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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
BAFFLE FILTRATION SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2021/205281
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Baffles are described. In particular, a baffle includes an intake side and an exhaust side, the exhaust side defining an opposed side of the baffle from the intake side and a first row having at least two columns forming a channel therebetween and a second row having at least two columns forming a second channel therebetween. The baffle also includes at least one column of the first row having a first layer and a second layer, the first layer including a fire-resistant material.

Inventors:
BRANDNER JOHN M (US)
GORRELL MATTHEW W (US)
SANOCKI STEPHEN M (US)
GAO YAOHUA (US)
STENDER JOHN B (US)
NORDLING CHAD E (US)
RAITHEL DAVID C (US)
KELLEY TOMMIE W (US)
Application Number:
PCT/IB2021/052580
Publication Date:
October 14, 2021
Filing Date:
March 29, 2021
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
3M INNOVATIVE PROPERTIES CO (US)
International Classes:
F24C15/20; B01D45/08
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
STERN, Michael J. et al. (US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A baffle, comprising: an intake side; an exhaust side, the exhaust side defining an opposed side of the baffle from the intake side; a first row having at least two columns forming a channel therebetween; a second row having at least two columns forming a second channel therebetween; and at least one column of the first row having a first layer and a second layer, the first layer including a fire-resistant material.

2. The baffle of claim 1, wherein at least one column of the second row has a third layer and a fourth layer, the third layer including the fire-resistant material.

3. The baffle of claim 1, further including a first row backing layer disposed on an opposed side of the second layer from the first layer, the first row backing layer including the fire- resistant material.

4. The baffle of claim 1, further including a second row backing layer disposed on an opposed side of the fourth layer from the third layer, the second row backing layer including the fire-resistant material.

5. The baffle of claim 1, wherein a fluid pathway traveling through the channel of the first row and the channel of the second row defines a bend of at least 30°.

6. The baffle of claim 1, wherein a fluid pathway traveling through the channel of the first row and the channel of the second row defines at least two bends of at least 30°.

7. The baffle of claim 1, wherein the first layer is adjacent the second layer.

8. The baffle of claim 1, wherein the first layer is joined to the second layer.

9. The baffle of claim 1, wherein the first layer includes a metal or a metal alloy.

10. The baffle of claim 1, wherein the first layer includes stainless steel.

11. The baffle of claim 1, wherein the first layer includes aluminum.

12. The baffle of claim 1, wherein the second layer includes chip board.

13. The baffle of claim 1, wherein the baffle is disposed in a range hood.

14. A multi-layer baffle, comprising: a first layer; an intake side at least partially defined by the first layer; a second layer; an exhaust side defining an opposed side of the baffle from the intake side; and at least one fluid pathway formed in the baffle, the at least one fluid pathway extending from the intake side to the exhaust side.

15. The multi-layer baffle of claim 14, wherein the first layer is joined to the second layer.

16. The multi-layer baffle of claim 14, wherein the first layer includes a metal or a metal alloy.

17. The multi-layer baffle of claim 14, wherein the second layer includes chip board.

18. The multi-layer baffle of claim 14, wherein the baffle is disposed in a range hood.

19. A multi-layer baffle, comprising: a first layer configured to prevent a flame from passing therethrough; an intake side at least partially defined by the first layer; a second layer; and an exhaust side defining an opposed side of the baffle from the intake side.

20. The multi-layer baffle of claim 19, wherein the first layer includes a metal or a metal alloy and wherein the second layer includes chip board.

Description:
BAFFLE FILTRATION SYSTEM

Background

Filters are used for many purposes, such as removing small suspended particulates from fluid flows. Filtration systems can include filtering members having a plurality of layers.

Summary

In some aspects, a baffle is disclosed. The baffle can include an intake side and an exhaust side, the exhaust side defining an opposed side of the baffle from the intake side. The baffle can further include a first row having at least two columns forming a channel therebetween and a second row having at least two columns forming a second channel therebetween. At least one column of the first row can have a first layer and a second layer, and the first layer can include a fire-resistant material.

