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Title:
ARCHITECTURAL INDIRECT LIGHTING ASSEMBLY WITH INTEGRATED WIRING
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2020/050846
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An architectural indirect lighting assembly resembling molding or millwork for use with lighting sources such as LED lighting strips is provided. The lighting assembly has cooperating base and cover members which are assembled by hand. The base members provide channels for positioning the lighting strips and supporting wiring or cabling. The cover member hides the base members allowing for the placement of gaps between adjacent base members to allow for transitioning of wiring between the interior channel and the lighting source channel and to allow for lighting strips to make bends around corners and the like.

Inventors:
EDDINS SCOTT (US)
Application Number:
PCT/US2018/049811
Publication Date:
March 12, 2020
Filing Date:
September 06, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
INCEPTION INNOVATIONS INC (US)
International Classes:
E04F19/04; F21V5/04; F21V23/00; F21V23/06; F21Y115/10
Foreign References:
US20160341377A12016-11-24
US6183104B12001-02-06
US20130063934A12013-03-14
US20170227209A12017-08-10
US20140268736A12014-09-18
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SCHROEDER, Peter, V. (US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
It is claimed:

1. A modular indirect lighting assembly for mounting to a surface of a room, the assembly comprising:

a plurality of non-metallic, extruded elongate base members mounted generally end to end on a structural surface, each base member defining an exterior lighting channel and an interior channel;

a plurality of lighting strips each having a plurality of light sources, each the lighting strip positioned along an exterior lighting channel, the light sources positioned to provide indirect light to the room;

at least one jumper or wire positioned at least in part in an interior channel of a base member and connected to one of the lighting strips; and

a plurality of non-metallic, extruded and opaque elongate cover members removably attached to the elongate base members and positioned end to end and abutting one another, the cover members hiding from view the plurality of base members.

2. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending transparent or translucent lens covers removably attachable to the base members and adjacent the lighting strips.

3. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, wherein the cover members are not coextensive with the base members.

4. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, wherein the plurality of lighting strips comprise a first set of lighting strips connected to one another end to end, and a second set of lighting strips, the second set connected to and powered by the jumper.

5. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, wherein the plurality of base members are positioned to create gaps between adjacent base members, and wherein the cover members extend across the gaps between the base members.

6. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, wherein two adjacent base members are mounted to adjacent wall surfaces at a corner of the room, a gap defined between the two adjacent base members, and wherein a lighting strip extends between the exterior lighting channels of the two adjacent base members, the lighting strip bending around the corner.

7. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 6, wherein two adjacent cover members abut one another at a beveled joint and hide the lighting strip bending around the comer and the gap between the two adjacent base members.

8. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, wherein the cover members attach removably to the base members by a friction fit or snap-on fit.

9. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, wherein the lighting strips attach to the exterior channels by friction fit or snap-on fit.

10. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 2, wherein the lens members removably attach to the exterior channels.

11. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of joint components, the joint components bridging between and removably attached to two adjacent cover members.

12. The modular indirect lighting assembly of claim 1, the plurality of lighting strips comprising:

a first set of lighting strips connected to a first jumper for providing power from a power source to the first set of lighting strips, the first set of lighting strips positioned in a first set of the interior channels defined by a first set of base members; and

a second set of lighting strips connected to a second jumper for providing power from a power source to the second set of lighting strips, the second set of lighting strips positioned in a second set of the interior channels defined by a second set of base members, the second jumper extending through the first set of interior channels.

13. A method of installing a modular indirect lighting system in a room, the method comprising:

mounting a plurality of elongate, non-metallic base members generally end to end on a structural surface;

running at least one jumper wire through interior channels defined by the base members; positioning a plurality of lighting strips in exterior channels defined by the base members to provide indirect light to the room, each lighting strip having a plurality of spaced apart and electrically connected light sources;

removably attaching a plurality of opaque, non-metallic cover members to the plurality of base members, the attached cover members and base members enclosing the interior channels of the base members, and the attached cover members hiding the base members from view.

