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Title:
WALL-ANGLE DEVICE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/039726
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An angle-member (200) including an integrally formed piece for running along a corner. The integrally formed piece including an elongate ridge region (205). A pair of elongate side panels (201, 203) are mutually joined by the elongate ridge region to define an angle to suit a nominal angle of the corner. The member includes one or more lines of weakness (211) along which the angle-member is bendable to suit an actual angle of the corner.

Inventors:
WATSON, Adam Robert (7 Margie Square, Narre Warren South, Victoria 3805, 3805, AU)
WATSON, Robert (19 Lucas Court, Narre Warren South, Victoria 3805, 3805, AU)
Application Number:
AU2017/050932
Publication Date:
March 08, 2018
Filing Date:
August 31, 2017
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
WATSON, Adam Robert (7 Margie Square, Narre Warren South, Victoria 3805, 3805, AU)
International Classes:
E04F13/06; E04F13/073; E04F13/08; E04F13/12; E04F19/02
Foreign References:
US6119420A2000-09-19
GB1225790A1971-03-24
DE20204926U12002-07-11
US20030021957A12003-01-30
US5131198A1992-07-21
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WADESON (Level 27, 101 Collins StreetMelbourne, Victoria 3000, 3000, AU)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1 . An angle-member including an integrally formed piece for running along a corner; the integrally formed piece including an elongate ridge region; a pair of elongate side panels mutually joined by the elongate ridge region to define an angle to suit a nominal angle of the corner; and one or more lines of weakness along which the angle-member is bendable to suit an actual angle of the corner. 2. The angle-member of claim 1 wherein one of the lines of weakness is a series of perforations.

3. The angle-member of claim 1 or 2 including two or more of the lines of weakness.

4. The angle-member of claim 1 , 2 or 3 wherein the one or more lines of weakness are adjacent a spine of the elongate ridge region.

5. The angle-member of any one of claims 1 to 4 wherein the panels have curvature for holding plaster and the line of weakness is to enable a user to so bend the angle-member without damaging the curvature.

6. The angle-member of any one of claims 1 to 5 wherein the integrally formed piece is a piece of metal.

7. The angle-member of any one of claims 1 to 5 wherein the angle-member consists of sheet metal. 8. The angle-member of claim 6 or 7 wherein the angle-member is galvanized.

9. A method of finishing a corner including bending the angle-member of any one of claims 1 to 8 along at least one of the lines of weakness to suit the actual angle of the corner.

Description:
WALL-ANGLE DEVICE FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to angle-members. Such members may be used to finish sections of drywall applications. Plasterboard wall-angle devices are disclosed.

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

Finishing sections for drywall applications are manufactured to assist in obtaining a strong, straight, knock-resistant corner with a superior long-lasting finish. In particular, in the interior walls of buildings, where the walls are made of plasterboard, the corners and edges in those walls are often reinforced by wall-angle devices to provide strength and protection to the external corners. The wall-angle devices provide a structural reinforcement that defines the angle of the corner or edge. The wall-angle devices are covered by plaster together with the rest of the wall.

In the trade, these wall-angle devices are known by various names, such as: angles, trim angles, external angles, internal angles, plaster trims, to name a few examples. In the marketplace, the words "externals" and "internals" are sometimes used as nouns that describe whether the wall-angle device is configured to be used on an external corner or an internal corner, respectively.

Examples of prior art wall-angle devices are shown in rough schematic form in

Figures 1 A, 1 B, 1 C, 2A, 2B and 2C.

Figures 1A, 1 B and 1 C show a 90 degree internal.

Figures 2A and 2B show a 135 degree internal, used for splayed angles. In the above prior art figures, the wall-angle device A comprises a pair of elongated side panels 10, joined together at an angle a. Whilst the internal A is nominally a 90 degrees internal, the angle a is in fact slightly more than 90 degrees. Likewise, whilst the elongated side panels 10 are almost planar, they in fact have very slight curvatures defining concave surfaces 10a to hold the plaster material that is applied to the surface of each elongated side panel. For example, when the wall-angle device of Figure 1 B is fitted to the corner of a wall, wet plaster is applied to cover the surfaces 10a.

