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Title:
WEDGE PRISM LEVELING MECHANISM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/046925
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
This invention is a leveling mechanism that provides an adjustable datum to align a circular gang saw machine in a sawmill. The adjustability of the mechanism comes from a plurality of wedge prisms connected in series. The relative rotation of the wedges offsets the datum surface from the normal plane of the shaft. It creates a leveled mounting surface even when the shaft is misaligned. The entire assembly is fastened over flat surfaces along with spigots and corresponding counterbores. This configuration allows the system to take on a large amount of forces. Above all else, the reaction cutting forces from the machine has no influence on the relative rotating motion. As a result, the leveling mechanism will not go out of alignment over time caused by vibration or any other means.

Inventors:
LI, Eugene (881 4th Ave, Prince George, British Columbia V2L 3H5, V2L 3H5, CA)
VOGT, Nalynd (881 4th Avenue, Prince George, British Columbia V2L 3H5, V2L 3H5, CA)
BERGEN, Carrick (881 4th Avenue, Prince George, British Columbia V2L 3H5, V2L 3H5, CA)
Application Number:
CA2017/051042
Publication Date:
March 14, 2019
Filing Date:
September 06, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
PRECISION GUIDE MACHINERY AND REPAIR LIMITED (881 4th Ave, Prince George, British Columbia V2L 3H5, V2L 3H5, CA)
International Classes:
B27B5/34
Foreign References:
CA2773792A12012-07-30
US5383678A1995-01-24
US6374665B12002-04-23
US0774042A1904-11-01
GB1604014A1981-12-02
DE102006059079A12008-06-19
US0776971A1904-12-06
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SMITHS IP (Suite 400 - 1367 West Broadway, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 4A7, CA)
Download PDF:
Claims:
The Embodiments Of The Invention In Which An Exclusive Property Or Privilege Is Claimed Are Defined As Follows:

1) A leveling device comprising:

• a shaft collar.

• a plurality of wedge prisms connected in series.

• a guide manifold.

2) The leveling device recited in claim 1 wherein said wedge prism geometry is defined as a right prism or a right cylinder with an angle offset to one of its polygonal or circular base.

3) The leveling device recited in claim 1 wherein said body of the shaft collar and the wedge prisms are designed with mating spigots and corresponding counterbores.

4) The leveling device recited in claim 1 wherein said location of the threaded holes on the shaft collar, the clearance holes on the wedge prisms, and the counterbores on the guide manifold are positioned on a common bolt-circle-diameter.

5) The wedge prism recited in claim 4 wherein said clearance holes are evenly spaced. The number of clearance holes must be consisting of a divisor from greater than 2 to less than or equal to half of its own value.

6) The shaft collar recited in claim 4 wherein said threaded holes are located on the part in multiple sets. Each set comprising of a number of evenly spaced threaded holes that is equal to the lowest divisor of the number of clearance holes that is greater than 2.

7) The guide manifold recited in claim 4 wherein said counterbore holes are in the same position as the shaft collar.

02 October 2017 02.10.2017

The Embodiments Of The Invention In Which An Exclusive Property Or Privilege Is Claimed Are Defined As Follows:

1) A leveling device comprising:

• a shaft collar.

• a plurality of wedge prisms connected in series.

• a guide manifold.

2) The leveling device recited in claim 1 wherein said wedge prism geometry is defined as a right prism or a right cylinder with an angle offset to one of its polygonal or circular base.

3) The leveling device recited in claim 1 wherein said body of the shaft collar and the wedge prisms are designed with mating spigots and corresponding counterbores.

4) The leveling device recited in claim 1 wherein said location of the threaded holes on the shaft collar, the clearance holes on the wedge prisms, and the counterbores on the guide manifold are positioned on a common bolt-circle-diameter.

5) The wedge prism recited in claim 4 wherein said clearance holes are evenly spaced. The number of clearance holes must be consisting of a divisor from greater than 2 to less than or equal to half of its own value.

6) The shaft collar recited in claim 4 wherein said threaded holes are located on the part in multiple sets. Each set comprising of a number of evenly spaced threaded holes that is equal to the lowest divisor of the number of clearance holes that is greater than 2.

7) The guide manifold recited in claim 4 wherein said counterbore holes are in the same position as the shaft collar.

Description:
Wedge Prism Leveling Mechanism

The Wedge Prism Leveling Mechanism will eliminate the machine misalignment commonly experienced with circular gang saws used in sawmills.

Background Of The Invention

A sawmill is a manufacturing facility that harvests logs into lumber. The primary breakdown turns a log into a cant, a rectangular piece of the log with its sides removed. The cant is then passed through a machine with a series of parallel saws, known as a gang of saws. Gang saws come in two main configurations: vertical arbor(s) or horizontal arbor(s). Typical setup ranges from one to four arbors for each machine. This invention will focus on solving the misalignment issue commonly seen in this type of equipment. Inside the machine, the saw guides are clamped to the guide manifold and the rotational movement is restrained between the guide post and the stopper. The guide manifold creates a flat mounting surface that is normal to the guide post. Original equipment manufacturers of these machines do not incorporate an adjustable guide manifold. The guide post can be misaligned due to a variety of factors including inaccurate boring, normal wear, thermal stresses, and inaccurately machined parts. It effectively creates an angle between the saws and the lumber resulting in unwanted axial forces. This produces more friction, generates more heat, requires more energy, decreases the life span of the adjacent components, and reduces the yield of the logs and saws.

Prior Art

One possible solution was documented in patent CA 2773792 by Stroud. The invention calls for a two part pivotable water block, wherein the frustoconical surface of the first part is outwardly extending and the frustoconical surface of the second part is inwardly receding. It has four evenly spaced mounting bolts surrounding the concaved edges. The adjustment comes from tightening and loosening of the bolts to create a push-pull effect on the parts until the desired alignment of the top plane is achieved.

