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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
UNDERWATER TURBINE SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/071014
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A submersible turbine engine system that utilizes gases captured beneath the surface of a body of water and utilizes potential energy of the gases to generate electricity. For example, the captured gases will be used to fill a bag lifts on a belt- chain system. The gases cause the bag lifts to ascend to the surface causing the belt- chain system to rotate which in turn cases a turbine to rotate generating electricity.

Inventors:
TORRENT, Felix, Antonio (San Miguel 607, Las Heras Mendoza, CP 5539, 5539, AR)
TORRENT, Jose, Ricardo (San Miguel 607, Las Heras Mendoza, CP 5539, 5539, AR)
Application Number:
US2016/056611
Publication Date:
April 19, 2018
Filing Date:
October 12, 2016
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
SAFETY DESIGN USA, INC. (4351 Seymour Highway, Wichita Falls, TX, 76309, US)
International Classes:
F01D23/00; F01B9/00; F01B17/02; F01B17/04
Foreign References:
US4084375A1978-04-18
US20150001021A12015-01-01
US20110162356A12011-07-07
US8633004B12014-01-21
US8453442B12013-06-04
US4805406A1989-02-21
US8001784B22011-08-23
US4054031A1977-10-18
US4363212A1982-12-14
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
EISENBERG, Andrew, L. (Michael Best & Friedrich LLP, 100 E. Wisconsin Avenue Suite 330, Milwaukee WI, 53202, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS :

1. A system comprising:

a collection bell positioned over a vent at a floor of a body of water, the collection bell to capture gases released by the vent;

a bag lift filling station to receive the gases captured by the collection bell; a turbine station positioned in proximity to a surface of the body of water, the turbine station including a turbine and a generator coupled to the turbine;

a plurality of bag lifts coupled to a belt-chain system suspended between the bag lift filling station and the turbine station, the bag lifts to cause the belt-chain system to rotate as the bag lifts are filled with the gases at the bag lift station and to rotate a turbine at the turbine power collection wheel station to cause the generator to produce electricity.

2. The system as recited in claim 1, further comprising a collection chamber configured to capture the gases released by the bag lifts at the surface.

3. The system as recited in claim 2, further comprising a greenhouse for cultivating plant life, the green house coupled to the collection chamber for receiving the gases and wherein the gases include carbon dioxide.

4. The system as recited in claim 3, further comprising an oxygen storage tank coupled to the greenhouse, the oxygen storage tank to receive the oxygen produced by the greenhouse from the carbon dioxide.

5. The system as recited in claim 2, further comprising a storage tank coupled to the collection chamber for receiving the gases.

6. The system as recited in claim 1, wherein the turbine is a wheel having teeth that are configured to engage with the bag lifts such that the bag lifts rotate the wheel as the bag lifts are pulled by the belt-chain system.

7. The system as recited in claim 1, wherein the generator is coupled to a power grid for distributing the electricity.

8. The system as recited in claim 1, wherein the bag lift filling station is no more than 300 meters below the surface.

9. The system as recited in claim 1, wherein the bells include a weight for resisting an upward force applied by the gases being captured.

10. A method comprising:

capturing gases beneath a surface of a body of water;

filling, at a location beneath the surface of the body of water, a plurality of bag lifts with the gases; and

converting mechanical energy generated by the plurality of bag lifts ascending towards the surface to electricity.

11. The method as recited in claim 10, further comprising capturing the gases at the surface of the body of water.

12. The method as recited in claim 10, further comprising separating carbon dioxide from the gases.

13. The method as recited in claim 12, further comprising:

capturing the carbon dioxide at the surface of the body of water; and converting the carbon dioxide to oxygen via photo synthesis.

14. The method as recited in claim 12, further comprising:

capturing the carbon dioxide at the surface of the body of water;

cultivating plant life using the carbon dioxide; and

capturing oxygen produced by the plant life.

15. The method as recited in claim 12, further comprising:

capturing the carbon dioxide at the surface of the body of water;

cultivating plant life using the carbon dioxide; and

generating fuel from the plant life.