Each pair of elongated side panels are joined together along an elongated spine 1 1 . When installed in a wall, the spine 1 1 can be oriented either vertically or horizontally. Vertically-installed spines are found on the corners of walls, both externals and internals. Horizontally-installed spines tend to be found, for example, on ceilings. The wall-angle devices can be of variable extended length to suit the height of the wall.

An angle is formed from the pair of elongated side panels relative to one another, the pair of panels not having parallel planes. In this industry that supplies such wall-angle devices, the general wall-angle devices, made of metal, are manufactured at a nominal internal angle of either 90 degrees or about 135 degrees.

To avoid confusion, references to angles in this specification are to the internal angles such as the angle a or the angle 9, shown in Figure 2B and 4A.

Figure 1 B shows an example of a known wall-angle device having a nominal internal angle of 90 degrees, with respect to the mutual orientation of the pair of elongated side panels. Figure 2B shows an example of a known wall-angle device having a nominal internal angle of approximately 135 degrees formed by the elongated side panels. In the accompanying drawings, the angles have been drawn schematically, and are not precisely drawn to scale or accuracy of angles.

If the user requires the angle to be different to these standard angles, for instance, if a particular wall corner has a different angle, it is very difficult to bend these known wall-angle devices into a different angle, particularly to achieve the different angle consistently along the entire length of the wall-angle device.

In these known wall-angle devices made of metal, if the user attempts to bend the device to alter the angle created by the elongated side panels, the step of bending the device can cause warping or other damage to the original perfect linearity of the elongated spine 1 1 .

Another problem is that such bending of the angle can damage the said slight curvature of the elongated side panels. When the curvature is lost or damaged as an unintended side effect of the bending, the surface of the elongated side panels is less adapted to hold the plaster material on its surface.

There is a known wall-angle device where the spine region is made of a different material which is flexible paper. The pair of elongated side panels are joined to each other by this paper spine material. The paper spine material is more flexible than metal, hence, the paper spine allows the user to bend the paper spine to the desired different angle. However, these known wall-angle device with paper spines are very expensive to manufacture. The known paper spines function as a paper hinge.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a wall-angle device, that addresses or at least ameliorates one or more of the aforementioned problems of the prior art and/or provides consumers with a useful or commercial choice. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One aspect of the invention provides an angle-member including an integrally formed piece for running along a corner;

the integrally formed piece including

an elongate ridge region;

a pair of elongate side panels mutually joined by the elongate ridge region to define an angle to suit a nominal angle of the corner; and

one or more lines of weakness along which the angle-member is bendable to suit an actual angle of the corner.

Preferably one of the lines of weakness is a series of perforations. Preferably there are two or more lines of weakness. The one or more lines of weakness may be adjacent a spine of the elongate ridge region.

The panels may have curvature for holding plaster. The one or more lines of weakness may be to enable a user to so bend the angle-member without damaging the curvature.

The integrally formed piece may be a piece of metal. The angle-member may consist of sheet metal. Preferably the angle-member is galvanized.

The nominal corner angle is preferably one of 90 degrees and 135 degrees. Another aspect of the invention provides a method of finishing a corner including bending the angle-member along at least one of the lines of weakness to suit the actual angle of the corner.

Also disclosed is a wall-angle device comprising:

a pair of elongated side panels joined together along an elongated ridge region therebetween to form an angle; wherein the elongated ridge region comprises a ridge-structural-weakener that provides greater bendability to the elongated ridge region compared to if the ridge- structural-weakener were not present, such that the bendability of the elongated ridge region enables a user to bend said angle to a range of angles.

Preferably, the elongated ridge region is made of the same material as the elongated side panels.

Preferably, the ridge-structural-weakener is an elongated region of thin material that runs along the length of the elongated ridge region.