In some aspects, a multi-layer baffle is disclosed. The multi-layer baffle can include a first layer, an intake side being at least partially defined by the first layer, and a second layer. An exhaust side can define an opposed side of the baffle from the intake side. At least one fluid pathway can be formed in the baffle, the at least one fluid pathway can extend from the intake side to the exhaust side.

In some aspects, a multi-layer baffle is disclosed. The multi-layer baffle can include a first layer configured to prevent a flame from passing therethrough, an intake side at least partially defined by the first layer, a second layer and an exhaust side defining an opposed side of the baffle from the intake side.

Brief Description of the Drawings

FIG. 1 is schematic system view of a filter securement system including cooking equipment and an exhaust system, according to exemplary embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective view of a baffle, according to exemplary embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the baffle of FIG. 2, taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a schematic perspective view of another baffle, according to exemplary embodiments of the present disclosure. FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the baffle of FIG. 4, taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a schematic perspective view of another baffle, according to exemplary embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the baffle of FIG. 6, taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 6.

Detailed Description

In the following description, reference is made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof and in which various embodiments are shown by way of illustration. The drawings are not necessarily to scale. It is to be understood that other embodiments are contemplated and may be made without departing from the scope or spirit of the present description. The following detailed description, therefore, is not to be taken in a limiting sense.

Filters can be used in a wide range of applications. In some embodiments, filters may be designed for general air filtration to filter primarily airborne particulates. For example, filters may be designed to filter particles smaller than 10 micrometers in diameter, smaller than 5 micrometers in diameter, smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter, smaller than 1.0 micrometer in diameter, smaller than 0.5 micrometers in diameter or smaller than 0.3 micrometers in diameter, among others.

Filters can also be used in a specific location, such as an exhaust hood, for grease filtering in a commercial cooking environment. In commercial kitchens, grease capture in exhaust hoods may be important for health, safety and environmental reasons. However, grease buildup in and around an exhaust hood or an exhaust system may pose a fire hazard. To mitigate the hazard, commercial kitchens typically use airflow interrupters or disrupters, such as baffles. These can be made of a non-flammable material, such as a metal or metal alloy, including stainless steel, galvanized steel or aluminum. The baffle can prevent fire from spreading from the cooking surface into the exhaust system.

However, grease buildup on baffles requires regular cleaning to maintain the baffle’s effectiveness as a fire barrier and a grease collector. Aesthetically, visible grease on a commercial hood baffle can also be undesirable. Removing, cleaning and reinstalling the baffles can be time consuming, labor-intensive, expensive and dangerous. The present disclosure provides various embodiments of an improved baffle. In some embodiments, the disclosed baffle can include one layer, a plurality of layers and/or a thin construction of grease-absorbing members. Versus conventional baffles, the present disclosure can provide a low-cost grease trapping solution that is lightweight and easy to install in an exhaust hood. The disclosed baffle can occupy a range hood position traditionally occupied by conventional baffles. Other benefits and uses are also foreseen.

The disclosed securement system can receive and retain the baffle in an exhaust hood for the filtration of grease droplets, although other uses and locations for the baffle are within the scope of this disclosure. Such a disclosed baffle can replace traditional baffles in an exhaust hood, thereby requiring minimal or no modifications to existing exhaust systems. Additionally, the disclosed baffle received and/or secured by the securement system can prevent flames from passing through the baffle and reduce the buildup of grease on portions of the exhaust system downstream of the baffle. For clarity, moving from the cooking equipment through the exhaust system and past the blower can be defined as moving downstream, while moving in the opposite direction can be defined as moving upstream.

