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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
GARMENT CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USING MESH MATERIAL
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2021/050604
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Multiple garment construction techniques are provided. The first garment construction technique is a method of creating ruching in a mesh material. The second garment construction technique is a method to gather a mesh material to reduce the edge length or to provide a stretch mesh fabric. The third garment construction technique is a method of creating an adjustable strap suitable using a G-clasp element for use with garments of mesh material or other fashion fabrics.

Inventors:
LUNA SERGIO (US)
Application Number:
US2020/050012
Publication Date:
March 18, 2021
Filing Date:
September 09, 2020
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
LUNA SERGIO (US)
International Classes:
A44B11/22; A41D31/00; A41F1/00; A41F15/02
Foreign References:
US20130298311A12013-11-14
US6968573B22005-11-29
US9521880B22016-12-20
US2646570A1953-07-28
US1231345A1917-06-26
US0920537A1909-05-04
US1019830A1912-03-12
US5016337A1991-05-21
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MASTERS, Connie R. (Las Vegas, Nevada, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed is:

1. A method of creating gathering in mesh material (55), comprising: obtaining a mesh portion (56) of mesh material (55) comprising a grid formed of spiders (20) interlocking with rings (30) attached together with chain connection columns (31) between adjacent rows of said spiders (20) and said rings (30); each of said spiders (20) comprising four spider legs (21) attached to a spider body (29); each of said spider legs (21) curling inward to create a leg channel (27) for accommodating a ring (30); obtaining a flexible filament (45); selecting a pre-determined chain connection column (31); threading a length of said flexible filament (45) through said pre-determined chain connection column (31); and gathering said pre-determined chain connection column (31) on said flexible filament (45) by reducing said length of said flexible filament (45).

2. The method of creating gathering in mesh material, as recited in claim 1, further comprising: obtaining additional flexible filament (45); selecting multiple additional pre-determined chain connection columns (31); threading said additional flexible filament (45) through said multiple additional pre determined chain connection columns (31); and gathering said multiple additional pre-determined chain connection columns (31) on said multiple additional flexible filaments (45) to create a stretch mesh material.

3. The method of creating gathering in mesh material, as recited in claim 1, wherein said multiple additional pre-determined chain connection columns (31) selected are all parallel; and wherein said stretch mesh material comprises a two-way stretch mesh material.

4. The method of creating gathering in mesh material, as recited in claim 1, wherein a first quantity of said multiple additional pre-determined chain connection columns (31) selected are parallel and a second quantity of said multiple additional pre-determined linking rows (31) selected are perpendicular to said first quantity of said multiple additional pre determined chain connection columns (31); and wherein said stretch mesh material comprises a four-way stretch mesh material.

5. The method of creating gathering in mesh material, as recited in claim 1, wherein said mesh portion (56) comprises an edge (25); wherein said pre-determined chain connection column (31) is disposed at said edge (25); and wherein said stretch mesh material comprises a gathered edge.

6. The method of creating gathering in mesh material, as recited in claim 1, wherein said flexible filament (45) comprises two opposing ends; the method further comprising: attaching a clasp (49) one of said two opposing ends of said flexible filament (45); attaching multiple clasp-receiving elements (39) to an interior part of said mesh portion (56); wherein said clasp (49) is engageable with one of said multiple clasp receiving elements (39).

7. A method of creating ruching in mesh material (55), comprising: obtaining a mesh portion (56) of mesh material (55); wherein said mesh material (55) comprises a grid formed of multiple spiders (20) interlocking with multiple rings (30) attached together with chain connection columns (31) between adjacent rows of said spiders (20) and said rings (30); each of said spiders (20) comprising four spider legs (21) attached to a spider body (29); each of said spider legs (21) curling inward to create a leg channel (27) for accommodating a ring (30); selecting a first pre-determined edge (25) from said chain connection columns (31) of said mesh portion (56); wherein said first pre-determined edge (25) comprises first edge spiders (20) and first edge rings (30); removing a first set of multiple triangular wedges (35), each comprising multiple spiders (20) interlocking with multiple rings (30) from along said first pre-determined edge (25); wherein the removal of each of said first set of multiple triangular wedges (35) creates a concave void (53) defined by a first void ring-spider border (57) comprising multiple first border spiders (20) and multiple first border rings (30) and a second void ring-spider border (57) comprising multiple second border spiders (20) and multiple second border rings (30); leaving a first spider/ring margin (54) between adjacent ones of said first set of multiple triangular wedges (35); wherein said first spider/ring margin (54) comprises at least one of said first edge spiders (20) and one of said first edge rings (30) of said first pre-determined edge (25); obtaining a first banding-piece (12) of mesh material (55) comprising a first banding- piece edge row (37) of multiple banding-piece spiders (20) interlocking with multiple banding-piece rings (30); and connecting said first banding-piece edge row (37) with multiple ones of said first spider/ring margins (54).

8. The method of creating ruching in mesh material (55), as recited in claim 7, further comprising leaving said void ring-spider borders (57) unattached.

9. The method of creating ruching in mesh material (55), as recited in claim 7, further comprising removing multiple spiders (20) and multiple rings (30) from one side of said pre determined edge (25) before removing multiple triangular wedges (35).

10. The method of creating ruching in mesh material (55), as recited in claim 7, wherein said connecting said banding-piece edge row (37) with multiple ones of said spider/ring margin (54) comprises connecting a part of said multiple banding-piece spiders (20) and said multiple banding-piece rings (30) to said edge spiders (20) and edge rings (30) of said spider/ring margin (54).

11. The method of creating ruching in mesh material (55), as recited in claim 7, further comprising: selecting a second pre-determined edge (25) from said chain connection columns (31) of said mesh portion (56); wherein said second pre-determined edge (25) comprises second edge spiders (20) and second edge rings (30); removing a second set of multiple triangular wedges (35), each comprising multiple spiders (20) interlocking with multiple rings (30) from along said second pre-determined edge (25); wherein the removal of each of said second set of multiple triangular wedges (35) creates a second concave void (53) defined by a third void ring-spider border (57) comprising a third border portion of said multiple spiders (20) and multiple rings (30) and a fourth void ring-spider border (57) comprising a fourth border portion of said multiple spiders (20) and multiple rings (30); leaving a second spider/ring margin (54) between adjacent ones of said second set of multiple triangular wedges (35); wherein said second spider/ring margin (54) comprises at least one of said second edge spiders (20) and one of said second edge rings (30) of said second pre-determined edge (25); obtaining a second banding-piece (12) of mesh material (55) comprising a second banding-piece edge row (37) of multiple banding-piece spiders (20) interlocking with multiple banding-piece rings (30); and connecting said second banding-piece edge row (37) with multiple ones of said second spider/ring margin (54) to create ruching on two sides of said mesh portion (56).

12. A method of creating an adjustable strap, comprising: obtaining an article (56) comprising a flexible material strap (90); said strap (90) comprising a strap garment end (91), a strap adjustment end (99), an inner lining (93) carrying multiple strap fastening components (95), and an outer fashion fabric; obtaining a G-clasp (60) comprising a closed outer bar (61), a middle bar (65), a connecting bar (62), a left side bar (63), and an open outer bar (69); wherein said closed outer bar (61), said middle bar (65), and said connecting bar (62) define a closed area; attaching a receiving channel (75) to said article (56); obtaining a tether (80) comprising a G-clasp end (87) and a fastener end (89); attaching a tether fastening component (85) that correlates with one of said strap fastening components (95) to said fastener end (89); and engaging said G-clasp end (87) with said closed outer bar (61); wherein, when said open outer bar (69) is introduced through said receiving channel (75) and said tether fastening component (85) is attached to one of said multiple strap fastening components (95), said strap (90) is adjusted in length.

13. The method of creating an adjustable strap, as recited in claim 12, wherein said fashion-fabric comprises a mesh material.

14. The method of creating an adjustable strap, as recited in claim 12, wherein said tether (80) is fixedly attached to said closed outer bar (61); wherein said tether fastening component (85) comprises a hook; and wherein each of said strap fastening components (95) comprise an eye.

15. The method of creating an adjustable strap, as recited in claim 12, wherein said tether (80) is looped behind said closed outer bar (61) and through said open area (68) of said G-clasp (60); wherein said tether fastening component (85) comprises an elastic loop; and wherein each of said strap fastening components (95) comprise a button.

16. The method of creating an adjustable strap, as recited in claim 12, wherein said tether (80) is fixedly attached to said closed outer bar (61); wherein said tether fastening component (85) comprises a buttonhole; and wherein each of said strap fastening components (95) comprise a button.

Description:
Garment Construction Techniques Using Mesh Material

FIELD OF INVENTION

[0001] This invention relates generally to garment construction techniques, and, more particularly, to construction of garments using mesh material, including gathering, ruching, draping, and fastening techniques.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Chain mail is typically a mesh made of small metal rings linked together in a pattern. Chain mail armor has existed since the third or fourth century B.C. and was originally valued for the protection it provided during battle. In the last hundred years, chain mail has been used in a protective role in gloves (such as for butchers or woodcarvers), in armor (such as in stab-proof vests or to protect divers from shark bites), and in shields or guards in industrial settings (such as in metal working operations).

[0003] Though the protective quality of chain mail mesh is well appreciated, uses for mesh material have recently expanded. It has become known for its aesthetic value due to the fluidity of the mesh and to its reflectivity that causes a play of lights on the mesh. Currently, it is recognized as an architectural design element, is useful for distinctive interior decor, and is appealing as a fashion material. This new recognition of the aesthetic potential of mesh materials has triggered the use of new materials to form mesh (various metals and plastics), new patterns of mesh, and new types of mesh, such as spider mesh that has multiple spiders with each spider joining four separate small metal rings within a grid of rings, as seen in FIGS. 20-22. The spider is formed of a central member (flat or convex) and four curved legs. The four curved legs of one spider curl inward to form four leg channels allowing four separate rings to connect to one spider. The spider mesh creates a shimmering metal fabric that looks delicate, but that is strong, fluid, and flexible.

[0004] However, though mesh material may now be perceived as aesthetically pleasing and may be appreciated as desirable for use in fashion and home furnishings, the conventional techniques used in producing fashion items and protective gear do not provide the variety of looks desired by the fashion and design industries due to the lack of mesh construction techniques. Though mesh material may share some similarity in function, form, and use with woven, non-woven, or knitted fabric, it cannot be sewn like atypical fabric. For example, seams, buttonholes, pleats, flutes, gathers, and darts, which are easy to sew into woven, knitted, or non-woven fabric, cannot be sewn into the mesh material. Current techniques in use for mesh material cannot produce ruching to allow the mesh to adapt to the shapes of the human body, cannot create gathering to create ruffles or to increase drape or to reduce an expanse, and do not allow for attachment, disconnection, and reattachment of portions of a garment. For example, using current mesh material techniques, it is not possible to sew a seam to gather an edge or to sew buttonholes to receive buttons to adjust the length of a strap.

[0005] Accordingly, there is a need for techniques for garment construction that function similarly to the gathering, ruching, and fastening/unfastening techniques used when fashioning clothing or decor with woven, non-woven, or knitted cloth, but that can be implemented using mesh material.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] The present invention is directed to multiple garment construction techniques. These techniques may all be used with mesh material, where the mesh material includes multiple spiders each with four legs that can interconnect with four separate rings. A connectable chain of spiders and rings of one row connects with a corresponding connectable chain of rings and spiders of an adjacent row at a chain connection column. These methods address the inherent challenges in working with mesh material that cannot be sewn on a machine or by hand in the manner of woven, knitted, or non-woven fabrics.

[0007] The first garment construction technique presented herein is a method of creating ruching in an article or mesh portion of a mesh material. This method may be applied to one area of a mesh portion or to multiple areas of a mesh portion. This method includes removing multiple triangular wedges of spiders and rings. The wedges are removed along a pre-determined edge, which may be the natural edge or may be a created edge. The removal of each of the triangular wedges creates a concave void defined by two void ring-spider borders and the opening between the rings or spiders on the outermost edge of the void ring-spider borders. The two void ring- spider borders form an angle like the front edges of an arrowhead. The two void ring-spider borders are the spiders and rings that were adjacent to the edges of the removed triangular wedge, but now remain as an edge. [0008] Between adjacent concave triangular voids, a spider/ring margin remains. The spider/ring margin is from one to a few rings of the original pre-determined edge. A banding-piece (having spiders and rings) then is used to connect to the spiders and rings of the spider/ring margin while leaving the spiders and rings of the two void ring-spider borders (which were adjacent to the edges of the triangular void before it was removed) unattached. This creates a first ruche, which is a pleating or folding effect created in the mesh material, which gives a similar appearance to a single ruche in a traditional woven, knitted, or non-woven fabric. Although a particular design may require only one ruche, commonly multiple ruches are formed adjacent to each other, and more than one area of ruching may be incorporated into a single article, as seen in FIG. 5. Further, when ruched, the mesh material provides a texture and support that is not provided by ruched traditional fabric.

[0009] The second garment construction technique is a method to gather a mesh material to reduce the length of an edge and/or to create a stretch mesh material. In a first aspect of the second garment construction technique, to reduce the length of an edge, a filament is run through the closed spider legs of a chain connection column at the edge of an article of mesh material. Then the closed spider legs are drawn into closer proximity by extracting the excess filament between the spiders. Thus, the portion of the length of the filament that interacts with or supports the closed spider legs is reduced as the closed spider legs are snugged together. This gathering technique solves the problem of reducing the edge length to create a gather and solves it unobtrusively.

[0010] The second aspect of the second garment construction technique is an extension of the first aspect. It is a method to create a two-way mesh material. In this aspect, multiple filaments are run through the closed spider legs of parallel chain connection columns of the garment or material. The multiple filaments may be run through every row of chain connection column or through some columns while leaving the other columns unchanged. The parallel chain connection columns may be vertical columns or horizontal columns. This aspect can create a two-dimensional stretch mesh material.

[0011] The third aspect of the second garment construction technique is an extension of the first and second aspects. It is a method to create a four-way stretch mesh material. In this aspect, filaments are run through the closed spider legs of parallel horizontal chain connection columns of the garment or material and are run through the closed spider legs of parallel vertical chain connection columns of the garment. (The vertical columns are substantially perpendicular to the horizontal columns.) The filaments may be run through every horizontal and vertical chain connection column of spider legs or through some horizontal and vertical chain connection columns while leaving the other chain connection columns unchanged.

[0012] The third garment construction technique is a system to create an adjustable-length strap or strap-like portion suitable for use with garments or articles of mesh material (though this method is usable with other types of fabrics), which may be particularly useful in fabrics used in fashion, decor, or other fabrics used in aesthetically pleasing usages. The mesh and non-mesh fabrics are termed “fashion fabrics.” The adjustability is provided without the need to tamper with the fashion fabric front, as opposed to conventional fastening means, such as a button and buttonhole or correlating snaps, that mar the fashion fabric front. This technique provides the ability to adjust the length of a strap or strap-like portion without sewing through the material front, which is not visually desirable to do with a mesh material. Three aspects of the third garment construction technique are provided.

[0013] These garment construction techniques may be used by a tailor fashioning a bespoke garment, by the garment industry in making mass market garments, by a seamstress creating his/her own garment, by manufacturers providing mesh material, or the like. However, for conciseness, the maker of the garment (or of the material from which the garment is made) is referred to herein as the “tailor” or “designer.”

[0014] The object of the invention is to provide garment construction techniques that can be applied to mesh materials formed by a grid of multiple spiders and multiple rings, which give an improved performance over the currently available mesh material garment construction techniques.

[0015] These and other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become more readily apparent from the attached drawings and from the detailed description of the preferred embodiments which follow.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

[0016] The preferred embodiments of the invention will hereinafter be described in conjunction with the appended drawings, provided to illustrate and not to limit the invention, where like designations denote like elements.

[0017] FIG. 1 is a partial bottom view of a portion of mesh material showing the first step in a ruching technique for spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention. [0018] FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a garment-type article with the first step of the ruching technique of FIG. 1 performed multiple times along two edges of the bodice of the article.

[0019] FIG. 3 is a partial bottom view at the start of a second step in the ruching technique for spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention.

[0020] FIG. 4 is a partial bottom view of the completion of a first ruche and the completion of the first step of a second ruche, where the second step of a second ruche is ready to begin of the ruching technique for spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention..

[0021] FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the completion of multiple ruches along both sides of a bodice using the ruching technique for spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention. [0022] FIG. 6 is a partial bottom view of a first step in a first gathering technique for a portion of spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention.

[0023] FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a garment showing the first aspect of the adjustable-length strap as seen in FIG. 12 and demonstrates the overly loose top edge of a rear skirt of a garment before using a first gathering technique for spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention.

[0024] FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a step in a first gathering technique for spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention applied along a top edge of a rear skirt of a garment.

[0025] FIG. 9 is a partial bottom view of a second aspect of the gathering technique, which provides a two-way stretch spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention.

[0026] FIG. 10 is a front perspective view showing stretchable mesh of an embodiment of the current invention applied to a garment.

[0027] FIG. 11 is a partial bottom view of a third aspect of the gathering technique, which provides a four-way stretch spider mesh of an embodiment of the current invention.

[0028] FIG. 12 is a perspective back view of a top portion of a garment showing a first aspect to create an adjustable-length strap using a G-clasp element of an embodiment of the current invention.

[0029] FIG. 13 is a perspective interior view of a strap attachment to a garment showing the first aspect to create an adjustable-length strap of FIG. 12.

[0030] FIG. 14 is a perspective interior view of a portion of a strap showing the first aspect to create an adjustable-length strap of FIG. 12.

[0031] FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a G-clasp used as an element in the construction technique to create an adjustable-length strap of FIG. 12. [0032] FIG. 16 is a cut interior view of a G-clasp, a receiving channel, a tether, and a strap taken from lines -16-16- of FIG. 13.

[0033] FIG. 17 is a perspective back view of a portion of a strap showing a second aspect of the adjustable-length strap using a G-clasp element of an embodiment of the current invention. [0034] FIG. 18 is a back view of the G-clasp element of a third aspect of the adjustable-length strap system using a G-clasp element of an embodiment of the current invention.

[0035] FIG. 19 is a perspective back view of a strap portion of a third aspect of the adjustable- length strap system of an embodiment of the current invention.

[0036] FIG. 20 is a front view of spider mesh material of the prior art.

[0037] FIG. 21 is a back view of spider mesh material of the prior art.

[0038] FIG. 22 is a bottom view of a single spider and a single ring of the spider mesh of the prior art.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0039] Shown throughout the figures, the present invention is directed toward three garment construction techniques for use with mesh material and includes an application to a dress-type garment. The mesh material of the prior art, as shown in FIGS. 20-22 includes a grid of multiple spiders 20 and multiple rings 30. Each of the spiders 20 has four legs 21A, 21B, 21C, 21D (FIG. 22) fixedly attached to, or formed integrally with, a central body 29. As seen in the detail of FIG. 22, in forming the mesh, a leg 21 may be opened to receive a ring. Then the distal portion of the leg 21 is curled inward and closed to form an open conduit or leg channel 27 (FIG. 22) within the curl of the leg 21, which accommodates the ring 30. A portion of a ring 30 is secured within the leg channel 27 of the leg 21.

[0040] In a similar manner, the next leg 21 of the spider is connected to a second ring 30. The third and fourth legs 21 are likewise connected to a third and fourth ring 30, respectively. Thus, except at the edge of the mesh material 55, each spider 20 is connected to four separate rings 30, and each ring 30 is connected to four separate spiders 20. One row or chain of spiders 20 with interspersed rings 30 is joined to an adjacent row or chain of rings 30 interspersed with spiders 20. The first row meets the adjacent row at a chain connection column 31 (FIG. 21). A chain connection column 31 in the middle of the mesh is a column at which the spiders 20 of the first row are attached to the rings 30 of the adjacent row and at which the spiders 20 of the adjacent row are attached to the rings 30 of the first row. A chain connection column 31 at the edge of the mesh is an edge column at which the spiders 20 of the first row are available for attachment to the rings 30 of another adjacent row and the rings 20 of the first row are available for attachment to the rings 30 of another adjacent row, but no adjacent row of spiders 20 and rings 30 is currently attached.

[0041] In combination, the multiple spiders 20 and rings 30 form a stylish and fashionable mesh material 55. But, in contrast to woven, knitted, and non-woven fabric, the mesh material 55 cannot be sewn with standard garment construction techniques. Therefore, the designer of garments or home decor is limited when using the conventional garment construction techniques. [0042] Three garment construction techniques are provided herein that provide the designer of mesh materials greater flexibility in usage. The first garment construction technique is a ruching technique, shown in FIGS. 1-5. The second garment construction technique is a gathering technique, shown in FIGS. 6-11. The third garment construction technique is a technique for creating a length-adjustable strap using a G-clasp element, shown in FIGS. 12-19. Though the term “garment construction techniques” is used herein for conciseness, these techniques can be equally well applied to other articles and items. These other types of items may be architectural elements (such as hanging room dividers and the like), home furnishings (such as pillows, curtains, bed skirts, and the like), decor, accessories (such as purses, scarves, and shoes), and the like.

[0043] Referring now to FIGS. 1-5, a garment construction technique for creating a single ruche or multiple ruches, shown generally as reference number 10, is illustrated in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention. The ruching technique creates a ruche 10, which is a pleated, ruffled, or folded portion of the mesh attached to a strip or band of mesh, which is referred to as banding-piece 12. One or many ruches 10 can be used for constructing a garment (for example, the dress as shown in FIG. 5) or other article (such as multiple ruches 10 at the top of a mesh room divider). Or one or many ruches 10 can be used for trimming or finishing a garment (such as applied at a neckline) or other article (such as applied to a purse).

[0044] In preparation for starting the formation of the ruching 10, the tailor obtains mesh material 55, which may be received as bulk mesh material on a bolt or may be a portion of mesh material. The ruching may be applied to one or multiple areas of the mesh material, or the tailor may remove sections of the mesh material 55 to form a piece, a shaped portion, or a fashion, utilitarian, or decor article (termed generally a “mesh portion 56”) of the mesh material 55.

When a mesh portion 56 is fashioned, it may be generally shaped according to a pattern or a design of the final item to be constructed. For example, a article or mesh portion 56 may be prepared according to a pattern for a skirt, a bodice, a dress (as in FIG. 2), a pillow, a curtain, a hanging divider, or the like. The example shown here includes multiple ruches 10 applied to two areas of a shaped, dress-type garment of mesh material 55.

[0045] As is standard in mesh material 55, the mesh portion 56 includes a grid of multiple spiders 20 and multiple rings 30. The mesh portion 56 has a periphery, which is disposed along the perimeter of the mesh portion 56. The mesh portion periphery may run along a single edge (such as in the case in which the mesh portion 56 is circular or generally circular) or may run along multiple edges (such as the dress shown in FIG. 2).

[0046] In overview, the first step of the ruching technique is shown in the detail view of FIG. 1. The first step is the creation of a concave void 53 by the removal of a first triangular wedge 35, which leaves two void ring-spider borders 57 that meet at an angle. