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Title:
WEARABLE PERSONAL CLIMATE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/034766
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A wearable personal climate device weighing less than 2 pounds comprising (a) battery or AC power operated thermoelectric module(s)/generator for generating conditioned air as set; (b) discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger(s); (c) fan(s) angled towards the base of heat exchanger for blowing ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction; (d) an exhaust heat sink; and (e) sensors; wherein the air temperature is modulated by pulsing the thermoelectric module and fans & the device is used by living being.

Inventors:
SINHA, Pankaj, Kumar (Microclimatek Corporation, Arizona145 S 79th Street, Suite #2, Chandler AZ, 85226, US)
Application Number:
US2017/042489
Publication Date:
February 22, 2018
Filing Date:
July 18, 2017
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
SINHA, Pankaj, Kumar (Microclimatek Corporation, Arizona145 S 79th Street, Suite #2, Chandler AZ, 85226, US)
International Classes:
F24F5/00; A41D13/00; A41D27/00; A61F7/00; F24F13/02; F25B21/02; F25D23/12
Foreign References:
US6430935B12002-08-13
US8397518B12013-03-19
US20030229385A12003-12-11
US20060185054A12006-08-24
US6349412B12002-02-26
US20120018418A12012-01-26
US6216961B12001-04-17
Other References:
ORION FANS DC FANS AND FAN ACCESSORIES - ORION FANS, 15 May 2011 (2011-05-15), XP055464660, Retrieved from the Internet [retrieved on 20170919]
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SINHA, Pankaj, Kumar (Microclimatek Corporation, Arizona145 S 79th Street, Suite #2, Chandler AZ, 85226, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
EXAMPLES

Comparison with reference example : Data for the device in the present invention was measured in the laboratory on one of the units assembled for this purpose

We claim

A wearable personal climate device weighing less than 2 pounds comprising

(a) battery or AC power adapter operated thermoelectric module(s)/generator for generating conditioned air as set;

(b) discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger(s);

(c) fan(s) angled towards the base of heat exchanger for blowing ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction;

(d) an exhaust heat sink; and

(e) sensors;

wherein the air temperature is modulated by pulsing the thermoelectric module and fans.

A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 is operated at 12 v and draws less than 4 amp current average.

A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the air is cooled up to 16°F and heated up to 35°F.

4. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the heat exchanger is less than 140mm x 50mm x 50mm in size.

5. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the fan is less than 50 mm x 50 mm cross section in size.

6. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the battery is standalone or integrated with device.

7. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the device is worn on the head or neck or waist.

8. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the device is fixed to a belt or vest or neck band or sling purse.

9. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 8 wherein the belt or vest or neck band or sling purse further comprises channels or ducts with orifices to enable air distribution over core or any part of the body of living being.

10. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 9 wherein optionally the orifice is with fixed or oscillating vanes.

11. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the air temperature is modulated by conduction and convection.

12. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the air temperature is modulated via manual controls or wired remote or wireless remote or smart phone or on-board computing capabilities or artificial intelligence.

13. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 used by living being.

14. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 13 further wherein the living being is human and is suffering from temperature sensitivities caused by old age, menopausal hot flash and the like.

15. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 13 further wherein the living being is human and is suffering from temperature sensitivities caused by disorders selected from Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), cancer and the like.

16. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 13 further wherein the living being is human and is undergoing surgical procedure.

17. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 13 further wherein the living being is human performing or assisting in surgery.

18. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 13 further wherein the device is an internet hub comprising multiple device network.

19. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 18 used in group activities selected from group bicycling, group walking, group motor cycling and the like.

20. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 18 used in group activities carried out by work force in factory or mining or oil rig and the like.

21. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 18 wherein the device is connected to the internet base station directly or via another internet source.

22. A wearable personal climate device as claimed in claim 1 with the proviso if one fan is used the fan will not be angled and the weight of the device is less than 1 pound.

23. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being to enable control of

temperature across the body of the living being wherein the device comprises

(a) battery or AC power adapter operated thermoelectric module(s)/generator for generating conditioned air as set;

(b) discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger(s);

(c) fan(s) angled towards the base of heat exchanger for blowing ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction;

(d) an exhaust heat sink; and

(e) sensors;

wherein the air temperature is modulated by pulsing the thermoelectric module and fans & wherein the device weighs less than 2 pounds.

24. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the device is operated at 12 v and draws less than 4 amp current average.

25. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the air is cooled up to 16°F and heated up to 35°F.

26. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the heat exchanger is less than 140mm x 50mm x 50mm in size.

27. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the fan is less than 50 mm x 50 mm cross section in size.

28. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the battery is standalone or integrated with device.

29. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the device is worn on the head or neck or waist.

30. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the device is fixed to a belt or vest or neck band or sling purse.

31. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 30 wherein the belt or vest or neck band or sling purse further comprises channels or ducts with orifices to enable air distribution over core or any part of the body of living being.

32. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 31 wherein optionally the orifice is with fixed or oscillating vanes.

33. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the air temperature is modulated by conduction and convection.

34. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 wherein the control of temperature is via manual controls or wired remote or wireless remote or smart phone or onboard computing capabilities or artificial intelligence.

35. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23

wherein the living being is a human.

36. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 34

further wherein the human is suffering from temperature sensitivities caused by old age, menopausal hot flash and the like.

37. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 34

further wherein the human is suffering from temperature sensitivities caused by disorders selected from Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), cancer and the like.

38. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 34

further wherein the human is undergoing surgical procedure.

39. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 34

further wherein the human is performing or assisting in surgery.

40. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 34

further wherein the device is an internet hub comprising multiple device network.

41. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 40 used in group activities selected from group bicycling, group walking, group motor cycling and the like.

42. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 40 used in group activities carried out by work force in factory or mining or oil rig and the like.

43. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 40 wherein the device is connected to the internet base station directly or via another internet source.

44. Use of wearable personal climate device by living being as claimed in claim 23 with the proviso if one fan is used the fan will not be angled and the weight of the device is less than 1 pound.

Description:
WEARABLE PERSONAL CLIMATE

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of the provisional application U.S. application no.

62/494,674 filed August 17, 2016 under 35 USC 119 (e) (1).

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Field of the invention

The present invention relates to a wearable personal climate device which is light in weight and consumes low power for modulating air temperature.

The wearable personal climate device of the present invention will enable transferring thermal energy to and from a living being such as human to enable several hours of high efficiency cooling or heating to the living being. More specifically the wearable personal climate device will provide high efficiency personal cooling or heating without the use of toxic chemicals with virtually no risk of injury associated with its use.

Related art

Heating or cooling of body may be desirable to provide comfort where climatic conditions are hot or cold or where the living being experiences temperature sensitivity.

A common strategy to keep a person warm is by using clothing with thick insulation for retention of body heat. This works well in most of the times. However, in very cold environments, the required insulation can become prohibitively bulky and heavy.

Another strategy to stay warm is to seal clothing to air circulation. This can hold heat in but also can seal in water vapour in the form of sweat. Accumulated water can be uncomfortable.

Another way to keep warm is to apply heat from an external energy source to heat the inside of a jacket, boot, hat, or glove. For protection against heat there are options such as evaporative cooling (wet towels, bands, vests), or passive cooling such as ice pack or phase change material. However, these techniques are not convenient for use anywhere and anytime, and do not have capabilities to control temperature.

United States patent no. 6,915,641 (by Mark R.Harvie, referred to herein as '641 patent) is a device which enables controlling temperature by recirculating liquid using conductive mode of heat transfer. The device further requires a special vest/garment. The wearable personal climate device of the present invention does not use liquid for modulating temperature nor does it require a special vest /garment. Further in the present invention the air temperature is modulated by conduction and convection.

United States patent no. 7,331,183 (assigned to The United States of America as represented by the Secretary of Navy, referred to herein as Ί83 patent) teaches a thermoelectric device which utilizes pin fin heat exchangers with a 16.1 V DC battery. The pin fins provides much larger surface area/weight and good interference to cause turbulent flow which in turn provides more efficient heat transfer than plate fins. However, the Ί83 patent uses perpendicular flow of air on the waste air side, which is not space efficient for the targeted applications. Also, normally the power source is carried by the user in one holster and the rest of the system is in another holster and these two holsters can be worn on a belt, on the chest, back or anywhere practicable. The device may be connected to a special garment / apparel that has non-porous bladder with multiple holes on its inner surface. The wearable personal climate device of the present invention uses discontinuous plate fin heat exchangers which creates turbulent air flow. The design of the device with improved heat exchangers and fans angled towards base of heat exchanger improves the power efficiency significantly as the device is lighter in weight. Also, a better heat exchanger efficiency reduces the power consumption of the device with higher COP (Coefficient of Performance) resulting in smaller, lighter and cheaper batteries. United States publication number 20100198322 (assigned to Disney Enterprises Inc.