Summary Of The Invention

The invention being presented addresses the saw guide misalignment issue with a new, unique, and superior method. The leveling mechanism can achieve the desired results with the use of a plurality of wedge prisms. The adjustability comes from the relative rotation between the wedges. The major advantage of this design is the ability to separate the reaction forces of cutting from the leveling adjustment mechanism. It does not rely solely on bolt tension. Moreover, the entire assembly is fastened over large flat surfaces. This allows the load to be evenly distributed. The loosening of any one bolt has no affect on the level of the manifold.

Brief Description Of The Drawings

Fig. 1 is an isometric view of a vertical single arbor machine;

Fig. 2 is a representation of a misaligned guide post with the wedge prism leveling mechanism; Fig. 3 is an isometric view of the wedge prism leveling mechanism; Fig. 4 is an exploded view of the wedge prism leveling mechanism; Fig. 5a is a top view of the wedge prism leveling mechanism;

Fig. 5b is the section view of the wedge prism leveling mechanism from figure 5a; and

Fig 6. is the performance graph that shows the amount of adjustment for each position of the wedges.

Detailed Description of the Invention

There are five main components that make up the assembly: retaining ring 9, shaft collar 5, bottom wedge 6, top wedge 7, and the guide manifold 8.

The shaft collar 5 works similar to the standard off the shelf part. It can be install anywhere on the guide post 10 and provides a normal surface. The frictional holding force of the collar 5 is the product of the clamping force and the coefficient of friction. It is relatively weak when it is up against a hydraulic clamping cylinder. As a result, a retaining ring 9 is added to the backing of the collar 5 to provide extra support. Furthermore, the collar 5 has six threaded holes located on a common bolt-circle-diameter. It contains two sets of evenly spaced three bolt patterns. The angular offset between the first and the second set is one and a half times the smallest adjustment interval. This allows for half step adjustments during the final phase of assembly.

The most intricate part of the design is the top wedge 7 and the bottom wedge 6. Each wedge is a right cylinder with a shallow angle on one of its circular face. The top face of the top wedge 7 and the bottom face of the bottom wedge 6 is perpendicular to its height. The relative rotation between the wedges gives the adjustment needed. Each wedge has twenty-seven clearance holes evenly spaced on the common bolt-circle-diameter. The smallest adjustment interval will be equal to three hundred and sixty degrees divided by twenty-seven. Each wedge has a position indicator on its side. In addition, the top wedge 7 has position numbers engraved. The angular adjustment is at zero when the two indicators line up. In the same way, the adjustment increases with the increase in position. The exact amount of adjustment can be found on the performance graph. Lastly, each wedge has threaded holes on its side for a spanner wrench type application.

The function of the guide manifold 8 is to provide a datum for the saw guides 12 to clamp on and channel lubrication through to the saws 3. It has six counterbores and they are located in the same position as the shaft collar.

The evolutionary design comes from the ability to isolate the cutting forces from the means of adjustment. It can be observed from the exploded assembly drawing that the shaft collar 5, bottom wedge 6 and top wedge 7 have mating spigots and counterbores. This configuration does not allow for any slippage of components under heavy loads. It also allows for the smooth rotation of the parts. In addition, it is important to note that all the mating surfaces are flat. As a result, the sequence during installation and/or the deviation in bolt tension does not affect the performance of the leveling mechanism. Most importantly, the rotation of the wedges is not affected by the reaction forces.

The following section will describe in detail the procedure of setting up the wedge prism leveling mechanism on a vertical single arbor machine. Firstly, install the retaining ring 9 onto the guide post 10. Next, install the shaft collar 5 but do not fully fasten the two pinch bolts 13. The shaft collar 5 should be able to rotate freely. With the bottom wedge 6 the top wedge 7, and the guide manifold 8 in place, ensure the two position-indicators on the wedges are aligned. This will keep the guide manifold 8 parallel to the shaft collar 5. It is important at this point to have the six counterbores on the guide manifold 8 line up with the six threaded holes on the shaft collar 5. Rotate the wedges around until three out of the six holes line up and fasten the bolts 14 by hand. Now, the whole assembly is tight together. Rotate the assembly to the desired position on the shaft and fasten the two pinch bolts 13 on the shaft collar 5 to the recommended torque. Remove the three mounting bolts 14. At this point, the proper location of the shaft collar 5 has been established. The next step will involve measuring how much the guide post 10 is misaligned by and setting the wedge prisms to provide a level surface.

The guide post 10 misalignment can be described using a spherical coordinate. A typical system consists of the radial distance, the polar angle, and the azimuth angle. Following the ISO convention, the polar angle is the only measurement of interest for this application. The polar angle can be obtained using a digital protractor with a resolution of at least one hundredth of a degree. Put the level on the guide manifold 8 and record the reading. It is important to note that the azimuth angle is unknown at this point. Fortunately, a precise numerical value is not needed. With that in mind, the level must be placed at seven more places to ensure a more accurate reading. It is recommended to position the protractor following the pattern of an octagon.

Compare the highest recorded angle with the performance graph. Find a position that yields a slightly higher amount of adjustment. Set the position by lining up the engraved number on the top wedge 7 to the position indicator on the bottom wedge 6. Place the protractor on the guide manifold 8 and rotate the two wedge prisms together until a leveled surface is found. There are theoretically two locations that satisfy the equilibrium for every three hundred and sixty degrees. At this point, the closest position of the two wedges that would allow for three mounting bolts 14 to pass through should be observed from the top. Rotate the wedges to that position and fasten the three bolts 14 to the recommended torque.