the apparatus are formed integrally, and certain other components are formed as separate pieces. Those of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that components shown and described herein as being formed integrally may in alternative embodiments be formed as separate pieces. Those of ordinary skill in the art will further appreciate that components shown and described herein as being formed as separate pieces may in alternative embodiments be formed integrally. Further, as used herein the term integral describes a single unitary piece.

[00136] With reference to Figure 1, the present embodiments include an audio/video (A/V) recording and communication device, such as a doorbell 100. While the present disclosure provides numerous examples of methods and systems including A/V recording and communication doorbells, the present embodiments are equally applicable for A/V recording and communication devices other than doorbells. For example, the present embodiments may include one or more A/V recording and communication security cameras instead of, or in addition to, one or more A/V recording and communication doorbells. An example A/V recording and communication security camera may include substantially all of the structure and functionality of the doorbells described herein, but without the front button and related components.

[00137] The A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 may be located near the entrance to a structure (not shown), such as a dwelling, a business, a storage facility, etc. The A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 includes a camera 102, a microphone 104, and a speaker 106. The camera 102 may comprise, for example, a high definition (FDD) video camera, such as one capable of capturing video images at an image display resolution of 720p or better. While not shown, the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 may also include other hardware and/or components, such as a housing, one or more motion sensors (and/or other types of sensors), a button, etc. The A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 may further include similar componentry and/or functionality as the wireless communication doorbells described in US Patent Application Publication Nos. 2015/0022620 (Application Serial No. 14/499,828) and 2015/0022618 (Application Serial No. 14/334,922), both of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties as if fully set forth.

[00138] With further reference to Figure 1, the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 communicates with a user's network 110, which may be for example a wired and/or wireless network. If the user's network 110 is wireless, or includes a wireless component, the network 110 may be a Wi-Fi network compatible with the IEEE 802.11 standard and/or other wireless communication standard(s). The user's network 110 is connected to another network 112, which may comprise, for example, the Internet and/or a public switched telephone network (PSTN). As described below, the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 may communicate with the user's client device 114 via the user's network 110 and the network 112 (Internet/PSTN). The user's client device 114 may comprise, for example, a mobile telephone (may also be referred to as a cellular telephone), such as a smartphone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), or another communication and/or computing device. The user's client device 114 comprises a display (not shown) and related components capable of displaying streaming and/or recorded video images. The user's client device 114 may also comprise a speaker and related components capable of broadcasting streaming and/or recorded audio, and may also comprise a microphone. The A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 may also communicate with one or more remote storage device(s) 116 (may be referred to interchangeably as "cloud storage device(s)"), one or more servers 118, and/or a backend API (application programming interface) 120 via the user's network 1 10 and the network 112 (Internet/PSTN). While Figure 1 illustrates the storage device 116, the server 118, and the backend API 120 as components separate from the network 112, it is to be understood that the storage device 116, the server 118, and/or the backend API 120 may be considered to be components of the network 112.

[00139] The network 112 may be any wireless network or any wired network, or a combination thereof, configured to operatively couple the above-mentioned modules, devices, and systems as shown in Figure 1. For example, the network 112 may include one or more of the following: a PSTN (public switched telephone network), the Internet, a local intranet, a PAN (Personal Area Network), a LAN (Local Area Network), a WAN (Wide Area Network), a MAN (Metropolitan Area Network), a virtual private network (VPN), a storage area network (SAN), a frame relay connection, an Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) connection, a synchronous optical network (SONET) connection, a digital Tl, T3, El or E3 line, a Digital Data Service (DDS) connection, a DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) connection, an Ethernet connection, an ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) line, a dial-up port such as a V.90, V.34, or V.34bis analog modem connection, a cable modem, an ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) connection, or an FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface) or CDDI (Copper Distributed Data Interface) connection. Furthermore, communications may also include links to any of a variety of wireless networks, including WAP (Wireless Application Protocol), GPRS (General Packet Radio Service), GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication), CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access), TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access), FDMA (Frequency Division Multiple Access), and/or OFDMA (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access) cellular phone networks, GPS, CDPD (cellular digital packet data), RIM (Research in Motion, Limited) duplex paging network, Bluetooth radio, or an IEEE 802.11 -based radio frequency network. The network can further include or interface with any one or more of the following: RS-232 serial connection, IEEE- 1394 (Firewire) connection, Fibre Channel connection, IrDA (infrared) port, SCSI (Small Computer Systems Interface) connection, USB (Universal Serial Bus) connection, or other wired or wireless, digital or analog, interface or connection, mesh or Digi ® networking.

[00140] According to one or more aspects of the present embodiments, when a person (may be referred to interchangeably as "visitor") arrives at the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100, the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 detects the visitor's presence and begins capturing video images within a field of view of the camera 102. The A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 may also capture audio through the microphone 104. The A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 may detect the visitor's presence using a motion sensor, and/or by detecting that the visitor has depressed the button on the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100.

[00141] In response to the detection of the visitor, the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 sends an alert to the user's client device 114 (Figure 1) via the user's network 110 and the network 112. The A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 also sends streaming video, and may also send streaming audio, to the user's client device 114. If the user answers the alert, two-way audio communication may then occur between the visitor and the user through the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 and the user's client device 114. The user may view the visitor throughout the duration of the call, but the visitor cannot see the user (unless the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 includes a display, which it may in some embodiments).

[00142] The video images captured by the camera 102 of the A/V recording and communication doorbell 100 (and the audio captured by the microphone 104) may be uploaded to the cloud and recorded on the remote storage device 116 (Figure 1). In some embodiments, the video and/or audio may be recorded on the remote storage device 116 even if the user chooses to ignore the alert sent to his or her client device 114.

[00143] With further reference to Figure 1, the system may further comprise a backend API 120 including one or more components. As discussed in further detail below, a backend API (application programming interface) may comprise, for example, a server (e.g. a real server, or a virtual machine, or a machine running in a cloud infrastructure as a service), or multiple servers networked together, exposing at least one API to client(s) accessing it.

[00144] Figures 2-4 illustrate an audio/video (A/V) communication doorbell 130 according to an aspect of present embodiments. Figure 2 is a front view, Figure 3 is a rear view, and Figure 4 is a left side view of the doorbell 130 coupled with a mounting bracket 137. The doorbell 130 includes a faceplate 135 mounted to a back plate 139 (Figure 3). With reference to Figure 4, the faceplate 135 has a substantially flat profile. The faceplate 135 may comprise any suitable material, including, without limitation, metals, such as brushed aluminum or stainless steel, metal alloys, or plastics. The faceplate 135 protects the internal contents of the doorbell 130 and serves as an exterior front surface of the doorbell 130.

[00145] With reference to Figure 2, the faceplate 135 includes a button 133 and a light pipe 136. The button 133 and the light pipe 136 may have various profiles that may or may not match the profile of the faceplate 135. The light pipe 136 may comprise any suitable material, including, without limitation, transparent plastic, that is capable of allowing light produced within the doorbell 130 to pass through. The light may be produced by one or more light- emitting components, such as light-emitting diodes (LED's), contained within the doorbell 130, as further described below. The button 133 may make contact with a button actuator (not shown) located within the doorbell 130 when the button 133 is pressed by a visitor. When pressed, the button 133 may trigger one or more functions of the doorbell 130, as further described below. [00146] With reference to Figures 2 and 4, the doorbell 130 further includes an enclosure 131 that engages the faceplate 135. In the illustrated embodiment, the enclosure 131 abuts an upper edge 135T (Figure 2) of the faceplate 135, but in alternative embodiments one or more gaps between the enclosure 131 and the faceplate 135 may facilitate the passage of sound and/or light through the doorbell 130. The enclosure 131 may comprise any suitable material, but in some embodiments the material of the enclosure 131 preferably permits infrared light to pass through from inside the doorbell 130 to the environment and vice versa. The doorbell 130 further includes a lens 132. In some embodiments, the lens may comprise a Fresnel lens, which may be patterned to deflect incoming light into one or more infrared sensors located within the doorbell 130. The doorbell 130 further includes a camera 134, which captures video data when activated, as described below.

[00147] Figure 3 is a rear view of the doorbell 130, according to an aspect of the present embodiments. As illustrated, the enclosure 131 may extend from the front of the doorbell 130 around to the back thereof and may fit snugly around a lip of the back plate 139. The back plate 139 may comprise any suitable material, including, without limitation, metals, such as brushed aluminum or stainless steel, metal alloys, or plastics. The back plate 139 protects the internal contents of the doorbell 130 and serves as an exterior rear surface of the doorbell 130. The faceplate 135 may extend from the front of the doorbell 130 and at least partially wrap around the back plate 139, thereby allowing a coupled connection between the faceplate 135 and the back plate 139. The back plate 139 may have indentations in its structure to facilitate the coupling.

[00148] With further reference to Figure 3, spring contacts 140 may provide power to the doorbell 130 when mated with other conductive contacts connected to a power source. The spring contacts 140 may comprise any suitable conductive material, including, without limitation, copper, and may be capable of deflecting when contacted by an inward force, for example the insertion of a mating element. The doorbell 130 further comprises a connector 160, such as a micro-USB or other connector, whereby power and/or data may be supplied to and from the components within the doorbell 130. A reset button 159 may be located on the back plate 139, and may make contact with a button actuator (not shown) located within the doorbell 130 when the reset button 159 is pressed. When the reset button 159 is pressed, it may trigger one or more functions, as described below. [00149] Figure 4 is a left side profile view of the doorbell 130 coupled to the mounting bracket 137, according to an aspect of the present embodiments. The mounting bracket 137 facilitates mounting the doorbell 130 to a surface, such as the exterior of a building, such as a home or office. As illustrated in Figure 4, the faceplate 135 may extend from the bottom of the doorbell 130 up to just below the camera 134, and connect to the back plate 139 as described above. The lens 132 may extend and curl partially around the side of the doorbell 130. The enclosure 131 may extend and curl around the side and top of the doorbell 130, and may be coupled to the back plate 139 as described above. The camera 134 may protrude slightly through the enclosure 131, thereby giving it a wider field of view. The mounting bracket 137 may couple with the back plate 139 such that they contact each other at various points in a common plane of contact, thereby creating an assembly including the doorbell 130 and the mounting bracket 137. The couplings described in this paragraph, and elsewhere, may be secured by, for example and without limitation, screws, interference fittings, adhesives, or other fasteners. Interference fittings may refer to a type of connection where a material relies on pressure and/or gravity coupled with the material's physical strength to support a connection to a different element.

[00150] Figure 5 is a right side cross-sectional view of the doorbell 130 without the mounting bracket 137. In the illustrated embodiment, the lens 132 is substantially coplanar with the front surface 13 IF of the enclosure 131. In alternative embodiments, the lens 132 may be recessed within the enclosure 131 or may protrude outward from the enclosure 131. The camera 134 is coupled to a camera printed circuit board (PCB) 147, and a lens 134a of the camera 134 protrudes through an opening in the enclosure 131. The camera lens 134a may be a lens capable of focusing light into the camera 134 so that clear images may be taken.

[00151] The camera PCB 147 may be secured within the doorbell with any suitable fasteners, such as screws, or interference connections, adhesives, etc. The camera PCB 147 comprises various components that enable the functionality of the camera 134 of the doorbell 130, as described below. Infrared light-emitting components, such as infrared LED's 168, are coupled to the camera PCB 147 and may be triggered to activate when a light sensor detects a low level of ambient light. When activated, the infrared LED's 168 may emit infrared light through the enclosure 131 and/or the camera 134 out into the ambient environment. The camera 134, which may be configured to detect infrared light, may then capture the light emitted by the infrared LED's 168 as it reflects off objects within the camera's 134 field of view, so that the doorbell 130 can clearly capture images at night (may be referred to as "night vision").

[00152] With continued reference to Figure 5, the doorbell 130 further comprises a front PCB 146, which in the illustrated embodiment resides in a lower portion of the doorbell 130 adjacent a battery 166. The front PCB 146 may be secured within the doorbell 130 with any suitable fasteners, such as screws, or interference connections, adhesives, etc. The front PCB 146 comprises various components that enable the functionality of the audio and light components, as further described below. The battery 166 may provide power to the doorbell 130 components while receiving power from the spring contacts 140, thereby engaging in a trickle- charge method of power consumption and supply. Alternatively, the doorbell 130 may draw power directly from the spring contacts 140 while relying on the battery 166 only when the spring contacts 140 are not providing the power necessary for all functions.

[00153] With continued reference to Figure 5, the doorbell 130 further comprises a power PCB 148, which in the illustrated embodiment resides behind the camera PCB 147. The power PCB 148 may be secured within the doorbell 130 with any suitable fasteners, such as screws, or interference connections, adhesives, etc. The power PCB 148 comprises various components that enable the functionality of the power and device-control components, as further described below.

[00154] With continued reference to Figure 5, the doorbell 130 further comprises a communication module 164 coupled to the power PCB 148. The communication module 164 facilitates communication with client devices in one or more remote locations, as further described below. The connector 160 may protrude outward from the power PCB 148 and extend through a hole in the back plate 139. The doorbell 130 further comprises passive infrared (PIR) sensors 144, which are secured on or within a PIR sensor holder 143, and the assembly resides behind the lens 132. The PIR sensor holder 143 may be secured to the doorbell 130 with any suitable fasteners, such as screws, or interference connections, adhesives, etc. The PIR sensors 144 may be any type of sensor capable of detecting and communicating the presence of a heat source within their field of view. Further, alternative embodiments may comprise one or more motion sensors either in place of or in addition to the PIR sensors 144. The motion sensors may be configured to detect motion using any methodology, such as a methodology that does not rely on detecting the presence of a heat source within a field of view. [00155] Figure 6 is an exploded view of the doorbell 130 and the mounting bracket 137 according to an aspect of the present embodiments. The mounting bracket 137 is configured to be mounted to a mounting surface (not shown) of a structure, such as a home or an office. Figure 6 shows the front side 137F of the mounting bracket 137. The mounting bracket 137 is configured to be mounted to the mounting surface such that the back side 137B thereof faces the mounting surface. In certain embodiments, the mounting bracket 137 may be mounted to surfaces of various composition, including, without limitation, wood, concrete, stucco, brick, vinyl siding, aluminum siding, etc., with any suitable fasteners, such as screws, or interference connections, adhesives, etc. The doorbell 130 may be coupled to the mounting bracket 137 with any suitable fasteners, such as screws, or interference connections, adhesives, etc.

[00156] With continued reference to Figure 6, the illustrated embodiment of the mounting bracket 137 includes the terminal screws 138. The terminal screws 138 are configured to receive electrical wires adjacent the mounting surface of the structure upon which the mounting bracket 137 is mounted, so that the doorbell 130 may receive electrical power from the structure's electrical system. The terminal screws 138 are electrically connected to electrical contacts 177 of the mounting bracket. If power is supplied to the terminal screws 138, then the electrical contacts 177 also receive power through the terminal screws 138. The electrical contacts 177 may comprise any suitable conductive material, including, without limitation, copper, and may protrude slightly from the face of the mounting bracket 137 so that they may mate with the spring contacts 140 located on the back plate 139.

[00157] With reference to Figures 6 and 7 (which is a rear view of the mounting bracket 137), the mounting bracket 137 further comprises a bracket PCB 149. With reference to Figure 7, the bracket PCB 149 is situated outside the doorbell 130, and is therefore configured for various sensors that measure ambient conditions, such as an accelerometer 150, a barometer 151, a humidity sensor 152, and a temperature sensor 153. The functions of these components are discussed in more detail below. The bracket PCB 149 may be secured to the mounting bracket 137 with any suitable fasteners, such as screws, or interference connections, adhesives, etc.

[00158] Figures 8A and 8B are top and bottom views, respectively, of the doorbell 130. As described above, the enclosure 131 may extend from the front face 13 IF of the doorbell 130 to the back, where it contacts and snugly surrounds the back plate 139. The camera 134 may protrude slightly beyond the front face 13 IF of the enclosure 131, thereby giving the camera 134 a wider field of view. The mounting bracket 137 may include a substantially flat rear surface 137R, such that the doorbell 130 and the mounting bracket 137 assembly may sit flush against the surface to which they are mounted. With reference to Figure 8B, the lower end of the enclosure 131 may include security screw apertures 141 configured to receive screws or other fasteners.

[00159] Figure 9A is a top view of the PIR sensor holder 143. The PIR sensor holder 143 may comprise any suitable material, including, without limitation, metals, metal alloys, or plastics. The PIR sensor holder 143 is configured to mount the PIR sensors 144 behind the lens 132 such that the PIR sensors 144 face out through the lens 132 at varying angles, thereby creating a wide field of view for the PIR sensors 144, and dividing the field of view into zones, as further described below. With further reference to Figure 9 A, the PIR sensor holder 143 includes one or more faces 178 within or on which the PIR sensors 144 may be mounted. In the illustrated embodiment, the PIR sensor holder 143 includes three faces 178, with each of two outer faces 178 angled at 55° with respect to a center one of the faces 178. In alternative embodiments, the angle formed by adjacent ones of the faces 178 may be increased or decreased as desired to alter the field of view of the PIR sensors 144.

[00160] Figure 9B is a front view of the PIR sensor holder 143. In the illustrated embodiment, each of the faces 178 includes a through hole 180 in which the PIR sensors 144 may be mounted. First and second brackets 182, spaced from one another, extend transversely across the PIR sensor holder 143. Each of the brackets 182 includes notches 184 at either end. The brackets 182 may be used to secure the PIR sensor holder 143 within the doorbell 130. In alternative embodiments, the through holes 180 in the faces 178 may be omitted. For example, the PIR sensors 144 may be mounted directly to the faces 178 without the through holes 180. Generally, the faces 178 may be comprise any structure configured to locate and secure the PIR sensors 144 in place.

[00161] Figures 10A and 10B are top and front views, respectively, of a PIR sensor assembly 179, including the PIR sensor holder 143, the lens 132, and a flexible power circuit 145. The PIR sensor holder 143 may be secured to a rear face 132R of the lens 132, as shown, with the brackets 182 abutting the rear face 132R of the lens 132. The flexible power circuit 145, which may be any material or component capable of delivering power and/or data to and from the PIR sensors 144, is secured to a rear face 143R of the PIR sensor holder 143, and may be contoured to match the angular shape of the PIR sensor holder 143. The flexible power circuit 145 may connect to, draw power from, and/or transmit data to and/or from, the power PCB 148 (Figure 5).

