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Title:
WHEEL MOUNTED CONVEYOR SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2006/138614
Kind Code:
A3
Abstract:
An excavation wheel (3) and conveyor assembly (4) for excavating a body of water without a vessel.

Inventors:
PLATT, Michael, D. (2034 Knox Road 700 North, Yates City, IL, 61572, US)
Application Number:
US2006/023573
Publication Date:
May 10, 2007
Filing Date:
June 16, 2006
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
PLATT, Michael, D. (2034 Knox Road 700 North, Yates City, IL, 61572, US)
International Classes:
B65G65/00; E02F3/00
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HALDIMAN, Robert, C. et al. (HUSCH & EPPENBERGER LLC, 190 Carondelet Plaza St. Louis, MO, 63105, US)
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Claims:

CLAIMS What is claimed is:

1. A non-hydraulic excavation and conveyor assembly comprising : a wheel assembly, said wheel assembly having a plurality of vanes adapted for sectioning and lifting excavation material; a frame deployed to mount said wheel such that said wheel can move over an aqueous terrain and dredge the aqueous terrain; at least one conveyor belt, said conveyor belt being disposed to receive dredged material from said wheel and convey it away from said wheel.

Description:

WHEEL MOUNTED CONVEYOR SYSTEM

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application 60/691,726 filed June 17, 2005.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates to excavating a bottom material in a body of water. RELATED ART

[0003] This is a new configuration for using the dredge wheel and associated technology covered under U.S. Patents Nos. 5,960,570; 5,907,915; 5,903,989; 6,289,613; 6,357,149; 6,357,150; 6,467,200 and 6,518,913.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0004] The invention combines an excavator, a wheel with sectioning vanes, with a plurality of conveyor configurations to excavate solid material from a body of water without a floating vessel.

[0005] Further areas of applicability of the present invention will become apparent from the detailed description provided hereinafter. It should be understood that the detailed description and specific examples, while indicating the preferred embodiment of the invention, are intended for purposes of illustration only and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0006] The present invention will become more fully understood from the detailed description and the accompanying drawings, wherein:

[0007] Figure 1 illustrates an excavator wheel with a conveyor.

[0008] Figure 2 illustrates an excavator wheel with a conveyor in operation.

[0009] Figure 3 is a top view of an excavator wheel with a conveyor.

[0010] Figure 4 is a top view of an excavator wheel with conveyor in operation.

[0011] Figure 5 illustrates an excavator wheel with a discharge assembly.

[0012] Figure 6 illustrates an alternative embodiment.

[0013] Figure 7 illustrates an alternative embodiment with a discharge assembly.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0014] The following description of the preferred embodiment(s) is merely exemplary in nature and is in no way intended to limit the invention, its application, or uses.

[0015] Figure 1 shows the dredge wheel and associated technology 3, a central conveyor 4, the main convey 1 and the main conveyor belt 2.

[0016] Figure 2 illustrates the dredged sediment 5 moving form the central conveyor 4 to the main conveyor belt 2. Direction of the main belts is indicated by 6. The main belt can move in either direction. Figure 2 also shows a shoe 50 having a

cutter bar 52 configured to cut and lift sectioned sediment, as depicted in the patents cited in the related art section, which is incorporated by reference.

[0017] Figure 3 shows the wheel 3. The wheel 3 can be mounted parallel to the conveyor or the wheel may be supported by its own flotation platform 7.

[0018] In the event the wheel is supported by the conveyor, a set of ride rails is mounted to the conveyor and carries the wheel. This allows the wheel 3 to move back and forth along the main conveyor 1 on which the ride rails that carry the wheel are mounted.

[0019] In the event the wheel 3 is supported by its own flotation 7 and its weight is mostly independent of the conveyor's 1 floatation devices 8, the ride rails 20 attached to the main conveyor 1 act less to carry the wheel 5 than to direct its travel as it moves back and forth along the length of the main conveyor 1.

[0020] As illustrated in Figure 3, the floatation 7 supporting the wheel 3 and its central conveyor 4 may operate without any attachment to the main conveyor 1.

[0021] Figure 4 depicts a second conveyor 9 attached to and receiving the discharge of dredged sediment 10 from the main working conveyor 1. The wheel 3 dredges sediment 10, places it on the central conveyor 4 which places it on the main working belt 2. The main working belt 2 transports its load to a second conveyor 9 which is supported by floatation 8. Direction of the main conveyor's belt 2 movement is indicated by 6.

[0022] Figure 5 depicts three sections of conveyors 1, 17 and 9. The end of the discharge conveyor 9 is elevated and supported by telescoping devices 16 which are attached between the floatation platform 8 and the discharge conveyor 9. A winch 11 and a stationary anchor 13 on a post 14 are linked by a cable 12. Dredged

sediment 10 discharged off the conveyor 9 falls to form a conical deposit 15. The wheel 3 works along the entire length of attached conveyors 1, 17 and 9. After a pass is made, the linked sections of conveyors are moved over so the wheel can make another pass in the opposite direction. As the conical deposit of sediment 15 rises and grows in dimensions laterally, the cable 12 is lengthened, allowing the entire configuration to move away form the conical deposit of sediment. Using this approach allows for the construction of large, very tall sediment disposal piles by a system that is automated or manned. Positioned control devices to properly move and align multiple sections of linked conveyors (not shown).

[0023] Figure 6 is a wheel mounted perpendicular to a long conveyor 101 showing a representation of the dredge wheel and associated technology 105, a central conveyor 101, the conveyor's belt 102 and a set of floating platforms supporting each end of the conveyor 103 and 104. The wheel can be mounted directly onto the conveyor, for example, by rails 120 or the wheel may be supported by its own floatation platform 122, or both. If the wheel is supported by the conveyor, a set of ride rails 120 is mounted to the conveyor and carries the wheel. This allows the wheel 105 to move back and forth (113 and 114) between the floatation devices (103 and 104) that support the conveyor 101 on which the ride rails that carry the wheel are mounted. In the vent the wheel is supported by its own floatation and its weight is mostly independent of the conveyor's 101 floatation devices (103 and 104), the ride rails attached to the main conveyor 101 act less to carry the wheel 105 than to direct its travel as it moves back and forth (113 and 114) between the conveyor's floatation devices (103 and 104).

[0024] Figure 7 illustrates the wheel mounted perpendicular to long conveyor with a second conveyor 106 attached to and receiving the discharge of dredged sediment from the main working conveyor 101 that accompanies the wheel 105. The wheel 105 dredges sediment 108 and places it on the main working belt 102. The main working belt 2 transports its load to belt 107 carried on the second conveyor 106. The discharge end of the second conveyor is elevated and supported by telescoping devices 118 which are attached between the flotation platform 117 and the discharge conveyor 106. A winch 109 and a stationary anchor 111 are linked by a cable 118. Dredged sediment 108 discharged off the second conveyor 106 falls to form a conical deposit 112. This entire configuration rotates 360 degrees around the stationary anchor 11. After the entire configuration makes a complete rotation, the wheel 105 relocates itself (113 or 114) on the main working conveyor 101 in preparation for another revolution in either direction (115 or 116). As the conical deposit of sediment 112 rises and grows in dimensions laterally, the cable 118 is lengthened, allowing the entire configuration to move away from the conical deposit of sediment. Using this approach allows for the construction of large, very tall sediment disposal piles by a system that is automated or manned.

[0025] As various modifications could be made to the exemplary embodiments, as described above with reference to the corresponding illustrations, without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the foregoing description and shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative rather than limiting. Thus, the breadth and scope of the present invention should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary

embodiments, but should be defined only in accordance with the following claims appended hereto and their equivalents.