Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
WEARABLE CONNECTOR CABLE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/135095
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
This invention relates to a wearable connector cable (10), and in particular a connector cable which can be worn as a bracelet when not in use. The connector cable (10) comprises a length of electrical cable having a protective sheath (12), a first electrical connector (14) at a first end of the electrical cable and a second electrical connector (16) at a second end of the electrical cable. A first receiver (20) is slidably mounted upon the electrical cable and is adapted to temporarily secure the first electrical connector (14). A second receiver (22) is slidably mounted upon the electrical cable and is adapted to temporarily secure the second electrical connector (16). The provision of two slidable receivers for the respective ends of the connector cable enables the connector cable to be formed into a loop for wearing (or otherwise to be stored) when not in use.

Inventors:
VENABLES, Carl (Tech HouseReddicap Trading Estate, Sutton Coldfield B75 7BU, B75 7BU, GB)
Application Number:
GB2019/050038
Publication Date:
July 11, 2019
Filing Date:
January 08, 2019
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
MIDBASS DISTRIBUTION LIMITED (Tech House, Reddicap Trading Estate, Sutton Coldfield B75 7BU, B75 7BU, GB)
International Classes:
H02G11/00; H04R1/00; A44C5/00; H01R31/06
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GEE, Steven William (Fairfield IP Limited, 1 South Lynn Gardens,London Road, Shipston on Stour CV36 4ER, CV36 4ER, GB)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. A connector cable (10; 1 10) comprising a length of electrical cable having a protective sheath (12, 1 12), a first electrical connector (14; 1 14) at a first end of the electrical cable, a second electrical connector (16; 1 16) at a second end of the electrical cable and one or more electrical wires for communicating an electric current between the first electrical connector and the second electrical connector, a first receiver (20; 120) slidably mounted upon the electrical cable and being adapted to temporarily secure the first electrical connector (14; 1 14), and a second receiver (22; 122) slidably mounted upon the electrical cable and being adapted to temporarily secure the second electrical connector (16; 1 16).

2. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to claim 1 in which the configuration of the first electrical connector (14; 1 14) is different from the configuration of the second electrical connector (16; 1 16).

3. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to claim 1 or claim 2 in which the first electrical connector has the configuration of a USB connector.

4. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to any one of claims 1 -3 in which the second electrical connector (16; 1 16) is a charging connector for a mobile telephone. 5. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to any one of claims 1 -4 in which the first and the second receivers (20, 22; 120, 122) are resilient.

6. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to any one of claims 1 -4 in which the first and second receivers (20, 22; 120, 122) are a friction fit upon the electrical cable (12; 1 12).

7. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to any one of claims 1 -6 in which the resistance to sliding movement of one or both of the first and second receivers (20, 22; 120, 122) along the electrical cable increases when its electrical connector is located in the receiver.

8. A connector cable (10) according to any one of claims 1 -7 in which the first receiver (20) is located between the second electrical connector (16) and the second receiver (22), and in which the second receiver (22) is located between the first electrical connector (14) and the first receiver (20).

9. A connector cable (110) according to any one of claims 1 -7 in which the first receiver (120) is located between the first electrical connector (1 14) and the second receiver (122), and in which the second receiver (122) is located between the second electrical connector (1 16) and the first receiver (120).

10. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to any one of claims 1 -9 in which the protective sheath is formed from woven nylon.

1 1. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to any one of claims 1 -10 in which the first and second electrical connectors (14, 16; 1 14, 1 16) have respective housings (32, 34) which are secured to respective ends of the protective sheath.

12. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to claim 1 1 in which a strain relieving component interconnects each housing and its end of the protective sheath, the strain relieving component being integral with the respective housing.

13. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to any one of claims 1 -12 in which the first receiver (20; 120) is shaped to accommodate the electrical terminal(s) of the first connector (14; 1 14). 14. A connector cable (10; 1 10) according to any one of claims 1 -13 in which the second receiver (22; 122) is shaped to accommodate the electrical terminal(s) of the second connector (16; 116).