[00162] Figure 11 is a top view of the PIR sensor assembly 179 illustrating the fields of view of the PIR sensors 144. Each PIR sensor 144 includes a field of view, referred to as a "zone," that traces an angle extending outward from the respective PIR sensor 144. Zone 1 is the area that is visible only to Passive Infrared Sensor 144-1. Zone 2 is the area that is visible only to the PIR sensors 144-1 and 144-2. Zone 3 is the area that is visible only to Passive Infrared Sensor 144-2. Zone 4 is the area that is visible only to the PIR sensors 144-2 and 144-3. Zone 5 is the area that is visible only to Passive Infrared Sensor 144-3. The doorbell 130 may be capable of determining the direction that an object is moving based upon which zones are triggered in a time sequence. In the illustrated embodiment, each zone extends across an angle of 110°. In alternative embodiments, each zone may extend across a different angle, such as one greater than or less than 110°.

[00163] Figure 12 is a functional block diagram of the components within or in communication with the doorbell 130, according to an aspect of the present embodiments. As described above, the bracket PCB 149 may comprise an accelerometer 150, a barometer 151, a humidity sensor 152, and a temperature sensor 153. The accelerometer 150 may be one or more sensors capable of sensing motion and/or acceleration. The barometer 151 may be one or more sensors capable of determining the atmospheric pressure of the surrounding environment in which the bracket PCB 149 may be located. The humidity sensor 152 may be one or more sensors capable of determining the amount of moisture present in the atmospheric environment in which the bracket PCB 149 may be located. The temperature sensor 153 may be one or more sensors capable of determining the temperature of the ambient environment in which the bracket PCB 149 may be located. As described above, the bracket PCB 149 may be located outside the housing of the doorbell 130 so as to reduce interference from heat, pressure, moisture, and/or other stimuli generated by the internal components of the doorbell 130.

[00164] With further reference to Figure 12, the bracket PCB 149 may further comprise terminal screw inserts 154, which may be configured to receive the terminal screws 138 and transmit power to the electrical contacts 177 on the mounting bracket 137 (Figure 6). The bracket PCB 149 may be electrically and/or mechanically coupled to the power PCB 148 through the terminal screws 138, the terminal screw inserts 154, the spring contacts 140, and the electrical contacts 177. The terminal screws 138 may receive electrical wires located at the surface to which the doorbell 130 is mounted, such as the wall of a building, so that the doorbell can receive electrical power from the building's electrical system. Upon the terminal screws 138 being secured within the terminal screw inserts 154, power may be transferred to the bracket PCB 149, and to all of the components associated therewith, including the electrical contacts 177. The electrical contacts 177 may transfer electrical power to the power PCB 148 by mating with the spring contacts 140.

[00165] With further reference to Figure 12, the front PCB 146 may comprise a light sensor 155, one or more light-emitting components, such as LED's 156, one or more speakers 157, and a microphone 158. The light sensor 155 may be one or more sensors capable of detecting the level of ambient light of the surrounding environment in which the doorbell 130 may be located. LED's 156 may be one or more light-emitting diodes capable of producing visible light when supplied with power. The speakers 157 may be any electromechanical device capable of producing sound in response to an electrical signal input. The microphone 158 may be an acoustic-to-electric transducer or sensor capable of converting sound waves into an electrical signal. When activated, the LED's 156 may illuminate the light pipe 136 (Figure 2). The front PCB 146 and all components thereof may be electrically coupled to the power PCB 148, thereby allowing data and/or power to be transferred to and from the power PCB 148 and the front PCB 146.

[00166] The speakers 157 and the microphone 158 may be coupled to the camera processor 170 through an audio CODEC 161. For example, the transfer of digital audio from the user's client device 114 and the speakers 157 and the microphone 158 may be compressed and decompressed using the audio CODEC 161, coupled to the camera processor 170. Once compressed by audio CODEC 161, digital audio data may be sent through the communication module 164 to the network 112, routed by one or more servers 118, and delivered to the user's client device 114. When the user speaks, after being transferred through the network 112, digital audio data is decompressed by audio CODEC 161 and emitted to the visitor via the speakers 157.

[00167] With further reference to Figure 12, the power PCB 148 may comprise a power management module 162, a microcontroller 163, the communication module 164, and power PCB non-volatile memory 165. In certain embodiments, the power management module 162 may comprise an integrated circuit capable of arbitrating between multiple voltage rails, thereby selecting the source of power for the doorbell 130. The battery 166, the spring contacts 140, and/or the connector 160 may each provide power to the power management module 162. The power management module 162 may have separate power rails dedicated to the battery 166, the spring contacts 140, and the connector 160. In one aspect of the present disclosure, the power management module 162 may continuously draw power from the battery 166 to power the doorbell 130, while at the same time routing power from the spring contacts 140 and/or the connector 160 to the battery 166, thereby allowing the battery 166 to maintain a substantially constant level of charge. Alternatively, the power management module 162 may continuously draw power from the spring contacts 140 and/or the connector 160 to power the doorbell 130, while only drawing from the battery 166 when the power from the spring contacts 140 and/or the connector 160 is low or insufficient. The power management module 162 may also serve as a conduit for data between the connector 160 and the microcontroller 163.

[00168] With further reference to Figure 12, in certain embodiments the microcontroller 163 may comprise an integrated circuit including a processor core, memory, and programmable input/output peripherals. The microcontroller 163 may receive input signals, such as data and/or power, from the PIR sensors 144, the bracket PCB 149, the power management module 162, the light sensor 155, the microphone 158, and/or the communication module 164, and may perform various functions as further described below. When the microcontroller 163 is triggered by the PIR sensors 144, the microcontroller 163 may be triggered to perform one or more functions, such as those described below with reference to Figure 14. When the light sensor 155 detects a low level of ambient light, the light sensor 155 may trigger the microcontroller 163 to enable "night vision," as further described below. The microcontroller 163 may also act as a conduit for data communicated between various components and the communication module 164.

[00169] With further reference to Figure 12, the communication module 164 may comprise an integrated circuit including a processor core, memory, and programmable input/output peripherals. The communication module 164 may also be configured to transmit data wirelessly to a remote network device, and may include one or more transceivers (not shown). The wireless communication may comprise one or more wireless networks, such as, without limitation, Wi-Fi, cellular, Bluetooth, and/or satellite networks. The communication module 164 may receive inputs, such as power and/or data, from the camera PCB 147, the microcontroller 163, the button 133, the reset button 159, and/or the power PCB non-volatile memory 165. When the button 133 is pressed, the communication module 164 may be triggered to perform one or more functions, such as those described below with reference to Figure 13. When the reset button 159 is pressed, the communication module 164 may be triggered to erase any data stored at the power PCB non-volatile memory 165 and/or at the camera PCB memory 169. The communication module 164 may also act as a conduit for data communicated between various components and the microcontroller 163. The power PCB non-volatile memory 165 may comprise flash memory configured to store and/or transmit data. For example, in certain embodiments the power PCB non-volatile memory 165 may comprise serial peripheral interface (SPI) flash memory.

[00170] With further reference to Figure 12, the camera PCB 147 may comprise components that facilitate the operation of the camera 134. For example, an imager 171 may comprise a video recording sensor and/or a camera chip. In one aspect of the present disclosure, the imager 171 may comprise a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) array, and may be capable of recording high definition (720p or better) video files. A camera processor 170 may comprise an encoding and compression chip. In some embodiments, the camera processor 170 may comprise a bridge processor. The camera processor 170 may process video recorded by the imager 171 and audio recorded by the microphone 158, and may transform this data into a form suitable for wireless transfer by the communication module 164 to a network. The camera PCB memory 169 may comprise volatile memory that may be used when data is being buffered or encoded by the camera processor 170. For example, in certain embodiments the camera PCB memory 169 may comprise synchronous dynamic random access memory (SD RAM). IR LED's 168 may comprise light-emitting diodes capable of radiating infrared light. IR cut filter 167 may comprise a system that, when triggered, configures the imager 171 to see primarily infrared light as opposed to visible light. When the light sensor 155 detects a low level of ambient light (which may comprise a level that impedes the performance of the imager 171 in the visible spectrum), the IR LED's 168 may shine infrared light through the doorbell 130 enclosure out to the environment, and the IR cut filter 167 may enable the imager 171 to see this infrared light as it is reflected or refracted off of objects within the field of view of the doorbell. This process may provide the doorbell 130 with the "night vision" function mentioned above. [00171] Figure 13 is a flowchart illustrating one embodiment of a process according to an aspect of the present disclosure. At block B200, a visitor presses the button 133 on the doorbell 130. At block B202, the communication module 164 sends a request to a network device. Once the network device receives the request, at block B204 the network device may connect the doorbell 130 to the user's client device 114 through the user's network 110 and the network 112. In block B206, the doorbell 130 may record available audio and/or video data using the camera 134, the microphone 158, and/or any other sensor available. At block B208, the audio and/or video data is transmitted to the user's client device 114. At block B210, the user may receive a notification on his or her client device 114 prompting him or her to either accept or deny. If the user denies the notification, then the process advances to block B214, where the audio and/or video data is recorded and stored at a cloud server. The session then ends at block B216 and the connection between the doorbell 130 and the user's client device 1 14 is terminated. If, however, the user elects to accept the notification, then at block B212 the user communicates with the visitor through the user's client device 114 while being provided audio and/or video data captured by the camera 134, the microphone 158, and/or other sensors. At the end of the call, the user may terminate the connection between the user's client device 114 and the doorbell 130 and the session ends at block B216. In some embodiments, the audio and/or video data may be recorded and stored at a cloud server even if the user accepts the notification and communicates with the visitor through the user's client device 114.

[00172] Figure 14 is a flowchart illustrating another embodiment of a process according to an aspect of the present disclosure. At block B300, an object may move into the field of view of one or more of the PIR sensors 144. At block B302, the PIR sensors 144 may trigger the microcontroller 163, which may then trigger the communication module 164 to send a request to a network device. At block B304, the network device may connect the doorbell 130 to the user's client device 114 through the user's network 110 and the network 112. At block B306, the doorbell 130 may record available audio and/or video data using the camera 134, the microphone 158, and/or any other available sensor, and stream the data to the user's client device 114. At block B308, the user may receive a notification prompting the user to either accept or deny the notification. If the notification is accepted, then at block B310a the live audio/video data may be displayed on the user's client device 114, thereby allowing the user surveillance from the perspective of the doorbell 130. When the user is satisfied with this function, the user may sever the connection at block B312, whereby the session ends. If, however, at block B308 the user denies the notification, or ignores the notification and a specified time interval elapses, then the connection between the doorbell 130 and the user's client device 114 is terminated and the audio/video data is recorded and stored at a cloud server at block B310b, such that the user may view the audio/video data later at their convenience. The doorbell 130 may be configured to record for a specified period of time in the event the notification in block B308 is denied or ignored. If such a time period is set, the doorbell 130 may record data for that period of time before ceasing operation at block B312 thereby ending the session.

[00173] Figure 15 is a flowchart illustrating another embodiment of a process according to an aspect of the present disclosure. At block B400, the user may select a "snooze time-out," which is a time period during which the doorbell 130 may deactivate or otherwise not respond to stimuli (such as light, sound, or heat signatures) after an operation is performed, e.g. a notification is either accepted or denied/ignored. For example, the user may set a snooze timeout of 15 minutes. At block B402, an object moves into the field of view of one or more of the PIR sensors 144. At block B404, the microcontroller 163 may trigger the communication module 164 to send a request to a network device. In block B406, the network device may connect the doorbell 130 to the user's client device 114 through the user's network 110 and the network 112. At block B408, audio/video data captured by the doorbell 130 may be streamed to the user's client device 114. At block B410, the user may receive a notification prompting the user to either accept or deny/ignore the request. If the request is denied or ignored, then at block B412b audio/video data may be recorded and stored at a cloud server. After the doorbell 130 finishes recording, the objects may remain in the PIR sensor 144 field of view at block B414. In block B416, the microcontroller 163 waits for the "snooze time" to elapse, e.g. 15 minutes, before triggering the communication module 164 to submit another request to the network device. After the snooze time, e.g. 15 minutes, elapses, the process moves back to block B404 and progresses as described above. The cycle may continue like this until the user accepts the notification request at block B410. The process then moves to block B412a, where live audio and/or video data is displayed on the user's client device 114, thereby allowing the user surveillance from the perspective of the doorbell 130. At the user's request, the connection may be severed and the session ends at block B418. At this point the user may elect for the process to revert back to block B416, whereby there may be no further response until the snooze time, e.g. 15 minutes, has elapsed from the end of the previous session, or the user may elect for the process to return to block B402 and receive a notification the next time an object is perceived by one or more of the PIR sensors 144.

[00174] As discussed above, the present disclosure provides numerous examples of methods and systems including A/V recording and communication doorbells, but the present embodiments are equally applicable for A/V recording and communication devices other than doorbells. For example, the present embodiments may include one or more A/V recording and communication security cameras instead of, or in addition to, one or more A/V recording and communication doorbells. An example A/V recording and communication security camera may include substantially all of the structure and functionality of the doorbell 130, but without the front button 133, the button actuator, and/or the light pipe 136. An example A/V recording and communication security camera may further omit other components, such as, for example, the bracket PCB 149 and its components.

[00175] As described above, one aspect of the present embodiments includes the realization that users of audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices may from time to time desire to share video footage recorded by their devices. For example, when an A/V recording and communication device records video footage of suspicious activity, or even criminal activity, a user viewing the footage may desire to alert his or her neighbors to the possible danger posed by the person(s) involved in the suspicious or criminal activity. It would be advantageous, then, to enhance the functionality of A/V recording and communication devices by facilitating easy sharing of video footage recorded by such devices with one's neighbors. In another example, an A/V recording and communication device may record video footage of activity that may be of interest to the user's friends and family (e.g., images of children playing in the yard). It would be advantageous, then, to enhance the functionality of A/V recording and communication devices by facilitating easy sharing of video footage recorded by such devices with one's friends and family. The present embodiments, as described in detail below, provide these, and other, enhancements. In particular, the present embodiments enable video footage captured by A/V recording and communication devices to be readily uploaded to the cloud and shared with anyone of the user's choosing, including neighbors, friends, and family. [00176] Figure 16 illustrates a system 500 for sharing video footage from A/V recording and communication devices according to the present embodiments. The illustrated system 500 includes a first A/V recording and communication doorbell 502 (labeled "A/V Doorbell #1"). The first A/V doorbell 502 may have, for example, similar components and/or functionality as the doorbell 130 described herein. Alternatively, the first A/V doorbell 502 may have different components and/or functionality as the doorbell 130, but may nevertheless be capable of recording video footage and/or audio and wirelessly transmitting the recorded video footage and/or audio. In certain embodiments, the first A/V doorbell 502 may not be a doorbell at all, but may be, for example, an A/V recording and communication security camera.

[00177] With further reference to Figure 16, the system 500 further includes a first client device 504 (labeled "Client Device #1") associated with the first A/V doorbell 502. The first client device 504 and the first A/V doorbell 502 may be owned by and/or controlled by the same user. The first client device 504 may have, for example, similar components and/or functionality as the user's client device 114 described herein, and may comprise, for example, a mobile telephone (may also be referred to as a cellular telephone), such as a smartphone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), or another communication and/or computing device. The system 500 further includes a network 506. The network 506, which may comprise, for example, the Internet and/or a public switched telephone network (PSTN), includes a plurality of network devices, such as one or more servers, routers, switches, storage devices, etc. (not shown). The system 500 further includes a plurality of other A/V doorbells 508, 510 (labeled "A/V Doorbell #2" through "A/V Doorbell #N") and a plurality of other client devices 512, 514 (labeled "Client Device #2" through "Client Device #N"). The other client devices 512, 514 are each associated with a corresponding one of the other A/V doorbells 508, 510. The other A/V doorbells 508, 510 may have, for example, similar components and/or functionality as the first A/V doorbell 502, and the other client devices 512, 514 may have, for example, similar components and/or functionality as the first client device 504.

[00178] In the system 500 of Figure 16, any of the A/V doorbells may record video footage from an area within a field of view of the respective doorbell. The owner (or a user) of the doorbell that has recorded video footage may share the video footage with one or more other owners/users of the other A/V doorbells. The determination of which users will receive a notification of the shared video footage may be based on the relative locations of the A/V doorbells associated with the different users. More particularly, a given user (USER X) may receive a notification of the shared video footage if the shared video footage was recorded by one of the A/V doorbells that is located within a predetermined distance of USER X's own A/V doorbell. Further, in certain embodiments the predetermined distance may be configurable by USER X. Example processes for such sharing of recorded video footage are described below with reference to Figures 17-19.

[00179] Figure 17 illustrates a neighborhood 516 comprising a plurality of buildings 518, such as homes, offices, retail businesses, warehouses, etc. At least some of the buildings 518 include A/V recording and communication doorbells secured to an exterior surface, such as adjacent the front door. For example, Figure 17 illustrates three A/V doorbells (A/V Doorbell #1 520, A/V Doorbell #2 522, A/V Doorbell #3 524) associated with three different buildings. Each of the A/V doorbells 520, 522, 524 has a defined area around it represented by the three overlapping circles (Area #1 526, Area #2 528, Area #3 530). Each circle 526, 528, 530 represents the area from which the owner/user of the A/V doorbell at the center of the circle will receive notifications of shared video footage recorded by other A/V doorbells within the area.

[00180] For example, if A/V Doorbell #1 520 records video footage and the owner/user of A/V Doorbell #1 520 shares the recorded video footage, then the owner/user of A/V Doorbell #3 524 will receive a notification of the shared video footage because A/V Doorbell #1 520 is located within Area #3 530, but the owner/user of A/V Doorbell #2 522 will not receive a notification of the shared video footage because A/V Doorbell #1 520 is located outside of Area #2 528. In another example, if A/V Doorbell #2 522 records video footage and the owner/user of A/V Doorbell #2 522 shares the recorded video footage, then the owners/users of A/V Doorbells 1 and 3 will both receive a notification of the shared video footage because A/V Doorbell #2 522 is located within both Area #1 526 and Area #3 530. In another example, if A/V Doorbell #3 524 records video footage and the owner/user of A/V Doorbell #3 524 shares the recorded video footage, then neither of the owners/users of A/V Doorbells 1 and 2 will receive a notification of the shared video footage because A/V Doorbell #3 524 is located outside of both Area #1 526 and Area #2 528. The determinations of which owners/users will receive share notifications, and which owners/users will not receive share notifications, are summarized in the table at the bottom of Figure 17. [00181] Figure 18 is a sequence diagram illustrating a process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell (or other A/V recording and communication device) according to an aspect of the present disclosure. An A/V doorbell 520 (A/V Doorbell #1, Figures 17 and 18) may record video footage, which may also include audio. For example, the doorbell 520 may begin recording the video footage when a visitor is detected at the doorbell 520, which may occur, for example, when the doorbell 520 detects motion or when the visitor presses the front button on the doorbell 520. With further reference to Figure 18, the doorbell 520 sends a first alert signal and a first video signal 540 to the network 542, and the network 542 receives the first alert signal and the first video signal 540. The network 542 includes one or more network devices, such as, for example, one or more servers, routers, switches, storage devices, etc. (not shown). At least some of the network devices include a processor and a memory. The first video signal includes images (the video footage) captured by a camera of the doorbell 520.