Preferably, the elongated region of thin material is thinner in comparison to the elongated side panels.

Preferably, the ridge-structural-weakener comprises a series of perforations.

Preferably, the elongated ridge region has a central axis, and the series of perforations is arranged along a single line of the central axis.

Preferably, the elongated ridge region has a central axis, and the series of perforations is arranged on either side of the central axis.

Preferably, the series of perforations are arranged on either side of the central axis in an alternating, non-symmetrical arrangement.

According to another aspect, although again not necessarily the broadest aspect, the present invention resides in a method of manufacturing a plasterboard wall- angle device, where the device comprising the following steps:

providing a pair of elongated side panels made of a material joined together along an elongated ridge region therebetween to form an angle between the elongated side panels, wherein the elongated ridge region is of the same material as the elongated side panels; providing the material of the elongated ridge region with a ridge-structural- weakener that provides greater bendability to the elongated ridge region compared to if the ridge-structural-weakener were not present, such that the bendability of the elongated ridge region enables a user to bend said angle to a range of angles.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In order that the invention may be readily understood and put into practical effect, reference will now be made to embodiments of the present invention with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numbers refer to identical elements. The drawings are provided by way of example only, wherein:

Prior art Figure 1A shows a rough schematic, perspective view (not drawn to scale) of a wall-angle device having a nominally 90 degree internal angle of the pair of elongated side panels, the device having indefinite length which can be varied depending on the length required for installation;

Prior art Figure 1 B shows an end view of the wall-angle device of Figure 1 A; Prior art Figure 1 C shows a side view of the wall-angle device of Figure 1A, shown when viewed from arrow A in Figure 1 A;

Prior art Figure 2A shows a rough schematic, perspective view (not drawn to scale) of a wall-angle device having a nominally 135 degree internal angle from the pair of elongated side panels;

Prior art Figure 2B shows an end view of the wall-angle device of Figure 2A; Prior art Figure 2C shows a side view of the wall-angle device of Figure 2A; Definition Figure 2D is provided to illustrate what is meant by internal and external angles; Figure 3A shows an end view of a first embodiment of a wall-angle device having an angle-ridge region with a thinned region;

Figure 4A shows an end view of a second embodiment of a wall-angle device having an angle-ridge region that is between the elongated side panels, the region being provided with a line of weakness comprising perforations;

Figures 4B shows a side view of the wall-angle device of Figure 4A, viewed from arrow A;

Figures 4C shows a side view of the wall-angle device of Figure 4A, viewed from the side opposite to that indicated by arrow A;

Figure 5A shows an end view of a third embodiment of a wall-angle device;

Figures 5B and 5C shows a side view of the wall-angle device of Figure 5A, shown when viewed from arrow A in Figure 5A;

Figure 6 illustrates an external in situ.

Skilled addressees will appreciate that elements in the drawings are illustrated for simplicity and clarity and have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the relative dimensions of some of the elements in the drawings may be distorted to help improve understanding of embodiments of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Embodiments of the present invention will be described with reference to a wall- angle device for drywall applications. For convenience sake, the wall-angle device will be described herein as a wall-angle plasterboard trim. However, it should be appreciated that embodiments of the present invention can be modified to suit wall types and applications. It will be appreciated that variations may need to be made as required. Referring to the accompanying drawings, Figure 3A shows an embodiment of a wall-angle device in the form of wall-angle trim 50A. The wall-angle trim of Figure 3A comprises a pair of elongated side panels in the form of a pair of long panel-portions 100. The long panel-portions 100 are made of a material, for example, galvanized iron. However, it is envisaged that any other suitable metal sheet material could also be utilised.

The long panel-portions 100 are joined together along an elongated ridge region therebetween. In the embodiment, the elongated ridge region is in the form of an elongated angle-ridge region 200. The elongated angle-ridge 200 is integrally formed with the long panel-portions 100 and thus, is made of the same material as the long panel-portions 100, in this example, of galvanized iron. In this embodiment, the parts of the wall-angle trim 50A are integrally formed using the same piece of metal sheet. The pair of elongated side panels 100 are provided on either side of the elongated angle-ridge region 200.