14. The method of claim 13, further comprising: attaching a plurality of elongate, non- metallic lens members to the plurality of base members.

15. The method of claim 14, further comprising attaching the plurality of lens members to the exterior channels of the base members.

16. The method of claim 13, further comprising mounting the plurality of base members and thereby creating gaps between adjacent base members.

17. The method of claim 16, further comprising attaching the plurality of cover members to cover the gaps between adjacent base members.

16. The method of claim 13, further comprising running a jumper from an interior channel of a first base member to an exterior channel of an adjacent base member at a gap created between the base members.

Description:
ARCHITECTURAL INDIRECT LIGHTING ASSEMBLY WITH

INTEGRATED WIRING

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present disclosure is in the technical field of architectural indirect lighting, and more particularly, provides for an architectural lighting system providing indirect linear lighting, such as for baseboard or crown molding lighting, with an integrated wire management system.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a more complete understanding of the features and advantages of the present invention, reference is now made to the detailed description of the invention along with the accompanying figures in which corresponding numerals in the different figures refer to corresponding parts and in which:

FIG. 1A is an orthogonal, partial cross-sectional view of a PRIOR ART foam trim molding for indirect lighting providing a ledge on which a lighting source.

FIG. IB is a cross-sectional orthogonal view of a section of a PRIOR ART foam trim molding for indirect lighting.

FIG. 2 is an end view of an exemplary crown molding or cove indirect lighting assembly according to aspects of the disclosure.

FIG. 3 is an end view of an exemplary baseboard and flooring indirect lighting assembly according to aspects of the disclosure.

FIG. 4 is an orthogonal view of an indirect lighting assembly according to aspects of the disclosure, attached to a wall surface and acting as a baseboard indirect lighting assembly.

FIG. 5 is a schematic top view of multiple indirect lighting assemblies 20a-c mounted to a wall surface, according to aspects of the disclosure.

FIG. 6 is a schematic top view of adjacent indirect lighting assemblies having abutting cover members bevel cut to form a joint therebetween according to aspects of the disclosure.

FIG. 7 is a schematic of adjacent base members having a jumper bridging between an interior channel of one base member to an exterior lighting channel of an adjacent base member, according to aspects of the disclosure. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The present inventions and disclosures are described by reference to drawings showing one or more examples of how the inventions can be made and used. In these drawings, reference characters are used throughout the several views to indicate like or corresponding parts. In the description which follows, like or corresponding parts are marked throughout the specification and drawings with the same reference numerals, respectively. The drawings are not to scale and proportions of certain parts have been exaggerated to better illustrate details and features.

Directional terms, such as“up,”“down,”“upward,” downward,” and the like, are made with reference to the accompanying figures unless otherwise indicated and are not to be taken as limiting the embodiments in their orientations of use.

Indirect lighting, as used herein, refers to lighting for a room or other area in which the viewer does not directly see the light source; that is, the emitted light does not travel directly from the light source to the viewer’s eye. Instead the indirect light is seen by the viewer, even when looking directly at the light fixture housing the light source, after the light is first emitted directly onto and reflected from a surface, such as a ceiling or wall. As used herein, indirect lighting does not refer to light emitted through a diffusing translucent lens which strikes the viewer’s eye directly after passing through the lens or which would strike the viewer’s eye directly absent the presence of the diffusing lens. For example, indirect lighting as used herein does not include a pendant chandelier having a translucent bowl shade under the light source.

In order to have linear trim lighting, such as cove or baseboard lighting, typically the location must be readied with drywall work in order to provide a ledge or mounting location for the lighting to be concealed and fastened. Otherwise, either foam or metal trim molding can be used to create a ledge where lighting can be installed and fastened. FIG. 1A is an orthogonal, partial sectional view of a prior art foam trim molding 10 which can be mounted to a wall for providing indirect lighting to a room, having a ledge 14 for supporting a lighting source 12, such as an LED strip. The exemplary foam molding 10 also provides longitudinally extending passageways 16 with room for additional wiring 18. However, placement and/or replacement of the lighting strips or wiring requires either removal of the molding from the wall, with consequent breakage and damage to the foam molding, or significant spacing between the molding and the ceiling above to allow for space to remove and position lighting sources and wiring. FIG. 1B is an orthogonal, partial sectional view of a prior art foam trim molding 10 which can be mounted to a wall for providing indirect lighting to a room, having a ledge 14 for supporting a lighting source 12, such as an LED strip. The exemplary foam molding 10 also provides longitudinally extending passageways 16 with room for additional wiring 18. However, replacement or addition of wiring once the molding is installed is virtually impossible, since the molding tends to tear or otherwise be damaged during removal, or requires carefully removing the molding which is fastened to the wall or ceiling, typically with glue or caulk for example, placement of the new wires, then reinstallation and re-adhesion to the wall.

FIG. 2 is an end view of an exemplary crown molding or cove indirect lighting assembly according to aspects of the disclosure. FIG. 3 is an end view of an exemplary baseboard and flooring indirect lighting assembly according to aspects of the disclosure. FIG. 4 is an orthogonal view of an indirect lighting assembly according to aspects of the disclosure, attached to a wall surface and acting as a baseboard indirect lighting assembly.

A modular indirect lighting assembly 20 consists of a plurality of longitudinal base members 22, a plurality of longitudinal cover members 24, and a plurality of longitudinal lens members 26. The assembly pieces extend longitudinally, having a significantly greater length than height or depth, and are for installation to provide linear lighting and wire management along a wall, ceiling, or other surface. For example, a typical base member can be extruded and cut to any length with a typical length of four feet while being approximately two to six inches in height and one-half inch to two inches deep. The width and depth are in keeping with the dimensions of typical molding and millwork. Obviously greater dimensions can be employed, for example, as outdoor molding intended to be visible at greater heights, such as along a roof line, eave or the like.

Each of the members is non-metallic and preferably poly vinyl chloride extruded plastic or in the case of needing UV performance, acrylic is better suited. The plastic is readily cut-to- length on site at the installation using handheld tools, such as shears or hacksaw. The cover members are opaque and hide the lighting sources and wiring from view. The assembly is designed for use with low-voltage lighting sources which do not need external heat-syncs to serve as a heat dissipater or radiator and can be used with the proposed channel which are made of extruded plastics.

A base member 22 is mountable on a surface 30, such as a wall or ceiling. The base member 22 provides a back plate 34 for ease of mounting the base member to the surface. For example, a generally planar back plate 34 can be positioned flush against a generally planar mounting surface 30. Fasteners, such as screws, nails, adhesive and the like, can be used to attach the base members to the surface.

A base member 22 defines two channels 40 and 42. An exterior channel 40 provides support for or holds a lighting source 50. The exterior channel 40 generally positions and holds the lighting source 50 such that the light emitted from lights 52 is obscured by the decorative cover 24, the emitted light directed towards a selected wall, ceiling or floor surface to provide indirect lighting to the room. In FIG. 2, the assembly 20 is oriented for mounting on a wall at or near the ceiling to provide indirect lighting above eye level. The exterior channel 40 positions the lighting source 50 such that light emitted from lights 52 is directed in a desired direction towards a surface off of which the light reflects to create the desired indirect lighting effect. The lighting channel 40 in FIG. 2 is angled to direct light away from the wall surface 30 and towards the ceiling. Alternate angles of orientation for the lighting channel 40 will be obvious to practitioners of the art. For example, the exterior channel 40 can be oriented at an angle to direct light vertically upwards towards the ceiling, angled towards the wall surface 30 to which the base member is attached, etc. The angle at which the exterior channel 40 holds the lighting source and directs emitted light in FIG. 2 is exemplary and non-limiting.

The indirect lighting assembly 20 of FIG. 2 can be used to provide indirect lighting at or near a floor surface as well. The assembly 20 is mounted upside down to the orientation shown in the FIG. 2, such that the emitted light is directed generally downward. The assembly 20 can be used in conjunction with a baseboard or without.

FIG. 3 is an end sectional view of an exemplary lighting assembly according to aspects of the disclosure having a lighting assembly as described above with an additional molding unit 80 integrally formed therewith. The molding unit 80 in this embodiment appears and acts as a baseboard along the intersection of the floor and wall surfaces. As seen in FIG. 3, where the exterior channel 40 of the assembly 20 is used to provide indirect lighting along or near a floor surface, the exterior channel 40 positioning the lighting source 50 to direct emitted light towards the floor surface 31. The angle of the exterior channel 40 seen in FIG. 3 is exemplary and non limiting. The exterior channel 40 can alternately direct emitted light vertically downwards, angled towards the molding unit 80 (where present), or towards the wall surface 30 below the exterior channel (where no baseboard is present). The lighting source 50 can include a plurality of individual lights 52, such as LED lights along a longitudinal LED lighting strip or module. The lighting source 50 can take various forms. For example, the lighting source can be lighting strips or lighting modules. Lighting strips and lighting modules are commercially available. The lighting modules have spaced apart, stiff circuit boards, each board typically having one to three light sources, the boards connected by intervening wires. Further, the lighting source can be a single color or color-changing, such as RGB (red, green, blue) or RGBW (red, green, blue, white) LED sources which allow for color changing as well as white.

The exterior channel 40 in an embodiment is sized such that a standard size LED light strip fit into the channel 40. That is, the strip can be“held” in place by the channel where the light strip is pressed past the channel flanges 44 or alternatively can be inserted into the channel 40 and held in place by adhesive tape commonly provided along the back of LED lighting strips or“tape lighting.” The lighting source can be held by friction fit, snap-on or snap-in fit, interference fit, or simply by gravity pulling the lighting source onto the channel bottom wall 45. Further, the lighting source can be held in position by flexible channel flanges 44, longitudinally spaced tabs, clasps or other mechanisms known in the art.

In some embodiments, a longitudinally extending lens member 26 is removably attachable to the base member 22 to substantially cover the open side of the exterior channel 40. In the embodiments seen in FIGS. 2-3, the lens member 26 is removably attachable to the exterior channel 40 itself. The lens member 26 is transparent or translucent. In some embodiments, the lens member 26 is made of diffusing material. Diffusing lenses, for example, may reduce the appearance of“hot spots” which are caused by linear spaced apart light sources.

The lens member 26 removably attaches to the base member 22 for ease of assembly and to allow easy replacement of lighting sources 50 or lens members 26. The lens members 26 are removably attachable to the base members 22 such as by cooperating mechanisms, such as interlocking channel flanges 44 and lens flanges 46. Alternate detachable mechanisms will be apparent to those of skill in the art. The lens member can be friction fit, snap fit, interference fit or otherwise attachable to the base member, for example. Alternately, clasps, tabs, or other mechanisms can be used as will be recognized by those of skill in the art. The lens member 26 is readily removable to allow replacement of lighting sources 50, and readily re-attachable once the source has been replaced. A lens member 26 may be coextensive with a base member 22 or cover member 24. Alternately, where base members 22 are mounted adjacently, generally end to end (with or without gaps between adjacent base members), a lens member 26 can be non- coextensive with either base member and instead bridge across and attach to both adjacent base members 22.

As seen in FIG. 3, where the lighting source 50 is held“upside down” within the exterior channel 40, the lighting source 50 can be supported by the flanges 44 of the exterior channel 40 or by the lens member 26, such as by the flanges 46 of the lens member 26. Alternately, the lighting source 50 can be removably supported by adhesive or tape backing attaching the lighting source 50 to the exterior channel wall 45.

In some embodiments, the exterior channel and cooperating lens member cooperate to provide outdoor rated, waterproof, weatherproof, water resistant or the like channels. Alternately, the lighting sources 50 themselves can be outdoor rated or the like. For interior use, such a sealed channel is unnecessary.

The base member 22 defines an interior channel 42 for holding or positioning of jumper wires or cables 60, other wiring, wiring connectors, voltage boosters, sensors and the like. The interior channel 42 provides a support surface below and to support the wiring and in some embodiments side walls for maintaining the wiring in the interior channel 42. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the interior channel 42 is defined partially by the back plate 34 and partially by a flange 48. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, the base member 22 defines an interior channel 42 defined in part by the back plate 34 and a bottom wall 47. In the embodiment at FIG. 3, the interior channel flange 47 is integral with the exterior channel bottom wall 45. The interior channels are generally U-shaped, as shown, but can take other shapes. The interior channel 42 allows for ease of positioning or re-positioning of wiring along the channel after the base member 22 is mounted to the surface 30.

In the embodiment shown at FIGS. 2-3, the base member 22 provides an interior channel 42 generally defined by the back plate 34, the flange 47 and the flange 48. Depending on the orientation of the base member 22 when mounted to the wall surface 30, wiring 60, if present, is supported by one of the flanges 47 or 48 and a portion of the back plate 34. When the cover member 26 is attached to the base member 22, the cover 26 can be said to enclose the internal channel 42 and/or to provide a final wall for the interior channel 42.

The cover member 24 is opaque and substantially blocks view of the base member 22. The cover member 24 is decorative and designed to appear as crown molding, baseboard molding, or other molding or millwork. In the embodiment shown, the cover member 24 has a shaped exterior surface 58, which can take various shapes to fit architectural tastes and serve a similar function to molding or millwork. The cover member blocks direct, line-of- sight viewing of the lighting source 50 and lights 52 by a viewer standing in the room.

The cover member 24 is removably attachable to one or more base members 22 and provides for ease of attachment upon installation and ease of removal for replacement or addition of wiring 60 and/or lighting sources 50. The cover member 24 removably attaches to the base member 22 at attachment locations 62. FIG. 2 shows an exemplary attachment mechanism comprising cooperating shaped surfaces on the base and cover members. Other cooperating shapes can be employed to provide a press fit, friction fit, interference fit, interlocking fit, snap- on fit, or other attachment. Integral attachments are preferred for ease of installation, removal and replacement of the cover member. In the embodiment shown, a cover lower flange 64 cooperates with a corresponding groove 66 defined in the base member 22 and an upper flange 68 cooperates with a corresponding groove 70 defined by the base member 22. In practice, the lower flange 64 of the cover member is positioned in the lower groove 62 and the cover member is then rotated upwardly and pressed against the base member until the upper flange 68 snaps into corresponding groove 70. Alternately, clasps, tabs, and the like can be employed to removably fasten the cover member to the base member.

A lens member 26 may be coextensive with a base member 22. Alternately, where base members 22 are mounted adjacently, generally end to end (with or without gaps between adjacent base members), a cover member 24 can be non-coextensive with either base member and instead bridge across and attach to both adjacent base members 22.

In the embodiment shown, the cover member 24 abuts or nearly abuts, at point 72, the mounting surface 30. Thus, the cover member 24 provides the appearance of molding. The same base members 22 can be used with cover members 24 having different architectural styles, appearances, and/or colors. Thus, across various jobs, the same style and shape of base members and lens members can be utilized. That is, the cover members can be customized and still used with a singular base member design.

The assembled unit, when seen by a viewer, hides the lighting source 50 and lights 52, such that only indirect light is seen by the viewer. The base member 22 and wiring 60 is also hidden from view. In the shown embodiment, when the cover member 24 is attached to the base member 22, the interior channel 42 can be viewed as being enclosed. In alternate embodiments, parts of the base member can be visible to the viewer, such as where the cover member does not abut the wall surface 30, leaving a portion of the base member exposed. However, such an embodiment requires that adjacent base members 22 abut one another longitudinally since the joints between adjacent base members 22 are then visible. Regardless, the assembly hides the lighting source and wiring from the viewer. The aesthetic look and feel of the assembly is such that it appears to be crown or baseboard molding, millwork, and the like.