[00182] The network 542 transmits to a first client device 544 (User's Client Device #1), in response to receiving the first alert signal and the first video signal 540, a second alert signal and a second video signal 546. The second alert signal may be, for example, a push notification. A push notification, also called a server push notification, is the delivery of information from a software application to a computing device without a specific request from the client. The second video signal includes the images captured by the camera of the doorbell 520. The user associated with the first client device 544 may be the owner/user of the doorbell 520 (A/V Doorbell #1). The user, upon receiving the second alert signal, may choose to answer the second alert signal, which may, for example, open a live call between the user and the visitor at the doorbell 520. Alternatively, the user may ignore the second alert signal (e.g. choose not to answer the call). If the user ignores the second alert signal, he or she may still view the video footage of the second video signal at a later time.

[00183] After viewing (or while viewing) the video footage on the display of his or her client device 544, the user may decide to share the video footage with other users. For example, the user may tap a "share" button from within an application executing on his or her client device 544. The first client device 544 then sends a share signal 548 to the network 542, and the network 542 receives the share signal 548 from the first client device 544. In response to receiving the share signal 548 from the first client device 544, at least one of the network devices in the network 542 determines the other users who are to receive a notification of the shared video footage. For example, the network device(s) may determine that the doorbell 520 that recorded the shared video footage is within a predefined distance from at least one other A/V recording and communication doorbell (or other A/V recording and communication device) from among a plurality of other A/V recording and communication doorbells (or other A/V recording and communication devices). For example, with reference to Figure 17, if the doorbell that recorded the shared video footage is A/V Doorbell #1 520, then the network device(s) may identify at least one other doorbell, such as A/V Doorbell #3 524, having a defined area (Area #3 530) around it that encompasses the location of the doorbell 520 that recorded the shared video footage. Once the other doorbell(s) has/have been identified, the network device(s) may transmit a share notification signal 550 to each client device associated with the other doorbell(s) identified (including at least User's Client Device #3 552). The share notification signal 550 may be, for example, a push notification. The other user(s), upon receiving the share notification signal 550, may choose to view the shared video footage. Alternatively, the other user(s) may ignore the share notification signal 550. If the other user(s) ignores the share notification signal 550, he or she may still view the shared video footage at a later time.

[00184] The process described above with reference to Figure 18 advantageously enables users of A/V recording and communication devices to share video footage with one another. This feature can help reduce crime by increasing public awareness of suspicious activity. For example, a first user may view video footage that was recorded by his or her doorbell and determine that the person or persons in the video footage are, or may be, engaged in criminal activity. The first user may then share that video footage with other users who, after viewing the shared video footage, may be alerted to be on the lookout for the person or persons in the shared video footage and, if one or more such other users observe the person or persons in the shared video footage engaged in further suspicious activity, they may be more likely to report the person or persons to law enforcement.

[00185] In the process of Figure 18, as well as in other processes described herein, a determination is made as to which other users will receive a notification of the video footage that is shared by the first user. This determination is based on the relative locations of the A/V recording and communication devices associated with each of the users. And, as described above with reference to Figure 17, whether or not a given user (User X) will receive a share notification is dependent upon the distance (alert radius) set by User X with respect to his or her own A/V recording and communication device(s). If the device that recorded the shared video is located within the area(s) defined by User X around his or her own A/V recording and communication device(s), then User X will receive a share notification. If the device that recorded the shared video is located outside the area(s) defined by User X around his or her own A/V recording and communication device(s), then User X will not receive a share notification. Thus, the determination of which users will receive a share notification is not dependent upon an alert radius set by the owner/user of the A/V recording and communication device that recorded the shared video. Rather, that determination is based on the alert radii set by the owners/users of the A/V recording and communication devices other than the device that recorded the shared video, and many of these alert radii may differ from one another. That is, User Xi may set an alert radius of one-half mile around his or her doorbell while User X2 may set an alert radius of three miles around his or her doorbell. If the device that recorded the shared video is within one- half mile of User Xi's doorbell, then User Xi will receive a share notification, and if the device that recorded the shared video is within three miles of User X 2 's doorbell, then User X 2 will receive a share notification.

[00186] Further, in some instances a first user may not receive a share notification while a second user may receive a share notification, even though the first user's doorbell is located closer to the doorbell that recorded the shared video than the second user's doorbell is. For example, again assume that User Xi has set an alert radius of one-half mile around his or her doorbell while User X 2 has set an alert radius of three miles around his or her doorbell. If User Xi's doorbell is one mile away from the doorbell that recorded the shared video and User X 2 's doorbell is two miles away from the doorbell that recorded the shared video, then User Xi will not receive a share notification because the doorbell that recorded the shared video is outside User Xi's alert radius, but User X 2 will receive a share notification because the doorbell that recorded the shared video is inside User X 2 's alert radius.

[00187] Still further, a given user may have more than one A/V recording and communication device, and at least two of those devices may be in different locations (e.g. not on the same property or attached to the same structure). In such cases, each device may have its own alert radius, and therefore its own defined distance/area for receiving share notifications. Thus, a user may receive a share notification when the device that recorded the shared video is within the defined area around at least one of that user's devices, even if the device that recorded the shared video is outside the defined area around at least one other of that same user's devices.

[00188] In some embodiments, a user may have more than one A/V recording and communication device at the same location (e.g. attached to the same structure, or attached to separate structures that are located on the same property). In such cases, devices that are proximate one another may share an alert area. For example, a user may have an A/V recording and communication doorbell located near his or her front door and an A/V recording and communication security camera located at the rear of his or her home. These devices may share one alert radius/alert area.

[00189] Still further, users may adjust as desired the size of the defined area(s) around their A/V recording and communication device(s). Information about each A/V recording and communication device in a given set of A/V recording and communication devices may be stored in one or more data structures and accessed when needed to determine which users will receive a share notification whenever a first user shares recorded video footage. When a user adjusts the size of the defined area(s) around his or her A/V recording and communication device(s), the information stored in the data structure(s) may be updated accordingly.

[00190] Figure 19 is a flowchart illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell (or other A/V recording and communication device) according to an aspect of the present disclosure. The process of Figure 19 is described from the perspective of the network device(s). Thus, at block B560 the network device(s) receive a first alert signal and a first video signal from a first A/V doorbell. At block B562, the network device(s) transmit a second alert signal and a second video signal to the first client device. At block B564, the network device(s) receive a share signal from the first client device. At block B566, the network device(s) determine at least one second A/V doorbell within at least one predefined distance from the first A/V doorbell. At block B568, the network device(s) transmit a share notification signal to the at least one second client device corresponding to the at least one determined second A/V doorbell.

[00191] Figures 20-24 are screenshots of a graphical user interface (GUI) 570 illustrating aspects of a process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication device according to an aspect of the present disclosure. The process of Figures 20-24 is described from the perspective of a user who receives an alert signal and a video signal on his or her client device. Thus, the GUI 570 illustrated in Figures 20-24 is configured to be displayed on a display of the user's client device, such as a smartphone.

[00192] With reference to Figure 20, a live call screen 572 is illustrated. When a user's A/V recording and communication device detects motion, or, in the case of a doorbell, when a visitor presses the front button on the doorbell, the user receives an alert on his or her client device along with streaming video footage recorded by the camera of the A/V recording and communication device. If the user answers the alert, a live call screen 572 such as that shown in Figure 20 may be displayed on the user's client device. The live call screen 572 may include one or more buttons, such as an END button 574 (to terminate or disconnect the call), a volume adjust button 576, a mute button 578, a full screen button 580 (to expand the video so that it fills the entire display screen), and/or a menu button 582.

[00193] The live call screen 572 may further include a neighborhood share button 584. If the user selects the neighborhood share button 584 during the live call, the GUI 570 may display a notification 586 that the user will be prompted after the live call to share the video of the call with other users in the user's "neighborhood," e.g. those users determined according to the process described above with reference to Figures 18 and 19. For example, as shown in Figure 21, the notification 586 may appear in a banner portion 588 of the live call screen 572. Advantageously, displaying the notification 586 in a banner 588 does not interrupt the live call, so that the user and the visitor can continue speaking to one another for as long as desired.

[00194] If the user selects the neighborhood share button 584 during the live call, then after the call is terminated, such as when the user selects the END button 574 on the live call screen 572 (Figure 20), a share information screen 590 may be shown on the GUI 570, as shown in Figure 22. In the illustrated embodiment, the share information screen 590 includes a still image 592 from the video that was recorded during the live call, and textual information 594. For example, the text 594 may include a phrase such as "Alert your neighborhood," which informs (or reminds) the user that he or she is about to share the recorded video footage with one or more other users. The text 594 may further include a notice that the video footage will be shared along with a general indication of where the video was recorded. For example, the location information may identify the street name and block number, such as "1300 block of 14 th Street," and/or may identify the nearest intersection, such as "Near the intersection of 14 th Street and Santa Monica Boulevard." An icon 596, such as a question mark, may also be displayed. If the user selects the question mark icon 596, further information about the share feature may be displayed, and/or a help menu may be displayed.

[00195] The share information screen 590 may further include a text entry box 598. If the user selects the text entry box 598, such as by tapping on it if the user's client device includes a touchscreen display, a keyboard 600 may appear on the display, as shown in Figure 23. The user may then enter text to describe the content of the shared video. After entering text, the user may select a SHARE button 602, after which the share signal (Figure 18) is sent to the network and the network identifies one or more other users who will be notified of the shared video and sends out notifications to the identified other users. The share signal may include, or be accompanied by, the text entered by the user in the text entry box 598 of the GUI 570 shown in Figure 23. The user may also decline to enter any text in the text entry box 598, and may instead simply select the SHARE button 602 from the share information screen 590 of Figure 22, after which the share signal (Figure 18) is sent to the network and the network identifies one or more other users who will be notified of the shared video and sends out notifications to the identified other users.

[00196] After the user selects the SHARE button 602, with or without entering text in the text entry box 598, a confirmation screen 604 may be displayed on the display of the user's client device, as shown in Figure 24. The confirmation screen 604 may include text 606, such as a message confirming that the video has been shared ("Your video has been shared") and/or a thank you message ("Thanks for helping to keep your neighborhood safe."). The confirmation screen 604 may further include a button, such as an OK button 608, which, when selected, may return the user to another screen, such as a menu screen, of the application executing on the user's client device. With reference to Figures 22-24, the share information screen 590 (Figure 22), the text entry screen 610 (Figure 23), and/or the confirmation screen 604 (Figure 24) may include a close button 612 (the "X" in the upper right-hand corner). If the user selects the close button 612, the share operation may be terminated without sharing the video footage from the live call. Further, if the user selects the close button 612, a popup window (not shown) may be shown on the display asking the user to confirm that the share operation is to be terminated.

[00197] In further reference to Figures 20-24, in some embodiments the share signal may be sent to the network, and the network may enable one or more of the identified recipient users to further comment about the shared video and/or the text regarding the shared video. In some embodiments, the further comments may be directed to the user that shared the video, or may be directed to all the users. For example, if a user shares a video depicting a person committing a crime, another user that receives the shared video may recognize the person depicted in the video (the perpetrator). The recipient user may then send identifying information about the perpetrator, which may be useful in apprehending the perpetrator. In some embodiments, the identifying information may be sent directly to the user that shared the information, or it may be posted to the network such that it is visible to all the recipients of the shared video. In another example, if a user shares a video depicting a person committing a crime, and knows (or recognizes) the perpetrator, then users that receive the shared video may request the identifying information about the person directly from the user that shared the video. In some embodiments, the user that shared the video may get a direct message such as (but not limited to) an email requesting the information. The user may then decide whether or not to provide the identifying information to the requesting user. A further example may include the network providing a comment section with the shared video so that the various users may provide comments regarding the shared video. An additional example may include allowing users to post comments and/or send messages regarding the shared video without revealing their personal identity and/or contact information, such as email addresses. In further embodiments, the share signal may include image data and/or audio data that is captured and transmitted to the network in real-time (or near real-time), which may make the share signal a live video feed. In such embodiments, a user may set his or her share features to automatically share particular events and/or types of events to the network. In some embodiments, various users may comment on the shared live video feed, as described above.

[00198] Figures 25-29 are screenshots of a graphical user interface (GUI) 620 illustrating aspects of another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication device according to an aspect of the present disclosure. The process of Figures 25-29 is described from the perspective of a user who views an earlier-recorded video on his or her client device. Thus, the GUI 620 illustrated in Figures 25-29 is configured to be displayed on a display of the user's client device, such as a smartphone. In this embodiment, the video displayed on the user's client device is not a live call, but rather is a recording of a visitor event that took place earlier in time. The recording may be, however, a recording of an earlier live call between the user and the visitor. [00199] With reference to Figure 25, a video playback screen 622 is illustrated. When a user's A/V recording and communication device detects motion, or, in the case of a doorbell, when a visitor presses the front button on the doorbell, the user receives an alert on his or her client device along with streaming video footage recorded by the camera of the A/V recording and communication device. If the user ignores the alert, the motion event or button press event may nevertheless be recorded and stored at a remote network device. When the user later accesses the stored video footage, the video may be displayed on the video playback screen 622 on the user's client device, as shown in Figure 25. Alternatively, if the user answers the alert and communicates with the visitor but does not share the video from within the live call (as described above with respect to Figures 20-24), the user may still view the recorded video footage by accessing it from a menu, as described below.

[00200] With further reference to Figure 25, the video playback screen 622 may include one or more buttons or controls, such as a volume adjustment slider widget 624, a rewind button 626, a play button 628, a fast forward button 630, a delete button 632, and/or a share button 634. If the user selects the share button 634, a popup menu (not shown) may be shown on the display offering the user one or more options for sharing the video with his or her contacts and/or via social media. For example, the popup menu (or any other suitable type of interface) may include options for sharing the video via e-mail, via text message, and/or via social media, such as on EXTDOOR ® , FACEBOOK ® , INSTAGRAM ® , TWITTER ® , etc. When the user selects one of the options, a new message (or post, etc.) may then be created including a link to the video to be shared. For example, if the user selects a social media network through which to share the video, the process may create a social media post with a link to the video to be shared. Posting the video to one or more social networks may enable the video to be seen by others, including others who live in the neighborhood where the video was recorded. Those persons may recognize a person in the video, and may be able to help identify that person. Further, the social network post may provide a warning to others who live in the neighborhood where the video was recorded, encouraging those people to be watchful for the person(s) in the video.

[00201] While the present embodiments are not limited to use with any particular social network, or type of social network, the present embodiments may nevertheless be well adapted for use with a neighborhood-oriented social network, such as NEXTDOOR ® . Neighborhood- oriented social networks allow users to connect with people who live in their neighborhood, and/or in nearby neighborhoods, by limiting access to posts to the people in the same neighborhood as the poster, or those nearby. As described above, in some aspects the present embodiments enable a user to share a video to a social network. When the video is posted to a social networking service for neighborhoods, the video is more likely to be seen by people who live in the neighborhood where the video was recorded. The video is thus more likely to be relevant to the people in the neighborhood-oriented social network, because those people are more likely to have also seen the person(s) in the video. The neighborhood-oriented social network members may therefore be able to provide additional information about the person(s) in the video, such as confirming that they too have seen the person(s) in the neighborhood and/or helping to identify the person(s) in the video. If the person(s) in the video has committed criminal acts in the neighborhood, identifying the person(s) may help lead to their capture and conviction.

[00202] With further reference to Figure 25, the video playback screen 622 may further include a progress bar 636 and a slider widget 638 that indicates what portion of the video is currently playing. For example, a timer 640 at a first end 642 of the progress bar 636 indicates how much of the video has elapsed, and a timer 644 at a second end 646 of the progress bar 636 indicates how much of the video is left to play. As the video plays, the progress slider widget 638 moves from the first end 642 to the second end 646 of the progress bar 636. If the user wants to jump to a particular portion of the video, he or she may move the slider widget 638 left or right by selecting it, sliding it along the progress bar 636, and releasing it. The video playback screen 622 may further include a Done button 648, which, when selected, closes the video and returns the user to a previous screen within the application executing on the user's client device.

[00203] With further reference to Figure 25, the video playback screen 622 may further include a neighborhood share button 584. If the user selects the neighborhood share button 584, the GUI 620 may display textual information 594, as shown in Figure 26. For example, the text 594 may include a phrase such as "Alert your neighborhood," which informs (or reminds) the user that he or she is about to share the recorded video footage with one or more other users. The text 594 may further include a notice that the video footage will be shared along with a general indication of where the video was recorded. For example, the location information may identify the street name and block number, such as " 1300 block of 14 th Street," and/or may identify the nearest intersection, such as "Near the intersection of 14 th Street and Santa Monica Boulevard." An icon 596, such as a question mark, may also be displayed. If the user selects the question mark icon 596, further information about the share feature may be displayed, and/or a help menu may be displayed.

[00204] The GUI 620 of Figure 26 may further include a text entry box 598. If the user selects the text entry box 598, such as by tapping on it if the user's client device includes a touchscreen display, a keyboard 600 may appear on the display, as shown in Figure 27. The user may then enter text to describe the content of the shared video. After entering text, the user may select a SHARE button 602, after which the share signal (Figure 18) is sent to the network and the network identifies one or more other users who will be notified of the shared video and sends out notifications to the identified other users. The share signal may include, or be accompanied by, the text entered by the user in the text entry box 598 of the GUI 620 shown in Figure 27. The user may also decline to enter any text in the text entry box 598, and may instead simply select the SHARE button 602 from the share screen 650 of Figure 26, after which the share signal (Figure 18) is sent to the network and the network identifies one or more other users who will be notified of the shared video and sends out notifications to the identified other users.