15. A connector cable (10) according to any one of claim 1 1 or claim 12 in which the first receiver (20) is shaped to accommodate at least a part of the housing (32) of the first connector (14). 16. A connector cable (10) according to any one of claims 1 1 , 12 or 15 in which the second receiver is shaped to accommodate at least a part of the housing of the second connector.

Description:
WEARABLE CONNECTOR CABLE FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a wearable connector cable, and in particular a connector cable which can be worn as a bracelet when not in use.

Whilst the cable has been designed to be suitable for wearing as a bracelet when not in use, it may alternatively be stored looped around an article, for example around the strap of a handbag, or around a keeper for a belt, or attached to a set of keys, for example. Thus, it will be appreciated that a connector cable which is suitable for wearing as a bracelet will comprise one or more loops of a size which is also suitable for storing in a large number of alternative locations; the present invention is not limited to any particular storage location chosen by the user, nor is it limited by the number or size of the loop(s) which the user chooses to create.

The invention is expected to be used primarily as a charging cable for recharging the battery of a mobile telephone and the following description will therefore refer to such usage unless otherwise indicated. It will be understood, however, that the invention is alternatively suitable as a charging cable for other electronic devices, and is further suitable as an adaptor to interconnect electrical devices other than (or in addition to) recharging the battery.

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

A mobile telephone typically has a battery which can be recharged from a mains socket by way of a dedicated charger. The mobile telephone will typically have a socket to receive a charging connector and the configuration of the charging connector and socket may be unique to the particular manufacturer and model of mobile telephone. In the present application“configuration” is used to describe the physical shape and also the number and location of the electrical terminals of the connector. The use of mobile telephones has become so widespread that users go to significant lengths to ensure that they do not fully discharge their battery and are left without use of the mobile telephone, even for short periods of time. Nevertheless, the battery of a user’s mobile telephone may become fully discharged in situations in which the user does not have access to the dedicated charger.

Electronic equipment which could be used to recharge a mobile telephone is often available even if the dedicated charger is not accessible. For example, the user may have access to a tablet or laptop computer with adequate battery charge to recharge the battery of the user’s mobile telephone. Many mobile telephones can be recharged by connection to the USB connector of a computer as an alternative to the dedicated charger, and the use of a USB charging cable can often avoid the complete discharging of the battery of the mobile telephone.

A USB charging cable for a mobile telephone has a (standard) USB connector at one end and a charging connector with a configuration matching that of the particular mobile telephone at the other end (with electrical wires interconnecting the respective terminals of the USB and charging connectors in known fashion). However, the user must have access to the USB charging cable for it to be effective, so that the user typically has to carry the USB charging cable with the mobile telephone at all times in case the battery of the mobile telephone should require recharging. In effect, this solution to the problem of a discharged battery of a mobile telephone requires the user to carry the USB charging cable instead of the dedicated charger. The USB charging cable is typically smaller and lighter than the dedicated charger and so is easier to carry and store when not in use. However, a USB charging cable requires a tablet or laptop computer with a suitably charged battery, and is relatively easy to overlook and to lose.

The problem is exacerbated if the user has multiple personal media devices, for example a mobile telephone and a separate MP3 player, and wishes to ensure that the batteries of both remain charged. Such devices will typically have charging sockets of differing configurations and require the user either to carry a dedicated charger and/or a separate USB charging cable for each device.

There is therefore a requirement for a connector cable which can more readily be carried when not in use, and which is therefore more likely to be available when required. There is also a requirement for a connector cable to be less vulnerable to becoming lost.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The inventor has appreciated that the user is more likely to have a connector cable available when required if it is worn on his or her person. A connector cable which can be stored by wearing around the wrist, for example, will be less liable to become lost. Also, if multiple connector cables having different configurations are required the user can readily wear multiple connector cables around one wrist, or one or more connector cables around each wrist.

The connector cable can be styled and/or coloured to make it aesthetically pleasing to wear as a bracelet. The connector cable can also be made comfortable to wear for extended periods. Thus, it is expected that many users might routinely wear the connector cable of the present invention as a fashion accessory so that it is available if and when required. It may even be that for some users the primary utility of the connector cable is as a bracelet with its electrical connector utility secondary.