FIG. l is a schematic sectional view of a filtration system 40 including cooking equipment 50 and an exhaust system 54. The cooking equipment 50 can be an oven, stove, grill, fryer, broiler or any other commonly used cooking apparatus known to those skilled in the art and can further define a cooking surface 52. The exhaust system 54 can include an exhaust hood 58 defining an exhaust hood flange 60. A securement system 78, which can include the exhaust hood flange 60, can releasably or permanently retain a baffle 100. The exhaust hood 58 can be positioned to capture all or a portion of grease and other particulates generated by the use of the cooking equipment 50. A blower 66 can, via a duct 62, create a reduced-pressure area proximate the cooking equipment 50 (relative to ambient pressure) that can encourage grease and other particulates generated by use of the cooking equipment 50 to enter the exhaust system 54 via the exhaust hood 58. In such a system, as illustrated in FIG. 1, air, gasses, grease and/or particulates can travel into the exhaust system 54 via the exhaust hood 58 (and baffle 100), as represented by arrow 70. The filtered air, gasses and any remaining grease and/or particulates can then pass through the duct 62 and blower 66 before exiting the exhaust system 54, as represented by arrow 74. Arrows 70 and 74 represent portions of a fluid flow traveling from the cooking surface 52, through the exhaust hood 58, baffle 100, and out through the rest of the exhaust system 54.

It is to be understood that a securement system 78 and baffle 100 releasably mounted on, proximate, adjacent and/or in contact with the exhaust hood flange 60 or exhaust hood 58 are within the scope of this disclosure. A baffle intake side 104 facing upstream and a baffle exhaust side 108 facing downstream are also illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIGS. 2 and 3 illustrate a schematic perspective view and a sectional view, respectively, of the baffle 100, also showing the baffle intake side 104 and baffle exhaust side 108. The intake and exhaust sides 104, 108 can be disposed on substantially opposed sides of the baffle 100. A frame 112, which can include a plurality of supporting members and can further define a perimeter of the baffle 100, is also shown. The frame 112 can be of any suitable shape, material or construction such that it can support the columns 120, as will be described in further detail.

The columns 120 can be disposed within or on the frame 112. In some embodiments, some or all of the columns 120 are linear, or substantially linear. In some embodiments, some or all of the columns 120 are parallel, or substantially parallel, with one another. In some embodiments, some or all of the columns 120 are parallel, or substantially parallel, with lateral sides of the frame 112. In some embodiments, at least some of the columns 120 extend from a first side, or a top side, to a second side, or a bottom side, of the frame 112, and the first side and the second side can define opposed sides of the frame 112. In some embodiments, the baffle 100 does not include a frame 112, instead only including individual or joined columns 120.

In non-limiting embodiments, cross-sections of at least some of the columns 120 can be substantially circular, ovular, triangular, rectangular, pentagonal, hexagonal, heptagonal, octagonal, organic, geometric, semi-circular, crescent-like, parallelogrammatic, quadrilateral, rhomboid and/or stadium-like. In some embodiments, some of the columns 120 define substantially the same shape while in other embodiments, at least some of the columns 120 define two or more different shapes. Additionally, a channel 122 can be formed by, and between, two of the columns 120. The channel 122 can extend from the intake side 104 to the exhaust side 108 and can allow fluid to pass through the baffle 100.

As also shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, one or more columns 120 can include a plurality of layers. In some embodiments, one or more columns 120 can include a first layer 124 and a second layer 128. The first layer 124 can form a portion of the intake side 104 and can further be facing upstream. The second layer 128 can form a portion of the exhaust side 108 and can be facing downstream. The first layer 124 and the second layer 128 can be joined together, proximate and/or in contact with one another.

Turning to FIGS. 4 and 5, another embodiment of the baffle 100 is shown. The columns 120 and frame 112 can have the same, or similar, properties and arrangements as those described in relation to FIGS. 2 and 3. However, it can be seen that the columns 120 can have a different cross-sectional shape than the columns 120 of FIGS. 2 and 3. In particular, the columns 120 of FIGS. 4 and 5 can include three portions with an acute angle formed between each pair of adjacent portions.

FIG. 5 illustrates a first row 150 of columns 120 and a second row 154 of columns 120. The first row 150 can be disposed closer to the intake side 104 than is the second row 154. It is to be understood that a baffle 100 having more than two rows is also within the scope of this disclosure.

A first row channel 160 can be formed between two columns 120 of the first row 150, and can allow a fluid to pass through the first row 150. A second row channel 170 can be formed between two columns 120 of the second row 154, and can allow a fluid to pass through the second row 154. A fluid pathway 180, which can include a first row channel 160 and a second row channel 170, can allow a fluid to pass through the baffle 100, or from the intake side 104 to the exhaust side 108. In some embodiments, the fluid pathway 180 can include, or define, one or more bends of, of about, of at least or of at most: 0°, 5°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, 60°, 70°, 80°, 90°, 100°, 110°, 120°, 130°, 140°, 150°, 160°, 170° or 180°.

One or more columns 120 can include a plurality of layers. In some embodiments, one or more columns 120 in the first row 150 can include the first layer 124 and the second layer 128.

As described above, the first layer 124 can form a portion of the intake side 104 and can further be facing upstream, while the second layer 128 can form a portion of the exhaust side 108 and can be facing downstream. The first layer 124 and the second layer 128 can be joined together, proximate and/or in contact with one another.

As also shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, one or more columns 120 in the second row 154 can include a third layer 190 and a fourth layer 194. The third layer 190 can form a portion of the intake side 104 and can further be facing upstream, while the fourth layer 194 can form a portion of the exhaust side 108 and can be facing downstream. The third layer 190 and the fourth layer 194 can be joined together, proximate and/or in contact with one another.

Turning to FIGS. 6 and 7, another embodiment of the baffle 100 is shown. The columns 120 and frame 112 can have the same, or similar, properties and arrangements as those described in relation to FIGS. 2-5. However, it can be seen that the columns 120 can include additional backing layers. In particular, one or more columns 120 of the first row 150 can include a first backing layer 200 and or more columns 120 of the second row 154 can include a second backing layer 204. The first backing layer 200 can be joined with, in contact with, adjacent and/or proximate the second layer 128 and the second backing layer 204 can be joined with, in contact with, adjacent and/or proximate the fourth layer 194. In some embodiments, the first backing layer 200 is disposed on an opposed side of the second layer 128 from the first layer 124 and the second backing layer 204 is disposed on an opposed side of the fourth layer 194 from the third layer 190. In some embodiments, the second backing layer 204 forms a portion of the exhaust side 108. In various embodiments, one or more of the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer and second backing layer 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204 can have a constant, substantially constant or average thickness, as measured from the intake side 104 to the exhaust side 108, of, of about, at least or at most: 0.1mm, 0.2mm, 0.3mm, 0.4mm, 0.5mm,

0.6mm, 0.7mm, 0.8mm, 0.9mm, 1.0mm, 1.1mm, 1.2mm, 1.3mm, 1.4mm, 1.5mm, 1.6mm,

1.7mm, 1.8mm, 1.9mm, 2.0mm, 2.1mm, 2.2mm, 2.3mm, 2.4mm, 2.5mm, 2.6mm, 2.7mm,

2.8mm, 2.9mm, 3.0mm, 3.1mm, 3.2mm, 3.3mm, 3.4mm, 3.5mm, 3.6mm, 3.7mm, 3.8mm,

3.9mm, 4.0mm, 4.5mm, 5.0mm, 5.5mm, 6.0mm, 6.5mm, 7.0mm, 7.5mm, 8.0mm, 8.5mm,

9.0mm, 9.5mm or 10.0mm.

In various embodiments, one or more of the channel, first row channel, second row channel and fluid pathway 122, 160, 170, 180 can have a constant, substantially constant or average width, as measured between the nearest portions of adjacent columns 120, of, of about, at least or at most: 0.1mm, 0.2mm, 0.3mm, 0.4mm, 0.5mm, 0.6mm, 0.7mm, 0.8mm, 0.9mm, 1.0mm, 1.1mm, 1.2mm, 1.3mm, 1.4mm, 1.5mm, 1.6mm, 1.7mm, 1.8mm, 1.9mm, 2.0mm,

2.1mm, 2.2mm, 2.3mm, 2.4mm, 2.5mm, 2.6mm, 2.7mm, 2.8mm, 2.9mm, 3.0mm, 3.1mm,

3.2mm, 3.3mm, 3.4mm, 3.5mm, 3.6mm, 3.7mm, 3.8mm, 3.9mm, 4.0mm, 4.5mm, 5.0mm,

5.5mm, 6.0mm, 6.5mm, 7.0mm, 7.5mm, 8.0mm, 8.5mm, 9.0mm, 9.5mm, 10.0mm, 11.0mm,

12.0mm, 13.0mm, 14.0mm, 15.0mm, 16.0mm, 17.0mm, 18.0mm, 19.0mm, 20.0mm, 25.0mm, 30.0mm, 35.0mm, 40.0mm, 45.0mm, 50.0mm, 75.0mm or 100.0mm.

In various embodiments, multiple layers, such as the first layer 124 and second layer 128, third layer 190 and fourth layer 194, second layer 128 and first backing layer 200 and fourth layer 194 and second backing layer 204 can be joined to one another by any conventional joining means known to those skilled in the art such as, but not limited to, mechanical fasteners, adhesives, magnets, electrostatics or any other chemical, electrical or mechanical technology.

The securement system 78 can include conventional exhaust hood flanges 60 and/or any other mechanical, magnetic, chemical or adhesive connection technology known to those skilled in the art. Additionally, the securement system 78 can releasably secure the baffle 100 within the exhaust hood 58.

In various embodiments, the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can include different materials or the same material. In particular, the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204,

112 can include fiberglass, steel, stainless steel, aluminum, aluminum foil, perforated aluminum foil, metals, metal alloys, polymers, carbon, ceramics, organic materials, braided materials, fire- resistant materials, 3M NEXTEL Ceramic Fibers and Textiles, card board, chip board or any other material known to those skilled in the art.

In some embodiments, the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can include fibers that form a non-woven and/or non-knitted material. The non-woven and/or non-knitted material can describe materials that are bonded together by chemical, mechanical, heat or solvent treatments, rather than by knitting or weaving. The non-woven material can be lofty, carded, air-laid or mechanically bonded (such as spun-lace, needle-entangled or needle-tacked). The non-woven material can be bonded (e.g., the fibers are bonded to one another at various locations) or non- bonded.

One or more the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can include a heat-setting material or a melt material that provides some or all of the bonding in the non-woven material, such as a flake, powder, fiber or a combination thereof. The heat-setting material can include any suitable thermoplastic or thermoset polymer, such as polyester, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polypropylene (PP) or a combination thereof. After melting and/or heat bonding, the flake, powder and/or fiber can melt and bond the fibers together, increasing a strength and stability of the material.

In some embodiments, one or more the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can include a Flame-Resistant (FR) material, Oxidized Polyacrylonitrile fiber (OP AN), modacrylic, flame-resistant rayon, Polyacrylonitrile (PAN), Polyphenylene Sulfide (PPS), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), Polypropylene (PP), Kapok Fiber, Poly Lactic Acid (PLA), cotton, nylon, polyester, rayon (e.g., non-flame-retardant rayon), wool, basalt, fiberglass, ceramic or a combination thereof. In some embodiments, one or more the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can include a conventional filter media material (such as polyolefin) that has been treated or coated to be flame-resistant, a conventional filter media material and a metal mesh and/or a flame-resistant barrier. In some embodiments, the fibers can be bicomponent fibers, or fibers made of more than one material, such as those listed in this disclosure. In various embodiments, the filter media can be pleated, non-pleated and/or multilayered (which can include a multi-layer web including a woven layer, such as a woven basalt layer), based upon application.

One or more the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can further include a coating, a heat-setting or melt material (e.g., powder, flakes and/or fibers), a metal fiber, a glass fiber, a ceramic fiber, an aramid fiber, a sorbent, an intumescent material (e.g., a fiber or a particle), mica, diatomaceous earth, glass bubbles, carbon particles or a combination thereof. Examples of flame-resistant materials include any polymer designated as flame-retardant (e.g., as pure materials or as compounds including the materials), aluminum, polyphosphate, phosphorus, nitrogen, sulfur, silicon, antimony, chlorine, bromine, magnesium, zinc, carbon or a combination thereof. Flame-resistant materials can be halogen-containing flame retardants or non- halogenated flame retardants. Examples of coatings or additives can include expandable graphite, vermiculite, ammonium polyphosphate, alumina trihydrate (ATH), magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2), aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3), molybdate compounds, chlorinated compounds, brominated compounds, antimony oxides, organophosphorus compounds or a combination thereof.

In some embodiments, one or more the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can include airlaid nonwoven web prepared using 90% oxidized polyacrylonitrile (OP AN) staple fiber with a denier diameter of 5.0dtex x 60mm (commercially available under the trade designation ZOLTEK™ OX) and 10% binding fiber (high temperature polyester binding or melty fiber with a denier diameter of 6.7dtex x 60 mm, commercially available under the trade designation TREVIRA® T270) with an area weight of 150 grams per square meter.

In some embodiments, one or more the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can include airlaid nonwoven web prepared using nylon staple fiber with a denier diameter of 1000 dtex, or denier, and 10% binding fiber (commercially available under the trade designation TREVIRA® T270) with an area weight of 550 grams per square meter.

In some embodiments, one or more the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can include airlaid nonwoven web prepared using 40% 5.0dtex x 60 mm OP AN staple fiber, 40%

500 dtex, or denier, PET staple fiber (commercially available from David C. Poole Company, Inc.), and 20% 15 dtex, or denier, binding fiber, such as is commercially available from Huvis (Seoul, South Korea) with an area weight of 225 grams per square meter.

In exemplary non-limiting embodiments, the first layer 124 can include a metal, such as aluminum, while the second layer 128 can include cardboard or chip board, in an arrangement similar to that shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. In other exemplary non-limiting embodiments, the first layer 124 and the third layer 190 can include a metal, such as aluminum, and the second layer 128 and fourth layer 194 can include cardboard or chip board, in an arrangement similar to that shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. In still other exemplary non-limiting embodiments, the first layer 124, the third layer 190, the first backing layer 200 and the second baking layer 204 can include a metal, such as aluminum, and the second layer 128 and fourth layer 194 can include cardboard or chip board, in an arrangement similar to that shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. It is also to be understood that any of the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 can be employed in a baffle in any permutation or combination while others of the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer, second backing layer and frame 124, 128, 190, 194, 200, 204, 112 may not be used while still falling within the scope of this disclosure.

In operation, grease generated from the cooking equipment or another source rises, or is suctioned, towards the baffle. Airborne droplets of grease can condense on the baffle, and specifically on any of the first layer, second layer, third layer, fourth layer, first backing layer or second backing layer of the columns. When the baffle has accumulated a particular amount, weight or opacity of grease, after a particular time period or after any other metric, it may be desirable to clean the baffle. In such a case, the baffle can be removed, cleaned and reinstalled.

However, as disclosed herein, the baffle can be of a low weight and/or a low cost relative to conventional baffles while maintaining grease filtration properties and flame-blocking properties. The disclosed grease-saturated baffle can then be discarded and a new baffle can then be installed. Thus, versus conventional baffles, the present disclosure can provide a lightweight and cost-effective grease-trapping solution that reduces or prevents the buildup of grease on exhaust system components, can be installed in the conventional baffle location in an exhaust hood and can be discarded after being saturated with grease.

The terms and expressions that have been employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, but it is recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the embodiments of the present disclosure.

Thus, it should be understood that although the present disclosure has been specifically disclosed by specific embodiments and optional features, modification and variation of the concepts herein disclosed may be resorted to by those of ordinary skill in the art, and that such modifications and variations are considered to be within the scope of embodiments of the present disclosure. The complete disclosures of the patents, patent documents, and publications cited herein are incorporated by reference in their entirety as if each were individually incorporated. To the extent that there is any conflict or discrepancy between this specification as written and the disclosure in any document that is incorporated by reference herein, this specification as written will control.