16. A system comprising:

a belt-chain coupled to a turbine near a surface of a body of water and a bag lift filling station positioned beneath a surface of the body of water; and

a plurality of bag lifts coupled to a belt-chain system, the plurality of bag lifts configured to be inflated at the bag lift filling station with gases captured beneath the surface of the body of water and to rotate the turbine using energy generated as the plurality of bag lifts ascend to the surface.

17. The system as recited in claim 16, further comprising at least one bell coupled to the bag lift filing station and positioned over the floor of the body of water to capture the gases.

18. The system as recited in claim 16, further comprising a collection chamber associated with the turbine to collect the gases near the surface.

19. The system as recited in claim 16, wherein the rotation of the turbine generates electrical energy.

20. The system as recited in claim 16, wherein the electrical energy is applied to a power grid.

Description:
UNDERWATER TURBINE SYSTEM

BACKGROUND

[0001] Today most countries use a high percentage of fossil fuels and biomass to generate sufficient power to meet their needs. Alternatively, countries may employ nuclear systems that come with some level of inherent risk and dangers. Therefore, a more environmentally friendly and safer power generation system is necessary for the long term health and wellbeing of the plant.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0002] The detailed description is described with reference to the accompanying figures. In the figures, the left-most digit(s) of a reference number identifies the figure in which the reference number first appears. The use of the same reference numbers in different figures indicates similar or identical components or features.

[0003] FIG. 1 illustrates an example system for generating power and collecting gaseous compounds from the ocean or sea floor according to some implementations.

[0004] FIG. 2 is an example big lift filling station according to some implementations.

[0005] FIG. 3 is an example belt-chain system associated with the bag lifts according to some implementations.

[0006] FIG. 4 is an example turbine station associated with the bag lifts according to some implementations.

[0007] FIG. 5 is an example collection bell station associated with the bag lifts according to some implementations. [0008] FIG. 6 is another example collection bell station associated with the bag lifts according to some implementations.

[0009] FIG. 7 is a partial view of an example generator associated with a turbine station according to some implementations.

[0010] FIG. 8 is an example flow diagram showing an illustrative process for transforming gases trapped at the ocean floor into electrical power and oxygen according to some implementations.

[0011] FIG. 9 illustrates example components of one or more servers associated with a control unit associated with the submersible turbine engine system according to some implementations.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0012] This disclosure includes techniques and implementations for generating power and oxygen from carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gasses trapped by the ocean floors and sea bottoms. For example, CO2 and other gasses are stored in a solid state under the ocean floors. Recently, as the ocean and sea temperatures have climbed, some of the solid or frozen gasses in the ocean floor have been converted to a gaseous state. The gaseous CO2 and other compounds escape the ocean and sea floors via vents and are released into the atmosphere further contributing to the greenhouse effect. In some cases, the submersible turbine engine system, described herein, is configured to capture CO2 and other gasses using a number of bells placed over the vents along the ocean and sea floor, thereby preventing the CO2 and other compounds from contributing to the greenhouse effect. [0013] In some implementations, the submersible turbine engine system uses a series of pipes to a bag lift filling station where the captured CO2 is used to inflate a series of bag lifts. The inflated bag lifts are propelled upward by the CO2 and other gases toward the surface. Each bag lift is coupled to turbine engine, such that the movement of the bag lift towards the surface turns a turbine and propels additional emptied bag lifts back down to the bag lift filling station on the floor of the ocean. The rotating of turbine causes a generator to produce power or energy that may be converted to electricity via a power grid.

[0014] As the bag lifts reach the surface, the captured CO2 and other gasses are released into a collection chamber, thereby emptying the lift bags, prior to initiating a return trip to the bag lift filling station. In some cases, the captured CO2 is stored or used. For example, in some implementations, the CO2 is pumped into a nearby greenhouse for the cultivation of crops or other agricultural uses. In some case, by using concentrated amounts of CO2, the production time of the crops will be reduced, thus producing more crops per year. In particular implementation, the CO2 is utilized to grow algae that is capable of being converted into biodiesel, thereby providing a source of fuel and a secondary source of power.