A set of headphones which can be looped for wearing around the wrist when not in use is described in the Applicant’s patent application WO2017/118846. Connector cables which can be worn around the wrist are described in the Applicant’s European Union design registration 003 755 487. The present invention provides a connector cable with additional functionality over those previously disclosed devices. According to a first aspect of the invention there is provided a connector cable comprising a length of electrical cable having a protective sheath, a first electrical connector at a first end of the electrical cable, a second electrical connector at a second end of the electrical cable and one or more electrical wires for communicating an electric current between the first electrical connector and the second electrical connector, a first receiver slidably mounted upon the electrical cable and being adapted to temporarily secure the first electrical connector, and a second receiver slidably mounted upon the electrical cable and being adapted to temporarily secure the second electrical connector.

Preferably, the configuration of the first electrical connector is different from the configuration of the second electrical connector. Preferably also the first electrical connector has the configuration of a USB connector. The second electrical connector may be a charging connector for a mobile telephone so that the connector cable is designed to supplement a dedicated charger. Alternatively, the second electrical connector may be a signal connector so that the connector cable is configured as an adaptor to communicate signals and/or information between electrical devices. Thus, whilst it is expected that the primary utility of the connector cable will to supplement a dedicated charger, the invention could alternatively be utilised as an adaptor cable to interconnect two electrical devices (for example two electrical devices having connectors with different configurations). In those electronic devices in which a single connector is used to communicate information and also to recharge the battery, the connector cable can provide both of those functions.

The provision of two receivers on the electrical cable allows the connector cable to be wound into one or more loops, with the first electrical connector retained by the first receiver and the second electrical connector retained by the second receiver. However, because both of the receivers are slidable along the electrical cable the length of the loop (or the length of each of the loops if there are more than one) can be adjusted, for example to suit the size of the user’s wrist. Thus, when each of the electrical connectors is inserted into its receiver the ends of the connector cable overlap; sliding the receivers along the electrical cable adjusts the length of the overlap and thereby adjusts the size of the loop(s).

Desirably, the first and the second receivers are resilient, and ideally of plastics material. The receivers therefore temporarily secure or retain the electrical connectors by way of their resilience, i.e. the receivers must be stretched slightly to accommodate the respective electrical connector. Ideally therefore the first and second electrical connectors are a“friction fit” in their respective receiver, in that they are retained by the friction between the receiver and the fitted connector. It will be understood that the friction fit is determined firstly by the respective sizes of the cooperating components and secondly by the materials which are used.

Preferably, each receiver is a“friction fit” upon the electrical cable, in that it can be slid along the electrical cable by the user to the desired adjustment position and will remain in that position so that the connector cable maintains the loop(s) of the desired length until further adjusted by the user. It can if desired be arranged that the resistance to movement of a receiver along the electrical cable increases when its electrical connector is located in the receiver. It is nevertheless desirable that the receivers are both movable along the electrical cable when the electrical connector is located in its receiver so that the user can adjust the length of the looped cable without having to first remove the electrical connectors from their respective receiver.

In one embodiment the first receiver is located between the second electrical connector and the second receiver, and the second receiver is located between the first electrical connector and the first receiver. Accordingly, the connector cable is arranged from its first end to its second end as: first electrical connector, second receiver, first receiver, second electrical connector. This embodiment is suitable when the overall length of the electrical cable is relatively short, the cable forming one complete loop with overlapping ends in the looped condition.

In another embodiment the first receiver is located between the first electrical connector and the second receiver, and the second receiver is located between the second electrical connector and the first receiver. Accordingly, the connector cable is arranged from its first end to its second end as: first electrical connector, first receiver, second receiver, second electrical connector. This embodiment is suitable when the overall length of the electrical cable is relatively long, the cable generally forming more than two complete loops with overlapping ends in the looped condition.

Preferably, the protective sheath is formed from woven nylon. Woven nylon is particularly resistant to abrasion and other damage. In addition, woven nylon is resistant to extension so that the likelihood of damage to the wires of the electrical cable (which might otherwise be caused by stretching of the connector cable) is reduced or avoided.