referred to herein as '322 application) teaches an apparatus using the conductive method of heat transfer through conductive material. The heat transfer occurs only at the point of contact which could be injurious to the skin in the event that the system goes out of control. The device of the present invention uses air flow with a combination of conductive, convective and latent heat of evaporation and it does not require skin contact with the device.

PCT publication number 2017002105 (applicant ENTROSYS LTD.; referred to herein as Ί05 publication) claims are to air distribution through a jacket/apparel. However, the wearable personal climate device of the present invention uses a different approach which would require ducting in a belt or vest or neck band to deliver air to the torso or any part of the body. The advantage of ducting is to reduce pressure drop in the system which in turn requires smaller blower, smaller battery and lower cost.

The current solutions in this field centre around garment designs that provide thermal insulation, venting, or heat exchange devices. However, the heat exchange devices are either bulky or require liquid in the heat exchangers. Thus, there is need for convenient and light weight device to provide comfort to living beings from hot or cold conditions for use at any time and any place.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a wearable personal climate device weighing less than 2 pounds comprising

(a) battery or AC power adapter operated thermoelectric module(s)/generator for generating conditioned air as set;

(b) discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger(s);

(c) fan(s) angled towards the base of heat exchanger for blowing ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction;

(d) an exhaust heat sink; and

(e) sensors;

wherein the air temperature is modulated by pulsing the thermoelectric module and fans. The device may be used by living beings requiring modulated temperatures.

More specifically, use of wearable personal climate device by living being to enable control of temperature across the body of the living being wherein the device comprises (a) battery or AC power adapter operated thermoelectric module(s)/generator for generating conditioned air as set;

(b) discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger(s);

(c) fan(s) angled towards the base of heat exchanger for blowing ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction;

(d) an exhaust heat sink; and

(e) sensors;

wherein the air temperature is modulated by pulsing the thermoelectric module and fans & wherein the device weighs less than 2 pounds.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above cited inventive features, aspects and advantages of the present invention is better understood with reference to the following description, and accompanying drawings namely: Fig. la Top and side views of the heat exchangers and angled installation of fans

Fig. lb Side view of the heat exchanger and fan arrangement for single fan design

Fig.2 Dimensions of the heat exchanger for the dual fan design

Fig.3 Concept of the wearable personal climate device

Fig.4 Schematic of Internet connected device

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is related to a light weight wearable personal climate device for modulating air temperature. The modulated air may be provided through ducts and/or channels to the core or any body part of a living being.

According to one embodiment of the present invention is a wearable personal climate device weighing less than 2 pounds comprising

(a) battery or AC power adapter operated thermoelectric module(s)/generator for generating conditioned air as set;

(b) discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger(s);

(c) fan(s) angled towards the base of heat exchanger for blowing ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction;

(d) an exhaust heat sink; and (e) sensors;

wherein the air temperature is modulated by pulsing the thermoelectric module and fans.

The wearable personal climate device of the present invention is operated at 12 v and draws less than 4 amp current. The wearable personal climate device of the present invention cools air up to 16°F and heats up to 35°F from ambient.

The wearable air conditioning device may comprise thermoelectric module, heat exchangers and fans as the major components as in Fig. la. Minor components may include heat transfer interface material, enclosures, insulators, printed circuit boards, switches, cables, nuts, screws and the like.

A thermoelectric device 1 (Fig. la) may be defined, but without limitation, as a device or apparatus that generates heat or coolness by electricity. The thermoelectric device 1 may be a heat pump, a thermoelectric generator or any type of thermoelectric device deemed practicable.