[0015] A byproduct of cultivating the agricultural crops and the algae is the production of oxygen. In some cases, the oxygen produced is released into the atmosphere to reduce the greenhouse effect. In other cases, the oxygen is stored and utilized in various industries, such as medical, welding, smelting, jet fuel, etc.

[0016] FIG. 1 illustrates an example system 100 for generating power and collecting gaseous compounds 102 form the ocean or sea floor 104 according to some implementations. In the current example, a bell or collection device 106 is positioned over a vent 108 in the ocean floor 104 to collect the gaseous compounds 102 (such as CO2) as the gaseous compounds 102 escape the ocean floor 104. For instance, the gaseous compounds 102 are frozen in a solid state under the ocean floor 104, generally indicated by 110. As the solid gaseous compounds 110 melt due to raising temperatures of the ocean and seas, the solid gaseous compounds 110 converts to a gas and is released as gaseous compounds 102 into the ocean or sea via vents 108. The gaseous compounds 102 are then captured by the bells 106.

[0017] The bells 106 transfer the captured gaseous compounds 102 to a bag lift filling station 112 via pipes or tubes 114. The bag lift filling station 112 may compress the captured gaseous compounds 102 and utilized the compressed or uncompressed captured gaseous compounds 102 to fill bag lifts. The bag lifts are coupled at intervals along a belt-chain 116 between a turbine station 118 and the bag lift filling station 112, such that the filled bag lifts move upward towards the surface 120 of the ocean or sea and the turbine station 118. As the filled bag lifts move upward, the bag lifts also pull both the belt-chain 116 and the emptied bag lifts coupled to the belt-chain 116 back down to the ocean floor 104 and the bag lift filling station 112 (where the lift bags are refilled to return to the surface 120). Thus, as the bag lifts are filled, the bag lifts move in an upward direction, the upward momentum of the bag lifts turn turbines or collector wheels at the turbine station 118 generating energy, generally indicated by 122, in a clean and environmentally friendly manner. In some cases, at least a portion of the energy 122 is stored and/or applied to the electric gird 122.

[0018] Upon reaching the surface 120, the bag lifts release the gaseous compounds 102 into a collection chamber 124. The collection chamber 124 prevents the captured gaseous compounds 102 (e.g., CO2) from escaping into the atmosphere and further contributing to the greenhouse effect. As the gaseous compounds 102 are removed from the collection chamber 124, the gaseous compounds 102 are separated from each other. In some cases, the CC is transported to a storage tank 126 via collection tubes 128. The stored CO2 is sold for industrial purposes or dispensed into a greenhouse or growing containers 130 via dispensing tubes 132 for the cultivating of agricultural crops and/or algae. For example, by increasing the C02 present within the greenhouse or containers 130, the rate or speed with which the crops are grown is reduced. In some cases, the growing period will be reduced by 5-10% when additional C02 is introduced into the environment in which the crops are being cultivated.

[0019] Oxygen is produced as a result of cultivating the crops or algae using the C02 captured from the ocean or sea floors 104. In some cases, the oxygen is released into the atmosphere to thereby reduce the contribution of the C02 to the greenhouse effect. In other cases, the oxygen will be transported to oxygen storage tanks 134 via collection tubes 136. The stored oxygen is sold for use in industry, such as industrial uses, medical use, manufacturing uses, etc.

[0020] In the illustrated example, the bag lift filling station 112 is located on a platform 138. In some cases, the bag lifts on the belt-chain 116 is unable to inflate using the gaseous compounds 102, even when compressed, due to external pressures on the exterior of the bag lifts coupled to the belt-chain 116 of the ocean or sea water. In some cases, the bag lifts are 8 meters high and 4 meters wide and formed from a vinyl, polymer, or other waterproof material.

[0021] In these cases, the bag lift filling station 112 are elevated off of the ocean or sea floor 104 by the platform 138 or in other ways such as suspended via containers with a specific buoyancy. In some implementations, the bag lift filling station 112 is positioned approximately less than or equal to 300 meters below the surface 120 or at a level such that the pressure on the bag lifts does not exceed 300 atmospheres. [0022] In some cases, the system 100 is equipped with a control unit or other centralized computing system (not shown) to coordinate the activities associated with filling the lift bags and dispensing the CC to the greenhouse 130. For example, the bag lift filling station 112, the bag lifts and/or belt-chain 116, and the turbine station 118 is equipped with various sensors, such as a pressure sensor or burst sensor, to monitor external and internal pressures associated with canisters used to store the gaseous compounds 102 at the ocean or sea floor 104, the bag lifts, and/or belt-chain 116. In other cases, the sensors are associated with monitoring the turbines, wheels or components or processes associated with the turbine station 1 18. In one instance, the control unit may terminate or suspend the filling of the bag lifts when an issue is detected to thereby prevent the decoupling of the belt-chain from the either the bag lift filling station 112 or the turbine station 1 18.

[0023] In other examples, the control unit is configured to control or monitor a rate at which the bag lifts are filled and/or emptied based on a desired rate of power consumption, a rate of motion associated with the belt-chain 1 16, an amount of stored gaseous compounds 102 at the bag lift filling station 1 12, among others.

[0024] FIG. 2 is an example bag lift filling station 200 according to some implementations. In the illustrated example, the bag lift filling station 200 is located in the ocean floor and receives a flow of gaseous compounds (such as CCh) from a collection bell positioned over a vent. The bag lifts, generally indicated by 202, are connected to each other via a chain-belt system, generally indicated by 204, such that the bag lifts 202 moving in an upward direction towards the surface pull or cause the emptied bag lifts 202 to move in a downward direction back toward the big lift filling station 200. [0025] In some cases, the bag lifts 202 are filled at the big lift filling station 200 with gases stored in tanks 206 as the bag lifts 202 reach the lowest point along the belt-chain system 204. For example, the belt-chain system 204 is coupled at the bag lift filling station 200 to one or more gears 208 that assist with changing the direction of the bag lifts 202. The bag lifts 202 are filled as the bag lifts 202 are at a position at which the belt-chain system 204 is coupled to the gears 208. In this manner, the bag lifts 202 may apply an upward pressure on the belt-chain system 204 as the bag lifts 202 exit the area associated with the gears 208. Thus, the bag lifts 208 may continue to cycle along the belt-chain system 204 being filled as the bag lifts 202 engage with the gears 208 of the bag lift filling station 200. In some examples, the gaseous compounds are compressed while in the tanks 204, such that the compressed gases are able to fill the bag lifts 202 at a rate that matches the movement of the belt-chain system 204.

[0026] FIG. 3 is an example belt-chain system 300 associated with the bag lifts according to some implementations. In the illustrated example, the bag lifts are coupled to the belt-chain system 300, such that inflated bag lifts 302 pull or apply an upward force on the belt-chain of the belt-chain system 300. The upward force applied by the inflated bag lifts 302 on the belt-chain system 300 allow the belt-chain system 300 to rotate pulling or applying a downward force on the deflated bag lifts 304. Thus, the belt-chain system 300 may operate based solely on the buoyancy or upward forces applied by the gaseous compounds (such as CO2) used to fill the inflated bag lifts 302. In some cases, the size, number, and spacing of the bag lifts on the belt-chain system 300 is based at least in part on a desired upward force necessary to achieve a desired speed or rate of movement with respect to the overall belt-chain system 300. Thus, additional bag lifts or larger bag lifts are utilized to increase the overall speed or rate of rotation of the belt-chain system 300. In one particular example, the bag is spaced approximately two meters apart and the belt-chain 300 system may include sixty bags. In other examples, the bag lifts are placed between one meter and five meters apart and the belt-chain system 300 may include between forty and eight bag lifts.