For the avoidance of doubt, "integrally formed" and similar terminology is used herein in its conventional sense to refer to a single continuous body of material. As the terminology is used herein, bodies of material may be integrated by welding but not by typical mechanical fastening techniques.

The material of the elongated ridge region is provided with a ridge-structural- weakener that provides greater bendability to the elongated ridge region compared to if the ridge-structural-weakener were not present, such that the bendability of the elongated ridge region allows said angle to be adjusted to a range of angles. The pair of elongated side panels, and the elongated ridge region therebetween which incorporates the ridge-structural-weakener, are all made of the same material. This is believed to minimise the cost of manufacture by avoiding the need for the use of different materials.

In this specification, the term ridge-structural-weakener is used as a functional term, and is not restricted to any specific number of discernible features in various embodiments of the invention, as will be described below. The scope of the term ridge- structural-weakener is defined by the function of being able to provide greater bendability to the elongated ridge region compared to if the ridge-structural-weakener were not present, such that the bendability of the elongated ridge region allows said angle to be adjusted to a range of angles. Several embodiments will be described, by way of example only, each showing a different ridge-structural-weakener that all achieve the said function.

In some embodiments, the elongated ridge region, defined above as being the said transition portion, may or may not include a minor portion of the elongated side panels. The important feature is that the presence of ridge-structural-weakener, in the region that is between the pair of elongated side panels, provides the said function of being able to provide greater bendability. The elongated ridge region, where the ridge-structural-weakener is provided, is defined as the general transition portion of material that is between and joins the pair of generally planar elongated side panels. The reasons for the panels preferably being generally planar, rather than being perfectly flat, are the same reasons as described in the prior art above.

Thus, in the following descriptions, the various embodiments of the ridge- structural-weakener can be either directly on the central axis between the elongated side panels or alternatively, slightly adjacent to the central axis between the elongated side panels. Whether directly on the axis, or slightly adjacent to the axis, these fall within the scope of the elongated ridge region. The word "region" in the term elongated ridge region embraces the central axis, as well as the parts that are slightly adjacent to the axis. The determining factor is that bending of the ridge-structural-weakener allows the embodiment of the wall-angle device to achieve an angle that can function as a corner or edge in a plasterboard wall. For clarification, in the diagrams of the embodiments, the central axis is labelled B-B.

Referring to Figure 3A, the figure shows an end view of a first embodiment of a wall-angle device in the form of wall-angle trim 50A. In Figure 3A, the angle-ridge region is provided with ridge-structural-weakener in the form of an elongated ridge region 1 1 OA of thin material that runs along the length of the central axis B-B of the elongated ridge region. In Figure 3A, the elongated region of thin material 1 1 OA is thinner compared a thickness that would be achieved if the elongated side panels had been solely bent into the angle from a flat sheet of material, with no extra thinning due to an extra rolling step.

The invention in its broadest aspect is not limited to the visual appearance of the rough schematic drawing shown in Figure 3A, which is not drawn to scale, but merely used to illustrate a principle of the functionality of the embodiment.

During manufacture, the elongated side panels 100 are bent to the desired angle. Following that, a rolling step is used to further thin out the centre of the angle- ridge region so that it is thinner than if it had simply been bent into shape from the flat, planar material. Alternatively, it is envisaged that during manufacture, the thinning of the angle-ridge region can be provided to the original sheet material before the entire assembly is bent into the desired profile. Either of these manufacturing processes will result in a wall-angle trim that has an angle created by a pair of elongated side panels, where the angle-ridge region is provided with a very thin portion, running along its length, that provides a degree of bendability that allows the user to readily bend the angle to a desired range of angles. It will be acknowledged that the extra thinness of the elongated region 1 1 OA may be achieved by other manufacturing techniques, other than rolling.

