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Title:
CUTTABLE LIGHT STRIP COMPRISING INDIVIDUALLY ADDRESSABLE SEGMENTS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2021/219493
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A cuttable light strip (102) comprises a plurality of individually addressable segments (11-19). Each of the segments comprises one or more light elements. The cuttable light strip comprises a power connector (3) at a first end of the light strip, a first light-element part (116) at a second end of the light strip, and a second light-element part (115) positioned between the power connector and the first light-element part. The second end is opposite to the first end. The first light-element part comprises a first group (11-13) of the segments and the second light-element part comprises a second group (14-16) of the segments. The light strip further comprises a code (125) printed on the second light-element part. The printed code is unique for the light strip and is associated with a subset of the segments. The subset comprises at least the second group and does not comprise the first group.

Inventors:
SUKUMARI AYYANESH (NL)
Application Number:
PCT/EP2021/060596
Publication Date:
November 04, 2021
Filing Date:
April 22, 2021
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SIGNIFY HOLDING BV (NL)
International Classes:
H05B45/20; F21S4/20; F21V23/04; H05B47/155
Foreign References:
US20160212827A12016-07-21
US20190342983A12019-11-07
US20190032870A12019-01-31
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
VAN DE LAARSCHOT, Huon, Urbald, Ogier, Norbert et al. (NL)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS:

1. A system (21,51) for controlling a cuttable light strip (1,102,103) comprising a plurality of individually addressable segments (11-19), each of said plurality of individually addressable segments (11-19) comprising one or more light elements, said system (21,51) comprising said cuttable light strip and: at least one input interface (23,53); at least one control interface (24,54); and at least one processor (25,55) configured to:

- receive, via said at least one input interface (23,53), input comprising a code,

- identify a set of individually addressable segments of a light strip (1,102,103) based on said code, each of said individually addressable segments comprising one or more light elements,

- determine, based on said identified set, one or more light effects to be rendered by said light strip (1,102,103) on said set of segments, and

- control, via said at least one control interface (24,54), said light strip

(1.102.103) to render said one or more light effects on said identified set of segments; and wherein said cuttable light strip (1,102,103) comprises:

- a power connector (3) at a first end of said cuttable light strip (1,102,103),

- a first light-element part (116) at a second end of said cuttable light strip

(1.102.103), said first light-element part (116) comprising a first group (6) of one or more of said plurality of individually addressable segments (11-19), said second end being opposite to said first end,

- a second light-element part (115) positioned between said power connector (3) and said first light-element part (116), said second light-element part (115) comprising a second group (5) of one or more of said plurality of individually addressable segments (11- 19), and

- a code (125,145) printed on said second light-element part (115), said printed code (125,145) being unique for said cuttable light strip (1,102,103) and being associated with a subset of said plurality of individually addressable segments (11-19), said subset comprising at least said second group (5) of one or more of said plurality of individually addressable segments (11-19) and not comprising said first group (6) of one or more of said plurality of individually addressable segments (11-19).

2. The system according to claim 1, wherein said code (125,145) is printed at a boundary between said first light-element part (116) and said second light-element part (115).

3. The system according to claim 1, further comprising a cutting line (131) printed at a boundary between said first light-element part (116) and said second light- element part (115).

4. The system according to claim 1 or 2, further comprising a further code (126,146) printed on said first light-element part (116), said further printed code (126,146) being unique for said cuttable light strip (1,102,103) and being associated with all of said plurality of individually addressable segments (11-19).

5. The system according to claim 1 or 2, wherein said printed code (145) comprises a number.

6. The system according to claim 1 or 2, wherein said printed code (125) comprises a machine-scannable code.

7. The system according to claim 1, wherein said at least one processor (25,55) is configured to:

- receive, via said at least one input interface (23,53), further input, and

- select said light strip (1,102,103) from a plurality of lighting devices based on said further input.

8. The system according to claim 7, wherein said at least one processor (25,55) is configured to store an association between said identified set of segments and said selected light strip (1,102,103) in a memory (27,57).

9. The system according to claim 1 , wherein said at least one processor (25,55) is configured to determine said one or more light effects based on a quantity of individually addressable segments in said identified set.

10. The system according to claim 1, wherein said at least one processor (25,55) is configured to determine said one or more light effects based on a quantity of light elements in said segments of said identified set.