[0027] FIG. 4 is an example turbine station 400 associated with the bag lifts 402 according to some implementations. In the illustrated example, the bag lifts 402 coupled to the belt-chain system 404 are nearing the apex or top of the belt-chain system 404. As the bag lifts 402 reach the apex of the belt-chain system 404, the bag lifts 402 turn turbines 406 that generate rotational momentum or mechanical power for the turbine system, which converts the mechanical power into electrical energy. Thus, the bag lifts 402 provide an upward force on the belt-chain system 404 as the belt-chain system 404 rotates the turbines 406 to generate the power. In this manner, the gases captured at the ocean or sea floor is utilized to provide an input into the system 400 that are converted to electrical energy.

[0028] The bag lifts 402 also release the gases used to provide the upward buoyancy or lift that raised the bag lifts 402 through an opening 408 in a floor of the turbine station 400 to allow the gases to be collected within a collection chamber 410. For example, CO2 is separated from other gases stored in the collection chamber 410 and utilized, for instance, for cultivation of agricultural crops within a greenhouse or other facility.

[0029] FIG. 5 is an example collection bell station 500 associated with the bag lifts according to some implementations. In the illustrated example, the collection bells 502 are positioned over a vent 504 in the floor 506 of the ocean or sea from which gaseous compounds 508 into the ocean or sea. In the current example, the bells 502 are positioned a few feet away from the opening or vent 504, however, the bells 502 are positioned directly over or within a few inches of the vent 504. Additionally, while in FIG. 5 the vents 504 are shown as roughly triangular in shape, the vents 504 are any shape or form. In some cases, the bells 502 may be any shape having an opening at the bottom such that the bells are able to collect the gaseous compounds 508.

[0030] In the current example, the bells 502 include weights 510 or are otherwise held in place against the upward forces of the gaseous compounds 508. For example, the weights 510 are incorporated into the exterior of the bells 502 or otherwise be integral to the bells 510. In other examples, the bells 510 are attached to the floor 506 or have the weights 510 suspended by cable below the bells 504. Once the gaseous compounds 508 are collected or captured by the bells 502, the gaseous compounds 508 are transported to the bag lift filling station via the collection tubes 512.

[0031] FIG. 6 is another example collection bell station 600 associated with the bag lifts according to some implementations. In the current example, the bells 602 are positioned along tube 604, such that a plurality of bells 602 are arranged along the length of a vent to capture at least a substantial maj ority of the escaping gases 606. The tube 604 is further coupled to additional tubes 608 to transport the gases 606 to the bag lift filling station.

[0032] As discussed above with respect to FIG. 5, the position, depth, and/or distance from the vent of the bell 602 are maintained via weights 610 having a desired drag, downward force, or bouncy depth. Thus the weights 610 may in some cases prevent the bells from raising towards the surface as the gases 610 are collected, while in other cases prevent the bells 602 from sinking to the ocean or sea floor. [0033] FIG. 7 is a partial view of an example generator 702 associated with a turbine station 700 according to some implementations. For instance, in the illustrated example, a turbine or gear 704 receives deflated bag lifts 706 coupled to the belt- chain system (not shown) as the bag lifts 706 reach the apex or top of the belt-chain system. In the current example, the bag lifts 706 include a locking device 708 to engage pips or teeth 710 extending outward from the turbine 704. As the locking device 708 engages the teeth 710, the belt-chain coupled to the bag lifts 706 pulls or turns the turbine 704. For instance, as illustrated, the turbine 704 is pulled in a clockwise direction as each bag lift 706 rotates over the top of the turbine 704.

[0034] In the illustrated implementation, the turbine 704 is coupled to the generator 702 by a shaft 712. Thus, as the turbine 704 is turned in response to a rotation of the belt-chain system as the bag lifts 706 move towards the surface, the shaft 712 is rotated at a rate corresponding to the rate of rotation of the turbine 704. The rotating of the shaft 712 transfers the mechanical power or force from the turbine 704 to the generator 702, generating electrical power.

[0035] FIG. 8 is an example flow diagram showing an illustrative process 800 for transforming gases trapped at the ocean floor into electrical power and oxygen according to some implementations. The process 800 is illustrated as a collection of blocks in a logical flow diagram, which represent a sequence of operations. The order in which the operations are described should not be construed as a limitation. Any number of the described blocks can be combined in any order and/or in parallel to implement the process, or alternative processes, and not all of the blocks need be performed. For discussion purposes, the processes herein are described with reference to the environments described in the examples herein, although the process 800 are implemented in a wide variety of other environments. [0036] At 802, a submersible turbine engine system may capture gaseous compounds (such as CO2) at the ocean or sea floor. In one implementation, one or more collection bells positioned above vents in the ocean or sea floor to capture gaseous compounds being released from the vent as the solid or frozen gases within the ocean and sea floors melt. For instance, the compounds may convert to a gaseous state as the compounds melt or the temperature at the ocean or sea floors increase. The gases may then migrate through the ocean or sea floor to an opening (such as a vent) and escape upwards towards the surface. Thus, the bells are positioned over the vents to collect the escaping gases.

[0037] At 804 the submersible turbine engine system may inflate a series of bag lifts with the gaseous compounds. In some implementations, a bag lift filling station is installed on the ocean or sea floor or at a level within the ocean or sea selected to reduce the exterior pressure on the bag lifts as the bag lifts are inflated. For example, the bag lifts filling station are less than 300 meters below the surface. In other cases, the bag lifts filling station are less than 400 meters below the surface.

[0038] In some cases, the bag lift filling station may include a compressor system to compress the gaseous compounds to increase the rate at which the bag lifts are filled. In some implementations, the compressors are powered using energy generated by the submersible turbine engine system.

[0039] At 806, the submersible turbine engine system may generate electrical energy from a turbine rotated by the bag lifts ascending to the surface. For instance, as discussed above, the submersible turbine engine system may include a turbine station at the surface. The turbines housed in the turbine station is configured to engage a belt-chain system coupled to the bag lifts that causes the turbines to rotate as the bag lifts ascend to the surface and pull the belt-chain downward to the bag lift filling station. The rotation of the turbines may cause a turbine engine to generate electrical power.

[0040] At 808, the submersible turbine engine system captures the gaseous compounds at the surface. For example, a collection chamber is positioned above the turbine station or the turbines themselves. Thus, as the bag lifts release the gases compounds and are deflated to make a return trip to the bag lift filling station, the gases are collected and stored. In other cases, the bag lifts may couple to a deflation device or vacuum that may withdraw or suction the gaseous compounds out of the bag lifts and deposit the gaseous compounds into the collection chamber or other storage area.

[0041] At 810, the submersible turbine engine system may store the gaseous compounds. For example, the gaseous compounds are transported via pipes, tubes, or via temporary storage compartments to a storage facility located in land or on a nearby shore.

[0042] At 812, the submersible turbine engine system may spate CO2 and other gaseous compounds from each other. For example, various gases are frozen in a solid state at or below the ocean or sea floor. Thus, the different gases are separated for use in industry. In one example, the CO2 is separated from the other gases for the cultivation of agricultural crops or algae.

[0043] At 814, the submersible turbine engine system may store the CO2. For example, the stored CO2 is sold, utilized in industry, or otherwise used for the cultivation of crops and other plant life.

[0044] At 816, the submersible turbine engine system may utilize the CO2 to cultivate plant life. In one example, the CO2 may provide to a growing area or greenhouse that may to reduce the speed at which agricultural crops are cultivated. For instance, in some cases, the growing time of crops is reduced by as much as 10% by introducing the crops to additional amounts of CO2. In other examples, the CO2 is provided to growing containers or areas for the cultivation of algae or other biomass that is converted into biodiesel or ethanol.

[0045] At 818, the submersible turbine engine system may capture oxygen generated by the plant life being provided the CO2. For example, the oxygen is collected for use in industries such as medical, manufacturing, construction, etc. In other cases, the oxygen is released into the atmosphere to assist in combating global warming.

[0046] At 820, the submersible turbine engine system may store the oxygen. For example, if the oxygen is not released into the atmosphere the oxygen is stored in tanks to be sold or distributed for various uses. Thus, the process 800 may produce energy, CO2 as well as other gases captured from the ocean floor, increase cultivation rates of crops, and produce oxygen (which may be stored or released into the environment).

[0047] FIG. 9 illustrates example components of one or more servers associated with a control unit 900 associated with the submersible turbine engine system according to some implementations. In the illustrated example, the control unit 900 is coupled to or include one or more communication interfaces 902. The control unit may also be coupled to or include one or more sensors 904, and one or more gauges 906 and one or more imaging units 908 for collecting data usable for monitoring the health and operations of the submersible turbine engine system.

[0048] The communication interfaces 902 may support both wired and wireless connection to various networks, such as cellular networks, radio networks (e.g., radio- frequency identification RFID), WiFi networks, short-range or near-field networks (e.g., Bluetooth®), infrared signals, local area networks, wide area networks, the Internet, and so forth. For example, the communication interfaces 902 may allow the control unit 900 to receive data, such as a operational data or sensor data from the various sensors 904, gauges 906, and/or image units 908 associated with the submersible turbine engine system.

[0049] The sensors 904 and gauges 906 may include one or more sensor package combinations, such as pressure sensors, accelerators, manometers, gyroscopes, temperature sensors or thermometers, internal measurement units (IMU) sensor, etc. For example, the sensors 904 and gauges 906 are installed or equipped on each of the bag lifts of the submersible turbine engine system to monitor both external and internal pressures as the bag lifts ascend to the surface. In this manner, the sensors 904 and gauges 906 may detect leaks or other abnormal conditions associated with the bag lifts. In other instances, the sensors 904 and gauges 906 are installed or equipped at various location on the turbine to monitoring pressure, friction, heat, etc. to again detect abnormal operating conditions.

[0050] The imaging units 908 may include one or more cameras or other image components usable to collect data associate with the submersible turbine engine system. In one example, the imaging units 908 may capture image data associated with the operations of the submersible turbine engine system such that the image data is analyzed to detect abnormal behavior or risk of injury to a person.

[0051] The control unit 900 may also include processing resources, as represented by processors 910, and computer-readable storage media 912. The computer-readable storage media 912 may include volatile and nonvolatile memory, removable and nonremovable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information, such as computer-readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data. Such memory includes, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, RAID storage systems, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which can be accessed by a computing device.

[0052] Several modules such as instruction, data stores, and so forth is stored within the computer-readable media 912 and configured to execute on the processors 910. For example, a monitoring module 914, a shutdown module 916, and a power generation module 918. In some implementations, the computer-readable media 912 may store data; such operation data 920 collected by the sensors 904, gauges 906, and/or image units 908.

[0053] In one example, the monitoring module 914 is configured to receive data from the sensors 904, gauges 906, and/or image units 908 and to analyze the data to determine an operational health and status of the submersible turbine engine system. In some cases, the monitoring module 914 may monitor the rate of power generation, gas collection amounts and types, crop production, and/or oxygen production.

[0054] In an example, the shutdown module 916 is configure to cause the submersible turbine engine system to shutdown or slow operations based upon the monitoring module 914 detecting an issue or risk of injury associated with the operation of the submersible turbine engine system. For example, if the CO2 collection chamber is at 90% capacity, the shutdown module 916 may slow the rate at which the bag lifts are ascending to the surface, thereby slowing the production of CO2. In another example, the shutdown module 916 may cause a valve or release installed on each of the bag lifts to open releasing the captured gases and brining the submersible turbine engine system to a halt when risk of death or injury to a person is detected.

[0055] In some cases, the power generation module 918 is configured to monitor and control a rate of power generation by the submersible turbine engine system. For example, in many cases, power usage is higher during the day then at night. In these cases, the power generation module 918 may slow the rate of power generation of the submersible turbine engine system during the night and increase the rate during the day time hours to match the needs of the customers.

[0056] Although the subject matter has been described in language specific to structural features, it is to be understood that the subject matter defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to the specific features described. Rather, the specific features are disclosed as illustrative forms of implementing the claims.