Typically a thermoelectric device 1 is a flat rectangle with two main surfaces disposed opposite of each other. When electricity is passed through a thermoelectric device 1, one main surface of the thermoelectric device 1 becomes cold while the other main surface becomes hot. The thermoelectric device 1 may be sealed to prevent moisture intrusions. The thermoelectric device 1 may be battery or AC adapter power operated. The battery may be stand alone or integrated with the device. The thermoelectric device in the wearable personal climate device of the present invention will enable generation of conditioned air as set.

A heat exchanger 2 may be defined, but without limitation, as a structure used to transfer heat between two airstreams without direct contact between them. The heat exchanger 2 is of plate fin construction in discontinuous pattern to enable turbulence. The heat exchanger may be manufactured from a high conductivity material like aluminum alloy or the like.

The discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger of the present invention may be of dimensions less than 140mm x 50mm x 50mm; preferably 130mm x 40mm x 45mm (Figure 2). As seen in figure 3 the two heat sinks (the heat exchanger 2) may be in thermodynamic communication and may face towards the thermoelectric device 1. Specifically, the heat exchanger 2 on the conditioned air 5 side (fig. la) is in thermodynamic communication with one of the main surfaces of the thermoelectric device 1 (hot or cold depending on whether the user wants to be cooled or heated), while the heat exchanger closer to exhaust 4 is in thermodynamic communication with the other main surface of the thermoelectric device 1.

The interface between thermoelectric device and heat exchanger may include thermo- conductive material. Thermo-conductive material may be defined, but without limitation, as a material that makes easy heat flow between electronic components and a heat exchanger/heat sink. The preferred thermo-conductive material may also be characterized by chemical resistance to oxidation and the effects of aqueous solutions of acids, alkalis, salts, sulphur dioxide and ammonia. The thermo-conductive material may also be non-adhesive, non- hardening, and a thermally conductive paste. The preferred thermo-conductive material is Arctic silver 5 high density polysynthetic silver thermal compound. The fan 3 may be defined as an apparatus with rotating blades that creates a current of air for cooling or ventilation. One or more than one fans may be used. The fans in the present invention will be angled, with the proviso that when one fan is used for both streams angle will be closer to 0. The fans in the device of the present invention will blow ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction. Further, the cross sectional dimension of the fan may be less than 50 mm x 50 mm; preferably 40 mm x 40 mm. The fan may be electronically controlled or computer controlled to provide various on/off cycle times. The fan intake may be filtered such that ambient air is clean to prevent biological or chemical hazards from entering the system. The fan angle a and β (as in Fig. la) can range from 0 to 25 degree.

The wearable personal climate device air distribution unit of the present invention may be worn on head or neck or waist. A waist mount air distribution is illustrated in figure 3. The wearable personal climate device of the present invention may be fixed to a belt or vest or back or sling purse and the like.

The belt or vest or neck band or sling may comprise channels or ducts with orifices to enable air distribution over core or any part of the body of living being.

Optionally the air releasing orifices are with fixed or oscillating vanes.

In the wearable personal climate device of the present invention the air temperature is modulated by conduction and convection.

The temperature may be modulated via manual controls or wired remote or wireless remote or smart phone or on-board computing capabilities or artificial intelligence. The temperature sensor used can be, e.g., any sensor known in the art which can provide an appropriate skin, body and ambient parameter measurement signal to the control circuit. For example, the temperature sensor can be a thermistor that changes electrical resistance with changing temperature. The temperature sensor can be, e.g., a thermocouple that changes voltage with temperature changes. The control circuit can, e.g., detect the level of resistance or voltage across the input terminals to determine the temperature inside the clothing or skin. An analog to digital converter can be provided, e.g., to supply a digital temperature signal for input to a digital control circuit.

Skin hydration sensors may also be used. The skin hydration sensor may measure either changes in the properties of skin as a function of skin hydration or measure of changes in the properties of materials that adsorb or absorb sweat when in contact with skin.

The device of the present invention can include, e.g., an electronic temperature control system to provide consistent temperature control and convenience. For example, the control system can have a control circuit with temperature selection input terminals, temperature signal input terminals, and ThermoElectricModule (TEM) power output terminals. The user can, e.g., turn a dial (or press a digital input keypad) on a temperature selection device in wired or wireless contact with the controller, to set a desired temperature. The controller can, e.g., receive a signal through electrical contact with a temperature sensor, compare it to the temperature setting, and adjust the power delivered to the ThermoElectricModule (TEM), as appropriate, to establish the desired temperature.

The device of the present invention can be connected to internet with the purpose to receive and transmit data to servers commonly known as cloud (figure 4). Such data can then be utilized for further analysis and draw inferences for useful applications.

The wearable personal climate device of the present invention may be used by living being. The living being may be human or animal.

The living being may be suffering from temperature sensitivity causing disorders and need to modulate the body temperature or may be working in adverse temperature conditions such as deserts, mines and need to modulate the body temperature or may be involved in group activities causing temperature sensitivities.

The device could be used by human suffering from temperature sensitivity caused by old age, diseases, menopausal hot flash and the like.

The device could be used by human with temperature sensitivity causing disorders such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), cancer and the like.

The device could be used by human undergoing surgical procedure or performing surgery or assisting in surgery. The device could also be used by human working at high temperature sites such as in factory or mines or oil rigs and the like.

Additionally, the device can be used as an internet hub comprising multiple internet device network and may be used in different activities such as by human performing group activities, human working in teams at remote sites. The group activities of particular interest may be group bicycling, group walking, group motor cycling and the like wherein each device is linked to the devices in the group. Further, the device may be connected to the internet base station directly or via another internet source. Another embodiment of the present invention encompasses use of the wearable personal climate device by living being to enable control of temperature across the body of the living being. The wearable personal climate device will be useful for living being and specifically human.

Accordingly, another embodiment of the present invention is the use of wearable personal climate device by living being to enable control of temperature across the body of the living being wherein the device comprises

(a) battery or AC power adapter operated thermoelectric module(s)/generator for

generating conditioned air as set;

(b) discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger(s);

(c) fan(s) angled towards the base of heat exchanger for blowing ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction;

(d) an exhaust heat sink; and

(e) sensors;

wherein the air temperature is modulated by pulsing the thermoelectric module and fans & wherein the device weighs less than 2 pounds. The wearable personal climate device of the present invention is operated at 12 v and draws less than 4 amp current. The wearable personal climate device of the present invention cools air up to 16°F and heats up to 35°F from ambient.

According to the present invention the living being may be human or animal.

The living being may be suffering from temperature sensitivities or disorders and need to modulate the body temperature or may be working in adverse temperature conditions such as deserts, mines and need to modulate the body temperature or may be involved in group activities.

The device may be used by human suffering from temperature sensitivities caused by old age, menopausal hot flash and the like. The device may be used by human with temperature sensitivities caused by disorders such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), cancer and the like. The device could be used in Operating room by human undergoing surgical procedure or surgeons performing surgery or personnel assisting in surgery.

The device could also be used by human working at high temperature sites such as in factory or mines or oil rigs and the like.

Additionally, the device can be used as an internet hub capable of receiving and transmitting data and comprising multiple internet device network and may be used in different activities such as by human performing group activities, human working in teams at remote sites. The group activities of particular interest may be group bicycling, group walking, group motor cycling and the like wherein each device is linked to the devices in the group. Further, the device may be connected to the internet base station directly or via another internet source.

The wearable air conditioning device may comprise thermoelectric module, heat exchangers and fans as the major components as in Fig. la. Minor components may include heat transfer interface material, enclosures, insulators, printed circuit boards, switches, cables, nuts, screws and the like.

A thermoelectric device 1 (figure la) may be defined, but without limitation, as a device or apparatus that generates heat or coolness by electricity. The thermoelectric device 1 may be a heat pump, a thermoelectric generator or any type of thermoelectric device deemed practicable.

Typically a thermoelectric device 1 is a flat rectangle with two main surfaces disposed opposite of each other. When electricity is passed through a thermoelectric device 1, one main surface of the thermoelectric device 1 becomes cold while the other main surface becomes hot. The thermoelectric device 1 may be sealed to prevent moisture intrusions. The thermoelectric device 1 may be battery or AC power operated. The battery may be stand alone or integrated with the device.

The thermoelectric device in the wearable personal climate device of the present invention will enable generation of conditioned air as set.