Desirably, the first and second electrical connectors have housings which are secured to respective ends of the protective sheath. Preferably, a strain relieving component interconnects each housing and its end of the protective sheath. The strain relief is preferably integral with the housing, and is ideally secured to the protective sheath during manufacture by an overmoulding process. In such an arrangement, stretching of the connector cable is resisted directly by the protective sheath so that the likelihood of damage to the electrical wires is minimised or avoided.

Preferably, the first receiver is shaped to accommodate the electrical terminal(s) of the first connector. Preferably also the second receiver is shaped to accommodate the electrical terminal(s) of the second connector. Desirably, the first and/or second receiver is shaped to also accommodate at least a part of the housing of the respective first and/or second connector.

The electrical cable can comprise two or more electrical wires, dependent upon the configuration of the first and second electrical connectors. If the connector cable is solely for charging the battery of a mobile telephone two separate electrical wires may be sufficient. However, more electrical wires are preferred so that signals indicating the state of charge and the like can be communicated from the mobile telephone to the charging electrical device. Additional electrical wires can be included, commensurate with the configuration of the electrical connectors, so that the desired signal and information connections can be made (as well as or instead of, as desired) a recharging current. The electrical wires are electrically isolated within the electrical cable, as by having their own protective sheathing, in known fashion.

According to a second aspect of the invention there is provided a connector cable comprising a length of electrical cable having a protective sheath, a first electrical connector at a first end of the electrical cable, a second electrical connector at a second end of the electrical cable and one or more electrical wires for communicating an electric current between the first electrical connector and the second electrical connector, a first receiver mounted upon the electrical cable and being adapted to temporarily secure the first electrical connector, and a second receiver mounted upon the electrical cable and being adapted to temporarily secure the second electrical connector, the first and second receivers being located between the first and second electrical connectors.

Unlike the connector cables of the Applicant’s European Union design registration 003 755 487, the connector cable according to the second aspect has the receivers located between (and preferably separate from) the electrical connectors at the respective ends of the connector cable. The length of the loop (or loops) which is formed when the connector cable is not in use is therefore determined by the positions of the receivers and not by the overall length of the connector cable. A connector cable can therefore be provided which has an overall length to suit the application and there is no compromise involved with the overall length also determining the size of the formed loop(s).

Preferably, one or both of the first and second receivers are slidable along the electrical cable, similarly to the first aspect of the invention. The provision of slidable receivers allows adjustment of the length of the formed loop(s) and is desirable (but not essential) for this aspect of the invention. Other features of the first aspect of the invention can be utilised with the second aspect of the invention with which they are applicable, and vice versa.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The invention will now be described in more detail, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Fig.1 shows a first perspective view of a first embodiment of connector cable according to the invention, in an in-use condition;

Fig.2 shows a second perspective view of the connector cable of Fig.1 ; Fig.3 shows a perspective view of the connector cable of Fig.1 in a partial non use or storage condition;

Fig.4 shows a second perspective view of the connector cable in the condition of Fig.3;

Fig.5 shows a first side view of a second embodiment of connector cable according to the invention, in an in-use condition;

Fig.6 shows an opposite side view of the connector cable of Fig.5;

Fig.7 shows a perspective view of the connector cable of Fig.5;

Fig.8 shows a first side view of the connector cable of Fig.5, in a storage condition;

Fig.9 shows a end view of the connector cable of Fig.8; and

Fig.10 shows a perspective view of the connector cable of Fig.8. DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The connector cable 10 of Figs. 1 -4 comprises a length of electrical cable with a protective sheath 12. There is a first electrical connector 14 at a first end of the electrical cable 12 and a second electrical connector 16 at a second end of the electrical cable 12.

The electrical cable 12 comprises one or more electrical wires (not seen) for communicating an electric current between respective electrical terminals of the first electrical connector 14 and the second electrical connector 16.