Some degree of experimentation may be required with usage of different materials, to achieve a degree of thinness for the angle-ridge region to allow a user to adjust said angle to a range of angles in an advantageous manner. The embodiment can be used as a 90 degree arrangement, or it can be bent towards a more obtuse shape. Thus, the single item, is able to cater for both 90 degree and for obtuse shapes (where a device having an interior angle of 135 degrees would be required), avoiding the need to purchase different items for different angled walls.

The thinness of material that is provided to the angle-ridge region, by the elongated region of thin material, means that, when the user alters the angle by bending the device along the linear length of the structural weakness, an advantage is that there is less likelihood of damage, or even no damage, to the said slight curvature on the surface of the elongated side panels. This means that the said slight curvature is able to be maintained to act as a slight trough to hold the wet plaster that is applied to the surface.

Regarding the configuration of the first embodiment in Figure 3A, where the central axis B-B is provided with a linear region of narrowness or thinness, this embodiment may be used either on either external angles or internal angles.

Referring to Figure 4A, a second embodiment of a wall-angle device is shown in the form of wall-angle trim 50B. The figure shows an end view of a second embodiment of a wall-angle device. As illustrated more clearly in Figures 4B and 4C, the elongated ridge region is in the form of a web of material 120 that spans between the pair of elongated side panels 100, and runs along the entire length of the second embodiment of the wall-angle device.

In Figures 4B and 4C, this web of material 120 is provided with a ridge- structural-weakener in the form of a linear series of perforations 1 10B that are provided periodically along the central axis B-B of the web of material 120. The linear series of perforations is arranged along a single line. The perforations are configured as elongated slots.

The perforations 1 10B act as a line of weakness that provides greater bendability to the web of material 120, compared to if the perforations 120 were not present. The bendability of the web of material 120, due to the perforations, allows said angle to be adjusted to a range of angles.

Regarding the configuration of the second embodiment in Figures 4A, 4B and 4C, where the perforations or slots are aligned in the elongated ridge region, along the central axis B-B, this embodiment is preferably used where the angle from the pair of elongated side panels 100 creates an obtuse shape (i.e. where the internal angle is roughly 135 degrees). This second embodiment is also preferred for internal angles, as defined by Figure 2C. The arrangement of the perforations or slots, along the central axis, contributes to being able to create a precise angle which is useful for internal angles. It is not recommended to use this second embodiment, where the slots are at the central axis, for use with external angles.

Figure 5A shows a third embodiment of a wall-angle device in the form of wall- angle trim 50C. The figure shows an end view of a third embodiment of a wall-angle device. In Figure 5A, the elongated ridge region is in the form of a linear angle-ridge region where the pair of elongated side panels 100 join together, and runs along the entire length of the third embodiment of the wall-angle device. In Figures 5B and 5C, in the angle-ridge region, particularly in the regions of the elongated side panels 100 that are adjacent to the central axis B-B, there is provided ridge-structural-weakener in the form of a series of perforations 1 10B.

In this third embodiment, the perforations 1 10C are provided periodically alongside the central axis B-B. Also, in this embodiment, the perforations 1 10C are provided alternatingly and non-symmetrically on either side of the central axis. It has been found that this alternating, staggered, non-symmetrical arrangement retains greater strength to the spine itself, while still allowing the bending to occur in the region of the elongated ridge region that is slightly adjacent to the central axis. Thus, in this embodiment, the angle from the elongated side panels can be altered, without compromising the strength of the spine. The perforations 1 10C act as a line of weakness that provides greater bendability along the perforations, compared to if the perforations 1 10C were not present. The bendability, due to the perforations, allows said angle to be adjusted to a range of angles. By way of example only, the length of the perforations can be 30 centimeters which are spaced apart every 10 centimeters. In other modifications of this embodiment, the perforations 1 10C need not be arranged alternatingly on either side of the central axis. Instead, in such a modification, the perforations can be symmetrical on either side of the central axis.