FIG. 3 shows an embodiment for indirect lighting of a floor surface 31 and incorporates a molding assembly 80. In this embodiment, the indirect lighting assembly 20 further incorporates an additional molding or millwork member 80 designed to appear as a baseboard or the like. Preferably the additional molding member 80 is integral to the assembly 20. In such an embodiment, adjacent base members 22 should abut longitudinally to avoid having gaps between adjacent molding members 80.

FIG. 4 is an orthographic view of an indirect lighting assembly 20 having a molding member 80 resembling a baseboard, according to aspects of the disclosure. The lighting unit seamlessly appears as baseboard molding when unlit. When the lighting source emits light, indirect lighting is provided along the floor surface and along the molding member 80. Assemblies 20a-b are mounted on adjacent walls 30 as shown. Assembly 20a includes cover 24a and molding member 80a. Similarly, the assembly 20b includes cover member 24b and molding member 80b. The cover members 20a-b and the molding members 80a-b are joined at a bevel cut at joint 31. Since the assemblies are made of extruded plastic, they are easily cut to length and, when needed, bevel cut to provide a smooth joint.

FIG. 5 is a schematic top view of multiple indirect lighting assemblies 20a-c mounted to a wall surface 30 at a comer, according to aspects of the disclosure. Base members 22a-c are mounted to the wall surfaces 30a-b, as shown. Gaps 82 between adjacent base members 22a and 22b and between adjacent base members 22b and 22c are shown. Lighting sources 50a-c are positioned in the exterior channels 40a-c of the base members 22a-c. The lighting sources 50 do not need to be same length as the base members 22, nor are they necessarily coextensive with the base members. As shown, a single lighting source, such as lighting source 50b, can“bridge” across multiple adjacent base members 22a-b and across gap 82 between the adjacent base members 22a-b. The base members 22 and lighting sources are independent and do not need to be coextensive.

Further, a lighting source 50, such as lighting source 50c, can bridge over a gap 82 between adjacent but axially unaligned base members, such as base members 22b and 22c. This ability to have flexible lighting sources, such as lighting strips or tape lighting, bridge between spaced apart base members, especially at the corners of surfaces like 30a and 30b, eliminates the need to have base members 22 abut one another at their ends, and eliminates the need to bevel cut the ends of adjacent base members 22 at surface comers. It is understood that the gap 82 between base members 22b and 22c, at the comer, allows room for a continuous lighting source 50c to bend around the corner. If base members 22b and 22c abutted one another, for example at a bevel seam, the lighting source 50c may be unable to bend around the comer without stressing the lighting source. Thus, the gap at the comer, and the cooperating cover members 24b-c hiding the gap, eliminate the need to have separate lighting sources meet at the comer.

Cover members 24a-c are removably attached to the base members 22a-c. Since the cover members 24a-c, in the shown embodiment, hide the base members 22a-c, the gaps 82 are not seen by a viewer of the final assemblies 20a-c. The cover members 24 do not need to be coextensive with the base members 22. As shown, a cover member 24b can be attached to multiple adjacent base members 22a-b and can bridge gaps therebetween. Similarly, cover members 24b-c combine to cover the gap 82 between base members 22b-c. Adjacent cover members 24 abut one another at their longitudinal ends, as shown, to provide continuous coverage of the base members, lighting sources, etc.

In some embodiments, specialized cover members 24 can be used to removably attach to adjacent base members 22 at corners, where adjacent base members are at an angle to one another, etc. Such specialized joint cover members sit between and abut adjacent cover members one either side of the comer, for example. Alternately, the specialized cover members can overlap the adjacent cover members on either side. Such joint members can take various shapes, such as for inside comers, outside comers, joints between flat and vaulted surfaces, etc.

FIG. 6 is a schematic of adjacent base members having a jumper 60 bridging between an interior channel 42 of one base member to an exterior lighting channel 40 of an adjacent base member, according to aspects of the disclosure. Jumpers or other wiring 60 can be run through one or more adjacent base members 22. Gaps 82 between adjacent base members 22a-b can be used to route wiring 60 from the interior channel 42 of a first base member 22a to the exterior channel 40 of a second base member 22b, such as for supplying power to another lighting strip 50. Multiple jumpers 60 can be run along an interior channel 42 to supply power to additional lighting strips further from the power source. As shown, lighting strip 60a is routed from an interior channel to an exterior channel while a second wire 60b is strung through the interior channels of adjacent base members 20a-b.

For example, multiple lighting strips can be powered by end-to-end connection. However, stringing together multiple lighting strips results in gradual voltage drops, eventually resulting in the light exhibiting a noticeable drop in intensity or brightness. A first set of connected lighting strips, for example, might run approximately 130 feet without appreciable loss of brightness. A jumper 60a (or multiple strung-together jumpers) can be run along the interior channels 42 of a set of adjacent base members 22a supporting a first set (not shown) of connected lighting strips 50, to connect to and supply power for a second set of connected lighting strips 50 supported by a second set of base members 22b. Similarly, another jumper 60b can be run along the interior channels 42 of the first and second sets of base members 22a and 22b to power lighting strips further along the assembly. Cover members 24 are then removably attached to the base members 22a-b as explained herein.

Referring to the exemplary LED strips which can be used for lighting sources 50, the LED strips are preferably low voltage to extend LED diode life and eliminate the need to dissipate heat created by the LED sources. A typical LED strip is thin and long, ten millimeter wide and five meters long, for example. Typical LED strips have cut marks between every one or two LED lights. Resistors are used to keep a consistent voltage, decrease voltage drop and increase life of the LED lights. Significant voltage drop is experienced at approximately one- hundred-thirty feet with ten inch LED light spacing and use of resistors. Connectors are provided between adjacent lighting sources. Spacing when using connectors at the ends of LED strips must be designed to ensure consistent spacing of LED lights when connecting strips end to end.

The indirect lighting assemblies disclosed can be mounted onto any flat surface of sufficient width, whether the surface faces forward, down, or at any other angle. The lighting units can be used on residential or commercial properties, signage, or any other location. The disclosure focuses on lighting units for use with a wired electrical power source (e.g., an electrical socket) but can also be used with other power sources, such as solar units, battery packs, etc. The lighting units can be mounted on stationary or movable surfaces (e.g., a door, rotating or moving signage). The lighting assemblies can be“strung together” or placed end-to- end to provide lighting along longer distances and can be of various lengths to allow users to match the length of the light units to the mounting surface.

For further disclosure regarding modular, linear, non-metallic lighting assemblies, see U.S. Patent No. 9,989,206 to Scott Eddins, which is incorporated herein for all purposes in its entirety.

While the foregoing written description of the invention enables one of ordinary skill to make and use what is considered presently to be the best mode thereof, those of ordinary skill will understand and appreciate the existence of variations, combinations, and equivalents of the specific embodiment, method, and examples herein. The invention should therefore not be limited by the above described embodiment, method, and examples, but by all embodiments and methods within the scope and spirit of the invention as claimed.

The words or terms used herein have their plain, ordinary meaning in the field of this disclosure, except to the extent explicitly and clearly defined in this disclosure or unless the specific context otherwise requires a different meaning. If there is any conflict in the usages of a word or term in this disclosure and one or more patent(s) or other documents that may be incorporated by reference, the definitions that are consistent with this specification should be adopted.

The words “comprising,” “containing,” “including,” “having,” and all grammatical variations thereof are intended to have an open, non- limiting meaning. For example, a composition comprising a component does not exclude it from having additional components, an apparatus comprising a part does not exclude it from having additional parts, and a method having a step does not exclude it having additional steps. When such terms are used, the compositions, apparatuses, and methods that“consist essentially of’ or“consist of’ the specified components, parts, and steps are specifically included and disclosed. The indefinite articles“a” or“an” mean one or more than one of the component, part, or step that the article introduces. The terms“and,”“or,” and“and/or” shall be read in the least restrictive sense possible. Each numerical value should be read once as modified by the term“about” (unless already expressly so modified), and then read again as not so modified, unless otherwise indicated in context.