The configuration of the first electrical connector 14 is different to that of the second electrical connector 16. In this embodiment the second electrical connector 16 is a“lightning” connector, i.e. having the configuration suited to communicate electrical signals, information and a recharging current to an iPhone™ supplied by the Apple Corporation. The first electrical connector 14 is a USB connector. This particular connector cable 10 is therefore suited to connecting an iPhone™ to a laptop or tablet computer (for example), and can be used to recharge the battery of the iPhone™ and to communicate signals and information between the ’phone and the computer. In known fashion, the connector cable 10 may also be used to recharge the’phone by inserting the USB connector 14 into a suitable transformer connected to the mains electrical supply. As explained above, the first electrical connector 14 and/or the second electrical connector 16 can have a different configuration to that shown in the drawings, suited to interconnect particular electrical devices. The present invention is not limited by the particular configuration of either of the electrical connectors. A first receiver 20 is slidably mounted upon the electrical cable 12 and is adapted to temporarily retain or secure the first electrical connector 14 as seen in Fig.3. A second receiver 22 is slidably mounted upon the electrical cable 12 and is adapted to temporarily retain or secure the second electrical connector 16. As best seen in Figs. 1 and 4, the second receiver 22 has a slot 24 into which the blade 26 of the second electrical connector 16 can be inserted.

As best seen in Figs. 2 and 3, the first receiver 20 has a recess 30 which is formed to receive the whole of the first electrical connector 14, i.e. the recess 30 can accommodate the metallic box-section terminal of the USB connector as well as the housing 32 of the USB connector. On the contrary, in this embodiment the second receiver 22 accommodates the blade 26 of the second electrical connector 16 and does not accommodate the housing 34. It will be understood that in alternative embodiments the recess of the first receiver could be shaped to accommodate only the box-section terminal (as is the case with the second embodiment shown in the drawings) and the recess of the second receiver could be shaped to accommodate some or all of the housing 34, as desired. Both of the receivers 20 and 22 are made of resilient plastics material and the respective receivers must be stretched slightly to accommodate the electrical terminals 14, 16 and thereby temporarily retain the terminals. The (friction) force retaining each of the electrical terminals 14, 16 does not need to be large as the electrical connectors 14, 16 are both very light in weight, but the force is sufficient to prevent an electrical connector from inadvertently falling out of its respective receiver.

Each of the receivers 20, 22 is a friction or interference fit upon the protective sheath of the electrical cable 12. The receivers 20, 22 can therefore readily be slid along the protective sheath by the user, but tend to remain in the chosen position. In this embodiment the interference fit is substantially the same whether or not the electrical connector 14, 16 is located in its receiver 20, 22, but in an alternative embodiment it can be arranged that the resistance to movement of a receiver along the protective sheath increases when its electrical connector is inserted. In one alternative embodiment it is arranged that stretching the receiver to accommodate its electrical connector acts to clamp the receiver onto the protective sheath so as to (slightly) increase the resistance to movement of the receiver along the protective sheath. The protective sheath of the electrical cable 12 is made from woven nylon, and can be coloured (including multi-coloured) as desired to increase its aesthetic appeal. Whilst the protective sheath is shown in the drawings as having a smooth surface, it can be textured to increase its aesthetic appeal without impairing the ability to slide the receivers therealong.

The second electrical connector 16 has a housing 34 and the protective sheath is secured directly to the respective housings 32 and 34 by an overmoulding process. Tension along the length of the electrical cable 12 (such as by a force seeking to separate the housings 32 and 34) is therefore resisted directly by the protective sheath rather than (solely) by way of the electrical wires of the electrical cable. Such an arrangement reduces the likelihood of damage to an electrical wire and/or its connection to a respective electrical terminal.

When the connector cable 10 is in use to recharge the battery of a mobile telephone, or to communicate signals and information between electrical devices, it is used in the condition of Figs. 1 and 2 (although the electrical cable may be straightened out as required). The USB connector 14 can be inserted into a USB socket of a computer and the“lightning” connector 16 can be inserted into the recharging socket of an iPhone™. Electrical current can pass along the electrical cable 12 to recharge the’phone battery, and signals and information can pass between the’phone and the computer, as desired or required. When not in use, for example when the ’phone battery has been fully or sufficiently recharged, the connector cable 10 is wound into a loop for storage. Firstly, the first receiver 20 may be slid along the electrical cable 12 to the approximate position required to form a loop (see Figs. 3 and 4) of the desired size. If the connector cable 10 is to be worn around the user’s wrist the user will choose the position of the first receiver 20 so that the loop matches his or her wrist (with the desired degree of freedom). The user uses his or free hand to wind the cable connector 10 around the wrist and to press the USB connector 14 into the first receiver 20. The user can if desired then twist the connector cable so that the USB connector is hidden from view as in Fig.4.

If required, the user then slides the second receiver 22 along the electrical cable 12, and inserts the blade 26 of the“lightning” connector 16 into the slot 24.

It will be understood that the connector cable 10 is shown in Figs. 3 and 4 to form one complete loop with overlapping ends 36 and 38. Because both of the receivers 20, 22 are movable along the electrical cable 12 the length of overlap is adjustable whereby to adjust the size of the formed loop. It is desirable that the second receiver 22 is slid along the electrical cable 12 to a position in which the overlapping ends 36 and 38 are of a similar length (i.e. the distance between the first electrical connector 14 and the second receiver 22 is similar to the distance between the second electrical connector 16 and the first receiver). Overlapping ends 36 and 38 of dis-similar lengths may be visually unappealing, albeit small differences between the length of the overlapping ends 36 and 38 are unlikely to be noticeable or significant.

It will be seen in Figs. 3 and 4 that the connector cable 10 forms a loop which could be wound around a user’s wrist when only one of the electrical connectors 14, 16 is received in its respective receiver 20, 22. Nevertheless, it is expected that most users will locate both electrical connectors in their respective receivers so as to avoid the loose end part 36 which is shown in the drawings. The loose end part 36 may be considered unsightly by users and might also become snagged on clothing or other article, increasing the likelihood that the connector cable 10 is inadvertently released. Most users are therefore expected to insert both of the electrical connectors 14, 16 into their respective receivers 20, 22 when the connector cable is not in use. The connector cable 10 has been designed with that expectation in mind and it will be understood that when both of the electrical connectors 14, 16 are accommodated by their respective receivers 20, 22 all of the metallic parts of the connectors can be hidden from view, maximising the aesthetic appeal of the connector cable 10 in the storage condition. A second embodiment of connector cable 1 10 is shown in Figs. 5-10. The function and operation of the second embodiment is very similar to that of the first embodiment described above and only the differences will be described in detail. Figs. 5-7 show the connector cable 1 10 in an in-use condition with the electrical connectors 1 14, 1 16 exposed (although the electrical cable 1 12 may be straightened out in practice). Figs. 8-10 show the connector cable 1 10 in a storage condition with the electrical connectors 1 14, 116 located in their respective receiver 120, 122. The first difference of the second embodiment is that the electrical cable 112 is significantly longer. Both embodiments are shown in the drawings as being sized to fit a user’s wrist and it will be seen that the second embodiment is sufficiently long to form more than three complete loops. Clearly, the number of overlapping loops, and the size of the formed loops, can be determined by the user and neither embodiment is limited to the number or size of the formed loops shown in the drawings.

The second difference is that the first receiver 120 is relatively close to the first electrical connector 114 and the second receiver 122 is relatively close to the second electrical connector 1 16. In particular, the first receiver 120 is located between the first electrical connector 1 14 and the second receiver 122 and the second receiver 122 is located between the second electrical connector 1 16 and the first receiver 120, along the length of the electrical cable 1 12. The two differences are related in that it is desirable in practice to form the end part 138 of the electrical cable 1 12 (i.e. that part between the first electrical connector 1 14 and the first receiver 120 into a single complete loop as shown in Fig.10), and similarly to form the end part 136 of the electrical cable 1 12 (i.e. that part between the second electrical connector 1 16 and the second receiver 122 into another single complete loop as shown in Fig.8). Whilst it would be possible to reverse the positions of the receivers 120, 122 in the second embodiment, the additional loops between the end parts 136, 138 makes that unnecessary, and in some cases undesirable as explained below. The additional length of the electrical cable 1 12 of the second embodiment allows the user to loop the connector cable 1 10 around his or her wrist with a slightly different procedure which can make storage of the connector cable 1 10 easier for some users. Firstly, the user slides the first receiver 120 along the electrical cable 1 12 to a position some distance away from the first electrical connector 1 14. The user can then use both hands to insert the first electrical connector 1 14 into the first receiver 120 to form a relatively large loop, and in particular a loop which is large enough to allow the user subsequently to place the looped end over his or her hand and onto the wrist. The user can then slide the first receiver 120 (with the retained first electrical connector 1 14) along the electrical cable 1 12 towards the end with the first electrical connector so as to reduce the size of the loop until it is comfortable around his or her wrist. The remainder of the electrical cable can then be wound around the wrist, forming further loops of a similar, comfortable, size. The second electrical connector 1 16 can be inserted into the second receiver 122, with the second receiver 122 being moved along the electrical cable 1 12 (either before or after inserting the second electrical connector, or both) to form a final loop of a similar, comfortable, size. It will be understood that because only a single loop is formed by the end parts 136, 138 of the electrical cable 1 12, the second receiver 122 is necessarily accessible to the user for insertion of the second electrical connector 116 and is not obscured beneath other loops of the electrical cable. Clearly, the user could change the stated procedure by initially inserting the second electrical connector 1 16 into the second receiver 122 without avoiding the benefit of the procedure in permitting the user to use both hands during the initial stages. The third difference of the second embodiment is that the first receiver 120 is shaped to accommodate only the metallic box-section of the USB connector 114, so that in use the metallic box-section is inserted longitudinally into the first receiver 1 20 (as is the case for the second electrical connector 1 16), as opposed to transversely as in the first embodiment.

It will be understood that the connector cable of the invention can depart from those shown in the drawings without adversely affecting the invention. As stated above, the configuration of the first electrical connector and the configuration of the second electrical connector can be changed to suit the chosen application. Also, the form of the receivers can be altered so as to accommodate more or less of the housing of the respective electrical connector, as desired. One or both of the first and second receivers may require the longitudinal or transverse insertion (and removal) of the respective electrical connector, as desired.

It is expected that some users will consider the primary utility of the present invention to be an electrical connector or adaptor, with the fact that it can be worn as a bracelet as a secondary utility (i.e. the invention provides a connector cable which can readily be stored when not in use). It is, however, expected that other users would consider the fashion accessory functionality to be the primary utility (i.e. the invention provides a fashion bracelet with the additional functionality as a charging cable or adaptor).

It will be recognised that it is the ability to form the connector cable into one or more loops of adjustable size which makes the connector cable particularly suitable for wearing as a bracelet, and furthermore that it is the provision of two movable receivers which provide the adjustability.

Many different connectors for joining the ends of a bracelet are known, some of which permit adjustment of the length of the bracelet. The provision of two movable receivers is beneficial on its own and provides a novel and inventive way to adjust the length of a bracelet. The resulting structure has two separate connections along the loop, the first connector and the first receiver forming one connection and the second connector and second receiver forming another connection. This in turn enables the respective ends of the cable to have any desired form since they are not required to connect to each other. The present inventor has taken advantage of this and forms each end of the cable as an electrical connector for an electrical device.

Whilst the drawings show that the connector cable 10 can be formed into one complete loop with overlapping ends 36, 38 (and the connector cable 1 10 formed into more than three loops with overlapping ends 136, 138), it will be understood that the same connector cables (and similarly longer or shorter connector cables) could alternatively be formed into smaller or larger loops (and perhaps consequently a different number of loops), as desired. The use of receivers which can move along the electrical cable, and which can therefore move relative to the electrical connectors, results in a connector cable in which the length of the formed loop(s) is independent of the overall length of the connector cable. Alternatively stated, the length of the electrical cable between the first and second electrical connectors does not determine the length of the formed loop(s). The length of the connector cable can therefore be chosen to suit the application without compromising the ability of the user to comfortably wear the cable around his or her wrist (or elsewhere as desired) when not in use.