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Title:
AN ENGINE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR A VEHICLE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2021/199074
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention discloses an engine management system (200) for a vehicle (100). Accordingly, the engine management system (200) has a first controller (210) operatively coupled to a fuel injection system and an ignition system of an internal combustion engine and second controller (220) which is remotely located from the first controller (210) and operatively coupled to an Integrated Starter Generator (ISG) (250). The first controller (210) is configured to receive inputs from a first set of sensors (260) mounted on the vehicle (100) whereas the second controller (220) is configured to receive inputs from the first controller (210) and from a second set of switches (280) mounted on the vehicle (100). Further, the engine management system (200) has a control bus (262) interconnecting the first controller (210) and the second controller (220).

Inventors:
RAJASEKAR SABARIRAM (IN)
PRAKASAM SURESH THATAVARTHI (IN)
RAJARAM SAGARE DATTA (IN)
Application Number:
PCT/IN2021/050317
Publication Date:
October 07, 2021
Filing Date:
March 26, 2021
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
TVS MOTOR CO LTD (IN)
International Classes:
F02N11/08; F02N11/10; F02D41/26
Foreign References:
US20170211494A12017-07-27
EP1992815A22008-11-19
US20080252041A12008-10-16
EP2716896A12014-04-09
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KHAITAN & CO (IN)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. An engine management system (200) for a vehicle (100) comprising: a first controller (210) operatively coupled to a fuel injection system (230) and an ignition system (240) of an internal combustion engine; a second controller (220) remotely located from the first controller (210); and a control bus (262) interconnecting the first controller (210) and the second controller (220).

2. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first controller (210) is configured to: receive inputs from a first set of sensors (260) mounted on the vehicle (100); compare the inputs with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs; and output control signals to a first set of actuators (242) of the fuel injection system (240) and the ignition system (210) based on the comparing results.

3. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the second controller is operatively coupled to an Integrated Starter Generator (ISG) (250) and configured to: receive inputs from the first controller (210) and from a second set of switches (280) mounted on the vehicle (100); compare the inputs with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs; and output control signal to the ISG (250) based on the comparing results.

4. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first set of sensors

(260) comprises at least one of crank position sensor, a throttle position sensor, an engine temperature sensor and a vehicle speed sensor.

5. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 4, wherein the first controller (210) is further configured to: communicate the inputs received from the crank position sensor (260a), the throttle position sensor (260b), the engine temperature sensor (260c) and the vehicle speed sensor (260d) to the second controller, the second controller (220) further configured to: compare the inputs with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs (260a, 260b, 260c, 260d); and output an idle stop signal to the ISG (250) and an ignition disable signal to the first controller (210) based on the comparing results.

6. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first set of sensors (260) comprises at least one of roll over sensor to measure angular position of the vehicle, and a side stand sensor to detect status of a side stand (190) of the vehicle (100).

7. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 6, wherein the first controller (210) is further configured to: output an ignition disable signal to the ignition system and an injection disable signal to the fuel injection system in case the vehicle is in a rollover state of and/ or in case the side stand is in a deployed state.

8. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 6, wherein the first controller (210) is further configured to: communicate the inputs received from the roll over sensor (260e) and the side stand sensor (260f) to the second controller (220), the second controller (220) further configured to: output a cranking disable signal to the ISG (270) in case the vehicle (100) is in a rollover state of and/ or in case the side stand is in a deployed state.

9. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first controller (210) is further configured to: receive inputs from a first set of switches (290), the first set of switches (290) comprises at least one of ignition key (290a) and a kill switch (290b); and outputs an ignition disable signal to the ignition system and an injection disable signal to the fuel injection system in case the ignition key (290a) is switched OFF and / or in case the kill switch (290b) is switched ON.

10. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 9, wherein the first controller (210) is further configured to: communicate the inputs (290a’, 290b’) received from the ignition key (290a) and the kill switch (290b) to the second controller (220), the second controller (220) further configured to: output a cranking disable signal to the ISG in case the ignition key (290a) is switched OFF and / or in case the kill switch (290b) is switched ON.

11. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first controller (210) is further configured to: monitor status of each of the first set of sensors (260); and output a signal

(264) indicating failure of any of the first set of sensors (260) to the second controller (220).

12. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first set of actuators (242) comprises a fuel pump (230a) and an injector (230b) of the fuel injection system (230).

13. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first set of actuators (242) comprises an ignition coil (240a) of the ignition system (240).

14. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the second set of switches (280) comprises at least one of electric start switch (280a), a brake switch (280b), an ignition key (280c), a headlamp switch (280d), and an idle start-stop switch (280e). 15. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the second controller

(220) is further configured to: receive inputs from a second set of sensors, the second set of sensors comprises at least one of speed sensor to detect speed of a rotor of the ISG (250) and a position sensor to detect position of the rotor of the ISG (250); and output a control signal to the ISG thereby dynamically controlling the operation of the ISG (250).

16. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first controller (210) and the second controller (220) communicate with each other through the control bus (262) using a CAN protocol. 17. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first controller (210) and the second controller (220) communicate with each other through the control bus (262) using a K-line protocol.

18. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the second controller (220) comprises an Electronic Control Unit (ECU) of a hybrid vehicle and configured to: communicate with the first controller (210).

19. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first controller (210) is further configured to communicate with an instrument cluster of the vehicle (100).

20. The engine management system (200) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first controller (210) is further configured to communicate with a telematics unit of the vehicle (100) or an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) of the vehicle (100) or a Bay Control Unit (BCU) of the vehicle (100) or a Hydraulic and Electronic Control Unit (HECU) of the vehicle (100).

Description:
TITLE OF INVENTION

An Engine Management System for a Vehicle

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[001] The present invention relates to an engine management system for a vehicle.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION [002] Typically, an Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) system is coupled with an Electric control Unit

(ECU) and uses various sensors to control an internal combustion engine and meet emission, fuel economy and drive ability requirements of a vehicle. Further, to reduce excess fuel consumption, an Integrated Starter Generator (ISG) is also incorporated in vehicles. The ISG cranks the engine and generates power. In some cases, the ISG is also provided with automatic idle start-stop functionality. Accordingly, when the vehicle momentarily halts, the ISG senses the same and shuts off the engine to save consumption of the fuel. Once the user actuates throttle of the vehicle, the ISG starts the engine immediately thus reducing the fuel consumption. As such, the ISG is also coupled with the ECU which controls the operation of the ISG.

[003] Presently, vehicles are incorporated with both the EFI and ISG systems. As such, vehicles have a common ECU which controls the EFI as well as the ISG. Further, there are plenty of vehicles having only EFI systems which require retrofitting of an ISG system. In such vehicles, when the ISG system is retrofitted, the ECU of the EFI is replaced with a common controller that controls both the EFI and the ISG.

[004] However, having a single ECU for both the EFI and the ISG has several problems, one of which is that the single ECUs are bulky and difficult to mount on the vehicle since they occupy a substantial amount of space. Moreover, typically a controller for an ISG generate a lot of heat and therefore functionality of such controller when combined with functionality of a controller for EFI in a common controller, the common controller generates a lot of heat and thus requires adequate cooling. However, common controller does not have requisite means to effectively dissipate the heat. Even if additional heat sinks are deployed for dissipation of heat, such heat sinks will make the entire packaging bulkier and will occupy substantial amount of space on the vehicle. Further, if either of the EFI system or the ISG system requires a repair or replacement, the common ECU also must be replaced or serviced. This adds to replacement and labour costs. Also, calibration of the single ECU takes a substantial amount of time during every servicing or replacement. Furthermore, vehicles having an ISG and vehicles not having ISG will require controller with different versions of software required for functioning of the controller. [005] Hence, there is a need in the art for a system which addresses at least the aforementioned problems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[006] The present invention is directed to an engine management system for a vehicle. The engine management system has a first controller, a second controller and a control bus interconnecting the first controller and the second controller. The first controller operatively coupled to a fuel injection system and an ignition system of an internal combustion engine. The first controller is configured to receive inputs from a first set of sensors mounted on the vehicle; compare the inputs with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs; and output control signals to a first set of actuators of the fuel injection system and the ignition system based on the comparing results. The second controller is remotely located from the first controller and operatively coupled to an Integrated Starter Generator (ISG). The second controller is configured to receive inputs from the first controller and from a second set of switches mounted on the vehicle; compare the inputs with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs; and output control signal to the ISG based on the comparing results.

[007] In an embodiment of the invention, the first set of sensors comprises at least one of crank position sensor, a throttle position sensor, an engine temperature sensor and a vehicle speed sensor. In this regard, the first controller is further configured to communicate the inputs received from the crank position sensor, the throttle position sensor, the engine temperature sensor and the vehicle speed sensor to the second controller, the second controller further configured to: compare the inputs with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs; and output an idle stop signal to the ISG and an ignition disable signal to the first controller based on the comparing results.

[008] In another embodiment of the invention, the first set of sensors comprises at least one of roll over sensor to measure angular position of the vehicle, and a side stand sensor to detect status of a side stand of the vehicle. In this regard, the first controller is further configured to output an ignition disable signal to the ignition system and an injection disable signal to the fuel injection system in case the vehicle is in a rollover state of and/ or in case the side stand is in a deployed state.

[009] In yet another embodiment of the invention, the first controller is further configured to communicate the inputs received from the roll over sensor and the side stand sensor to the second controller, the second controller further configured to: output a cranking disable signal to the ISG in case the vehicle is in a rollover state of and/ or in case the side stand is in a deployed state. [010] In a further embodiment of the invention, the first controller is configured to receive inputs from a first set of switches, the first set of switches comprises at least one of ignition key and a kill switch; and outputs an ignition disable signal to the ignition system and an injection disable signal to the fuel injection system in case the ignition key is switched OFF and/ or in case the kill switch is switched ON. [Oil] In another embodiment of the invention, the first controller is further configured to communicate the inputs received from the ignition key and the kill switch to the second controller. The second controller is further configured to output a cranking disable signal to the ISG in case the ignition key is switched OFF and / or in case the kill switch is switched ON. [012] In yet another embodiment of the invention, the first controller is further configured to monitor status of each of the first set of sensors; and output a signal indicating failure of any of the first set of sensors to the second controller.

[013] In a further embodiment of the invention, the first set of actuators comprises an injector and a fuel pump of the fuel injection system, and an ignition coil of the ignition system. [014] In an embodiment of the invention, the second set of switches comprises at least one of electric start switch, a brake switch, an ignition key and an idle start-stop switch.

[015] In yet another embodiment of the invention, the second controller is further configured to receive inputs from a second set of sensors. The second set of sensors has at least one of speed sensor to detect speed of a rotor of the ISG and a position sensor to detect position of the rotor of the ISG; and output a control signal to the ISG thereby dynamically controlling the operation of the ISG.

[016] In another embodiment of the invention, the first controller and the second controller communicate with each other through the control bus using a CAN protocol or a K-line protocol. [017] In yet another embodiment of the invention, the second controller is an Electronic Control Unit (ECU) of a hybrid vehicle and configured to: communicate with the first controller.

[018] In another embodiment of the invention, the first controller is further configured to communicate with an instrument cluster of the vehicle.

[019] In an further embodiment of the invention, the first controller is further configured to communicate with a telematics unit of the vehicle or an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) of the vehicle or a Bay Control Unit of the vehicle or a Hydraulic and Electronic Control Unit of the vehicle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS [020] Reference will be made to embodiments of the invention, examples of which may be illustrated in accompanying figures. These figures are intended to be illustrative, not limiting. Although the invention is generally described in context of these embodiments, it should be understood that it is not intended to limit the scope of the invention to these particular embodiments. Figure 1 shows a right-side perspective view of a vehicle having an engine management system in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.

Figure 2 shows a block diagram of an engine management system in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.

Figure 3 shows exploded view of the vehicle having an engine management system in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[021] The present invention discloses an engine management system for a two-wheeled vehicle. [022] Figure 1 shows a right-side perspective view of a saddle type vehicle 100. The vehicle 100 extends between a front wheel 110 and a rear wheel 120. The vehicle has a maneuvering handle 130 coupled to its front wheel 110. Between the handle 130 and front wheel 110, there is a front cover 140 and a rear cover 150. Front cover 140 and the rear cover 150 abut on each other to form a housing for various components of the vehicle 100. The vehicle 100 has a floorboard 160 which acts as a footrest for a rider sitting on a seat 170. Further, the vehicle has a left-side cover 180 and a right-side cover (not shown). As shown in Figure 3, between the left-side cover 180 and the right- side cover, various components such as Internal Combustion (IC) engine, transmission system, Integrated Starter Generator (ISG), fuel injection system, ignition system, etc., of the vehicle 100 are housed. Further the vehicle 100 has a center stand 190a and a side standl90b.

[023] Figure 2 shows a block diagram of an engine management system 200 of the present invention. As shown, the engine management system 200 has a first controller 210 and a second controller 220. The first controller 210 is operatively coupled to a fuel injection system 230 and an ignition system 240 of an IC engine of the vehicle 100. The second controller 200, on the other hand is operatively coupled to an Integrated Starter Generator (ISG) 250. The first controller 210 and the second controller 220 are interconnected by a control bus 262. [024] The fuel injection system 230 delivers fuel to the IC engine, while precisely controlling the injection timing, fuel atomization, and other parameters. In this regard, the fuel injection system 230 includes a battery, a fuel pump 230a and an injector 230b. The ignition system 240 generates a spark or heats an electrode to a high temperature to ignite a fuel-air mixture in the IC engine. In this regard, the ignition system 240 includes a battery, ignition coil 240a and a spark plug. The ISG 250 acts as a bi-directional power converter, changing mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa. Functioning as an electric motor, it starts the IC almost soundlessly and considerably faster than any conventional starter. As a generator, it produces power for the lights, the battery, etc.

[025] Referring now to Figure 2, for the purpose of controlling the operations of the fuel injector system 230 and the ignition system 240, the first controller 210 receives inputs from a first set of sensors 260 mounted on the vehicle 100. In this regard, the first controller 210 is configured to compare the inputs received from the first set of sensors 260 with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs, and output control signals to the fuel injection system 230 and the ignition system 240 based on the comparing results. Thus, the fuel pump 230a and the injector 230b of the fuel injection system 230 are controlled by control signals received from the first controller 210. Similarly, the ignition coil 240a of the ignition system 240 is controlled by control signal received from the first controller 210. The fuel pump 230a, the injector 230b and the ignition coil 240a constitute first set of actuators 242 controlled by control signal from the first controller 210. [026] For the purpose of controlling the operations of the ISG 250, the second controller receives inputs from the first controller 210 and from a second set of switches 280 mounted on the vehicle 100. The second controller 220 is remotely located from the first controller 210 and interconnected with the first controller through the control bus 260. In an embodiment of the present invention, communication between the first controller 210 and the second controller 220 is through CAN protocol or through k-line protocol. As shown in Figure 3, in an embodiment of the invention, the first controller 210 is located between the front cover 140 and the rear cover 150 whereas the second controller 220 is located between the left-side cover 180 and the right-side cover. Further, the second controller 220 is configured to compare the inputs received from the first controller and the second set of switches 280 with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs, and output control signal to the ISG 250 based on the comparing results. Thus, the control signal from the second controller 220 controls the operation of the ISG 250 thereby controlling the cranking of the IC engine and idle start-stop of the vehicle.

[027] In an embodiment of the invention, the first set of sensors 230 includes a crank position sensor to determine engine RPM, a throttle position sensor to detect position of a throttle/ accelerator of the vehicle 100, an engine temperature sensor to detect temperature of the IC engine and a vehicle speed sensor to determine speed of the vehicle. The first controller thus receives inputs from the crank position sensor, the throttle position sensor, the engine temperature sensor and the vehicle speed sensor; compares the inputs with predetermined conditions and outputs a corresponding control signal to the first set of actuators. In another embodiment of the invention, the first controller is further configured to communicate the inputs received from the crank position sensor 260a, the throttle position sensor 260b, the engine temperature sensor 260c and the vehicle speed sensor 260d to the second controller 220. In this regard, the second controller 220 is further configured to: compare the inputs with predetermined conditions and generate comparing result for each of the inputs 260a, 260b, 260c, 260d; and output a corresponding control signal to the ISG. In another embodiment of the invention, in case the inputs 260a, 260b, 260c, 260d received from the first controller 210 indicate to stop the vehicle, the controller 220 outputs an idle stop signal to the ISG 250 and an ignition disable signal to the first controller 210 based on the comparing results. Thus, the first controller 210 inhibits the operation of the fuel pump 230a, the injector 230b and the ignition coil 240a.

[028] In another embodiment of the invention, the first set of sensors 260 includes safety critical sensors such as a roll over sensor to measure angular position of the vehicle 100 and a side stand sensor to detect status of a side stand 190 of the vehicle 100. In this regard, the first controller 210 is further configured to: output an ignition disable signal to the ignition system 240 and an injection disable signal to the fuel injection system 230 in case the vehicle is in a rollover state and/ or in case the side stand 190b is in a deployed state. In a further embodiment of the invention, the first controller 210 is configured to: communicate the inputs received from the roll over sensor 260e and the side stand sensor 260f to the second controller 220 wherein the second controller 220 is configured to: output a cranking disable signal to the ISG 250 in case the vehicle 100 is in a rollover state and / or in case the side stand 190 is in a deployed state.

[029] In an embodiment of the invention, the first set of sensors 260 also includes a manifold pressure sensor to determine pressure inside a manifold, an oxygen sensor to determine concentration of oxygen. Based on these inputs, the first controller 210 controls the operation of the fuel injector system 230 and the ignition system 240. [030] In an embodiment of the invention, the vehicle 100 has a first set of switches 290, such as an ignition key 290a and a kill switch 290b. In this regard, the first controller 210 is configured to receive inputs from the first set of switches 290 and output an ignition disable signal to the ignition system and an injection disable signal to the fuel injection system in case the ignition key is switched OFF and / or in case the kill switch is switched ON. The first controller 210 is also configured to communicate the inputs 290a’, 290b’ received from the ignition key and the kill switch to the second controller 220 whereby the second controller 220 outputs a cranking disable signal to the ISG in case the ignition key is switched OFF and/ or in case the kill switch is switched ON. A cranking disable signal from the second controller 220 restrains the ISG from cranking the IC engine.

[031] Further, the first controller 210 is also configured to monitor status of each of the first set of sensors 260. Upon having monitored, the first controller 210 is configured to output a signal 264 indicating failure of any of the first set of sensors 260 to the second controller 220. Indication of sensor failure to the second controller 220 helps the second controller 220 to control the operation of the ISG 250 independent of inputs received from the first set of sensors 260.

[032] As described hereinbefore, for the purpose of controlling the operations of the ISG 250, the second controller 220 receives inputs from a second set of switches 280 mounted on the vehicle 100. The second set of switches 280 includes an electric start switch 280a to activate electrical systems for the vehicle 100, a brake switch 280b to detect application of brake, an ignition key 280c to activate ignition of the vehicle 100, a headlamp switch 280d to activate the headlamp, and an idle start-stop switch 280e. The second controller 220 is also connected to a battery 300 to monitor the state of charge of the battery 300. Based on the inputs received from the second set of switches 280, the second controller 220 controls the operation of the ISG 250. [033] Furthermore, the second controller 220 is also configured to receive inputs from a second set of sensors (not shown) and output a control signal to the ISG thereby dynamically controlling the operation of the ISG 250. In this regard, the second set of sensors are, including but not limited to, at least one of speed sensor to detect speed of a rotor of the ISG and a position sensor to detect position of the rotor of the ISG.

[034] While the present invention has been described with a second controller (220) operatively coupled to the ISG 250, it may be noted that present invention may also extend to hybrid vehicles wherein the second controller is an Electronic Control Unit (ECU) of a hybrid vehicle and configured to communicate with the first controller. [035] Also, the first controller 210 may be further configured to communicate with an instrument cluster of the vehicle 100. In another embodiment of the invention, the first controller 210 may be further configured to communicate with a telematics unit of the vehicle 100 or an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) of the vehicle 100 or a Bay Control Unit of the vehicle 100 or a Hydraulic and Electronic Control Unit of the vehicle 100. [036] Advantageously, the need for having a common bulky controller for controlling the operations of a fuel injector system, an ignition system and ISG is obviated by the present invention. As such, packaging and mounting of individual controllers according to present invention on the vehicle becomes feasible and easier. Further, failure of one of the controllers of the present invention require replacement of that controller and not that of the entire system. Accordingly, if either of the EFI system or the ISG system requires a repair of replacement, the same can be done independently without disturbing the others’ settings. Moreover, since number of pins on each of the controllers of the present invention is less, any hardware changes is feasible and easily achievable. Consequently, assembly time, mounting time and serviceability time of the controllers of the present invention will be reduced. Furthermore, where vehicles are to be retrofitted with an ISG unit in a vehicle having an EFI system, the same can be done without replacing the controller.

[037] Further, the second controller 220 is connected to a headlamp unit 310, an idle start-stop indicator 320 which indicates start/ stop status of the vehicle and ISG malfunction indicator 330 which indicates failure or malfunctioning of the ISG 250.

[038] While the present invention has been described with respect to certain embodiments, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modification may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.