In the variant of Figure 5B, the perforations 1 10C define two lines of weakness including a respective line of weakness on each side of the spine. Of course, an integral piece of material including two or more lines of weakness is aptly described as including a line of weakness on the plain and ordinary meaning of the words and as the words are used herein.

Regarding the configuration of the third embodiment in Figures 5B and 5C, where the perforations or slots are arranged in the elongated ridge region, adjacent on either side of the central axis, this embodiment has been found useful for external angles, as defined in Figure 2C. Hence, for external angles, where the edge of the corner is important, it is an advantage to avoid having slots directly on the spine-edge itself.

In other modifications, the ridge-structural-weakener is not limited to the embodiments described above. For example, in other modifications, the ridge- structural-weakener may comprise a series of small holes. The functional aim would be for the series of small holes to provide greater bendability to the elongated ridge region compared to if the series of holes were not present.

It is understood that the elongated side panels of the wall-angle devices can be manufactured to a range of lengths, or can be cut to size to a range of lengths. The final length of the elongated side panels will depend on the height of the wall to which the wall-angle device is to be attached. Also, the widths of the elongated side panels can also be varied without limiting the invention in its broadest aspect.

Figure 6 illustrates an external angle-member 200 fitted to a corner C. The corner C has a nominal angle β of 90 degrees. The external 200 consists of galvanized steel sheet that is punched and roll-formed. The steel is of course an integral piece of material.

The external has a first panel 201 and a second panel 203. The panels 201 , 203 are mutually connected by a ridge region 205.

The ridge region 205 defines a high point 207 running along the corner C and projecting outwards beyond the notional intersection of the panels 201 , 203. In this example, the high point 207 is defined by a partially cylindrical section. The high point 207 defines the external vertex of the corner and a high point to which plaster (or other suitable finishing material) may be trowelled off to neatly overlie the panels 201 , 203, thereby concealing the panels. A skilled plasterer can taper the thickness of the applied plaster to on the one hand conceal the panels 201 , 203, and on the other hand be imperceptible once painted.

In this example, the high point 207 is coincident with the spine of the external 200. Dotted line 209 indicates an elongate region of external concavity between the high point 207 and a portion of the ridge region 205 continuous with the panel 201 .

The elongate ridge region 205 further includes a line of weakness 21 1 . In this example, the line of weakness takes the form of a series of 1 mm x 3 mm rectangular perforations separated by 0.75 mm bridges of material. The elongate ridge region further includes another line weakness (not shown) arranged symmetrically on the other side of the spine of the external.

Whilst the corner C is nominally a 90 degree corner, in reality corners are rarely built to exacting specifications and as such the angle β may well be anywhere in the range of 80 to 100 degrees. The line of weakness 21 1 enables a user to simply bend the external 200 to suit the actual angle of the corner C.

By providing a line of weakness (i.e. a line that is weak relative to the material about it), the bending is relatively controlled, whereby the external can be opened and closed in hinge-like manner (e.g. opened to 100 degrees or closed to 80 degrees) without adversely distorting the panels 201 , 203.

For the sake of illustration, a short external 200 is illustrated so that exposed portions of the corner C remain visible. In practice, typically substantially the entire length of the corner C will be covered by the external 200. Similar comments apply in respect of internals.

Orientational terms used in the specification and claims such as vertical, horizontal, top, bottom, upper and lower are to be interpreted as relational and are based on the premise that the term "vertical" would be how a person, who is installing a wall-angle device, would refer to a wall in a room as being vertical, and all other orientational terms given their natural meaning in that context.

Hence, the wall-angle device provides a solution to the aforementioned problems of the prior art by providing plasterboard wall-angle device for drywall applications which allows a single device to be used for internal angle and external angle walls of any angle or shape, eliminating the needs for multiple devices to suit the different angles and shapes.

The reference to any prior art in this specification is and should not be taken as, an acknowledgment or any form or suggestion that the prior art forms part of the common general knowledge.