A heat exchanger 2 may be defined, but without limitation, as a device used to transfer heat between two airstreams without direct contact between them. The heat exchanger 2 is of plate fin construction in discontinuous pattern to enable turbulence. The heat exchanger may be manufactured from a high conductivity material like aluminum alloy or the like.

The discontinuous plate fin heat exchanger of the present invention may be of dimensions less than 140mm x 50mm x 50mm; preferably 130mm x 40mm x 45mm (figure 2). As seen in figure 1 the two heat sinks (the heat exchanger 2) may be in thermodynamic communication and base may face towards the thermoelectric device 1.

Specifically, the heat exchanger 2 on the conditioned air 5 side (fig. la) is in thermodynamic communication with one of the main surfaces of the thermoelectric device 1 (hot or cold depending on whether the user wants to be cooled or heated), while the heat exchanger 2 closer to exhaust 4 side is in thermodynamic communication with the other main surface of the thermoelectric device 1.

The interface between thermoelectric device and heat exchanger may include thermo- conductive material. Thermo-conductive material may be defined, but without limitation, as a material that makes easy heat flow between electronic components and a heat exchanger/heat sink. The thermo-conductive material may be in one or more pieces. The preferred thermo- conductive material protects the system from weather conditions and is puncture-resistant. The preferred thermo-conductive material may also be characterized by chemical resistance to oxidation and the effects of aqueous solutions of acids, alkalis, salts, sulphur dioxide and ammonia. The thermo-conductive material may also be non-adhesive, non-hardening, and a thermally conductive paste. The preferred thermo-conductive material is Arctic silver 5 high density polysynthetic silver thermal compound. The fan 3 may be defined as an apparatus with rotating blades that creates a current of air for cooling or ventilation. One or more than one fans may be used. The fans in the present invention will be angled, with the proviso that when one fan is used for both streams angle will be closer to 0.

The fans in the device of the present invention will blow ambient air across the heat exchanger in a parallel direction. Further, the cross sectional dimension of the fan may be less than 50 mm x 50 mm; preferably 40 mm x 40 mm. The fan may be electronically controlled or computer controlled to provide various on/off cycle times. The fan intake may be filtered such that ambient air is clean to prevent biological or chemical hazards from entering the system.

The fan angle a and β (as in Fig. la) can range from 0 to 25 degree. The wearable personal climate device of the present invention may be worn on head or neck or waist. A waist mount air distribution is illustrated in figure 3.

The wearable personal climate device of the present invention may be fixed to a belt or vest or neck band or sling purse.

The belt or vest or neck band may comprise channels or ducts with orifices to enable air distribution over core or any part of the body of living being. Optionally the air releasing orifices are with fixed or oscillating vanes.

In the wearable personal climate device of the present invention the air temperature is modulated by conduction and convection. The temperature may be modulated via manual controls or wired remote or wireless remote or smart phone or on-board computing capabilities or artificial intelligence. The temperature sensor of the invention can be, e.g., any sensor known in the art which can provide an appropriate skin, body and ambient parameter measurement signal to the control circuit. For example, the temperature sensor can be a thermistor that changes electrical resistance with changing temperature. The temperature sensor can be, e.g., a thermocouple that changes voltage with temperature changes. The control circuit can, e.g., detect the level of resistance or voltage across the input terminals to determine the temperature inside the clothing or skin. An analog to digital converter can be provided, e.g., to supply a digital temperature signal for input to a digital control circuit.

Skin hydration sensors may also be used. The skin hydration sensor may measure either changes in the properties of skin as a function of skin hydration or measure of changes in the properties of materials that adsorb or absorb sweat when in contact with skin.

The device of the present invention can include, e.g., an electronic temperature control system to provide consistent temperature control and comfort. For example, the control system can have a control circuit with temperature selection input terminals, temperature signal input terminals, and ThermoElectricModule (TEM) power output terminals. The user can, e.g., turn a dial (or press a digital input keypad) on a temperature selection device in wired or wireless contact with the controller, to set a desired temperature. The controller can, e.g., receive a signal through electrical contact with a temperature sensor, compare it to the temperature setting, and adjust the power delivered to the ThermoElectricModule (TEM), as appropriate, to establish the desired temperature.

The following examples illustrate preferred embodiments in accordance with the present invention without limiting the scope of the invention.