11. The system according to claim 1 wherein said code comprises a machine- scannable code.

12. A method of controlling a light strip according to claim 1 via a processor according to claim 1, said method comprising:

- receiving (201) input comprising a code;

- identifying (203) a set of individually addressable segments of the light strip based on said code, each of said individually addressable segments comprising one or more light elements; - determining (205), based on said identified set, one or more light effects to be rendered by said light strip on said set of segments; and

- controlling (207) said light strip to render said one or more light effects on said identified set of segments. 13. A computer program or suite of computer programs comprising at least one software code portion or a computer program product storing at least one software code portion, the software code portion, when run on a system according to claim 1, being configured for performing the method of claim 12.

Description:
CUTTABLE LIGHT STRIP COMPRISING INDIVIDUALLY ADDRESSABLE SEGMENTS

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a cuttable light strip and a system for controlling such a light strip.

The invention further relates to a method of controlling such a light strip.

The invention also relates to a computer program product enabling a computer system to perform such a method.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

With the introduction of LED technology, it has become possible to produce light strips to illuminate houses and offices. An advantage of light strips is that they can illuminate a large width space relatively uniformly. Initially, all LEDs of a light strip were only able to emit one color, e.g. white. Later, certain light strips allowed a user to change the color emitted by the LEDs, but all LEDs still emitted the same color. The next advance in light strips was the pixelated light strip. Pixelated light strips comprise multiple individually controllable segments, each such segment generally referred to as a ‘pixel’ of which e.g. the color and/or intensity of light emitted may be controlled. Each segment comprises one LED or multiple LEDs of the same or different colors.

Since pixelated light strips may come in different dimensions with different quantities of light segments, it is not trivial to optimally control the pixelated light strip according to its quantity of light segments. This is especially the case if the user of the light strip can customize the length of the pixelated light strip in the same way he can already customize certain non-pixelated light strips, i.e. by cutting the light strip.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is a first object of the invention to provide a cuttable light strip, which makes it possible to control the pixelated light strip according to its quantity of light segments. It is a second object of the invention to provide a system for controlling such a light strip according to its quantity of light segments.

It is a third object of the invention to provide a method of controlling such a light strip according to its quantity of light segments.

In a first aspect of the invention, a cuttable light strip comprises a plurality of individually addressable segments, each of said plurality of individually addressable segments comprising one or more light elements, and further comprises a power connector at a first end of said cuttable light strip, a first light-element part at a second end of said cuttable light strip, said first light-element part comprising a first group of one or more of said plurality of individually addressable segments, said second end being opposite to said first end, a second light-element part positioned between said power connector and said first light- element part, said second light-element part comprising a second group of one or more of said plurality of individually addressable segments, and a code printed on said second light- element part, said printed code being unique for said cuttable light strip and being associated with a subset of said plurality of individually addressable segments, said subset comprising at least said second group and not comprising said first group.

With this cuttable light strip, it becomes easy to make a system aware of the quantity of (remaining) individually addressable segments on the light strip to allow this system to control the light strip according to its actual quantity of light segments, e.g. to select, suggest or create a light scene (comprising one or more light effects) to be rendered by the light strip based on the determined quantity of (remaining) light segments and/or based on the derived (remaining) dimensions of the light strip and/or the derived quantity of (remaining) light elements on the light strip.

Said code may be printed at a boundary between said first light-element part and said second light-element part. This makes it easy for a user to know which code he needs to scan or enter when cutting the light strip at this boundary. Furthermore, this may be used to indicate the boundary without a printed cutting line.

Said cuttable light strip may further comprise a cutting line printed at a boundary between said first light-element part and said second light-element part. This makes it easier for a user to know where he can cut the light strip, especially when the code is not printed near a boundary where the light strip can be cut.

Said cuttable light strip may further comprise a further code printed on said first light-element part, said further printed code being unique for said cuttable light strip and being associated with all of said plurality of individually addressable segments. Although it is also possible to only ask a user to input or scan a code if the light strip has been cut, it may be more intuitive to always ask a user to input or scan the code, especially if the user cannot easily determine whether the light strip has been cut or not.

Said printed code may comprise a machine-scannable code, e.g. a QR code. This may make it easier for a user to provide the code and for the system to recognize the code. Alternatively, said printed code may comprise a number, for example.

In a second aspect of the invention, a system for controlling such a light strip comprises at least one input interface, at least one control interface, and at least one processor configured to receive, via said at least one input interface, input comprising a code, identify a set of individually addressable segments of a light strip based on said code, each of said individually addressable segments comprising one or more light elements, determine, based on said identified set, one or more light effects to be rendered by said light strip on said set of segments, and control, via said at least one control interface, said light strip to render said one or more light effects on said identified set of segments. Said at least one processor may be configured to store an association between said identified set of segments and said selected light strip in a memory. Said system may comprise said light strip. Said code may comprise a machine-scannable code or a number, for example.

Said at least one processor may be configured to receive, via said at least one input interface, further input, and select said light strip from a plurality of lighting devices based on said further input. This is beneficial if it is not possible to identify the light segments on the light strip, e.g. to determine the quantity of (remaining) light segments on the light strip, based on only the code, e.g. if a printed QR code does not indicate a quantity of light segments but indicates a part of the light strip.

Said at least one processor may be configured to determine said one or more light effects based on a quantity of individually addressable segments in said identified set. This makes it possible to select, suggest or create a light scene (comprising one or more light effects) to be rendered by the light strip based on the determined quantity of (remaining) light segments.

Said at least one processor may be configured to determine said one or more light effects based on a quantity of light elements in said segments of said identified set. This makes it possible to select, suggest or create a light scene (comprising one or more light effects) to be rendered by the light strip based on the quantity of (remaining) light elements on the light strip, for example. The quantity of (remaining) light elements may be derived from the determined quantity of (remaining) light segments, e.g. if the type/model of the light strip is known.

In a third aspect of the invention, a method of controlling such a light strip comprises receiving input comprising a code, identifying a set of individually addressable segments of a light strip based on said code, each of said individually addressable segments comprising one or more light elements, determining, based on said identified set, one or more light effects to be rendered by said light strip on said set of segments, and controlling said light strip to render said one or more light effects on said identified set of segments. Said method may be performed by software running on a programmable device. This software may be provided as a computer program product.

Moreover, a computer program for carrying out the methods described herein, as well as a non-transitory computer readable storage-medium storing the computer program are provided. A computer program may, for example, be downloaded by or uploaded to an existing device or be stored upon manufacturing of these systems.

A non-transitory computer-readable storage medium stores at least one software code portion, the software code portion, when executed or processed by a computer, being configured to perform executable operations for controlling such a light strip.

The executable operations comprise receiving input comprising a code, identifying a set of individually addressable segments of a light strip based on said code, each of said individually addressable segments comprising one or more light elements, determining, based on said identified set, one or more light effects to be rendered by said light strip on said set of segments, and controlling said light strip to render said one or more light effects on said identified set of segments.

As will be appreciated by one skilled in the art, aspects of the present invention may be embodied as a device, a method or a computer program product. Accordingly, aspects of the present invention may take the form of an entirely hardware embodiment, an entirely software embodiment (including firmware, resident software, micro code, etc.) or an embodiment combining software and hardware aspects that may all generally be referred to herein as a "circuit", "module" or "system." Functions described in this disclosure may be implemented as an algorithm executed by a processor/microprocessor of a computer. Furthermore, aspects of the present invention may take the form of a computer program product embodied in one or more computer readable medium(s) having computer readable program code embodied, e.g., stored, thereon. Any combination of one or more computer readable medium(s) may be utilized. The computer readable medium may be a computer readable signal medium or a computer readable storage medium. A computer readable storage medium may be, for example, but not limited to, an electronic, magnetic, optical, electromagnetic, infrared, or semiconductor system, apparatus, or device, or any suitable combination of the foregoing. More specific examples of a computer readable storage medium may include, but are not limited to, the following: an electrical connection having one or more wires, a portable computer diskette, a hard disk, a random access memory (RAM), a read-only memory (ROM), an erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM or Flash memory), an optical fiber, a portable compact disc read-only memory (CD-ROM), an optical storage device, a magnetic storage device, or any suitable combination of the foregoing. In the context of the present invention, a computer readable storage medium may be any tangible medium that can contain, or store, a program for use by or in connection with an instruction execution system, apparatus, or device.

A computer readable signal medium may include a propagated data signal with computer readable program code embodied therein, for example, in baseband or as part of a carrier wave. Such a propagated signal may take any of a variety of forms, including, but not limited to, electro-magnetic, optical, or any suitable combination thereof. A computer readable signal medium may be any computer readable medium that is not a computer readable storage medium and that can communicate, propagate, or transport a program for use by or in connection with an instruction execution system, apparatus, or device.

Program code embodied on a computer readable medium may be transmitted using any appropriate medium, including but not limited to wireless, wireline, optical fiber, cable, RF, etc., or any suitable combination of the foregoing. Computer program code for carrying out operations for aspects of the present invention may be written in any combination of one or more programming languages, including an object oriented programming language such as Java(TM), Smalltalk, C++ or the like and conventional procedural programming languages, such as the "C" programming language or similar programming languages. The program code may execute entirely on the user's computer, partly on the user's computer, as a stand-alone software package, partly on the user's computer and partly on a remote computer, or entirely on the remote computer or server. In the latter scenario, the remote computer may be connected to the user's computer through any type of network, including a local area network (LAN) or a wide area network (WAN), or the connection may be made to an external computer (for example, through the Internet using an Internet Service Provider).

Aspects of the present invention are described below with reference to flowchart illustrations and/or block diagrams of methods, apparatus (systems), and computer program products according to embodiments of the present invention. It will be understood that each block of the flowchart illustrations and/or block diagrams, and combinations of blocks in the flowchart illustrations and/or block diagrams, can be implemented by computer program instructions. These computer program instructions may be provided to a processor, in particular a microprocessor or a central processing unit (CPU), of a general purpose computer, special purpose computer, or other programmable data processing apparatus to produce a machine, such that the instructions, which execute via the processor of the computer, other programmable data processing apparatus, or other devices create means for implementing the functions/acts specified in the flowchart and/or block diagram block or blocks.

These computer program instructions may also be stored in a computer readable medium that can direct a computer, other programmable data processing apparatus, or other devices to function in a particular manner, such that the instructions stored in the computer readable medium produce an article of manufacture including instructions which implement the function/act specified in the flowchart and/or block diagram block or blocks.

The computer program instructions may also be loaded onto a computer, other programmable data processing apparatus, or other devices to cause a series of operational steps to be performed on the computer, other programmable apparatus or other devices to produce a computer implemented process such that the instructions which execute on the computer or other programmable apparatus provide processes for implementing the functions/acts specified in the flowchart and/or block diagram block or blocks.

The flowchart and block diagrams in the figures illustrate the architecture, functionality, and operation of possible implementations of devices, methods and computer program products according to various embodiments of the present invention. In this regard, each block in the flowchart or block diagrams may represent a module, segment, or portion of code, which comprises one or more executable instructions for implementing the specified logical function(s). It should also be noted that, in some alternative implementations, the functions noted in the blocks may occur out of the order noted in the figures. For example, two blocks shown in succession may, in fact, be executed substantially concurrently, or the blocks may sometimes be executed in the reverse order, depending upon the functionality involved. It will also be noted that each block of the block diagrams and/or flowchart illustrations, and combinations of blocks in the block diagrams and/or flowchart illustrations, can be implemented by special purpose hardware-based systems that perform the specified functions or acts, or combinations of special purpose hardware and computer instructions.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other aspects of the invention are apparent from and will be further elucidated, by way of example, with reference to the drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a block diagram of a first embodiment of the system and a first embodiment of the light strip;

Fig. 2 is a block diagram of a second embodiment of the system and the first embodiment of the light strip;

Fig. 3 depicts a top view of the first embodiment of the light strip;

Fig. 4 depicts a top view of a second embodiment of the light strip;

Fig. 5 depicts a top view of a third embodiment of the light strip;

Fig. 6 is a flow diagram of a first embodiment of the method;

Fig. 7 is a flow diagram of a second embodiment of the method;

Fig. 8 is a flow diagram of a third embodiment of the method; and Fig. 9 is a block diagram of an exemplary data processing system for performing the method of the invention.

Corresponding elements in the drawings are denoted by the same reference numeral.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

Fig. 1 shows a first embodiment of a cuttable light strip: a light strip 1. The light strip 1 comprises a plurality of individually addressable segments 11-19. Each of the individually addressable segments 11-19 comprises one or more light elements. The light strip 1 is connected to a controller 9. The controller 9 comprises a receiver, e.g. a Zigbee receiver, and a power converter for converting power received from the power mains to a lower voltage and providing the converted power to the light strip 1.

In the example of Fig. 1, each segment comprises a single light element, e.g. a direct emitting or phosphor converted LED. Alternatively, one or more of the segments may comprise multiple light elements. The light strip 1 comprises nine individually controllable segments. Nine light elements per light strip will in practice be a relatively low quantity of light elements per light strip, but this quantity has been chosen for the purpose of illustration.

The cuttable light strip 1 comprises a power connector 3 at a first end of the cuttable light strip 1 and a first light-element part at a second end of the cuttable light strip 1. The first light-element part comprises a first group of the segments 11-19: a group 6 comprising segments 11-13. The second end is opposite to the first end.

The light strip 1 further comprises a second light-element part positioned between the power connector 3 and the first light-element part. The second light-element part comprises a second group of the segments 11-19: a group 5 comprising segments 14-16. The light strip 1 also comprises a code printed on the second light-element part. The printed code is unique for the cuttable light strip 1 and is associated with a subset of the individually addressable segments 11-19. The subset comprises at least the second group 5 and does not comprise the first group 6.

In the example of Fig. 1, the light strip 1 further comprises a third light- element part positioned between the power connector 3 and the second light-element part. The third light-element part comprises a third group of the segments 11-19: a group 4 comprising segments 17-19. Thus, the above-mentioned subset also comprises the third group 4.

The light strip 1 can be cut at certain positions: between the first light-element part and the second light-element part and between the second light-element part and the third light element-part. If the light strip 1 is cut between the first light-element part and the second light-element part, then groups 4 and 5 with light segments 14-19 remain. If the light strip 1 is cut between the second light-element part and the third light-element part, then group 4 with light segments 17-19 remains. Of course, the light strip 1 can also be used without being cut.

Fig. 1 further shows a first embodiment of the system for controlling the light strip 1: a bridge 21. The bridge 21 controls the light strip 1 via the light strip controller 9, e.g. using Zigbee technology. The bridge 21 may be a Philips Hue bridge, for example. The bridge 21 is connected to the wireless LAN access point 31, e.g. via Ethernet or Wi-Fi. A mobile device 33 is also connected to the wireless LAN access point 23, e.g. via Wi-Fi. Mobile device 33 may be a mobile phone, a tablet or a smart watch, for example. A user may be able to use an app running on mobile device 33 to control light strip 1 via the wireless LAN access point 31, the bridge 21 and the light strip controller 9. The bridge 21 comprises a receiver 23, a transmitter 24, a processor 25, and memory 27. The processor 25 is configured to receive, via the receiver 24, input comprising a code and identify a set of individually addressable segments of the light strip 1 based on the code. The input may be a command received from the mobile device 33, for example. In the example of Fig. 1, the code may identify segments 11-19, segments 14-19 or segments 17-19.

The processor 25 is further configured to determine, based on the identified set, one or more light effects to be rendered by the light strip 1, and control, via the transmitter 4, the light strip 1 to render the one or more light effects on the identified set of segments.

In the embodiment of the bridge 21 shown in Fig. 1, the bridge 21 comprises one processor 25. In an alternative embodiment, the bridge 21 comprises multiple processors. The processor 25 of the bridge 21 may be a general-purpose processor, e.g. ARM-based, or an application-specific processor. The processor 25 of the bridge 21 may run a Unix-based operating system for example. The memory 27 may comprise one or more memory units.

The memory 27 may comprise one or more hard disks and/or solid-state memory, for example.

The receiver 23 and the transmitter 24 may use one or more wired or wireless communication technologies such as Zigbee to communicate with the light strip controller 9 and Ethernet to communicate with the wireless LAN access point 31, for example. In an alternative embodiment, multiple receivers and/or multiple transmitters are used instead of a single receiver and a single transmitter. In the embodiment shown in Fig. 1, a separate receiver and a separate transmitter are used. In an alternative embodiment, the receiver 23 and the transmitter 24 are combined into a transceiver. The bridge 21 may comprise other components typical for a bridge such as a power connector. The invention may be implemented using a computer program running on one or more processors.

In the embodiment of Fig. 1, the system of the invention is a bridge. In an alternative embodiment, the system of the invention is a different device, e.g. an HDMI module or a mobile device. In the embodiment of Fig. 1, the system of the invention comprises a single device. In an alternative embodiment, the system of the invention comprises a plurality of devices.

Fig. 2 shows a second embodiment of the of the system for controlling the light strip 1 : a mobile device 51. The mobile device 51 may be a mobile phone, a tablet or a smart watch, for example. A user may be able to use an app running on mobile device 51 to control light strip 1 via the wireless LAN access point 31, a bridge 39 and the light strip controller 9. In the embodiment of Fig. 2, the light strip 1 is controlled via the bridge 39. In an alternative embodiment, the light strip 1 is controlled without a bridge, e.g. a direct Bluetooth connection may be setup between the mobile device 51 and the light strip controller 9.

The mobile device 51 comprises a receiver 53, a transmitter 54, a processor 55, a memory 57, and a display 59. The processor 55 is configured to receive, via the receiver 54, input comprising a code and identify a set of individually addressable segments of the light strip 1 based on the code. The input may be provided by a user (e.g. via the display 9 or via a microphone), for example. The processor 55 is further configured to determine, based on the identified set, one or more light effects to be rendered by the light strip 1, and control, via the transmitter 4, the light strip 1 to render the one or more light effects on the identified set of segments.

For example, an app running on the mobile device 51 may receive the input comprising the code and automatically configure the light strip 1 in the app by assigning unique addresses to each light segment of the light strip 1 in a sequential manner. Based on the identified light segments, e.g. the determined quantity of light segments, the app may propose a preconfigured light scene to be rendered on the light strip. This helps the user avoid the difficulty of manually configuring each segment of the light strip individually and choosing a suitable light scene manually. A light scene comprises one or more light effects.

In the embodiment of the mobile device 51 shown in Fig. 2, the mobile device 51 comprises one processor 55. In an alternative embodiment, the mobile device 51 comprises multiple processors. The processor 55 of the mobile device 51 may be a general- purpose processor, e.g. from ARM or Qualcomm or an application-specific processor. The processor 55 of the mobile device 51 may run an Android or iOS operating system for example. The display 59 may comprise an LCD or OLED display panel, for example. The display 59 may be a touch screen display, for example. The memory 57 may comprise one or more memory units. The memory 57 may comprise solid state memory, for example.

The receiver 53 and the transmitter 54 may use one or more wireless communication technologies such as Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11) to communicate with the wireless LAN access point 31, for example. In an alternative embodiment, multiple receivers and/or multiple transmitters are used instead of a single receiver and a single transmitter. In the embodiment shown in Fig. 2, a separate receiver and a separate transmitter are used. In an alternative embodiment, the receiver 53 and the transmitter 54 are combined into a transceiver. The mobile device 51 may further comprise a camera (not shown). This camera may comprise a CMOS or CCD sensor, for example. The mobile device 51 may comprise other components typical for a mobile device such as a battery and a power connector. The invention may be implemented using a computer program running on one or more processors.

Fig. 3 depicts a top view of the cuttable light strip 1 of Figs. 1 and 2. The printed code described in relation to Fig. 1 is printed code 125. In the embodiment of Fig. 3, the printed code 125 comprises a machine-scannable code, a QR code in particular. Code 125 has been printed on the second light-element part 115, which comprises group 5 of Figs. 1 and 2.

Furthermore, a code 126 has been printed on the first light-element part 116, which comprises group 6 of Figs. 1 and 2, and a code 124 has been printed on the third light element part 114, which comprises group 4 of Figs. 1 and 2. These further printed codes are also unique for the cuttable light strip. The printed code 126 is associated with all of the light segments 11-19.

When the code 126 is provided as input, the bridge 21 of Fig. 1 or the mobile device 51 of Fig 2 identifies the light segments 11-19 based on this input. When the code 125 is provided as input, the bridge 21 of Fig. 1 or the mobile device 51 of Fig 2 identifies the light segments 14-19 based on this input. When the code 124 is provided as input, the bridge 21 of Fig. 1 or the mobile device 51 of Fig 2 identifies the light segments 17-19 based on this input.

Fig. 4 depicts a top view of a second embodiment of the cuttable light strip: light strip 102. In the embodiment of Fig. 4, the codes 124-126 are printed at the boundaries between the light-element parts 124-126 and at the second end of the light strip 102. Furthermore, the light strip 102 comprises a cutting line 131 printed at the boundary between the first light-element part 116 and the second light-element part 115 and a cutting line 132 printed at the boundary between the second light-element part 115 and the third light-element part 114.

The cutting line may be composed of scissor cut symbols or scissor cut symbols may be printed next to a straight or dashed line to make it easier for the user to understand the purpose of the lines. In addition to cutting lines, the length between the cutting lines may be indicated on the light strip so that the user is aware what the length is between two cutting lines. The latter is not shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 5 depicts a top view of a third embodiment of the cuttable light strip: light strip 103. In the embodiment of Fig. 5, codes 144-146 have been printed on the light-element parts 114-116. Each of codes 144-146 comprises a number. Codes 144-146 read “71901- P01”, “71901-P02”, and “71901-P03”, respectively. “71901” identifies the light strip type. “P01”, “P02”, and “P03” identify the part of the light strip.

A first embodiment of the method of controlling a light strip is shown in Fig.

6. A step 201 comprises receiving input comprising a code. The code may comprise a machine-scannable code such as a QR code, for example. A step 203 comprises identifying a set of individually addressable segments of a light strip based on the code. Each of the individually addressable segments comprises one or more light elements. Steps 201 and 203 may be performed when commissioning the light strip, for example.

A step 205 comprises determining, based on the identified set, one or more light effects to be rendered by the light strip on the set of segments. Step 205 may be performed in response to receiving user input or in response to receiving a command from another device, for example. The user input may comprise a desired color setting and/or dim level or a desired light scene, for example. A step 207 comprises controlling the light strip to render the one or more light effects on the identified set of segments.

Step 205 is repeated after step 207, e.g. in response to receiving further user input or a further command from another device, and the method then proceeds as shown in Fig. 6.

A second embodiment of the method of controlling a light strip is shown in Fig. 7. The embodiment of Fig. 7 is an extension of the embodiment of Fig. 6. In the embodiment of Fig. 7, steps 221, 223 and 225 have been added and step 205 is implemented by a step 227.

Steps 221 and 223 are performed before step 201 is performed. Step 221 comprises receiving further input. Step 223 comprises selecting the light strip from a plurality of lighting devices based on the further input. For example, a user may be able to select the type of his light strip from a list of lighting device types using a touch screen. As described in relation to Fig. 6, step 201 comprises receiving the input comprising the code and step 203 comprises identifying the set of individually addressable segments of the light strip based on the code. Next, step 225 comprises storing an association between the identified set of segments and the selected light strip in a memory.

Later, when one or more light effects need to be determined, these one or more light effects are determined in step 227 based on the quantity of individually addressable segments in the identified set. As a first example, a light scene is obtained in step 227 that is suitable, or even optimized, for the quantity of (remaining) segments on the light strip. A user may be able to choose from multiple light scenes that are suitable, or even optimized, for the quantity of (remaining) segments on the light strip.

As a second example, if a command is received from another device that comprises light settings for X light segments, while the light strip only has Y light segments (Y being less than X), because a part of the light strip has been cut off, then the light effects for the Y light segments may be determined from the light settings for the X light segments. For example, some of the light settings in the command may be disregarded or at least one of the light effects may be determined based on multiple light settings specified for adjacent light segments.

As described in relation to Fig. 6, step 207 comprises controlling the light strip to render the one or more light effects on the identified set of segments.

A third embodiment of the method of controlling a light strip is shown in Fig.

8. The embodiment of Fig. 8 is a variation on the embodiment of Fig. 7. In the embodiment of Fig. 8, step 225 has been omitted and step 205 is implemented by a step 241. In step 241, the one or more light effects are determined based on the quantity of light elements in the segments of the identified set. As a first example, a light scene is obtained in step 241 that is suitable, or even optimized, for the quantity of (remaining) light elements on the light strip. A user may be able to choose from multiple light scenes that are suitable, or even optimized, for the quantity of (remaining) segments on the light strip.

As a second example, if a user indicates a single color for the entire light strip, light effects may be determined for the light strip such that the light effects have a gradient of colors taken from a subarea of color space centered around this single color. The dimensions of the subarea of color space may be determined based on the quantity of light elements in the segments of the identified set.

In an alternative embodiment, the one or more light effects are also determined based on the quantity of individually addressable segments in the identified set, which has been described in relation to Fig. 7. For example, the dimensions of the subarea of color space may further be determined based on the quantity of individually addressable segments in the identified set.

The embodiments of Figs. 6 to 8 differ from each other in multiple aspects, i.e. multiple steps have been added or replaced. In variations on these embodiments, only a subset of these steps is added or replaced and/or one or more steps is omitted. For example, step 225 of Fig. 7 may be added to the embodiment of Fig. 6 and/or the embodiment of Fig.

8 Fig. 9 depicts a block diagram illustrating an exemplary data processing system that may perform the method as described with reference to Figs. 6 to 8.

As shown in Fig. 9, the data processing system 300 may include at least one processor 302 coupled to memory elements 304 through a system bus 306. As such, the data processing system may store program code within memory elements 304. Further, the processor 302 may execute the program code accessed from the memory elements 304 via a system bus 306. In one aspect, the data processing system may be implemented as a computer that is suitable for storing and/or executing program code. It should be appreciated, however, that the data processing system 300 may be implemented in the form of any system including a processor and a memory that is capable of performing the functions described within this specification.

The memory elements 304 may include one or more physical memory devices such as, for example, local memory 308 and one or more bulk storage devices 310. The local memory may refer to random access memory or other non-persistent memory device(s) generally used during actual execution of the program code. A bulk storage device may be implemented as a hard drive or other persistent data storage device. The processing system 300 may also include one or more cache memories (not shown) that provide temporary storage of at least some program code in order to reduce the quantity of times program code must be retrieved from the bulk storage device 310 during execution. The processing system 300 may also be able to use memory elements of another processing system, e.g. if the processing system 300 is part of a cloud-computing platform.

Input/output (I/O) devices depicted as an input device 312 and an output device 314 optionally can be coupled to the data processing system. Examples of input devices may include, but are not limited to, a keyboard, a pointing device such as a mouse, a microphone (e.g. for voice and/or speech recognition), or the like. Examples of output devices may include, but are not limited to, a monitor or a display, speakers, or the like.

Input and/or output devices may be coupled to the data processing system either directly or through intervening EO controllers.

In an embodiment, the input and the output devices may be implemented as a combined input/output device (illustrated in Fig. 9 with a dashed line surrounding the input device 312 and the output device 314). An example of such a combined device is a touch sensitive display, also sometimes referred to as a “touch screen display” or simply “touch screen”. In such an embodiment, input to the device may be provided by a movement of a physical object, such as e.g. a stylus or a finger of a user, on or near the touch screen display. A network adapter 316 may also be coupled to the data processing system to enable it to become coupled to other systems, computer systems, remote network devices, and/or remote storage devices through intervening private or public networks. The network adapter may comprise a data receiver for receiving data that is transmitted by said systems, devices and/or networks to the data processing system 300, and a data transmitter for transmitting data from the data processing system 300 to said systems, devices and/or networks. Modems, cable modems, and Ethernet cards are examples of different types of network adapter that may be used with the data processing system 300.

As pictured in Fig. 9, the memory elements 304 may store an application 318. In various embodiments, the application 318 may be stored in the local memory 308, the one or more bulk storage devices 310, or separate from the local memory and the bulk storage devices. It should be appreciated that the data processing system 300 may further execute an operating system (not shown in Fig. 9) that can facilitate execution of the application 318.

The application 318, being implemented in the form of executable program code, can be executed by the data processing system 300, e.g., by the processor 302. Responsive to executing the application, the data processing system 300 may be configured to perform one or more operations or method steps described herein.

Fig. 9 shows the input device 312 and the output device 314 as being separate from the network adapter 316. However, additionally or alternatively, input may be received via the network adapter 316 and output be transmitted via the network adapter 316. For example, the data processing system 300 may be a cloud server. In this case, the input may be received from and the output may be transmitted to a user device that acts as a terminal.

Various embodiments of the invention may be implemented as a program product for use with a computer system, where the program(s) of the program product define functions of the embodiments (including the methods described herein). In one embodiment, the program(s) can be contained on a variety of non-transitory computer-readable storage media, where, as used herein, the expression “non-transitory computer readable storage media” comprises all computer-readable media, with the sole exception being a transitory, propagating signal. In another embodiment, the program(s) can be contained on a variety of transitory computer-readable storage media. Illustrative computer-readable storage media include, but are not limited to: (i) non-writable storage media (e.g., read-only memory devices within a computer such as CD-ROM disks readable by a CD-ROM drive, ROM chips or any type of solid-state non-volatile semiconductor memory) on which information is permanently stored; and (ii) writable storage media (e.g., flash memory, floppy disks within a diskette drive or hard-disk drive or any type of solid-state random-access semiconductor memory) on which alterable information is stored. The computer program may be run on the processor 302 described herein.

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of the invention. As used herein, the singular forms "a," "an," and "the" are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms "comprises" and/or "comprising," when used in this specification, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof.

The corresponding structures, materials, acts, and equivalents of all means or step plus function elements in the claims below are intended to include any structure, material, or act for performing the function in combination with other claimed elements as specifically claimed. The description of embodiments of the present invention has been presented for purposes of illustration, but is not intended to be exhaustive or limited to the implementations in the form disclosed. Many modifications and variations will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the present invention. The embodiments were chosen and described in order to best explain the principles and some practical applications of the present invention, and to enable others of ordinary skill in the art to understand the present invention for various embodiments with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated.