Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
CONTAINER SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR STRENGTHENING GROUND SURFACES FOR CONTAINER HANDLING
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2020/236048
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The invention relates to a container support system for protecting paved ground surfaces from damage during container handling. The container support system comprises one or more container supports (20), each having a base portion (22) that can be dug into the ground and a top portion (21) disposed on top of the base portion, the top portion being a steel plate. The container support is arranged to be lowered into the ground such that the top portion is level with the surrounding ground and the base portion is embedded in ground substance. The invention also relates to a method for mounting such a container support system.

Inventors:
BERGSTRÖM RONNIE (SE)
Application Number:
PCT/SE2020/000012
Publication Date:
November 26, 2020
Filing Date:
May 22, 2020
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
INVENTHOR SWEDEN AB (SE)
BERGSTROEM RONNIE (SE)
International Classes:
E02D27/01; E02D27/10; E02D27/32
Domestic Patent References:
WO2012026345A12012-03-01
Foreign References:
CN2480439Y2002-03-06
US5692343A1997-12-02
US5257489A1993-11-02
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ELMAN, Ulf (SE)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

1 A freight container support system comprising a freight container support (20) for an area where the ground comprises a ground cover, characterized in that the freight container support comprising a base portion (22) constituting a portion arranged for burying, and a top portion (21) disposed on top of the base portion, the top portion constituting a ground level portion being constituted by a steel sheet, wherein the freight container support is arranged to be lowered into the ground such that the upper side of the top portion is substantially level with the surrounding ground and the base portion is embedded in ground substance.

2 A freight container support system according to claim 1 , characterized in that the base portion (22) comprises a frame portion (26) projecting horizontally beyond the periphery of the top portion (21), and where the upper side of the top portion is located some distance above the top of the frame portion.

3 Freight container support system of claim 2, characterized in that the base portion (22) comprises elongate angle irons (23) which are connected to each other at their ends to form a flange, each angle iron comprising two elongated legs (24, 25) constituted by an upper and a lower leg that meet each other at an angle, the lower legs projecting sideways, and the frame portion (26) comprising the lower legs (25) of the angle irons.

4 Freight container support system according to claim 2, characterized in that the base portion (2) comprises a central pillar portion (7) of substantially the same horizontal extent as the top portion (3), the pillar portion projecting above the upper portion of the frame portion (4).

5 Freight container support system according to any one of claims 2 to 4, characterized in that the frame portion (4, 26) has a width of at least 10 mm and not more than 100 mm.

6 Freight container support system according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the base portion (2) comprises a load bearing substance comprising at least one of concrete and rubber.

7 Freight container support system according to any of the preceding claims, characterized in that the base portion (2) comprises reinforcement. Freight container support system according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the steel sheet (21, 3) has a thickness of at least 6 mm and not more than 20 mm. Freight container support system according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that it comprising a reinforcing plate arranged to be placed under the freight container support and having a horizontal extent greater than the horizontal extent of the freight container support. A method of mounting a freight container support system according to any one of the preceding claims in an area where the ground comprises a ground coating, characterized in that the method comprises the steps of:

- forming a recess (27) in the ground;

- lowering the base portion (2, 22) of a freight container support according to any one of the preceding claims, such that the upper side of the top portion is substantially positioned at the level of the surrounding ground;

- supplying substance (10, 11, 28) around the freight container support such that the

substance embeds the base portion, and such that the substance extends to the periphery of the top portion, the substance at least partially constituted by ground coating.

Description:
Container support system for strengthening ground surfaces for container handling

The present invention relates to a container support system for strengthening ground surfaces for container handling, the strengthening intended to prevent damage to paved ground surfaces for container

Background of the invention

At terminals where goods placed in containers are to be shifted between different vehicles, the containers need to be stored at a load shifting site. A common example is a port where containers are unloaded from ships and placed at a storage site waiting for them to be loaded onto trucks for further transport to the final destination. The storage site is usually a larger paved area where the containers often have fixed locations and are often placed four or more on top of each other. The weight on the surface becomes considerable and within a relatively short time, the surface layer, i.e. the asphalt, will become damaged. Asphalting of a storage site is costly both in terms of materials and work and regarding the problems of handling the containers during renovation work.

Summary of the invention

It is an object of the invention to reduce the cost for maintaining a storage site for containers.

At least said object is achieved with a container support system and a method for installing a container support system, respectively, according to the accompanying patent claims.

In accordance with one aspect of the invention, there is provided a container support system comprising a container support having a base portion that can be set in the ground and a top portion disposed on top of the base portion, the top portion being a steel sheet. The container support is arranged to be lowered into the ground so that the top portion is level with the surrounding ground surface and the base portion is embedded in ground material. By placing a plurality of such container supports with a properly selected spacing between them on a container storage site so that the feet of the containers can be placed on the container supports, it is possible to significantly prolong the durability of the substrate and thus the time between maintenance of the surface layer. The environmental impact that arises in the event of asphalting is significantly reduced, giving the product an attractive environmental property. The life span of asphalt surfaces where the container support system is used is expected to be 4-6 times longer than asphalt surfaces without the system.

In accordance with an embodiment of the container support system, the base portion comprises a frame portion which extends horizontally beyond the periphery of the top portion, such that the upper side of the top portion is situated some distance above the top of the frame portion. This simplifies the paving work as the ground paving, such as asphalt, can be paved on top of the frame portion up to the top of the top portion.

In accordance with an embodiment of the container support system, the base portion comprises elongated angle irons which are connected to each other at their ends to form a flange, each angle iron comprising two elongated legs which are formed by an upper and a lower limb which meet at an angle, wherein the lower legs extend sideways, and the frame portion includes the lower legs of the angle irons. This gives a light yet stable and durable construction which is also easy to assemble.

In accordance with an embodiment of the container support system, the base portion comprises a central pillar portion having substantially the same horizontal extent as the top portion, the pillar portion projecting above the upper side of the ramp portion.

In accordance with an embodiment of the container support system, it comprises a reinforcing plate which is arranged to be placed below the container support and which has a horizontal extent greater than the horizontal extent of the container support. The reinforcing plate is advantageous when the ground substance has questionable support capability.

In accordance with an embodiment of the container support system, the frame portion has a width of at least 10 mm and a maximum of 100 mm.

In accordance with an embodiment of the container support system, the base portion is a load carrying substance comprising at least one of concrete and rubber.

In accordance with an embodiment of the container support system, the base portion comprises reinforcement.

In accordance with an embodiment of the container support, the steel sheet has a thickness of at least 6 mm and a maximum of 20 mm. An advantageous type of steel sheet is so-called tear- patterned flooring sheet. This reduces the risk of slipping for pedestrians, cyclists and other vehicles.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, a method is provided for reinforcing the ground in order to carry a container, comprising:

-forming a recess in the ground;

-lowering the base portion of a container support into the recess; and

-supplying substance around the container support, such that the substance embeds the base portion, and such that the material extends to the periphery of the top portion.

The method is applicable both for construction of a new container storage site and for repairing or improving an existing storage site. In the latter case, it is possible to avoid large costs to reinforce large areas of ground surface that do not have sufficient load carrying capacity. This method strengthens the ground precisely at the points where the highest load and ground pressure occurs. It is possible to perform this method while retaining most of the original ground cover.

Brief description of the drawings

In the following, embodiments of the container support and method, respectively, will be described in greater detail with reference to the drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a first embodiment of a container support which is part of a container support system according to the invention;

Fig. 2 is a view in cross section of the container support according to Fig. 1 in mounted position;

Figs 3 and 4 are views from above of a plurality of container supports according to Fig. 1 mounted in the ground in various configurations; Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of a container support according to the invention;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view of the container support according to Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view of a container support according to the second embodiment in mounted position; and

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a third embodiment of a container support according to the invention.

Description of preferred embodiments

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, a first embodiment of the container support system includes several container supports 1, each having a base portion 2 and a top portion 3 disposed on top of the base portion 2. The base portion 2 buried below the ground and includes a frame portion 4 extending horizontally beyond the periphery 5 of the top portion 3. The upper side 6 of the top portion 3 is located a bit above the upper side of the frame portion 4. Thus, the frame portion 4 forms a frame around the top portion 3. The base portion 2 comprises a central pillar portion 7 of substantially the same, and in the embodiment shown exactly the same, horizontal extent as the top portion 3, where the pillar portion 7 projects above the top of the ramp portion 4. The frame portion 4 forms part of a bottom portion 8 of the base portion 2. The bottom portion 8 is the part of the base portion 2 which has the greatest horizontal extent and constitutes the majority of the base portion 2. The top portion 3 is constituted by a steel plate, preferably made form a stainless steel alloy having good resistance to wear and has a long life time. A tear-patterned flooring sheet is particularly preferred as it provides a degree of slip protection for road users. The base portion 2 consists of a load bearing substance constituted by, for example, concrete or rubber. The load bearing substance has is strong and gives the container support a high degree of stability. When using concrete, it should be reinforced with reinforcing bars 9.

The container support 1 may have a freely selectable size in terms of its general extent, and its horizontal cross-section may be. freely chosen, but it should of course be practical to set a container so that each foot of the container with a good margin falls within the upper part of the top 3 without too much cumbersome precision work by the person moving the container to the storage site. Placing the container should be quick and efficient. To give a suitable example, it is assumed that the most common type of container, i.e. a standard 20-foot container, should be set in place. It is further assumed that the horizontal cross-section of the container support 1 is rectangular, and more specifically square, as it simplifies the fabrication. The top portion 3 should then have a minimum width b of at least 0.5m. If it is circular, the same dimensions apply to its diameter. As shown in Fig. 3, a total of four container supports 1 are distributed for a 20- foot containerl2, shown in dashed lines. Container supports 1 for different containers are placed as close to each other as possible, but such that it is easy to place and remove the containers 12. It is also possible to design container supports 1 and arranged their locations such that two, or even four containers standing next to each other thus share each container support 1. In the case of four containers 12 sharing a container support 1, they thus stand with one foot each on the same container support 1, as shown in Fig. 4. The dimensions of the top portion 3 are chosen differently depending on whether a single container foot or several container feet is to be accommodated on it.

The vertical extent of the base portion 2, i.e. its height H, is at least about 50 mm and at most about 0.5m. The vertical distance h between the upper surface of the ramp portion 4 and the upper side 6 of the top portion 3, i.e. the height of the pillar portion 7 plus the thickness t of the steel plate 3, is at least 20 mm and not more than 100 mm. The thickness t of the steel plate itself is at least 6 mm and not more than 20 mm. The container support 1 has a total width B of at least about 0.7m. It should be noted that the dimensions given are only examples which serve to give an idea of the approximate size of the container support. Depending on the conditions at the installation site, the person skilled in the art can, using this description, adjust the dimensions.

The container support 1 is arranged to be lowered into the ground so that the upper side of the top portion 3 is level with the surrounding ground, as shown in Fig. 2. One embodiment of the method of reinforcing the ground to carry a container comprises the following steps. A recess is formed in the ground. The most common situation is that a site for storage for containers must be renovated because the ground cover 11, usually asphalt, has been worn down by the container feet. The asphalt 11 is then removed across an area slightly exceeding the containers largest horizontal cross-sectional area and the underlying filling material is excavated. A container support 1 is lowered into the recess. Filler material 10 is then supplied around the container support 1, and more specifically around the bottom portion 8. Finally, ground coating 1 1, i.e. usually asphalt, is supplied such that it reaches the periphery of the top portion 3. The ground cover 11 thus extends in over the upper surface of the ramp portion 4 to the edge of the pillar portion 7 and the steel plate 3. The base portion 2 is thus fully embedded. Furthermore, an edge portion of the ground cover 1 1 receives good support from the underlying frame portion 4, which increases the life span of the ground cover. In the case of an already present ground cover, the thickness of which can often be 30 cm or more, the case may be that the container support 1 is lower than the thickness of the ground cover. The entire recess is then formed in the ground cover and only ground cover is used in the backfill, i.e. the aforementioned filler material consists of the ground cover substance.

According to a second, currently preferred embodiment of the container support system, it comprises several container supports designed as shown in Figs. 5 and 6. The container support 20 in this embodiment comprises a top portion in the form of a steel plate 21, preferably tear- patterned floor plating, as in the first embodiment, and a base portion 22 constructed of angle irons 23 which is secured, for example, by welding, to the steel plate 21 at its periphery on its underside. The angle irons 23 are elongated and connected to each other at their ends forming a flange. Each angle iron 23 comprises two elongated legs 24, 25, which are formed by an upper leg 24 and a lower leg 25 which meet at an angle. The lower legs 25 extend laterally, more specifically horizontally when this embodiment of the container support 20 is assembled, and the upper legs 24 extend vertically. Other angles are also possible. In this embodiment, the frame portion 26 comprises the lower legs 25 of the angle irons 23. The space delimited by the upper legs 24 and the top portion 21 is filled with concrete 32, which is reinforced by a reinforcing mat 31 extending between the inside of the upper legs 24 just below the middle of the upper legs 24. The angle irons 23 can be given increased strength with triangular stiffening plates 29, which are arranged standing on edge at the comers of the container support 20 at an angle of 45 degrees, so that they follow the joint between the angle irons 23, and in the middle of the respective angle iron 23. The middle stiffening plates 29 are provided with holes 30 are intended for lifting hooks.

The container support 20 according to this embodiment is particularly suitable for use when the ground cover at the place of storage for containers does not need to be completely replaced but only needs to be strengthened with the aid of the container support 20. The height of the base portion 22 can then be kept fairly low, for example 50-100 mm, which is usually less than the thickness of the ground cover. In such a case, when the container support 20 according to the second embodiment is to be arranged on a storage site, see Fig. 7, a recess is formed, for example by milling away asphalt, such that the recess 27 forms a square whose dimensions correspond substantially to the dimension of the flange formed by the angle irons 23. The width of the recess 27 obviously needs to be slightly greater than the distance between the edges of the lower legs 25, and its depth should correspond to the height of the base portion 22, etc., as will be appreciated by those skilled in the art. The container support 20 is then placed such that the base portion 22, i.e., the angle irons 23 with the concrete filling, is received in the recess 27 and rests against the bottom of the recess 27. The upper side of the top portion 21 is in level with, or slightly higher than, the top surface of the surrounding ground cover. New ground cover, for example asphalt, is applied in the recess 27 so that it is filled up and so that the ground cover reaches the periphery of the top portion 21, i.e. outer edge, and embeds the base portion 22. Preferably, the ground cover 28 is applied such that its upper side, at least adjacent to the top portion 21 , is at the same level as the upper side of the top portion 21, as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 8, but this is not necessary as the thickness of the steel plate in the context is relatively small.

If the ground on which the container support is placed has too low load bearing capacity so that the container support is at risk of sinking under a repeated load from heavy containers, a third embodiment of a container support system may be used. This third embodiment comprises a first part in the form of a separate reinforcing plate 33, preferably of concrete, and a second part in the form of a container support 20 according to the second embodiment. The first portion, i.e., the reinforcing plate 33, is placed as a support for the second portion, i.e. the container support 20, as exemplified in Fig. 8, and constitutes a pressure distributing element. The first part 33 has a horizontal extent which is considerably larger than the extent of the container support, for example 2-4 times the dimensions of the container support 20. In this case, the method comprises forming a recess, which also accommodates the additional reinforcing plate 33, after which the first part 33 is lowered and the second part 20 is placed on top of the first part 33 and fastened onto it, for example by means of fastening means 34 extending through the lower legs 25 and engaging with the underlying reinforcing plate 33. Then the filler material is supplied, i.e. for example, asphalt or gravel and on top of that asphalt.

When required, the method may also include supplying adequate filler substances for the recess, for example stone rubble of varying sizes. This is to achieve a sufficient load bearing capacity. The container support is then placed on the filler substances.