[00205] After the user selects the SHARE button 602, with or without entering text in the text entry box 598, a confirmation message 652 may be displayed on the GUI 620 of the user's client device, as shown in Figure 28. The confirmation message 652 may include text, such as a message confirming that the video has been shared ("Your video has been posted and your neighborhood has been alerted."). With reference to Figure 29, a popup message 654 may also be shown asking the user if he or she would like to "unshare" the video. The popup message 654 may include text 656 such as "You have already shared this video with your Neighborhood." and one or more buttons, such as a CANCEL button 658 and/or a YES (or OK) button 660. If the user selects the YES button 660, the shared video may be "unshared," whereas if the user selects the CANCEL button 658, the shared video will not be "unshared." With reference to Figures 26- 28, the GUI 620 may include a close button 612 (the "X" in the upper right-hand corner). If the user selects the close button 612, the share operation may be terminated without sharing the video footage. Further, if the user selects the close button 612, a popup window (not shown) may be shown on the display asking the user to confirm that the share operation is to be terminated. [00206] In some embodiments, video footage recorded by a user's A/V recording and communication device may not be stored at a remote network device on a long-term basis. In such embodiments, the user may still share video footage from his or her A/V recording and communication device with other users, but only from a live call, such as according to the process described above with reference to Figures 20-24 (and not from a video playback process, such as that described above with reference to Figures 25-29). To enable this aspect, all video recorded by the user's A/V recording and communication device may be temporarily stored at a remote network device so that it is available for sharing if the user shares the video footage from the live call. For example, the video may be temporarily stored at a remote network device as long as the live call is in progress, but if the live call terminates without the user selecting the neighborhood share button 584 (Figure 20), the video that was temporarily stored at the remote network device may then be deleted.

[00207] In further reference to Figures 25-29, and as described above with respect to Figures 20-24, in some embodiments, the share signal may be sent to the network, and the network may enable one or more of the identified recipient users to further comment about the shared video and/or the text regarding the shared video. In some embodiments, the further comments may be directed to the user that shared the video, or may be directed to all the users. For example, if a user shares a video depicting a person committing a crime, another user that receives the shared video may recognize the person depicted in the video (the perpetrator). The recipient user may then send identifying information about the person, which may be useful in apprehending the perpetrator. In some embodiments, the identifying information may be sent directly to the user that shared the information, or it may be posted to the network such that it is visible to all the recipients of the shared video. In another example, if a user shares a video depicting a person committing a crime, and knows (or recognizes) the perpetrator, then users that receive the shared video may request the identifying information about the person directly from the user that shared the video. In some embodiments, the user that shared the video may get a direct message such as (but not limited to) an email requesting the information. The user may then decide whether or not to provide the identifying information to the requesting user. A further example may include the network providing a comment section with the shared video so that the various users may provide comments regarding the shared video. An additional example may include allowing users to post comments and/or send messages regarding the shared video without revealing their personal identity and/or contact information, such as email addresses. In further embodiments, the share signal may include image data and/or audio data that is captured and transmitted to the network in real-time (or near real-time) which may make the share signal a live video feed. In such embodiments, a user may set his or her share features to automatically share particular events and/or types of events to the network. In some embodiments, various users may comment on the shared live video feed, as described above.

[00208] Figure 30 is a sequence diagram illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure. The process of Figure 30 includes aspects of the process of Figure 18, including the doorbell 520 sending a first alert signal and a first video signal 540 to the network (and the network receives the first alert signal and the first video signal 540), the network 542 transmitting to a first client device (User' s Client Device #1), in response to receiving the first alert signal and the first video signal, a second alert signal and a second video signal 546, the first client device 544 sending a share signal 548 to the network (and the network receiving the share signal 548 from the first client device), and the network device(s) 542 transmitting a share notification signal 550 to each client device associated with the other doorbell(s) identified (including at least User' s Client Device #3 552).

[00209] The process of Figure 30 further comprises the third client device 552 sending a playback request signal 662 to the network 542 (and the network 542 receiving the playback request signal 662 from the third client device 552), and the network device(s) 542, in response to receiving the playback request signal 662 from the third client device 552, transmitting a third video signal 664 to the third client device 552, the third video signal 664 including the shared video footage recorded by A/V Doorbell #1 520. For example, User' s Client Device #3 552 may receive the share notification signal 550, which may be, for example, a push notification. The user associated with User' s Client Device #3 552 may then choose to view the shared video footage, such as by selecting a "VIEW NOW" button (or an "OK" button, etc.) in the push notification. Alternatively, the user may ignore the share notification signal 550, but may subsequently request to view the shared video footage through one or more screens/menus within an application executing on User's Client Device #3 552, as described below. The playback request signal 662 is then sent to the network 542, and the shared video footage is sent to User' s Client Device #3 552 in the third video signal 664. [00210] Figure 31 is a flowchart illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure. The process of Figure 31 is described from the perspective of the network device(s). Thus, at block B560 the network device(s) receive a first alert signal and a first video signal from a first A/V doorbell. At block B562, the network device(s) transmit a second alert signal and a second video signal to the first client device. At block B564, the network device(s) receive a share signal from the first client device. At block B566, the network device(s) determine at least one second A/V doorbell within at least one predefined distance from the first A/V doorbell. At block B568, the network device(s) transmit a share notification signal to the at least one second client device corresponding to the at least one determined second A/V doorbell. At block B670, the network device(s) receive a playback request signal from the second client device. At block B672, the network device(s) transmits a third video signal to the second client device.

[00211] Figures 32-35 are screenshots of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) illustrating aspects of another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication device according to an aspect of the present disclosure. Figures 32-35 are described below from the perspective of a user operating his or her client device. Thus, the GUIs illustrated in Figures 32-35 are configured to be displayed on a display of the user's client device, such as a smartphone.

[00212] With reference to Figure 32, the GUI 680 includes buttons for each of the user's A/V recording and communication devices. For example, the GUI 680 of Figure 32 includes a first button 682 for the doorbell located adjacent the user's front door and a second button 684 for the doorbell located adjacent the user's back door. The user may view video footage recorded by his or her devices by selecting from among the buttons 682, 684 corresponding to each device. The user may further view video footage organized by type by selecting from among a plurality of filter buttons 686, 688, 690. For example, the GUI 680 of Figure 32 includes a first filter button 686 for ALL ACTIVITY, a second filter button 688 for CALLS (video recorded when the front button on the user's doorbell is pressed), and a third filter button 690 for MOTION (video recorded when the user's doorbell detects motion). When the user selects the ALL ACTIVITY filter button 686, a list 691 may be displayed on the GUI 680 that includes entries for all videos recorded by the user's device(s), as well as entries for all shared videos recorded by other users' devices in the user's "neighborhood," e.g. those devices determined according to the process described above with reference to Figures 18 and 19. For example, the list 691 of Figure 32 includes entries labeled "ACCEPTED RING" 692 and "MISSED RING" 694, which correspond to videos recorded by the user's doorbell(s) in response to the button on the doorbell(s) being pressed. The list 691 further includes entries labeled "MISSED MOTION" 696, which correspond to videos recorded by the user's device(s) in response to motion being detected.

[00213] The list 691 of Figure 32 further includes an entry labeled "NEIGHBORHOOD ALERT [Suspicious Activity]" 698. The neighborhood alert entry 698 may further include a neighborhood event icon 700, which identifies the entry 698 as corresponding to a shared video from another user's device in the user's "neighborhood." The neighborhood alert entry 698 may further include information about the shared video, including the approximate location 702 where it was recorded, the day and time 704 when it was recorded, and a textual description 706 of the video as provided by the user whose device recorded the video. If the user selects the neighborhood alert entry 698, a playback request signal 662 is sent from the user's client device to the network (Figure 30), and a video signal 664 including the requested video is sent from the network to the user's client device. A GUI similar to that shown in Figure 25 (but without the neighborhood share button) may then be shown on the display of the user's client device and the user may view the shared video.

[00214] With reference to Figure 33, the GUI 680 may further include a side menu 708. The side menu 708 may be accessed, for example, by touching the display of the user's client device and swiping to the right (if the display of the user's client device is a touchscreen). The side menu 708 may include buttons 710 for various settings, buttons 712 for each of the user's A/V recording and communication devices, as well as a NEIGHBORHOOD button 714. The NEIGHBORHOOD button 714 may further include the neighborhood event icon 700, which is described in the foregoing paragraph. When the user selects the NEIGHBORHOOD button 714, the NEIGHBORHOOD ACTIVITY screen 716 illustrated in Figure 34 may be displayed on the display of the user's client device.

[00215] With reference to Figure 34, the NEIGHBORHOOD ACTIVITY screen 716 may include a Neighborhood button 718 and an Alert Settings button 720. When the user selects the Neighborhood button 718, a NEIGHBORHOOD ACTIVITY list 722 may be displayed on the GUI 680 that includes neighborhood alert entries 698 (the content and functionality of which is described above with respect to Figure 32). With further reference to Figure 34, when the user selects the Alert Settings button 720, if the user has A/V recording and communication devices at more than one location, then a Select a Neighborhood screen 724 may be displayed on the display of the user's client device, as shown in Figure 35. The Select a Neighborhood screen 724 may include a list 726 having entries corresponding to each location (e.g. each "neighborhood") where the user has at least one A/V recording and communication device. For example, the list 726 of Figure 35 includes a first entry 728 for the user's home "neighborhood" and a second entry 730 for the user's office "neighborhood." In certain embodiments, if the user has more than one A/V recording and communication device at a given location, only one entry may be displayed per location. For example, if the user has two doorbells and one security camera at a given address, only one entry appears in the list 726 for that location, and the entry covers all three devices at that location. If the user has one or more A/V recording and communication devices at another location, another entry appears in the list 726 for that other location. Also in certain embodiments, the entries in the list 726 may comprise addresses rather than, or in addition to, names. For example, rather than the first entry 728 being labeled "Home" and the second entry 730 being labeled "Office," the first entry 728 may be labeled "123 Main Street" and the second entry 730 may be labeled "456 First Street."

[00216] If, however, the user does not have A/V recording and communication devices at more than one location, then when the user selects the Alert Settings button 720 (Figure 34) a Neighborhood Alert Settings screen 732 may be displayed on the display of the user's client device, as shown in Figures 36 and 37. Further, if the user has A/V recording and communication devices at more than one location, then when the user selects one of the locations from the list 726 on the NEIGHBORHOOD ACTIVITY screen 716 of Figure 35, then the Neighborhood Alert Settings screen 732 of Figures 36 and 37 may also be displayed on the display of the user's client device.

[00217] With reference to Figure 36, the Neighborhood Alert Settings screen 732 includes an ON/OFF slider widget 734 that enables the user to toggle the video sharing feature on and off. When the ON/OFF slider widget 734 is in the ON position, as shown in Figure 36, the user may receive sharing notifications (alerts) when other users in the user's "neighborhood" share videos, and shared videos may appear in the list 691 of events on the user's ALL ACTIVITY screen 736 (Figure 32), as well as in the list 722 of events on the user's NEIGHBORHOOD ACTIVITY screen 716 (Figure 34). In certain embodiments, the ON/OFF slider widget 734 may be in the ON position by default. When the ON/OFF slider widget 734 is in the OFF position, as shown in Figure 37, the user may not receive sharing notifications (alerts) when other users in the user's "neighborhood" share videos, and shared videos may not appear in the list 691 of events on the user's ALL ACTIVITY screen 736 (Figure 32), but shared videos may appear in the list 722 of events on the user's NEIGHBORHOOD ACTIVITY screen 716 (Figure 34). The Neighborhood Alert Settings screen 732 further includes a text banner 738 that explains how the video sharing feature functions when the ON/OFF slider widget 734 is in the ON position (Figure 36) and when the ON/OFF slider widget 734 is in the OFF position (Figure 37).

[00218] With reference to Figure 36, the Neighborhood Alert Settings screen 732 further includes a map 740. An indicator 742 on the map 740 indicates the location of the user's A/V recording and communication device(s) corresponding to the location selected from the list 724 of Figure 35 (or corresponding to the single location at which the user has at least one A/V recording and communication device, if the user does not have A/V recording and communication devices at more than one location). In the illustrated embodiment, the indicator 742 comprises a dot, but in other embodiments the indicator 742 may comprise any other type of indicator, such as a pin, for example. The Neighborhood Alert Settings screen 732 further includes a text banner 744 that provides the street address of the location corresponding to the indicator 742 on the map 740.

[00219] With further reference to Figure 36, the Neighborhood Alert Settings screen 732 further includes a slider widget 746 for adjusting the alert radius around the user's A/V recording and communication device(s) at the location indicated on the map 740. A circle 748 around the indicator 742 on the map 740 identifies the outer boundary of the area 750 from which the user will receive share notifications from other users. An area 750 within the circle 748 may be shaded, as indicated in Figure 36. To adjust the size of the area 750, the user adjusts the length of the alert radius by moving the slider widget 746 up or down. In the illustrated embodiment, moving the slider widget 746 up increases the size of the area 750 (and the alert radius), while moving the slider widget 746 down decreases the size of the area 750 (and the alert radius). As the slider widget 746 is moved up and down, the size of the circle 748 around the indicator 742 may increase and decrease to provide the user with a visual representation of the area 750 covered as the length of the alert radius increases and decreases. In some embodiments, the map 740 may have a default scale. As the user moves the slider widget 746 up to increase the size of the alert radius, if the circle 748 reaches the edges of the map 740, then the map 740 may begin to scale down so that the entire alert area 750 is always visible on the map 740.

[00220] When the user adjusts the size of the alert radius, the user's client device may send an alert radius adjustment signal to the network and the network may update a data structure with the changed size of the user's alert radius. For example, with further reference to Figure 36, the user may adjust the size of the alert radius by moving the slider widget 746 up or down. To confirm the change, the user may select a back arrow 752 on the GUI 680 to return to the previous screen within the application executing on the user's client device. When the user selects the back arrow 752, the alert radius adjustment signal is sent to the network and the network updates the data structure with the changed size of the user's alert radius. In some embodiments, if the user exits the application without selecting the back arrow 752, then the adjustment of the alert radius may be discarded (the size of the alert radius may remain unchanged).

[00221] With further reference to Figure 36, the magnitude of the alert radius may be indicated by a number on the slider widget 746. For example, in Figure 36 the alert radius is set at 0.2 miles, as indicated by the number .2 on the slider widget 746. Maximum and/or minimum magnitudes of the alert radius may be indicated by numbers at opposite ends of the slider widget 746. For example, in Figure 36 the maximum alert radius is indicated as 10 miles at the upper end of the slider widget 746, while the minimum alert radius is indicated as .1 miles at the lower end of the slider widget 746. It should be appreciated that the maximum and minimum magnitudes shown in Figures 36 and 37 are just examples and are not limiting.

[00222] In certain embodiments, the magnitude of the alert radius may be dynamically set based on the number of other A/V recording and communication devices around the location indicated on the map 740. For example, the alert radius may be set such that the resulting defined area 750 around the user's A/V recording and communication device encompasses at least a minimum threshold number of other A/V recording and communication devices. Alternatively, the alert radius may be set such that the resulting defined area 750 around the user's A/V recording and communication device encompasses no more than a maximum threshold number of other A/V recording and communication devices. Still further, the alert radius may be set such that the resulting defined area 750 around the user's A/V recording and communication device encompasses a number of other A/V recording and communication devices that falls within a defined range. In certain embodiments, the magnitude of the alert radius may be dynamically adjusted as the number of other A/V recording and communication devices around the user's device changes. Thus, as more A/V recording and communication devices are added around the user's device, the size of the alert radius may be decreased so that the number of other A/V recording and communication devices in the defined area 750 remains about the same. Conversely, as A/V recording and communication devices are removed (or deactivated) from the area 750 around the user's device, the size of the alert radius may be increased so that the number of other A/V recording and communication devices in the defined area 750 remains about the same. In certain embodiments, the user may override the dynamic setting and/or adjustment of the magnitude of the alert radius by manually selecting the magnitude of the alert radius by moving the slider widget 746 as described above with reference to Figure 36.

[00223] In some embodiments, the defined alert area about a user's A/V recording and communication device may not have a circular outer boundary. For example, a user may define an alert area about his or her A/V recording and communication device that has a non-circular shape, such as square, rectangular, or any other shape, including irregular polygons. The shape of the alert area may also extend a greater distance from A/V recording and communication device in one direction than in another direction. For example, if an A/V recording and communication device is located in a coastal area, or on a lakefront, or on an edge of an uninhabited area (such as a desert), or on an edge of a restricted area (such as a military base), then the user may not want the alert area to extend over the water, or desert, or military base, etc., but the user may want the alert area to extend a substantial distance in directions away from the water, or desert, or military base, etc. In such embodiments, the A/V recording and communication device would not be located at the center of the defined alert area.

[00224] Figure 38 is a sequence diagram illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure. In the process of Figure 38, a new A/V recording and communication device is activated and connected to the network. In certain embodiments, some aspects of the activation/setup/connection process may be carried out using an application executing on the user's client device. Thus, with reference to Figure 38, the user's client device 754 (User's Client Device #1) may send to the network 756, and the network 756 may receive from the user's client device 754, information 758 associated with the user's A/V recording and communication device (A/V Doorbell #1). The information 758 may include, for example, the location of the user's A/V recording and communication device. The location may comprise the street address of a building with which the user's A/V recording and communication device is associated, such as being secured thereto, for example. The user's client device 754 may further send to the network 756, and the network 756 may further receive from the user's client device 754, an enable signal 760 for the video sharing feature of the user's A/V recording and communication device. For example, during the setup process the user may enable (turn on) the video sharing feature using a GUI such as that illustrated in Figure 36. In some embodiments, the video sharing feature may be enabled by default, such that the user does not have to take any affirmative steps to enable the video sharing feature.

[00225] With further reference to Figure 38, the user's client device 754 may further send to the network 756, and the network 756 may further receive from the user's client device 754, a notification distance (alert radius) 762 associated with the video sharing feature of the user's A/V recording and communication device. For example, during the setup process the user may select an alert radius 762 using a GUI such as that illustrated in Figure 36. In some embodiments, the alert radius 762 may be set automatically to a default value, or may be set automatically according to the criteria described above, such that the user does not have to take any affirmative steps to set the alert radius 762. The alert radius 762 defines an area around the user's A/V recording and communication device that encompasses at least one other A/V recording and communication device, which in this example will be referred to as A/V Doorbell #2. A/V Doorbell #2 may record video footage, and the user associated with A/V Doorbell #2 may share the recorded video footage according to a process described herein. Thus, with further reference to Figure 38, the client device associated with A/V Doorbell #2 (User's Client Device #2 764) may send to the network 756, and the network 756 may receive from User's Client Device #2 764, a share signal 766. The network 756, after determining that A/V Doorbell #2 764 is within the alert area defined around A/V Doorbell #1, may then send a share notification signal 768 to the client device associated with A/V Doorbell #1 (User's Client Device #1 754).

[00226] Figures 39 and 40 are flowcharts illustrating other processes for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure. Figure 39 is described from the perspective of the user, while Figure 40 is described from the perspective of the network device(s). Thus, with reference to Figure 39, at block B770 the user may activate a new A/V recording and communication device and connect it to the network. As described above, some aspects of the activation/setup/connection process may be carried out using an application executing on the user's client device. At block B772, the user may enable the video sharing feature of the user's A/V recording and communication device, and at block B774 the user may set a notification distance (alert radius) associated with the video sharing feature of the user's A/V recording and communication device. As described above, these aspects of the activation/setup/connection process may be automated, such that the user does not have to take any affirmative steps. The alert radius defines an area around the user's A/V recording and communication device that encompasses at least one other A/V recording and communication device, which in this example will be referred to as a second A/V doorbell. The second A/V doorbell may record video footage, and the user associated with the second A/V doorbell may share the recorded video footage according to a process described herein. The client device associated with the second A/V doorbell may send to the network, and the network may receive from the second A/V doorbell, a share signal. The network, after determining that the second A/V doorbell is within the alert area defined around A/V Doorbell #1, may then send a share notification signal to the client device associated with A/V Doorbell #1 (first client device). Thus, at block B776 the first client device may receive the share notification signal, including a link to the video footage recorded by the second A/V doorbell that is within the notification distance (alert radius) of the first A/V doorbell.

[00227] With reference to Figure 40, at block B778 the network may receive from the user's client device information associated with the user's A/V recording and communication device (first A/V doorbell). The information may include, for example, the location of the first A/V doorbell. The location may comprise the street address of a building with which the first A/V doorbell is associated, such as being secured thereto, for example. At block B780, the network may further receive from the user's client device, an enable signal for the video sharing feature of the first A/V doorbell. For example, during the setup process the user may enable (turn on) the video sharing feature using a GUI such as that illustrated in Figure 36. In some embodiments, the video sharing feature may be enabled by default, such that the user does not have to take any affirmative steps to enable the video sharing feature. [00228] With further reference to Figure 40, at block B782 the network may further receive from the user's client device a notification distance (alert radius) associated with the video sharing feature of the first A/V doorbell. For example, during the setup process the user may select an alert radius using a GUI such as that illustrated in Figure 36. In some embodiments, the alert radius may be set automatically to a default value, or may be set automatically according to the criteria described above, such that the user does not have to take any affirmative steps to set the alert radius. At block B784, the network may update one or more data structures (alert areas) with the information received about the first A/V doorbell, including its location and/or its alert radius.

[00229] The alert radius defines an area around the first A/V doorbell that encompasses at least one other A/V recording and communication device, which in this example will be referred to as second A/V doorbell. The second A/V doorbell may record video footage, and the user associated with the second A/V doorbell may share the recorded video footage according to a process described herein. Thus, with further reference to Figure 40, at block B786 the network may receive from the second client device a share signal. The network, after determining, at block B788, that the second A/V doorbell is within the alert area defined around the first A/V doorbell, may then send a share notification signal to the client device associated with the first A/V doorbell at block B790.

[00230] Figure 41 is a sequence diagram illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure. The process of Figure 41 includes aspects of the process of Figure 38, including the user' s client device 754 (User' s Client Device #1) sending to the network 756 (and the network 756 receiving from the user' s client device 754, information 758 associated with the user' s A/V recording and communication device (A/V Doorbell #1), the user' s client device 754 further sending to the network 756 (and the network 756 further receiving from the user' s client device 754) an enable signal 760 for the video sharing feature of the user' s A/V recording and communication device, the user' s client device 754 further sending to the network 756 (and the network 756 further receiving from the user's client device 754) a notification distance (alert radius) 762 associated with the video sharing feature of the user' s A/V recording and communication device, the second client device 764 (User's Client Device #2) sending a share signal 766 to the network 756 (and the network 756 receiving the share signal 766 from the second client device 764), and the network device(s) 756 transmitting a share notification signal 768 to the user's client device 754.

[00231] The process of Figure 41 further comprises the user's client device 754 sending a playback request signal 792 to the network 756 (and the network 756 receiving the playback request signal from the user's client device 754), and the network device(s) 756, in response to receiving the playback request signal 792 from the user's client device 754, transmitting a video signal 794 to the user's client device 754, the video signal 794 including the shared video footage recorded by A/V Doorbell #2. For example, User's Client Device #1 754 may receive the share notification signal 768, which may be, for example, a push notification. The user associated with User's Client Device #1 754 may then choose to view the shared video footage, such as by selecting a "VIEW NOW" button (or an "OK" button, etc.) in the push notification. Alternatively, the user may ignore the share notification signal 768, but may subsequently request to view the shared video footage through one or more screens/menus within an application executing on User's Client Device #1 754, as described above. The playback request signal 768 is then sent to the network 756, and the shared video footage is sent to User's Client Device #1 754 in the video signal 794.

[00232] Figure 42 is a flowchart illustrating another process for sharing video footage from an A/V recording and communication doorbell according to an aspect of the present disclosure. The process of Figure 42 is described from the perspective of the network device(s). Thus, at block B778 the network receives from the user's client device information associated with the user's A/V recording and communication device (first A/V doorbell). The information may include, for example, the location of the first A/V doorbell. The location may comprise the street address of a building with which the first A/V doorbell is associated, such as being secured thereto, for example. At block B780, the network may further receive from the user's client device, an enable signal for the video sharing feature of the first A/V doorbell. For example, during the setup process the user may enable (turn on) the video sharing feature using a GUI such as that illustrated in Figure 36. In some embodiments, the video sharing feature may be enabled by default, such that the user does not have to take any affirmative steps to enable the video sharing feature.

[00233] With further reference to Figure 42, at block B782 the network may further receive from the user's client device a notification distance (alert radius) associated with the video sharing feature of the first A/V doorbell. For example, during the setup process the user may select an alert radius using a GUI such as that illustrated in Figure 36. In some embodiments, the alert radius may be set automatically to a default value, or may be set automatically according to the criteria described above, such that the user does not have to take any affirmative steps to set the alert radius. At block B784, the network may update one or more data structures (alert areas) with the information received about the first A/V doorbell, including its location and/or its alert radius.

[00234] The alert radius defines an area around the first A/V doorbell that encompasses at least one other A/V recording and communication device, which in this example will be referred to as second A/V doorbell. The second A/V doorbell may record video footage, and the user associated with the second A/V doorbell may share the recorded video footage according to a process described herein. Thus, with further reference to Figure 40, at block B786 the network may receive from the second client device a share signal. The network, after determining, at block B788, that the second A/V doorbell is within the alert area defined around the first A/V doorbell, may then send a share notification signal to the client device associated with the first A/V doorbell at block B790. At block B796, the network receives a playback request signal from the first client device. At block B798, the network transmits a video signal to the first client device.

[00235] Figure 43 is a functional block diagram illustrating a system 800 for sharing video footage from audio/video recording and communication devices according to the present embodiments. The system 800 may comprise a backend API 802 including one or more components. A backend API (application programming interface) may comprise, for example, a server (e.g. a real server, or a virtual machine, or a machine running in a cloud infrastructure as a service), or multiple servers networked together, exposing at least one API to client(s) accessing it. These servers may include components such as application servers (e.g. software servers), depending upon what other components are included, such as a caching layer, or database layers, or other components. A backend API may, for example, comprise many such applications, each of which communicate with one another using their public APIs. In some embodiments, the API backend may hold the bulk of the user data and offer the user management capabilities, leaving the clients to have very limited state. [00236] The backend API 802 illustrated Figure 43 may include one or more APIs 804. An API is a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software and applications. An API expresses a software component in terms of its operations, inputs, outputs, and underlying types, defining functionalities that are independent of their respective implementations, which allows definitions and implementations to vary without compromising the interface. Advantageously, an API may provide a programmer with access to an application's functionality without the programmer needing to modify the application itself, or even understand how the application works. An API may be for a web-based system, an operating system, or a database system, and it provides facilities to develop applications for that system using a given programming language. In addition to accessing databases or computer hardware like hard disk drives or video cards, an API can ease the work of programming GUI components. For example, an API can facilitate integration of new features into existing applications (a so-called "plug-in API"). An API can also assist otherwise distinct applications with sharing data, which can help to integrate and enhance the functionalities of the applications.

[00237] The backend API 802 illustrated in Figure 43 may further include one or more services 806, 808 (also referred to as network services). A network service is an application that provides data storage, manipulation, presentation, communication, and/or other capability. Network services are often implemented using a client-server architecture based on application- layer network protocols. Each service may be provided by a server component running on one or more computers (such as a dedicated server computer offering multiple services) and accessed via a network by client components running on other devices. However, the client and server components can both be run on the same machine. Clients and servers may have a user interface, and sometimes other hardware associated with them.

[00238] The backend API 802 illustrated in Figure 43 includes an alert areas service 806. The alert areas service 806 may comprise one or more data structures 810 storing information about a plurality of A/V recording and communication devices. For example, the information may include the location of each device (such as the street address of each device), and the size of the alert radius around each device. The alert areas service 806 may access the information in the data structure(s) 810 when needed to determine which users will receive a share notification when a first user shares recorded video footage, as further described below. The alert areas service 806 may also maintain the information in the data structure(s) 810 and update the information in the data structure(s) 810 when new A/V recording and communication devices are activated, when existing A/V recording and communication devices are deactivated, and/or when the alert radii around existing A/V recording and communication devices are changed.

[00239] In the system 800 of Figure 43, a first A/V recording and communication device 812 (A/V Doorbell 812 #1) may record video footage, which may also include audio. The doorbell 812 sends a first alert signal and a first video signal 814 to the API 804, and the API 804 receives the first alert signal and the first video signal 814. The first video signal includes images (the video footage) captured by a camera of the doorbell 812. The API 804 transmits to a first client device 816 (User's Client Device #1), in response to receiving the first alert signal and the first video signal 814, a second alert signal and a second video signal 818. The second alert signal may be, for example, a push notification. The second video signal includes the images captured by the camera of the doorbell 812. The user associated with the first client device 816 may be the owner/user of the doorbell 812 (A/V Doorbell #1). The user, upon receiving the second alert signal, may choose to answer the second alert signal, which may, for example, open a live call between the user and the visitor at the doorbell 812. Alternatively, the user may ignore the second alert signal (e.g. choose not to answer the call). If the user ignores the second alert signal, he or she may still view the video footage of the second video signal at a later time. After viewing (or while viewing) the video footage on the display of his or her client device 816, the user may decide to share the video footage with other users. For example, the user may tap a "share" button from within an application executing on his or her client device 816. The first client device 816 then sends a share signal 820 to the API 804, and the API 804 receives the share signal 820 from the first client device 816. The share signal 820 may include text describing the images captured by the camera of the doorbell 812 (A/V Doorbell #1). In response to receiving the share signal 820 from the first client device 816, the API 804 sends identifying information 822 to the alert areas service 806. For example, the identifying information 822 may include an identifier for the user associated with A/V Doorbell #1 and an identifier for the video footage that is to be shared with other users. Alternatively, the identifying information 822 may include an identifier for A/V Doorbell #1 (rather than an identifier for the user associated with A/V Doorbell #1) and an identifier for the video footage that is to be shared with other users. The alert areas service 806 accesses the alert areas data structure(s) 810 and determines, based on the identifying information 822, the other users who are to receive a notification of the shared video footage. For example, the alert areas service 806, using the information stored in the alert areas data structure(s) 810 may determine that A/V Doorbell #1 812 is within the alert radius defined around at least one other A/V recording and communication device. Once the other device(s) has/have been identified, the alert areas service 806 may transmit a share notification signal 824 to a push notification service 808. The share notification signal 824 may include the text describing the images captured by the camera of the doorbell 812 (A/V Doorbell #1). The push notification service 808 may then forward one or more push notifications 825 to a plurality of provider push notification services 826. The provider push notification services 826 are configured to send push notifications to client devices that run different operating systems. For example, Android devices may receive push notifications from an Android push notification service 826, while iOS devices may receive push notifications from an iOS push notification service 826. Android is a mobile operating system (OS) developed by Google, based on the Linux kernel. iOS, by contrast, is a mobile operating system created and developed by Apple Inc. and distributed exclusively for Apple hardware. The provider push notification services 826 then send push notifications 828 to the client devices 830 associated with the other doorbell(s) identified by the alert areas service 806. The other user(s), upon receiving the push notifications 828, may choose to view the shared video footage. Alternatively, the other user(s) may ignore the push notifications 828. If the other user(s) ignores the push notifications 828, he or she may still view the shared video footage at a later time. In either event (viewing the shared video footage right away or viewing the shared video footage at a later time), one or more of the client devices 830 sends a playback request signal (not shown) to the backend API 802 (and the backend API 802 receives the playback request signal from the one or more of the client devices 830). In response to receiving the playback request signal from the one or more of the client devices 830, the backend API 802 transmits a video signal (not shown) to the one or more of the client devices 830. The video signal includes the shared video footage. In certain embodiments, the alert areas service 806 may receive the playback request signal from the one or more of the client devices 830 and transmit the video signal to the one or more of the client devices 830. If the other user(s) opens the push notification, which may contain a reference to the shared video footage, the other user(s) client device(s) 830 may use the API 804 to get the URL (Uniform Resource Locator) of the shared video footage and any other metadata (if any) about the shared video footage so that the shared video footage can be played back. If the other user(s) opens the shared video footage from the NEIGHBORHOOD ACTIVITY screen 716 (Figure 34), a similar process may occur, but the reference to the shared video footage may be in the activity feed item.

[00240] In some embodiments, an A/V recording and communication device may begin recording video footage not in response to a visitor being detected, but rather when a user accesses the camera of the device to view live video footage using his or her client device (e.g. "on-demand" viewing). In such embodiments, a process for sharing a video may include a step of the user accessing the camera of the device to view live video footage using his or her client device (e.g. "on-demand" viewing), followed by the user sharing the live video footage. For example, the user may select a share button from within an application executing on the user's client device (similar to the share button 584 described above with respect to Figures 20 and 21), and a share signal may then be sent from the user's client device and received by the network device(s) (similar to step 548 described above with respect to Figure 18), and a share notification signal may then be sent from the network device(s) and received by another client device(s) (similar to step 550 described above with respect to Figure 18). Example embodiments of video- on-demand are described in U.S. patent application Serial Nos. 62/267,762 and 62/289, 114, both of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties as if fully set forth.

[00241] As described above, the present embodiments advantageously enable users of A/V recording and communication devices to share video footage with one another. This feature can help reduce crime by increasing public awareness of suspicious activity. Users can tailor the number and frequency of alerts (notifications of shared videos) they receive by increasing and decreasing the size of the alert radius around their own A/V recording and communication device(s). Users will only receive alerts that result from videos recorded by other A/V recording and communication devices that are located within the alert area that the user has set. Users may share videos as frequently or as infrequently as desired, and users may view shared videos from other users as frequently or as infrequently as desired. When a user receives an alert, he or she can choose to view the accompanying video immediately, or to ignore the alert. If the user ignores the alert, he or she can still view the video at a later time using one or more menu screens within an application executing on the user's client device. The present embodiments thus advantageously provide a tool that can be used to reduce crime rates and that can be tailored by each user to meet his or her personal preferences. [00242] The present embodiments describe numerous ways for sharing videos, including via social media and/or social network(s). A social network may comprise a third-party network, such as EXTDOOR ® , FACEBOOK ® , INSTAGRAM ® , TWITTER ® , etc. A social network may also comprise a network made up of users of A/V recording and communication devices, such as video doorbells and security cameras. For example, when a user shares a video via the neighborhood share button 584 described above with respect to Figures 20, 21, 25, and 26, the video is shared with a social network in which the members of the social network are users who have A/V recording and communication devices, such as video doorbells and security cameras. The present embodiments are not limited to any particular kind or type of social network. Further, participants in the social network are not limited to users of A/V recording and communication devices of any particular kind or type.

[00243] In the present embodiments, some steps shown in one or more of the sequence diagrams and/or flowcharts may be omitted. For example, in the process for sharing video footage from a first A/V recording and communication device, such as shown in Figures 18 and 19, for example, the steps of transmitting/receiving the first alert signal and the first video signal and transmitting/receiving the second alert signal and the second video signal may be omitted. Such an embodiment might comprise, therefore, just the steps of transmitting/receiving the share signal transmitting/receiving the share notification signal.

[00244] Figure 44 is a functional block diagram of a client device 850 on which the present embodiments may be implemented according to various aspects of the present disclosure. The user's client device 114 described with reference to Figure 1 may include some or all of the components and/or functionality of the client device 850. The client device 850 may comprise, for example, a mobile phone such as a smartphone, or a computing device such as a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a desktop computer, etc.

[00245] With reference to Figure 44, the client device 850 includes a processor 852, a memory 854, a user interface 856, a communication module 858, and a dataport 860. These components are communicatively coupled together by an interconnect bus 862. The processor 852 may include any processor used in smartphones and/or portable computing devices, such as an ARM processor (a processor based on the RISC (reduced instruction set computer) architecture developed by Advanced RISC Machines (ARM).). In some embodiments, the processor 852 may include one or more other processors, such as one or more conventional microprocessors, and/or one or more supplementary co-processors, such as math co-processors.

[00246] The memory 854 may include both operating memory, such as random access memory (RAM), as well as data storage, such as read-only memory (ROM), hard drives, flash memory, or any other suitable memory/storage element. The memory 854 may include removable memory elements, such as a CompactFlash card, a MultiMediaCard (MMC), and/or a Secure Digital (SD) card. In some embodiments, the memory 854 may comprise a combination of magnetic, optical, and/or semiconductor memory, and may include, for example, RAM, ROM, flash drive, and/or a hard disk or drive. The processor 852 and the memory 854 each may be, for example, located entirely within a single device, or may be connected to each other by a communication medium, such as a USB port, a serial port cable, a coaxial cable, an Ethernet- type cable, a telephone line, a radio frequency transceiver, or other similar wireless or wired medium or combination of the foregoing. For example, the processor 852 may be connected to the memory 854 via the dataport 860.

[00247] The user interface 856 may include any user interface or presentation elements suitable for a smartphone and/or a portable computing device, such as a keypad, a display screen, a touchscreen, a microphone, and a speaker. The communication module 858 is configured to handle communication links between the client device 850 and other, external devices or receivers, and to route incoming/outgoing data appropriately. For example, inbound data from the dataport 860 may be routed through the communication module 858 before being directed to the processor 852, and outbound data from the processor 852 may be routed through the communication module 858 before being directed to the dataport 860. The communication module 858 may include one or more transceiver modules capable of transmitting and receiving data, and using, for example, one or more protocols and/or technologies, such as GSM, UMTS (3 GSM), IS-95 (CDMA one), IS-2000 (CDMA 2000), LTE, FDMA, TDMA, W-CDMA, CDMA, OFDMA, Wi-Fi, WiMAX, or any other protocol and/or technology.

[00248] The dataport 860 may be any type of connector used for physically interfacing with a smartphone and/or a portable computing device, such as a mini-USB port or an IPHO E ® /IPOD ® 30-pin connector or LIGHTNING ® connector. In other embodiments, the dataport 860 may include multiple communication channels for simultaneous communication with, for example, other processors, servers, and/or client terminals. [00249] The memory 854 may store instructions for communicating with other systems, such as a computer. The memory 854 may store, for example, a program (e.g., computer program code) adapted to direct the processor 852 in accordance with the present embodiments. The instructions also may include program elements, such as an operating system. While execution of sequences of instructions in the program causes the processor 852 to perform the process steps described herein, hard-wired circuitry may be used in place of, or in combination with, software/firmware instructions for implementation of the processes of the present embodiments. Thus, the present embodiments are not limited to any specific combination of hardware and software.

[00250] Figure 45 is a functional block diagram of a general-purpose computing system on which the present embodiments may be implemented according to various aspects of the present disclosure. The computer system 900 may execute at least some of the operations described above. The computer system 900 may be embodied in at least one of a personal computer (also referred to as a desktop computer) 900A, a portable computer (also referred to as a laptop or notebook computer) 900B, and/or a server 900C. A server is a computer program and/or a machine that waits for requests from other machines or software (clients) and responds to them. A server typically processes data. The purpose of a server is to share data and/or hardware and/or software resources among clients. This architecture is called the client-server model. The clients may run on the same computer or may connect to the server over a network. Examples of computing servers include database servers, file servers, mail servers, print servers, web servers, game servers, and application servers. The term server may be construed broadly to include any computerized process that shares a resource to one or more client processes.

[00251] The computer system 900 may include at least one processor 910, memory 920, at least one storage device 930, and input/output (I/O) devices 940. Some or all of the components 910, 920, 930, 940 may be interconnected via a system bus 950. The processor 910 may be single- or multi -threaded and may have one or more cores. The processor 910 may execute instructions, such as those stored in the memory 920 and/or in the storage device 930. Information may be received and output using one or more I/O devices 940.

[00252] The memory 920 may store information, and may be a computer-readable medium, such as volatile or non-volatile memory. The storage device(s) 930 may provide storage for the system 900, and may be a computer-readable medium. In various aspects, the storage device(s) 930 may be a flash memory device, a hard disk device, an optical disk device, a tape device, or any other type of storage device.

[00253] The I/O devices 940 may provide input/output operations for the system 900. The I/O devices 940 may include a keyboard, a pointing device, and/or a microphone. The I/O devices 940 may further include a display unit for displaying graphical user interfaces, a speaker, and/or a printer. External data may be stored in one or more accessible external databases 960.

[00254] In some embodiments, users may tag or categorize their videos when sharing them with other users, and users may set one or more preferences for the type(s) of videos for which they want to receive share notifications. For example, Figure 46 illustrates an embodiment of a graphical user interface (GUI) 970 for setting one or more user preferences for the type(s) of videos for which the user wants to receive share notifications. The Neighborhood Alert Settings screen 970 includes a list 972 having a plurality of categories, including, for example, SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY 974, BURGLARY 976, ATTEMPTED BURGLARY 978, VANDALISM 980, THEFT 982, and OTHER 984. By selecting one or more of the listed categories, a user may limit the type(s) of videos that will be shared with that user. For example, the user may only receive share notifications for shared videos that fall within one or more of the categories that the user has selected. A GUI (not shown) similar to that shown in Figure 46 may be provided to users during the video sharing process, so that the shared videos can be tagged or categorized. In some embodiments, a user may choose not to categorize a shared video. In some embodiments, a user who has set preferences for the types of videos he or she wants to be notified about may receive share notifications for uncategorized shared videos. In alternative embodiments, a user who has set preferences for the types of videos he or she wants to be notified about may not receive share notifications for uncategorized shared videos.

[00255] In some embodiments, users may be able to view shared videos regardless of where their own A/V recording and communication devices are located. In still further embodiments, even users who do not even own any A/V recording and communication devices may be able to view shared videos. For example, shared videos may be available through a publicly accessible forum, such as a website. In another example, shared videos may be accessed by users running an application on their client devices. A user sharing a video may have the option to make the shared video available to the public, or to restrict the shared video to only those users identified through the processes described above, such as the processes of Figures 16-19. In still further embodiments, a user may be able to view shared videos from any area the user specifies by selecting a location on a map and specifying an alert radius around the location. In still further embodiments, a user may enable "alerts around me." This feature may work in real-time to provide the user with alerts from within a given radius of the user's current location. The user's current location may be determined, for example, using GPS technology and the user's mobile client device, such as a smartphone.

[00256] In some embodiments, shared videos may be accessed by law enforcement agencies. For example, a user sharing a video may have the option to make the shared video available to law enforcement through a web portal. Law enforcement may be able to log in through the web portal to view the shared videos. For example, the web portal may include a map view indicating the locations of all of the shared videos. The map view may include selectable markers or icons corresponding to the locations of the shared videos. Selecting one of the icons may open a video player and begin playback of the shared video corresponding to the selected icon. Different law enforcement agencies, departments, or groups may have different logins that grant access to specific zones, such as geographic locations that are within the jurisdiction of each agency, department, or group.

[00257] In some embodiments, users may be able to block videos from certain other users and/or from certain locations.

[00258] In some embodiments, when a user attempts to share a video, the video may undergo a review before being shared with other users. For example, with reference to Figure 18, when the network 542 receives the share signal 548, an administrator may subsequently review the video before the share notification signal 550 may be sent to any client devices of other users. If the video violates any policies, the administrator may prevent the share notification signal 550 from being sent to any client devices of other users. A notification, such as an e-mail, may be sent to the user who shared the video explaining that the video did not comply with one or more policies or guidelines. The requirement for administrator review may apply to all users, or selectively to only some users, such as users who have attempted to share one or more inappropriate videos. In further embodiments, an administrator may ban a user from sharing videos, such as for repeated policy violations (such as attempting to share one or more inappropriate videos). [00259] As described above, another aspect of the present embodiments includes the realization that A/V recording and communication devices could be enhanced by processing a user share signal to identify events, persons, and/or objects of interest to trigger one or more further actions. For example, a user, using a client device such as a smartphone, may send a share signal to a network including one or more backend devices, where the share signal includes first image data, first audio data, and/or first text data. In some embodiments, share signals may include image data, audio data, and/or text data from various first devices, including first A/V recording and communication devices such as A/V doorbells, and first client devices such as smartphones. In many embodiments, the backend device(s) may be configured to process the share signal to identify events such as (but not limited to) suspicious and/or criminal activity and to identify a person and/or an object of interest from information in the share signal and/or sent in conjunction with the share signal. Further, the backend device(s) may be configured to process additional image data, audio data, and/or text data captured by various second devices, including second A/V recording and communication devices such as A/V doorbells, and second client devices such as smartphones, for a match of the person and/or object of interest. Once a match is found, the backend device(s) may trigger one or more further actions such as (but not limited to) sounding warning alarms/sirens/messages from one or more A/V recording and communication devices, causing one or more A/V recording and communication devices to capture additional image data and/or audio data, and/or sending reports of the activity to one or more client devices and/or law enforcement. The present embodiments thus advantageously enable advanced monitoring and reduction in crime within a network of users and devices.

[00260] In one example use case, a camera of an A/V recording and communication device or a client device may record video footage of a criminal act, or another type of event that may be of interest to one or more users. The video footage may include audio recorded contemporaneously with the video by a microphone of the A/V recording and communication device or the client device, although in some embodiments the video footage may not include audio. A first user, using an application executing on a client device, may share the video footage (with the audio, if available) to a network of users. For example, the network of users may comprise users who own at least one A/V recording and communication device, such as a video doorbell. In another example, the network of users may comprise some users who own at least one A/V recording and communication device, such as a video doorbell, and some users who do not own such a device. In another example, the network of users may comprise users who do not own any A/V recording and communication devices, including video doorbells. In some embodiments, the first user may provide textual information about the shared video footage, such as a description of the person(s) and/or event(s) depicted in the shared video footage. The first user may, for example, enter the textual information about the shared video footage using a keyboard or other input device (e.g., speech-to-text processing) of the client device. This text data, if provided, may also be shared with the network of users in connection with the shared video footage. The shared video footage (and audio and/or text data, if provided) may be received by one or more backend devices in the network, such as one or more servers, APIs, databases, etc. The one or more backend devices may process and analyze the shared video footage (and audio and/or text data, if provided) and attempt to match the person(s) depicted in the shared video footage with one or more person(s) depicted in other video footage that was shared by one or more second users in the network at an earlier point in time. For example, the matching processing and analysis may comprise at least one of computer vision, facial recognition, or other types of biometric analysis and matching.

[00261] If a match is found, one or more actions may be initiated. For example, the second user(s) who had previously shared the other video footage may be notified that the same person(s) depicted in the video footage that they had shared was captured on video footage recorded by the first user's camera device. The notification to the second user(s) may include location information, such as an approximate location where the video footage shared by the first user was recorded. In another example, the first user who shared the video footage may be notified that the same person(s) depicted in the first user's shared video footage was also depicted in video footage that had previously been shared to the network by another user (the second user). The notification to the first user may include location information, such as an approximate location where the video footage shared by the second user was recorded. In another example, the video footage shared by the first and/or second user(s) may be forwarded to law enforcement so that the person(s) depicted in the video footage may be apprehended. The notification to law enforcement may include location information, such as an approximate location where either or both of the first and second video footage shared by the first and second users, respectively, was recorded. In another example, one or more alerts may be sent to users in the network, where the users who receive an alert are determined according to their proximity to the user(s) who shared the video footage and/or the device(s) that recorded the shared video footage. For example, an alert may be sent to all users who are located within a defined radius of the location where the video footage shared by the first user was recorded. In another example, an alert may be sent to all users who are located in proximity to the location where the video footage shared by the first user was recorded, wherein proximity is determined according to a process similar to that described above with reference to Figures 17-19. In another example, one or more alert sounds and/or messages may be transmitted to A/V recording and communication devices, such as video doorbells, that are located within a defined radius of the location where the video footage shared by the first user was recorded. Such alert sounds and/or messages may be broadcast from speakers of such devices, and the alert sounds and/or messages may provide a warning to persons nearby that a potentially dangerous person is in the area, and/or the alert sounds and/or messages may provide a warning to the person (the "perpetrator") depicted in the shared video footage, which warning may cause the perpetrator to flee, which in turn makes the neighborhood safer by expelling the potentially dangerous perpetrator. Another example may include identifying A/V recording and communication devices in proximity to the location where the video footage shared by the first user was recorded, and triggering the identified A/V recording and communication devices to record additional video and/or audio. The additional video and/or audio might capture the perpetrator, which may be useful to law enforcement in apprehending the perpetrator. If no match is found in the comparison of the shared video footage and/or audio and/or text data from the first user with previously shared video footage and/or audio and/or text data from the second user(s), then the shared video footage and/or audio and/or text data from the first user may be stored at one or more of the backend devices, where it may be accessed in the future and used to match video footage and/or audio and/or text data shared by one or more third users at some future time(s).

[00262] In any of the present embodiments, the shared video footage may be recorded by any type of device having a camera, including, but not limited to, an A/V recording and communication device such as a video doorbell, or a client device such as a smartphone. Further, in some embodiments, the shared video footage may comprise only a single frame of video or a still image. In embodiments in which the shared video footage is recorded by a client device, the client device may be associated with an A/V recording and communication device such as a video doorbell. For example, the client device may receive alerts from the A/V recording and communication device in a similar manner as described above with respect to Figure 1. In other embodiments, however, in which the shared video footage is recorded by a client device, the client device may not be associated with any A/V recording and communication devices. The present embodiments are thus not limited to networks that include A/V recording and communication devices, nor are the present embodiments limited to use by users who own A/V recording and communication devices. That is, any user who has a device with a camera may join and participate in the network. Further, even users with non-camera devices may join and participate in the network. Still further, users with camera devices may participate in the network in one or more ways that do not include the camera. For example, for non-camera devices, as well as for camera devices, the type of content/data/information shared with the network may comprise only audio data, or only text data, or audio data combined with text data. For example, a user may witness a criminal act, or another type of event that may be of interest to one or more other users, but the witnessing user may not have video footage of the event. The witnessing user may, however, have audio of the event, which may include recorded audio of the perpetrator's voice. The witnessing user may share the audio of the perpetrator's voice to the network, where it may be received by one or more backend devices, which device(s) may then compare the voice to voice recordings from audio and/or video shared by other users. If a match is found, one or more actions may be triggered, including any of the actions described above or described elsewhere herein. The process of matching the perpetrator's voice with other voice recordings may comprise, for example, comparing a spectrogram of the perpetrator's voice with spectrograms of other voice recordings (may also be referred to as voiceprint or voicegram analysis). In another example, the witnessing user may not have audio or video footage of the event, but the witnessing user may share a textual description of the event to the network, and the textual description may include, for example, a description of the perpetrator(s). The shared textual description may be received by one or more backend devices in the network, which device(s) may then perform natural language processing on the text to extract a description of the perpetrator(s) that can then be compared to descriptions of perpetrators that had previously been shared to the network by other users. These previous descriptions may comprise, for example, textual descriptions, or the one or more backend devices may compare the shared textual description to video footage shared by other users to attempt to find a match. If a match is found, one or more actions may be triggered, including any of the actions described above or described elsewhere herein.

[00263] Figure 47 is a functional block diagram illustrating a system 1000 for communicating in a network using a share signal. In some embodiments, the share signal may trigger one or more actions according to various aspects of the present disclosure, as described below. As described above, a first client device may share a video, audio, and/or text using a share signal, and the network may receive the share signal. As further described below, the network may include one or more backend devices that may be configured to process the share signal to identify particular events (such as a criminal act) and/or a person or persons of interest. In addition, the backend devices may process the share signal by comparing first image data, first audio data, and/or first text data to second image data, second audio data, and/or second text data for a match of the person(s) of interest. In some embodiments, the processing of the share signal may be done with second image data, second audio data, and/or second text data that is captured in real-time, or may be done with second image data, second audio data, and/or second text data that is stored in backend devices such as databases and/or servers. In many embodiments, matching information in the share signal to a person or persons of interest may be performed using machine vision and/or computer vision processes. Upon finding a match, the backend device(s) may generate and transmit an alert signal to at least one second client device, which in some embodiments may be associated with at least one second A/V recording and communication device, and/or may trigger one or more further actions, as described below.

[00264] In reference to Figure 47, the system 1000 may include one or more first audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices 1002 configured to access a user's network 1008 to connect to a network (Internet/PSTN) 1010. The system 1000 may also include one or more first client devices 1004, 1006, which in various embodiments may be configured to be in network communication with the first A/V recording and communication device 1002. The first client devices 1004, 1006 may comprise, for example, a mobile phone such as a smartphone, or a computing device such as a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a desktop computer, etc. The first client devices 1004, 1006 may include any or all of the components and/or functionality of the client device 114 and/or the client device 850 described herein. In some embodiments, the first client devices 1004, 1006 may not be associated with a first A/V recording and communication device, as described above. [00265] In various embodiments, the system 1000 may also include one or more second A/V recording and communication devices 1012 connected to the network (Internet/PSTN) 1010 using various networks such as a cellular/mobile network 1018, a local network, a wireless network such as a Wi-Fi network, a public network, a low-bandwidth network, and/or any other appropriate network to access the network (Internet/PSTN) 1010. The system 1000 may further include one or more second client devices 1014, 1016, which in various embodiments may be configured to be in network communication with the second A/V recording and communication device 1012. The second client devices 1014, 1016 may comprise, for example, a mobile phone such as a smartphone, or a computing device such as a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a desktop computer, etc. The second client devices 1014, 1016 may include any or all of the components and/or functionality of the client device 114 and/or the client device 850 described herein. In some embodiments, the second client devices 1014, 1016 may not be associated with a second A/V recording and communication device, as described above.

[00266] In some embodiments, the system 1000 may also include one or more third party A/V recording and communication devices 1020 connected to the network (Internet/PSTN) 1010 using various third party networks 1026 such as a local network, a wireless network such as a cellular/mobile network and/or a Wi-Fi network, a wired network such as an Ethernet network, a public network, a low-bandwidth network, and/or any other appropriate network to access the network (Internet/PSTN) 1010. The system 1000 may further include one or more third party client devices 1022, 1024, which in various embodiments may be configured to be in network communication with the third party A/V recording and communication device 1020. The third party client devices 1022, 1024 may comprise, for example, a mobile phone such as a smartphone, or a computing device such as a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a desktop computer, etc. The third party client devices 1022, 1024 may include any or all of the components and/or functionality of the client device 114 and/or the client device 850 described herein. In some embodiments, the third party client devices 1022, 1024 may not be associated with a third party A/V recording and communication device, as described above.

[00267] With further reference to Figure 47, the system 1000 may also include various backend devices such as (but not limited to) storage devices 1032, backend servers 1030, and backend APIs 1028 in network communication with the first, second, and third party A/V communication devices 1002, 1012, 1020 and their respective client devices 1004, 1006, 1014, 1016, 1022, 1024. In some embodiments, the storage devices 1032 may be a separate device from the backend servers 1030 (as illustrated) or may be an integral component of the backend servers 1030. In addition, the user's network 1008 and the network 1010 may be similar in structure and/or function to the user's network 110 and the network 112 (Figure 1), respectively. In some embodiments, the first and second A/V recording and communication devices 1002, 1012 may be similar in structure and/or function to the A/V doorbell 100 (Figure 1) and/or the A/V recording and communication doorbell 130 (Figures 2-12). In some embodiments, the first user's client devices 1004, 1006 may be similar in structure and/or function to the user's client device 114 (Figure 1) and/or the user's client device 850 (Figure 44). The second user's client devices 1014, 1016 may also be similar in structure and/or function to the user's client device 114 (Figure 1) and/or the user's client device 850 (Figure 44). Also, the storage devices 1032 may be similar in structure and/or function to the storage device 116 (Figure 1). In addition, in some embodiments, the backend servers 1030 and backend APIs 1028 may be similar in structure and/or function to the server 118 and the backend API 120 (Figure 1), respectively.

[00268] Figure 48 is a functional block diagram illustrating an embodiment of the first A/V recording and communication device 1002 according to various aspects of the present disclosure. The first A/V recording and communication device 1002 may comprise a processing module 1050 that is operatively connected to a camera 1040, a microphone 1042, a speaker 1044, and a communication module 1046. The processing module 1050 may comprise a processor 1052, volatile memory 1054, and non-volatile memory 1056 that includes a camera application 1058. In various embodiments, the camera application 1058 may configure the processor 1052 to capture first image data 1060 using the camera 1040 and first audio data 1062 using the microphone 1042. In some embodiments, the camera application 1058 may also configure the processor 1052 to generate text data 1064 describing the first image data 1060. In other embodiments, the text data 1064 describing the first image data 1060 may be generated by a user using the first client device 1004, 1006 associated with the first A/V recording and communication device 1002, as described above. In addition, the camera application 1058 may configure the processor 1052 to transmit the first image data 1060, the first audio data 1062, and/or the text data 1064 to the first client device 1004, 1006 using the communication module 1046, and the first client device 1004, 1006 may generate and transmit a share signal 1048 using the first image data 1060, the first audio data 1062, and/or the text data 1064 to the backend server 1030. In other embodiments, the camera application 1058 may configure the processor 1052 to directly generate and transmit a share signal 1048 using the first image data 1060, the first audio data 1062, and/or the text data 1064 to the backend server 1030 using the communication module 1046. As further described below, the share signal 1048 may be processed by the backend server 1030 for triggering one or more of various actions.

[00269] Figure 49 is a functional block diagram illustrating an embodiment of the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 according to various aspects of the present disclosure. The second A/V recording and communication device 1012 may comprise a processing module 1080 that is operatively connected to a camera 1070, a microphone 1072, a speaker 1074, and a communication module 1076. The processing module 1080 may comprise a processor 1082, volatile memory 1084, and non-volatile memory 1086 that includes a camera application 1088. In some embodiments, the camera application 1088 may configure the processor 1082 to capture second image data 1090 using the camera 1070 and second audio data 1092 using the microphone 1072. In various embodiments, the camera application 1088 may also configure the processor to generate and transmit an output signal 1094 that may include the second image data 1090 and the second audio data 1092. In some embodiments, the output signal 1094 may be transmitted, using the communication module 1076, to the second client device 1014, 1016, and the second client device 1014, 1016 may send the output signal 1094 to the backend server 1030. In other embodiments, the output signal 1094 may be transmitted directly to the backend server 1030 using the communication module 1076. In either embodiments, the backend server 1030 may use the output signal 1094 to process the share signal 1048 for triggering one or more further actions. For example, in various embodiments, the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 may receive the alert signal 1078 from the backend server 1030 and perform one or more actions in response to receiving the alert signal 1078. For example, such actions may include (but not be limited to) any of the actions described herein, including the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 playing an audio warning message using the speaker 1074 in response to receiving the alert signal 1078. Further, the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 may capture additional second image data 1090 and/or second audio data 1092. Another example may include identifying A/V recording and communication devices in a predetermined vicinity of the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 and triggering the identified A/V recording and communication devices to play an audio warning message using their respective speakers. Further, the A/V recording and communication devices in the predetermined vicinity may be triggered to capture additional second image data and/or second audio data. The additional second image data and/or second audio data might capture additional audio and/or video of the perpetrator, which may be useful in apprehending the perpetrator. In these and other embodiments, the "predetermined vicinity" about the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 may be determined according to any of the methods described herein, such as the methods described with respect to Figures 17-19.

[00270] In reference to Figures 48 and 49, the image data 1060, 1090 may comprise image sensor data such as (but not limited to) exposure values and data regarding pixel values for a particular sized grid. Further, image data may comprise converted image sensor data for standard image file formats such as (but not limited to) JPEG, JPEG 2000, TIFF, BMP, or PNG. In addition, image data may also comprise data related to video, where such data may include (but is not limited to) image sequences, frame rates, and the like. Moreover, image data may include data that is analog, digital, uncompressed, compressed, and/or in vector formats. Image data may take on various forms and formats as appropriate to the requirements of a specific application in accordance with the present embodiments. As described herein, the term "record" may also be referred to as "capture" as appropriate to the requirements of a specific application in accordance with the present embodiments. In addition, a communication module, such as the communication modules 1046, 1076 may comprise (but is not limited to) one or more transceivers and/or wireless antennas (not shown) configured to transmit and receive wireless signals. In further embodiments, the communication modules 1046, 1076 may comprise (but are not limited to) one or more transceivers configured to transmit and receive wired and/or wireless signals.

[00271] Figure 50 is a functional block diagram illustrating one embodiment of a backend server 1030 according to various aspects of the present disclosure. The backend server 1030 may comprise a processing module 1100 comprising a processor 1102, volatile memory 1104, a network interface 1119, and non-volatile memory 1106. The network interface 1119 may allow the backend server 1030 to access and communicate with devices connected to the network (Internet/PSTN) 1010. The non-volatile memory 1106 may include a server application 1108 that configures the processor 1102 to receive the share signal 1112 and perform processes for triggering one or more actions using the share signal 1112, as further described below. In various embodiments, the share signal 1112 may include first image data 1060, first audio data 1062, and/or text data 1068 received from the first client device 1004, 1006 and/or the first A/V recording and communication device 1002. Further, the non-volatile memory 1106 may include an output signal 1094 that includes second image data 1090 and/or second audio data 1092 received from the second client device 1014, 1016 and/or the second A/V recording and communication device 1012. In various embodiments, the backend server 1030 may be configured to process the share signal 1112 by identifying an event depicted in the share signal 1112 and determining whether the depicted event meets at least one event criteria 1118, as further described below. Further, the backend server 1030 may be configured to process the share signal 1112 by comparing the first image data 1060, the first audio data 1062, and/or the text data 1068 with the second image data 1090 and/or the second audio data 1092 for a match of a person or object of interest, as further described below. In some embodiments, the second image data 1090 and/or the second audio data 1092 may be separately stored at the backend databases 1032, where the backend server 1030 may process the share signal 1112 by comparing the first image data 1060, the first audio data 1062, and/or the text data 1068 to information at the databases 1032, as further described below.

[00272] In further reference to Figure 50, the non-volatile memory 1106 may also include source identifying data 1110 that may be used to determine locations of the first A/V recording and communication device 1002, the second A/V recording and communication device 1012, and/or the third party A/V recording and communication device 1020. In addition, the source identifying data 1110 may be used to determine locations of the first client device 1004, 1006, the second client device 1014, 1016, and/or the third party devices 1022, 1024. In some embodiments, the server application 1108 may configure the processor 1102 to generate and transmit a report signal 1116 to a third party client device 1022, 1024 and/or a law enforcement agency that includes information indicating an approximate location of where the first image data was captured and/or where the second image data was captured, as further described below.

[00273] In the illustrated embodiment of Figures 48-50, the various components including (but not limited to) the processing modules 1050, 1080, 1100, the communication modules 1046, 1076, and the network interface 1119 are represented by separate boxes. The graphical representations depicted in each of Figures 48-50 are, however, merely examples, and are not intended to indicate that any of the various components of the first A/V recording and communication device 1002, the second A/V recording and communication device 1012, or the backend server 1030 are necessarily physically separate from one another, although in some embodiments they might be. In other embodiments, however, the structure and/or functionality of any or all of the components of first A/V recording and communication device 1002 may be combined. In addition, in some embodiments the communication module 1046 may include its own processor, volatile memory, and/or non-volatile memory. Likewise, the structure and/or functionality of any or all of the components of the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 may be combined. In addition, in some embodiments the communication module 1076 may include its own processor, volatile memory, and/or non-volatile memory. Further, the structure and/or functionality of any or all of the components of the backend server 1030, may be combined. In addition, in some embodiments the network interface 1119 may include its own processor, volatile memory, and/or non-volatile memory.

[00274] Figure 51 is a flowchart illustrating one embodiment of a process 1200 for triggering an action using a share signal according to various aspects of the present disclosure. In some embodiments, the first client device 1004, 1006 may transmit a share signal 1048 to the backend server 1030 for triggering one or more further actions, where the first A/V recording and communication device 1002 is associated with the first client device 1004, 1006. Further, the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 may capture second image data 1090 and/or second audio data 1092 that is transmitted to and received by the backend server 1030 using an output signal 1094. As further described below, a share signal that triggers one or more further actions may also be generated and transmitted to the backend devices 1028, 1030, 1032, such as the backend server 1030, from various devices.

[00275] In reference to Figure 51, the process 1200 may include the backend server 1030 receiving (block B1202) a share signal 1048 from the first client device 1004, 1006 using the network interface 1119, where the share signal 1048 includes first image data 1060 captured using a camera 1040 of a first A/V recording and communication device 1002. In some embodiments, the share signal 1048 may include first audio data 1062 captured by a microphone 1042 of the first A/V recording and communication device 1002 associated with the first client device 1004, 1006. Further, the share signal 1048 may also include text data 1064 that describes the first image data 1060. In alternative embodiments, and as described above, the share signal 1048 may include the first audio data 1062 and/or the text data 1064 without the first image data 1060. In addition, the share signal may also include a command to share the first image data 1060 (and/or the first audio data 1062 and/or the text data 1064) with a network of users. The process 1200 may also include processing (block B 1204) the share signal 1048 for triggering one or more further actions, as described above, and as further described below. The process 1200 may further include generating (block B 1206) and transmitting (block B1208) an alert 1114 to at least one second client device 1014, 1016, where the at least one second client device 1014, 1016 may be associated with a second A/V recording and communication device 1012. In some embodiments, the generating (block B1206) and transmitting (block B1208) of the alert 1114 may occur when the processing (block B1204) of the share signal 1048 determines that an event depicted in the first image data 1060 meets at least one event criteria 1118, and/or when the comparison of the first image data 1060 with the second image data 1090 indicates a person and/or object of interest is depicted in both the first image data 1060 and the second image data 1090. In other embodiments, the processing (block B1204) of the share signal 1048 may include comparing the first image data 1060 with the second image data 1090 for an indication of an object or animal of interest. In addition, the alert 1114 may include information such as (but not limited to) information indicating that the person and/or object of interest was reported by another user in the network of users, and/or information indicating an approximate location where the first image data 1060 was captured. In various embodiments, the alert 1114 may trigger the second client device 1014, 1016 and/or the at least one second A/V recording and device 1012 to take one or more further actions, as described above.

[00276] Figure 52 is a flowchart illustrating one embodiment of a process 1230 for processing (block B1204) the share signal 1048 for further action according to various aspects of the present disclosure. The process 1230 may include identifying (block B1232) an event depicted in the share signal 1048. In some embodiments, the share signal 1048 may include first image data 1060, first audio data 1062, and/or text data 1064. The process 1230 may also include determining (block B1234) whether the event depicted meets at least one event criteria 1118. In various embodiments, the at least one event criteria 1118 may include some indication of a criminal act where the criminal act may be any act defined by local, state, and/or federal penal codes. For example, the at least one event criteria 1118 may be related to theft, and in particular, package/parcel theft. In such embodiments, the process 1230 may include identifying (block B1232) an event depicted in the first image data 1060 of the share signal 1048, and making a determination (block B1234) whether the identified event depicted in the first image data 1060 meets parameters of package theft. In other embodiments, the process 1230 may include identifying (block B 1232) an event described in the share signal 1048 by processing the text data 1064. For example, natural language processing and/or keyword searching may identify one or more descriptive words in the text data 1064 that indicate that the share signal includes an indication of criminal activity. In some embodiments, the at least one event criteria 1118 may include designating a parcel area about the first A/V recording and communication device 1002, where an unauthorized removal of the package from the designated parcel area may be the at least one event criteria 1118. In further embodiments, the at least one event criteria 1118 may also include a specific time period. In another example, the at least one event criteria 1118 may be related to trespassing. In such embodiments, the process 1230 may include identifying (block B 1232) an event depicted in the first image data 1060 of the share signal 1048, and making a determination (block B1234) whether the identified event depicted meets parameters of trespassing. In some embodiments, the at least one event criteria 1118 may include designating a trespass area about the first A/V recording and communication device 1002, where a person entering the trespass area may be the at least one event criteria. In further embodiments, the at least one event criteria 1118 may further include a specific time period and/or a specific amount of time that a person is in the trespass area. The foregoing examples of event criteria are not to be construed as limiting the present embodiments. To the contrary, the present embodiments contemplate that any type of event, and any type of event criteria, may provide a basis for taking one or more further actions in response to the share signal according to various aspects of the present disclosure.

[00277] In further reference to Figure 52, in various embodiments, the determination (block B1234) may be automated where the server application 1108 may configure the processor 1102 to perform a process such as (but not limited to) a computer vision process to analyze image data to determine (block B1234) whether the event depicted meets the at least one event criteria 1118. Further, in embodiments where the share signal 1048 includes text data 1064, the process 1230 may include identifying an event depicted in the share signal 1048 based on the text data 1064 and determining (block B1234) whether the event depicted meets at least one event criteria 1118 by determining (block B1234) whether the text data 1064 indicates that the event depicted in the first image data 1060 meets the at least one event criteria 1118. In some embodiments, identifying (block B1232) an event depicted in the share signal 1048 may include performing natural language processing of the text data to determine (block B1234) whether the event depicted in the first image data 1060 meets that at least one event criteria 1118. If it is determined (block B1234) that the event depicted does not meet the at least one event criteria 1118, then the process 1230 may continue to identify (block B1232) events depicted in the share signal 1048. However, if it is determined (block B1234) that the event depicted does meet the at least one event criteria 1118, then the process 1230 may also include comparing (block B1236) the first image data 1060 to the second image data 1090 and/or comparing (block B 1238) the first audio data 1062 to the second audio data 1092 for a match of a person and/or object of interest, as described above. However, in some embodiments, the process 1230 may not include the step of identifying (block B 1232) an event depicted in the share signal 1048 and/or determining (block B1234) whether the identified event depicted meets at least one event criteria. Instead, the process 1230 may include comparing (block B1236) the first image data 1060 to the second image data 1090 and/or comprising (block B1238) the first audio data 1062 to the second audio data 1092 for a match of person and/or object of interest, as described above.

[00278] In further reference to Figures 51 and 52, in some embodiments, the generating (block B1206) and transmitting (block B1208) the alert 1114 to the second client device 1014, 1016 may occur when processing (block 1204) the share signal 1048 includes a determination (block B1234) that the event depicted in the first image data 1060 meets the at least one event criteria, and when the comparison (block B1236) of the first image data 1060 with the second image data 1090 indicates a person and/or object of interest is depicted in both the first image data 1060 and the second image data 1090. In some embodiments, the generating (block B1206) and transmitting (block B 1208) to the second client device 1014, 1016 may occur when processing (block 1204) the share signal 1048 includes a determination (block B1234) that the event depicted in the first image data 1060 meets the at least one event criteria, and when the comparison (block B1236) of the first audio data 1062 with the second audio data 1092 indicates a person and/or object of interest is depicted in both the first audio data 1062 and the second audio data 1092. In various embodiments, the second image data 1090 and the second audio data 1092 may be stored at backend databases 1032, where the comparison (blocks B1236 and B1238) may include comparing the first image data 1060 and/or the first audio data 1062 to information stored at the backend databases 1032 to find the person of interest. In a variety of embodiments, facial recognition processes may be performed to automate the process of searching and/or concluding that a person and/or object of interest is depicted in both the first image data 1060 and the second image data 1090. Likewise, voice recognition processes may be performed to automate the process of searching and/or concluding that a person and/or object of interest is depicted in both the first audio data 1062 and the second audio data 1092.

[00279] Figure 53 is a sequence diagram illustrating an embodiment of a process for triggering an action using a share signal 1048 according to various aspects of the present disclosure. The process may include the first client device 1004, 1006, a backend device such as the backend server 1030, and the second client device 1014, 1016. At a time Ti, the first client device 1004, 1006 may transmit a share signal 1048 to the backend server 1030, as described above. In response to receiving the share signal 1048, the backend server 1030 may process the share signal 1048 and generate and transmit an alert 1114 to the second client device 1014, 1016 at a time T 2 . In various embodiments, the backend server 1030 may determine one or more second client devices 1014, 1016 to which to transmit the alert 1 114 based on the location of the first A/V recording and communication device 1002 associated with the first client device 1004, 1006 and the defined areas, as described above (see Figure 17). Further, the backend server 1030 may also know the location of the first client device 1004, 1006 using source identifying data 1110 received from the first client device 1004, 1006 and may include the location of the first client device 1004, 1006 in the alert 1114. The second client device 1014, 1016 may be triggered by the alert 1114 to perform one or more of various actions including (but not limited to) causing the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 associated with the second client device 1014, 1016 to perform one or more of various actions, as described above.

[00280] Figure 54 is a sequence diagram illustrating another embodiment of a process for triggering an action using a share signal 1048 according to various aspects of the present disclosure. The process may include the second A/V recording and communication device 1012, the first client device 1004, 1006, a backend device such as the backend server 1030, and the second client device 1014, 1016. At time Ti, the process may include at least one second A/V recording and communication device 1012 sending an output signal 1094 to the backend server 1030 that includes second image data 1090 and/or second audio data 1092, as described above. At a time T 2 , the first client device 1004, 1006 may transmit a share signal 1048 that may include first image data 1060, first audio data 1062, and/or text data 1068 to the backend server 1030, as described above. In response to receiving the share signal 1048, the backend server 1030 may process the share signal 1048 and generate and transmit an alert 1114 to the second client device 1014, 1016 at a time T 3 . In various embodiments, the backend server 1030 may process the share signal 1048 by comparing the first image data 1060 to the second image data 1090 and/or comparing the first audio data 1062 to the second audio data 1092, as described above. Further, in some embodiments, the backend server 1030 may receive the output signal 1094 at the same time or after receiving the share signal 1048 from the first client device 1004. In additional embodiments, the backend server 1030 may limit the second image data 1090 and/or second audio data 1092 that is used to process the share signal 1048 based on the location of the first A/V recording and communication device 1002 and/or the location(s) of the at least one second A/V recording and communication device 1012 that captured the second image data 1090 and/or the second audio data 1092, as described above (see Figure 17). For example, if the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 is configured such that it has a defined area that excludes the first A/V recording and communication device 1002, then the backend server 1030 may not use an output signal 1094 from such second A/V recording and communication device 1012 to process the share signal 1048 from the first A/V recording and communication device 1002. However, if the second A/V recording and communication device 1012 is configured such that it has a defined area that includes the first A/V recording and communication device 1002, then the backend server 1030 may use an output signal 1094 from such second A/V recording and communication device 1012 to process the share signal 1048 from the first A/V recording and communication device 1002. In further embodiments, the backend server 1030 may use any and all output signals irrespective of geographic locations to process the share signal 1048, as described above.

[00281] Although specific processes are described above for triggering one or more further actions, there may be a variety of other ways to trigger one or more further actions in accordance with the present embodiments. For example, in some embodiments, an RFID tag may be placed on an item such as (but not limited to) a parcel, a child, a pet, an item of personal property, or any other item. If the item and/or person associated with the item is reported missing, then various A/V recording and communication devices (with RFID reading capabilities) may be notified to listen for the specific RFID signature associated with the RFID tag corresponding to the missing item/person/pet/etc. Further, if an A/V recording and communication device detects the RFID signature, then the A/V recording and communication device may take one or more further actions, including (but not limited to) powering up its camera and capturing image data. In addition, the A/V recording and communication device may transmit the captured image data to one or more backend devices and/or law enforcement agencies. In another example, the share signal from a first client device may include first image data and/or first audio data of a parcel, child, pet, or any other item. In such embodiments, the process of triggering one or more further actions (Figures 51 and 52) may include automatically identifying the event (block B1232) and determining the event (block B1234) as meeting the at least one event criteria (block B 1234). For example, the event may be automatically identified as theft or missing persons and the process 1230 may then proceed to comparing (block B1236) the first image data to second image data and/or comparing (block B1238) the first audio data to second audio data, as described above.

[00282] Figure 55 is a flowchart illustrating another embodiment of a process 1250 for triggering an action using a share signal according to various aspects of the present disclosure. As described above, processes for triggering actions using a share signal may not be limited to any specific devices or any specific actions. In reference to Figure 55, the process 1250 may include backend devices such as a backend server 1030 (Figure 47) receiving (block B 1252) a share signal 1048 using a network interface 1119 (Figure 50), where the share signal 1048 may include a variety of data providing information such as (but not limited to) descriptions of an event and/or a perpetrator. For example, in some embodiments, a camera 1040 of a first A/V recording and communication device 1002 or a first client device 1004, 1006 may record video footage (may also be referred to as first image data 1060) of a criminal act, or another type of event that may be of interest to one or more persons, such as other users in a network and/or a law enforcement agency. The video footage 1060 may include audio (may also be referred to as first audio data 1062) recorded contemporaneously with the video by a microphone 1042 of the first A/V recording and communication device 1002 or the first client device 1004, 1006, although in some embodiments the video footage may not include audio. A first user, using an application executing on a client device 1004, 1006, may share the video footage 1060 (with the audio 1062, if available) to a network of users using a share signal 1048. For example, the network of users may comprise users who own at least one A/V recording and communication device, such as a video doorbell. In another example, the network of users may comprise some users who own at least one A/V recording and communication device, such as a video doorbell, and some users who do not own such a device. In another example, the network of users may comprise users who do not own any A/V recording and communication devices, including video doorbells. In some embodiments, the first user may provide textual information (may also be referred to as text data 1064) about the shared video footage 1060, such as a description of the person(s) and/or event(s) depicted in the shared video footage 1060. The first user may, for example, enter the textual information about the shared video footage 1060 using a keyboard or other input device (e.g., speech-to-text processing) of the client device 1004, 1006. This text data 1064, if provided, may also be shared with the network of users in connection with the shared video footage 1060 using the share signal 1048. The shared video footage 1060 (and audio 1062 and/or text data 1064, if provided) may be received (block B 1252) by one or more backend devices in the network, such as one or more servers 1030, APIs 1028, databases 1032, etc. The process 1250 may also include the one or more backend devices processing (block 1254) and analyzing the share signal 1048 including the shared video footage 1060 (and audio 1062 and/or text data 1064, if provided) and attempting to match (block B 1254) the person(s) depicted in the shared video footage 1060 with one or more person(s) depicted in other video footage that was shared by one or more second users in the network at an earlier point in time. For example, the matching processing (block B1254) and analysis (block B1254) may comprise at least one of computer vision, facial recognition, or other types of biometric analysis and matching.

[00283] If a match is found, the process 1250 may also include determining (block B 1256) and executing (block B 1258) one or more actions. For example, in some embodiments, the second user(s) who had previously shared the other video footage may be notified that the same person(s) depicted in the video footage (may also be referred to as second image data 1090) that they had shared was captured on video footage 1060 recorded by the first user's camera device. The notification to the second user(s) may include location information, such as an approximate location where the video footage 1060 shared by the first user was recorded. An approximate location may include an identification of one or more streets, such as a street name and block number (e.g., the 700 block of Main Street) where the video footage 1060 shared by the first user was recorded, or an intersection (e.g., the intersection of 1 st Street and 2 nd Avenue) closest to where the video footage 1060 shared by the first user was recorded. In another example, the first user who shared the video footage 1060 may be notified that the same person(s) depicted in the first user's shared video footage 1060 was also depicted in video footage 1090 that had previously been shared to the network by another user (the second user). The notification to the first user may include location information, such as an approximate location where the video footage 1090 shared by the second user was recorded. In another example, the video footage 1060, 1090 shared by the first and/or second user(s) may be forwarded to law enforcement so that the person(s) depicted in the video footage 1060, 1090 may be apprehended. The notification to law enforcement may include location information, such as an approximate location where either or both of the first 1060 and second video footage 1090 shared by the first and second users, respectively, was recorded. In another example, one or more alerts may be sent to users in the network, where the users who receive an alert are determined according to their proximity to the user(s) who shared the video footage and/or the device(s) that recorded the shared video footage. For example, an alert may be sent to all users who are located within a defined radius of the location where the video footage 1060 shared by the first user was recorded. In another example, an alert may be sent to all users who are located in proximity to the location where the video footage shared 1060 by the first user was recorded, wherein proximity is determined according to a process similar to that described above with reference to Figures 17-19. In another example, one or more alert sounds and/or messages may be transmitted to A/V recording and communication devices, such as video doorbells, that are located within a defined radius of the location where the video footage 1060 shared by the first user was recorded. Such alert sounds and/or messages may be broadcast from speakers of such devices, and the alert sounds and/or messages may provide a warning to persons nearby that a potentially dangerous person is in the area, and/or the alert sounds and/or messages may provide a warning to the person (the "perpetrator") depicted in the shared video footage 1060, which warning may cause the perpetrator to flee, which in turn makes the neighborhood safer by expelling the potentially dangerous perpetrator. Another example may include identifying A/V recording and communication devices in proximity to the location where the video footage 1060 shared by the first user was recorded, and triggering the identified A/V recording and communication devices to record additional video and/or audio. The additional video and/or audio might capture the perpetrator, which may be useful to law enforcement in apprehending the perpetrator. If no match is found in the comparison of the shared video footage 1060 and/or audio 1062 and/or text data 1064 from the first user with previously shared video footage 1090 and/or audio 1092 and/or text data from the second user(s), then the shared video footage 1060 and/or audio 1062 and/or text data 1064 from the first user may be stored at one or more of the backend devices, where it may be accessed in the future and used to match video footage and/or audio and/or text data shared by one or more third users at some future time(s).

[00284] In further reference to Figure 55, the shared video footage may be recorded by any type of device having a camera, including, but not limited to, an A/V recording and communication device such as a video doorbell, or a client device such as a smartphone. Further, in some embodiments, the shared video footage may comprise only a single frame of video or a still image. In embodiments in which the shared video footage is recorded by a client device, the client device may be associated with an A/V recording and communication device such as a video doorbell. For example, the client device may receive alerts from the A/V recording and communication device in a similar manner as described above with respect to Figure 1. In other embodiments, however, in which the shared video footage is recorded by a client device, the client device may not be associated with any A/V recording and communication devices. The present embodiments are thus not limited to networks that include A/V recording and communication devices, nor are the present embodiments limited to use by users who own A/V recording and communication devices. That is, any user who has a device with a camera may join and participate in the network. Further, even users with non-camera devices may join and participate in the network. Still further, users with camera devices may participate in the network in one or more ways that do not include the camera. For example, for non-camera devices, as well as for camera devices, the type of content/data/information shared with the network may comprise only audio data, or only text data, or audio data combined with text data. For example, a user may witness a criminal act, or another type of event that may be of interest to one or more other users, but the witnessing user may not have video footage of the event. The witnessing user may, however, have audio of the event, which may include recorded audio of the perpetrator's voice. The witnessing user may share the audio of the perpetrator's voice to the network, where it may be received by one or more backend devices, which device(s) may then compare the voice to voice recordings from audio and/or video shared by other users. If a match is found, one or more actions may be triggered, including any of the actions described above or described elsewhere herein. The process of matching the perpetrator's voice with other voice recordings may comprise, for example, comparing a spectrogram of the perpetrator's voice with spectrograms of other voice recordings (may also be referred to as voiceprint or voicegram analysis). In another example, the witnessing user may not have audio or video footage of the event, but the witnessing user may share a textual description of the event to the network, and the textual description may include, for example, a description of the perpetrator(s). The shared textual description may be received by one or more backend devices in the network, which device(s) may then perform natural language processing on the text to extract a description of the perpetrator(s) that can then be compared to descriptions of perpetrators that had previously been shared to the network by other users. These previous descriptions may comprise, for example, textual descriptions, or the one or more backend devices may compare the shared textual description to video footage shared by other users to attempt to find a match. If a match is found, one or more actions may be triggered, including any of the actions described above or described elsewhere herein.

[00285] Figure 56 is a functional block diagram illustrating a system for communicating in a network using various signals. In some embodiments, the share signals may trigger one or more actions according to various aspects of the present disclosure, as described below. In some embodiments, the first client device 1002 may transmit a share signal 1048 to backend devices for triggering one or more actions, as described above. However, in other embodiments, various other devices, such as (but not limited to) third party devices, may transmit various signals that may include various data including (but not limited to) image data, audio data, and/or text data to the backend devices that may trigger one or more actions within a network of users.

[00286] In reference to Figure 56, the system 1200 may include one or more first audio/video (A/V) recording and communication devices 1202 configured to access a user's network 1208 to connect to a network (Internet/PSTN) 1210. The system 1200 may also include one or more first client devices 1204, 1206, which in various embodiments may be configured to be in network communication with the first A/V recording and communication device 1202. The first client devices 1204, 1206 may comprise, for example, a mobile phone such as a smartphone, or a computing device such as a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a desktop computer, etc. The first client devices 1204, 1206 may include any or all of the components and/or functionality of the client device 114 and/or the client device 850 described herein. In some embodiments, the first client devices 1204, 1206 may not be associated with a first A/V recording and communication device, as described below.

[00287] In various embodiments, the system 1200 may also include one or more second A/V recording and communication devices 1212 connected to the network (Internet/PSTN) 1210 using various networks such as a cellular/mobile network 1218, a local network, a wireless network such as a Wi-Fi network, a public network, a low-bandwidth network, and/or any other appropriate network to access the network (Internet/PSTN) 1210. The system 1200 may further include one or more second client devices 1214, 1216, which in various embodiments may be configured to be in network communication with the second A/V recording and communication device 1212. The second client devices 1214, 1216 may comprise, for example, a mobile phone such as a smartphone, or a computing device such as a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a desktop computer, etc. The second client devices 1214, 1216 may include any or all of the components and/or functionality of the client device 114 and/or the client device 850 described herein. In some embodiments, the second client devices 1214, 1216 may not be associated with a second A/V recording and communication device, as described below.

[00288] In some embodiments, the system 1200 may also include one or more third party A/V recording and communication devices 1220 connected to the network (Internet/PSTN) 1210 using various third party networks 1226 such as a local network, a wireless network such as a cellular/mobile network and/or a Wi-Fi network, a wired network such as an Ethernet network, a public network, a low-bandwidth network, and/or any other appropriate network to access the network (Internet/PSTN) 1210. The system 1200 may further include one or more third party client devices 1222, 1226, which in various embodiments may be configured to be in network communication with the third party A/V recording and communication device 1220. The third party client devices 1222, 1226 may comprise, for example, a mobile phone such as a smartphone, or a computing device such as a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a desktop computer, etc. The third party client devices 1222, 1226 may include any or all of the components and/or functionality of the client device 114 and/or the client device 850 described herein. In some embodiments, the third party client devices 1222, 1226 may not be associated with a third party A/V recording and communication device, as described below.

[00289] With further reference to Figure 56, the system 1200 may also include law enforcement A/V recording and communication devices 1228, 1230 connected to the network (Internet/PSTN) 1210 using a law enforcement network 1236 such as a local network, a wireless network such as a cellular/mobile network and/or a Wi-Fi network, a wired network such as an Ethernet network, a public network, a low-bandwidth network, and/or any other appropriate network to access the network (Internet/PSTN) 1210. In addition, the law enforcement A/V recording and communication devices 1228, 1230 may be configured to capture image data, audio data, and/or text data and be associated with law enforcement client devices 1232, 1234. In the illustrated embodiment, the law enforcement A/V recording and communication devices include a body camera 1228 and a dashboard camera 1230, but the illustrated devices are only examples and are not limiting.

[00290] In further reference to Figure 56, the system 1200 may also include various backend devices such as (but not limited to) storage devices 1242, backend servers 1240, and backend APIs 1238 in network communication with the law enforcement A/V recording and communication devices 1228, 1230, the first and second A/V recording and communication devices 1202, 1212, and the third party A/V recording and communication devices 1220. Further, the various backend devices 1238, 1240, 1242 may be in network communication with the law enforcement client devices 1232, 1234, the first client devices 1204, 1206, the second client devices 1214, 1216, and the third party client devices 1222, 1224. In some embodiments, the storage devices 1242 may be a separate device from the backend servers 1240 (as illustrated) or may be an integral component of the backend servers 1240. In addition, the user's network 1208 and the network 1210 may be similar in structure and/or function to the user's network 1008 and the network 1010 (Figure 47), respectively. As described above, the backend devices such as the backend servers 1240 may be configured to receive a share signal from the first client devices 1204, 1206 to trigger one or more of various actions within a network of devices as illustrated in Figure 56. Further, the backend devices such as the backend servers 1240 may also be configured to receive and process various signals from any A/V recording and communication device, such as the third party A/V recording and communication device 1220 and/or the law enforcement A/V recording and communication devices 1228, 1230, using the processes described above. In addition, the backend devices such as the backend server 1240 may receive the various signals from third party client devices 1222, 1224, and law enforcement client devices 1232, 1234. In some embodiments, the backend devices such as the backend server 1240 may receive the various signals from third party social networks that may include any social media service or platform that uses computer-mediated tools that allow participants to create, share, and/or exchange information in virtual communities and/or networks, such as (but not limited to) social networking websites and/or applications running on participant devices. Non-limiting examples of social networks include NEXTDOOR ® , FACEBOOK ® , INSTAGRAM ® , SNAPCHAT ® , TWITTER ® , etc. In some embodiments, the backend devices such as the backend server 1240 may receive the various signals from third parties, such as the general public, where a member of the public may transmit a signal that includes information about an event that the member of the public witnessed, such as (but not limited to) a possible crime using their third party device 1222, such as, but not limited to, a smartphone, where the signal transmitted by the member of the public may include image data, audio data, and/or text data.

[00291] The features of the present embodiments described herein may be implemented in digital electronic circuitry, and/or in computer hardware, firmware, software, and/or in combinations thereof. Features of the present embodiments may be implemented in a computer program product tangibly embodied in an information carrier, such as a machine-readable storage device, and/or in a propagated signal, for execution by a programmable processor. Embodiments of the present method steps may be performed by a programmable processor executing a program of instructions to perform functions of the described implementations by operating on input data and generating output.

[00292] The features of the present embodiments described herein may be implemented in one or more computer programs that are executable on a programmable system including at least one programmable processor coupled to receive data and/or instructions from, and to transmit data and/or instructions to, a data storage system, at least one input device, and at least one output device. A computer program may include a set of instructions that may be used, directly or indirectly, in a computer to perform a certain activity or bring about a certain result. A computer program may be written in any form of programming language, including compiled or interpreted languages, and it may be deployed in any form, including as a stand-alone program or as a module, component, subroutine, or other unit suitable for use in a computing environment.

[00293] Suitable processors for the execution of a program of instructions may include, for example, both general and special purpose processors, and/or the sole processor or one of multiple processors of any kind of computer. Generally, a processor may receive instructions and/or data from a read only memory (ROM), or a random access memory (RAM), or both. Such a computer may include a processor for executing instructions and one or more memories for storing instructions and/or data.

[00294] Generally, a computer may also include, or be operatively coupled to communicate with, one or more mass storage devices for storing data files. Such devices include magnetic disks, such as internal hard disks and/or removable disks, magneto-optical disks, and/or optical disks. Storage devices suitable for tangibly embodying computer program instructions and/or data may include all forms of non-volatile memory, including for example semiconductor memory devices, such as EPROM, EEPROM, and flash memory devices, magnetic disks such as internal hard disks and removable disks, magneto-optical disks, and CD-ROM and DVD-ROM disks. The processor and the memory may be supplemented by, or incorporated in, one or more ASICs (application-specific integrated circuits).

[00295] To provide for interaction with a user, the features of the present embodiments may be implemented on a computer having a display device, such as an LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor, for displaying information to the user. The computer may further include a keyboard, a pointing device, such as a mouse or a trackball, and/or a touchscreen by which the user may provide input to the computer.

[00296] The features of the present embodiments may be implemented in a computer system that includes a back-end component, such as a data server, and/or that includes a middleware component, such as an application server or an Internet server, and/or that includes a front-end component, such as a client computer having a graphical user interface (GUI) and/or an Internet browser, or any combination of these. The components of the system may be connected by any form or medium of digital data communication, such as a communication network. Examples of communication networks may include, for example, a LAN (local area network), a WAN (wide area network), and/or the computers and networks forming the Internet.

[00297] The computer system may include clients and servers. A client and server may be remote from each other and interact through a network, such as those described herein. The relationship of client and server may arise by virtue of computer programs running on the respective computers and having a client-server relationship to each other.

[00298] The above description presents the best mode contemplated for carrying out the present embodiments, and of the manner and process of practicing them, in such full, clear, concise, and exact terms as to enable any person skilled in the art to which they pertain to practice these embodiments. The present embodiments are, however, susceptible to modifications and alternate constructions from those discussed above that are fully equivalent. Consequently, the present invention is not limited to the particular embodiments disclosed. On the contrary, the present invention covers all modifications and alternate constructions coming within the spirit and scope of the present disclosure. For example, the steps in the processes described herein need not be performed in the same order as they have been presented, and may be performed in any order(s). Further, steps that have been presented as being performed separately may in alternative embodiments be performed concurrently. Likewise, steps that have been presented as being performed concurrently may in alternative embodiments be performed separately.