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Title:
A TURBO-GENERATOR PLANT
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1997/045924
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
In a plant containing a turbo-generator the magnetic circuit of the turbo-generator is included in an electric generator which directly supplies a high supply voltage of 20-800 kV, preferably higher than 36 kV. The insulation of the generator is built up of a cable (6) comprising one or more current-carrying conductors (31) with a number of strands (36) surrounded by outer and inner semiconducting layers (34, 32) and intermediate insulating layers (33). The outer semiconducting layer (34) is at earth potential. The phases of the winding are Y-connected. The Y-point may be insulated and protected from over-voltage by means of surge arresters, or else the Y-point may be earthed via a suppression filter.

Inventors:
Leijon
Mats, Templin
Peter, Ivarson
Claes, Gertmar
Lars, Carstensen
Peter, Larsson
Bertil, Berggren
S�ren, S�rensen
Erland, Berggren
Bertil, Kylander
Gunnar, H�lleland
Mons
Application Number:
PCT/SE1997/000886
Publication Date:
December 04, 1997
Filing Date:
May 27, 1997
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
ASEA BROWN BOVERI AB LEIJON
Mats, Templin
Peter, Ivarson
Claes, Gertmar
Lars, Carstensen
Peter, Larsson
Bertil, Berggren
S�ren, S�rensen
Erland, Berggren
Bertil, Kylander
Gunnar, H�lleland
Mons
International Classes:
H02M7/04; B60M3/00; H01B7/00; H01B7/02; H01F3/10; H01F3/14; H01F27/00; H01F27/28; H01F27/32; H01F27/34; H01F29/14; H02H3/02; H02J3/36; H02K3/12; H02K3/14; H02K3/28; H02K3/40; H02K3/48; H02K11/04; H02K15/00; H02K15/085; H02K15/12; H02K47/18; H02M3/00; H02K1/16; H02K9/19; (IPC1-7): H02K3/40
Foreign References:
US5036165A1991-07-30
US4429244A1984-01-31
SE453236B1988-01-18
US4091139A1978-05-23
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS
1. A plant for generating active and reactive electric power for a highvoltage distribution or transmission network (110), comprising at least one electric generator (200) which is coupled to at least one gas and/or steam turbine (102) via a shaft means (101) and comprises at least one winding, cha racteri zed i n that the winding of at least one of the electric generators comprises a solid insulation system comprising at least two semiconducting layers, each layer constituting essentially an equipotential surface, and also intermediate solid insulation, wherein at least one of the layers has substantially the same coefficient of thermal expansion as the solid insulation.
2. A plant as claimed in claim 1, characteri zed i n that the generator comprises a magnetic circuit with a magnetic core.
3. A plant as claimed in claim 2, cha racte ri zed i n that the flux paths in the core of the magnetic circuit consist of laminated sheet and/or cast iron and/or powderbased iron and/or forged iron.
4. A plant as claimed in any of claims 13, character i zed in that the solid insulation is built up of a cable (6) intended for high voltage, comprising one or more currentcarrying conductors (31) surrounded by at least two semiconducting layers (32, 34) and intermediate insulating layers (33) of solid insulation.
5. A plant as claimed in claim 4, characteri zed in that the innermost semiconducting layer (32) is at substantially the same potential as the conductor(s) (31) .
6. A plant as claimed in either claim 4 or claim 5, characteri zed in tha t one of the outer semiconducting layers (34) is arranged to form essentially an equipotential surface surrounding the conductor (s) (31) .
7. A plant as claimed in claim 6, characte ri zed in that said outer semiconducting layer (34) is connected to a selected potential.
8. A plant as claimed m claim 7, cna racte r i zed i n that the selected potential is earth potential.
9. A plant as claimed in any of claims 48, cha racte r i zed i n that at least two of said layers have substantially the same coefficient of thermal expansion.
10. A plant as claimed in any of claims 46, cha racteri zed in tha t the currentcarrying conductor comprises a plurality of strands, only a few of the strands not being insulated from each other.
11. A plant as claimed in any of claims 110, characte ri zed i n tha t the winding consists of a cable comprising one or more currentcarrying conductors (2), each conductor consisting of a number of strands, an inner semiconducting layer (3) being arranged around each conductor, an insulating layer (4) of solid insulation being arranged around each inner semiconducting layer (3) and an outer semiconducting layer (5) being arranged around each insulating layer (4) .
12. A plant as claimed in claim 11, cha racte r i zed in that the cable also comprises a metal screen and a sheath.
13. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, cha racte ri zed i n tha t at least one electric generator (200) is arranged to supply the outgoing electric network (110) directly without any intermediate connection of a stepup transformer (unit transformer) .
14. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, cha racte r i zed i n tha t at least one generator (200) is arranged to supply an outgoing network consisting of at least two partnetworks, at least one partnetwork being supplied via an intermediate system transformer.
15. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, characte ri zed i n that it comprises several generators, each of which lacks an individual stepup transformer but which, via a system transformer common to the generators, is connected to the transmission or distribution network (110) .
16. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, cha rac te r i zed i n t ha t the windings (9, 5153) of the stator (1) in at least one generator (200) are arranged for connection to more than one voltage level.
17. A plant as claimed in claim 15, characte r i zed in tha t one of said voltage levels relates to generation of auxiliary power, this being generated from a separate winding (9) in the generator (200).
18. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, cha ra c te r i zed i n t ha t at least one generator (200) is earthed via an impedance.
19. A plant as claimed in any of claims 117, 5 cha ra cte r i zed i n tha t at least one generator (200) is directly earthed.
20. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, characteri zed in tha t the stator (1) of the generator (200) is cooled at earth potential by means of a flow of gas and/or 10 liquid.
21. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, cha racte ri zed in tha t the cables (6) intended for high voltage have a conductor area of between 50 and 3000 mm^ and have an outer diameter of between 20 and 250 mm.
22. 15 22.
23. A plant as claimed m any of the preceding claims, cha racte r i zed i n that at least one winding (9, 5152) of the stator (1) is carried out with integral slot winding.
24. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, characteri zed in that at least one winding (9, 5152) of 0 the stator (1) is carried out with fractional slot winding.
25. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, cha ra cte r i zed in tha t the rotor (2) of at least one generator is arranged for two or four poles.
26. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, 5 chara cte r i zed i n that the voltage level is controllable + 20% of the rated voltage.
27. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, cha ra cter i zed in that the winding of the generator is arranged for selfregulating field control and lacks auxiliary 0 means for control of the field.
28. A plant as claimed in any of the preceding claims, characte r i zed i n tha t the stator of at least one generator is composed of axially combined, plateshaped sections, preferably as whole sections in peripheral direction. 5.
29. A plant for generating active and reactive electric power for a highvoltage distribution or transmission network (110), comprising at least one electric generator (200) which is coupled to at least one gas and/or steam turbine (102) via a shaft means ( 101) and comprises at least one winding, cha racte r i zed in 0 that the winding of at least one of the electric generators comprises an insulation system which, as regards its thermal and electrical properties, permits a voltage level in excess of 36 kV.
30. An electric generator (200) arranged to be coupled to at least one gas and/or steam turbine (102) via a shaft means (101) and comprising at least one winding, characteri zed in tha t the winding comprises a solid insulation system consisting of at least two semiconducting layers, each layer constituting essentially an equipotential surface, and also intermediate solid insulation, wherein at least one of the layers has substantially the same coefficient of thermal expansion as the solid insulation.
31. An electric generator as claimed in claim 29 that includes the features defining the generator claimed in any of claims 228.
32. A procedure for manufacturing an electric generator as claimed in claim 29 or claim 30, cha racte r i zed in tha t the stator is wound at the plant site where the generator is to be used.
33. A procedure as claimed in claim 31, cha racte r i zed i n tha t the stator is manufactured at the factory axially divided into a plurality of plateshaped, separate sections, each section preferably being manufactured as a whole section in peripheral direction.
Description:
A TURBO-GENERATOR PLANT

Technical field:

The present invention relates to equipment, primarily in thermal power plants, for generating active and reactive electric power for high-voltage distribution or transmission networks connected to it. More specifically the invention relates to rotating electro¬ mechanical equipment for generating electric power for high-voltage distribution or transmission networks without intermediate trans- formers. The generator or generators included in the equipment have a magnetic circuit, normally comprising a core of iron and an air gap, a cooling system and at least one, usually two, windings disposed in the stator and rotor, respectively.

Background art: Thermal power plants are nowadays built in accordance with a number different principles. Various types of fuel, e.g. natural gas, oil, bio-fuel, coal, mixtures of the fuels just mentioned, or nuclear fuel, are used in order to achieve high temperature in a gas in either a combustion process or a nuclear process. This gas may be either waste gases from the combustion or indirectly heated steam. The heating is performed in a relatively small volume, which means that the pressure is extremely high. The hot gas is then conveyed in gradually larger and larger volumes, the thermal energy then being converted to kinetic energy. The fast-moving gas is allowed in a number of steps to influence the vanes in a turbine, thereby giving rise to a turning phase. At least one generator mounted on the same shaft as the turbine, or via a gear, converts the energy to electric power which, via a step-up trans¬ former, is emitted to distribution or transmission networks, hereinafter also termed power networks.

Power plants consisting of only one unit in accordance with one of the principles explained above can naturally be the best solution in certain cases However, a plant is often advantageously built up of more units This offers greater flexibility and robustness against interference in the equipment. Various units may also be designed for operation with different types of fuel so that the fuel that is currently cheapest can be used. Other combinations are possible to increase the total efficiency of the plant, where residual heat from one unit can be utilized by another.

A distinction is normally made between two types of turbines: gas turbines and steam turbines. Gas turbines are operated directly by combustion gases (possibly after cleaning), whereas steam turbines, as the name implies, are operated by steam heated to high pressure. Vital parts of a gas turbine unit include at least one compressor step, a combustion chamber, at least one turbine step and a gene¬ rator. In many cases it is advantageous for the actual turbine step to be in several steps in order to enable optimal utilization of the thermal energy. Each step is dimensioned for the pressure the gas has in the relevant part of the turbine. Typically a high and a low pressure part are used, or a high, an intermediate and a low pressure part. The compressor may also be designed in several steps, normally two. The pressure in the compressor step is adjusted in order to obtain optimal combustion. The air entering the combustion chamber is pre-heated.

Vital parts of a steam turbine unit include a combustion or reactor hearth, steam generator, steam turbine and an electric generator. The steam generator consists typically of steel pipes with water circulating in them, which pipes are located in the hearth in order to obtain optimal heat transfer. The steam, heated to high temperature and high pressure, is conveyed to the turbine. The steam turbine can also advantageously be divided into various sections in the same way as described above, depending on pressure.

In order to achieve the highest possible efficiency, a combination of both these turbine types is advantageously used in two steps, i.e. a combined cycle power plant. For example, a gas turbine power plant which generates most of its power via a gas turbine, is supplemented by a steam generator which utilizes residual heat in the waste gases after the last turbine step, thus obtaining add- ltional energy yield. A coal power plant of PFBC (Pressurized

Fluidized Bed Combustion) type, which today represents the best that can be achieved as regards efficiency and environmentally friendly combustion of coal, generates the majority of its electric energy via a steam generator in the hearth. The combustion gases, somewhat cooled after the steam generation, are conveyed to a gas turbine after dust separation.

Many power plants are also used for district heating and in many cases an extremely high degree of total efficiency is attainable.

Examples of relevant plant types are described below. A gas turbine in these plants is fired with gas (preferably natural gas) , oil or a combination of gas and oil.

Gas turbine power plan t

A plant consisting of one or more units, each comprising one gas turbine and associated generator.

Combined cycle mul ti-shaft gas turbine power plan t A plant consisting of one or more units, each comprising a gas turbine and associated electric generator, in which the hot gases from the gas turbines are conveyed to a heat exchanger for steam generation. The steam drives a steam turbine and associated electric generator.

Combined cycle single-shaft gas turbine power plant

A plant consisting of one or more units, each comprising a gas turbine and associated electric generator, in which the hot gases from the gas turbines are conveyed to a heat exchanger for steam generation. The steam drives a steam turbine connected to the "free end" of one of the gas turbines.

Steam power plant

A plant in which a combustion process (such as oil, coal, PFBC, bio-fuel) via a steam generator (pipes conveying water which are located in the hearth) generates a steam pressure which drives a steam turbine and associated electric generator.

Nuclear power plant

A plant similar to the steam power plant but with the steam generator located in a nuclear reactor hearth.

Common to all the power plants described above is the connection of an electric generator via a common shaft, or via a gear, to the turbine for conversion to electric power. An electric generator may also be connected to two turbines. The conversion usually takes place in a synchronous generator which can be used for generating reactive power as well as for converting active power. Usually these are 2-pole or 4-pole electric generators of turbo¬ generator type, but other pole numbers and embodiments exist. A typical voltage range for today's generators is 10-30 kV.

An intermediate unit is used to enable reliable connection of the generator to an out-going power network. As is clear from Figure 3, insulated busbar systems run from the output terminal of the generator 100 to a generator breaker with isolator 107. The busbar

systems continue to an auxiliary power transformer 109 and to a step-up transformer 106. The two oil-filled transformers are normally placed outdoors because of the risk of explosion. Some form of explosion-proof wall is also often used to protect the plant. Connection to the out-going network 110 is via another breaker and isolator 108 m a high-voltage switchgear outside the plant. This switchgear is preferably common to several units in the plant.

An alternative to allowing the step-up transformer 106 of each generator 100 be connected directly to the out-going power network 110 is to use the step-up transformer to transform the generator voltage to an intermediate voltage level and then connect this intermediate voltage level via a system transformer to the out¬ going power network 110. In a limited area or a plant with several units, this may offer a cheaper total solution, particularly if the power in each unit is slight in relation to the voltage level of the out-going power network.

The drawbacks of the above solutions are related to the low voltage level (10-30 kV) of the generator. The busbar systems must be dimensioned with a large copper area to keep down the losses. The generator breaker 107 becomes large and expensive in order to break the high currents resulting from the low voltage. The step-up transformer 106 is expensive and also constitutes a safety risk. It also causes deteriorated efficiency. The magnetic circuit in individual electric generators usually comprises a laminated core, e.g. of sheet steel with a welded construction. To provide ventilation and cooling the core is often divided into stacks with radial and/or axial ventilation ducts. For larger machines the laminations are punched out in segments which are attached to the frame of the machine, the laminated core being held together by pressure fingers and pressure rings. The winding of the magnetic circuit is disposed in slots in the core, the slots generally having a cross section in the shape of a rectangle or trapezium. In multi-phase electric generators the windings are made as either single or double layer windings. With single layer windings there is only one coil side per slot, whereas with double layer windings there are two coil sides per slot. By coil side is meant one or more conductors combined vertically or horizontally and provided with a common coil insulation, i.e. an insulation designed to withstand the rated voltage of the generator to earth.

Double-layer windings are generally made as diamond windings whereas single layer windings in the present context can be made as diamond or flat windings. Only one (possibly two) coil width exists in diamond windings whereas flat windings are made as con- centric windings, i.e. with widely varying coil width. By coil width is meant the distance in arc dimension between two coil sides pertaining to the same coil.

Normally all large machines are made with double-layer winding and coils of the same size. Each coil is placed with one side in one layer and the other side in the other layer. This means that all coils cross each other in the coil end. If there are more than two layers these crossings complicate the winding work and the coil end is less satisfactory.

It is considered that coils for rotating generators can be manu- factured with good results within a voltage range of 10 - 20 kV.

Attempts to develop the generator for higher voltages however, however, been in progress for a long time. This is obvious, for instance from "Electrical World", October 15, 1932, pages 524-525. This describes how a generator designed by Parson 1929 was arranged for 33 kV. It also describes a generator in Langerbrugge, Belgium, which produced a voltage of 36 kV. Although the article also speculates on the possibility of increasing voltage levels still further, the development was curtailed by the concepts upon which these generators were based. This was primarily because of the shortcomings of the insulation system where varnish-impregnated layers of mica oil and paper were used in several separate layers.

Some attempts at a new approach as regards the design of synchronous generators are described, for instance, in an article "Water-and-oil-cooled Turbo-generator TVM-300" in J. Elektro- techmka, No. 1, 1970, pages 6-8 in US 4,429,244 "Stator of generator" and in Russian patent specification CCCP Patent 955369.

The water-and-oil-cooled synchronous machine described in J. Elektrotechnika is intended for voltages of up to 20 kV. The article describes a new insulation system consisting of oil/paper insulation, allowing the stator to be entirely immersed in oil. The oil can then be used as coolant while also serving as insulat¬ ion. To prevent oil in the stator from leaking out to the rotor, a dielectric oil-separating ring is provided at the internal surface of the core. The stator winding is manufactured from conductors with an oval, hollow shape, provided with oil and paper insulation. The coil sides with their insulation are retained in the slots formed with rectangular cross section by means of wedges. Oil is

used as coolant both in the hollow conductors and in apertures in the stator walls. However, such cooling systems entail a large number of connections for both oil and electricity at the coil ends. The thick insulation also causes increased radius of curvature on the conductors, which in turn results in increased size for the coil overhang.

The above-mentioned US patent relates to the stator part of a synchronous machine comprising a magnetic core of laminated plate with trapezium-shaped slots for the stator winding. The slots are stepped since the need for insulation in the stator winding is less in towards the rotor where the part of the winding nearest the neutral point is located. The stator part also includes a dielectric oil-separating cylinder nearest the inner surface of the core. This part may require more excitation than a machine without this ring. The stator winding is manufactured from oil-saturated cables having the same diameter for each coil layer. The layers are separated from each other by means of spacer elements in the slots, and secured with wedges. Specific to the winding is that it consists of two so-called half-windings connected in series. One of these two half-windings is placed centrally inside an insulating sleeve. The conductors of the stator winding are cooled by the surrounding oil. A drawback with so much oil in the system is the risk of leakage and the major clean-up work necessary after a fault condition. The parts of the insulation sheath located outside the slots have a cylindrical part and a conical screen electrode, the purpose of which is to control the electric field strength in the area where the cable leaves the laminations.

CCCP 955369 reveals in another attempt to increase the rated voltage of the synchronous machine, that the oil-cooled stator winding consists of a high-voltage cable having the same dimension for all layers. The cable is placed in stator slots shaped as circular, radially located openings corresponding to the cross- sectional area of the cable and space required for fixing and coolant. The various radially placed layers of the winding are surrounded by and secured in insulating tubes. Insulating spacer elements fix the tubes in the stator slot Here too, because of the oil cooling, an inner dielectric ring is required to seal the oil coolant from the inner air gap The construction shows no stepping of the insulation or of the stator slots. The design shows a very small radial waist between the various stator slots, entailing a large slot stray flux which strongly affects the excitation requirement of the machine

In a report from the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, EL-3391 from April 1984, an account is given of generator concepts for achieving higher voltage in an electric generator with the object of being able to connect such a generator to a power network without intermediate transformers. Such a solution is assessed in the report to offer good gains in efficiency and considerable financial advantages. The main reason that it was deemed possible in 1984 to start developing generators for direct connection to power networks was that a supra-conducting rotor had been developed at that time. The considerable excitation capacity of the supra- conducting field enables the use of airgap-wmding with sufficient thickness to withstand the electrical stresses.

By combining the concept deemed most promising according to the project, that of designing a magnetic circuit with winding, known as "monolithe cylinder armature", a concept in which two cylinders of conductors are enclosed in three cylinders of insulation and the whole structure is attached to an iron core without teeth, it was assessed that a rotating electric machine for high voltage could be directly connected to a power network. The solution entailed the main insulation having to be made sufficiently thick to withstand network-to-network and network-to-earth potentials. Obvious draw¬ backs with the proposed solution, besides its demanding a supra- conducting rotor, are that it also requires extremely thick insulation, which increases the machine size. The coil ends must be insulated and cooled with oil or freones in order to control the large electric fields at the ends. The whole machine must be hermetically enclosed in order to prevent the liquid dielectric medium from absorbing moisture from the atmosphere.

Description of the invention:

Against this background the object of the invention is to provide a plant comprising at least one generator for such a high voltage that the step-up transformer becomes superfluous. The generator breaker then also becomes superfluous. Functionally this is replaced by the already existing high-voltage breaker. The busbar system is replaced with screened high-voltage cable. It is thus an object of the invention to connect the electric generators in a power plant directly to the out-going power network

This object has been achieved according to the invention from a first aspect in that a plant of the type described in the preamble to claim 1 comprises the special features defined in the character¬ izing part of this claim, from a second aspect in that a generator

of the type described in the preamble to claim 29 comprises the special features defined in the characterizing part of this claim, and through the procedure described in claim 31

Thanks to this design of the insulation system for the winding, the decomposition of the insulation is avoided which tends to appear in the relatively thick-walled insulating layers used conventionally for high-voltage generators, e.g. impregnated layers of mica tape, which decomposition is in some part caused by partial discharges, PD. Inner corona discharges occur in cavities, pores and the like which are present in these conventional insulations, and which arise during manufacture, when the insulation is subjected to excessive electrical field strengths These corona discharges gradually break down the material and may result in electrical disruptive discharge through the insulation Other defects, cracks or the like, occurring at thermal movement in the winding are avoided, thanks to the temperature coefficients of the layers being substantially equal. These problems constitute an important reason for it having been impossible to design generators for the voltage range above 36 kV previously. This problem has been eliminated by the insulation system according to the invention. The insulation system according to the invention can be achieved by using layers for the insulation which are manufactured in such a way that the risk of cavities and pores is minimal, e.g. extruded layers of suitable permanent insulating material, such as PEX, thermo-plastics, including cross-linked thermo-plastics, EP rubber, other types of rubber, etc. By using only insulating layers which can be produced with a minimum of defects and also providing the insulation with an inner and an outer semiconducting part, it can be ensured that the thermal and electrical loading is reduced. In the event of temperature gradients, the insulating part with semiconducting layers will constitute a monolithic part and defects caused by different expansion due to temperature in the insulation and surrounding layers will not occur. The electrical load on the material decreases as a result of the semiconducting parts around the insulation constituting equipotentia] surfaces and of the electrical field in the insulation part thus being distributed uniformly over the thickness of the insulation. The outer semiconducting layer can be connected to earth potential. This means that, for such a cable, the outer sheath of the winding can be maintained at earth potential along its entire length.

The special features of a plant according to the invention, particularly as relating to the insulation system for the winding in the generator stator, have thus eliminated the obstacles preventing an increase in voltage level, and enable elimination of the step-up transformer even for voltages above 36 kV, with the associated advantages.

In the first place the mere absence of a transformer entails great savings in weight, space and expense.

When the transformer, as is often the case, is arranged at a distance from the turbine hall, busbars are required to connect generator and transformer. The need for these is thus also eliminated which saves not only the expense and space they require - the power losses in these, which are considerable since the current is high, also disappear in busbar systems 2-phase and 3- phase faults can occur and the breakers and isolators required therefor demand a high level of maintenance. By the present invent¬ ion the risk for these faults has been greatly reduced.

The fire risk entailed with an oil-insulated transformer is also reduced, thereby reducing the necessity for safety precautions against fire.

The turbo-generator plant according to the invention also has the advantage that it can be arranged with several connections to different voltage levels.

In all, the advantages mentioned above constitute radically improved total economy for the plant. The costs of building the plant are dramatically reduced and operating economy is improved by less need of service and maintenance and by an increase in the efficiency of approximately 0.5-1.5 %.

The invention is also applicable and entails advantages for a turbo-generator for peak loads, used as synchronous compensator when necessary, so that the generator is disconnected from the turbine.

The purpose of the invention is also that auxiliary power shall be generated by the generator by means of an auxiliary power winding inserted in its stator, which gives considerably lower voltage than is generated by the main winding of the generator.

To accomplish this the magnetic circuit in the generator or generators included in the turbo-generator plant is formed with threaded permanent insulating cable with included earth.

The major and essential difference between known technology and the embodiment according to the invention is thus that this is achieved with a magnetic circuit included in an electric generator which is arranged to be directly connected via possible breakers and isolators to a high supply voltage in the vicinity of between 20 and 800 kV, preferably higher than 36 kV. The magnetic circuit thus comprises a laminated core having at least one winding consisting of a threaded cable with one or more permanently insulated conductors having a semiconducting layer both at the conductor and outside the insulation, the outer semiconducting layer being connected to earth potential.

To solve the problems arising with direct connection of electric machines to all types of high-voltage power networks, the generator in the plant according to the invention has a number of features as mentioned above, which differ distinctly from known technology. Additional features and further embodiments are defined in the dependent claims and are discussed in the following.

Such features mentioned above and other essential characteristics of the generator and thus of the turbo-generator plant according to the invention include the following:

The winding of the magnetic circuit is produced from a cable having one or more permanently insulated conductors with a semiconducting layer at both conductor and sheath. Some typical conductors of this type are PEX cable or a cable with EP rubber insulation which, however, for the present purpose are further developed both as regards the strands in the conductor and the nature of the outer sheath. PEX = crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) . EP = ethylene propylene.

Cables with circular cross section are preferred, but cables with some other cross section may be used in order to obtain better packing density, for instance.

Such a cable allows the laminated core to be designed according to the invention in a new and optimal way as regards slots and teeth. • The winding is preferably manufactured with insulation in steps for best utilization of the laminated core.

The winding is preferably manufactured as a multi-layered, concentric cable winding, thus enabling the number of coil-end intersections to be reduced.

The slot design is suited to the cross section of the winding cable so that the slots are in the form of a number of cylindrical openings running axially and/or radially outside each other and having an open waist running between the layers of the stator winding

The design of the slots is adjusted to the relevant cable cross section and to the stepped insulation of the winding. The stepped insulation allows the magnetic core to have substantially constant tooth width, irrespective of the radial extension. • The above-mentioned further development as regards the strands entails the winding conductors consisting of a number of impacted strata/layers, i.e. insulated strands that from the point of view of an electric machine, are not necessarily correctly transposed, uninsulated and/or insulated from each other. • The above-mentioned further development as regards the outer sheath entails that at suitable points along the length of the conductor, the outer sheath is cut off, each cut partial length being connected directly to earth potential.

The use of a cable of the type described above allows the entire length of the outer sheath of the winding, as well as other parts of the plant, to be kept at earth potential. An important advantage is that the electric field is close to zero within the coil-end region outside the outer semiconducting layer. With earth potential on the outer sheath the electric field need not be controlled This means that no field concentrations will occur either in the core, in the coil-end regions or in the transition between them.

The mixture of insulated and/or uninsulated impacted strands, or transposed strands, results in low stray losses. The cable for high voltage used in the magnetic circuit winding is constructed of an inner core/conductor with a plurality of strands, at least two semiconducting layers, the innermost being surrounded by an insulating layer, which is in turn surrounded by an outer semiconducting layer having an outer diameter in the order of 20-200 mm and a conductor area in the order of 50-3000 mm^.

Since the generator in a plant according to the invention is manufactured with the special insulation system, the stator need not be completed at the factory but can instead be delivered divided axially into sections and the winding threaded on site. This naturally gives obvious financial advantages from the transport point of view.

The invention thus also relates to a procedure in which this possibility is exploited.

From another aspect of the invention, the objectives listed have been achieved in that a plant of the type described in the preamble to claim 29 is given the special features defined in the characterizing part of this claim.

Since the insulation system, suitably permanent, is designed so that from the thermal and electrical point of view it is dimensioned for over 36 kV, the plant can be connected to high- voltage power networks without any intermediate step-up transformer, thereby achieving the advantages referred to. Such a plant is preferably, but not necessarily, constructed to include the features defined for the plant as claimed in any of claims 1-28. The above-mentioned and other advantageous embodiments of the invention are defined in the dependent claims.

Brief description of the drawings :

The invention will be described in more detail in the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the construction of the magnetic circuit of the electric generator in the turbo¬ generator plant, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which

Figure 1 shows a schematic axial end view of a sector of the statox in an electric generator in the turbo-generator plant according to the invention,

Figure 2 shows an end view, step-stripped, of a cable used in the winding of the stator according to Figure 1,

Figure 3 shows a schematic diagram for a turbo-generator arrangement according to known technology,

Figure 4 shows a schematic diagram for a turbo-generator arrangement utilizing the present invention, and

Figure 5 shows a schematic diagram for a modified embodiment of the turbo-generator arrangement according to the invention Figure 6 is a diagram showing a generator according to the invention with build-in windings for generation of auxiliary power and frequency converter starting in a single shaft generator plant.

Description of a preferred embodiment:

In the schematic axial view through a sector of the stator 1 according to Figure 1, pertaining to the generator or generators included in the turbo-generator plant, the rotor 2 of the generator is also indicated. The stator 1 is composed in conventional manner of a laminated core. Figure 1 shows a sector of the generator corresponding to one pole pitch. From a yoke part 3 of the core situated radially outermost, a number of teeth 4 extend radially in towards the rotor 2 and are separated by slots 5 in which the stator winding is arranged. Cables 6 forming this stator winding, are high-voltage cables which may be of substantially the same type as those used for power distribution, i.e. PEX cables. One difference is that the outer, mechanically-protective sheath, and the metal screen normally surrounding such power distribution cables are eliminated so that the cable for the present application comprises only the conductor and at least one semiconducting layer on each side of an insulating layer. Thus, the semiconducting layer which is sensitive to mechanical damage lies naked on the surface of the cable. The cables 6 are illustrated schematically in Figure 1, only the conducting central part of each cable part or coil side being drawn in. As can be seen, each slot 5 has varying cross section with alternating wide parts 7 and narrow parts 8. The wide parts 7 are substantially circular and surround the cabling, the waist parts between these forming narrow parts 8. The waist parts serve to radially fix the position of each cable. The cross section of the slot 5 also narrows radially inwards. This is because the voltage on the cable parts is lower the closer to the radially inner part of the stator 1 they are situated Slimmer cabling can therefore be used there, whereas coarser cabling is necessary further out. In the example illustrated cables of three different dimensions are used, arranged in three correspondingly dimensioned sections 51, 52, 53 of slots 5

Figure 2 shows a step-wise stripped end view of a high-voltage cable for use in an electric machine according to the present invention. The high-voltage cable 6 comprises one or more conductors 31, each of which comprises a number of strands 36 which together give a circular cross section of copper (Cu) , for instance These conductors 31 are arranged in the middle of the high-voltage cable 6 and in the shown embodiment each is surrounded by a part insulation 35. However, it is feasible for the part insulation 35 to be omitted on one of the conductors 31. In the

present embodiment of the invention the conductors 31 are together surrounded by a first semiconducting layer 32. Around this first semiconducting layer 32 is an insulating layer 33, e.g. PEX insulation, which is in turn surrounded by a second semiconducting layer 34. Thus the concept "high-voltage cable" in this application need not include any metallic screen or outer sheath of the type that normally surrounds such a cable for power distribution.

A turbo-generator plant constructed in accordance with known technology is shown in Figure 3 where a generator 100, as already described in the introduction, is driven by a gas turbine 102 via a common shaft 101. The gas turbine is driven by gas from a combustion chamber 103 controlled by a control device 104 and supplied by a compressor 105. The compressor 105 is arranged on the same shaft 101 as the generator 100 and gas turbine 102.

In the known turbo-generator plant the generator 100 normally generates a voltage of maximally 25-30 kV. To supply a high- voltage distribution or transmission network 110, normally supplying voltages of up to 800 kV, the output voltage from the known generator 100 must be stepped up, as illustrated by the step- up transformer 106. This also requires a generator breaker 107 to be connected between the generator 100 and the step-up transformer 106, which generator breaker comprises at least one set of isolators, power breakers and earth connectors. Connection to the distribution or transmission network 110 is via additional isolators, breakers and flashover protection, here jointly designated 108.

The output voltage of the generator, lying at a medium voltage level of 25-30 kV, is usually also branched off to a step-down transformer 109. The step-down transformer 109 supplies the generator 100 with excitation voltage via a rectifier circuit 111, and is also able to generate low voltage 112 for other requirements .

Figure 4 shows the same plant as in Figure 3 but utilizing a turbo- generator arrangement according to the present invention. With the invention, the generator 200 which generates the same high voltage (up to approximately 800 kV) as that for which the distribution or transmission network 110 is intended, is directly connected to this distribution or transmission network 110 via conduit 201. There is thus no need for any step-up transformer or generator breaker (106, 107 in Figure 3) .

The step-down transformer 109 shown in Figure 4 is supplied from a separate output on the stator winding of the generator 200 for supply of the excitation voltage via the conduit 202 and the rectifier circuit 111, as well as for any other requirement via conduit 112.

As can be seen in Figure 5, the step-down transformer 109 may also be omitted when using a generator 200 constructed in accordance with the invention. The stator winding of the generator 200 (compare Figure 1) is thus provided with separate outputs for the excitation voltage via conduit 202 and the rectifier circuit 111, as well as for any other requirement via the conduit 203.

With the turbo-generator arrangement according to the present invention, therefore, several transformer and breaker units that were previously necessary are eliminated which is obviously advantageous - not least from the expense and operating reliability aspects .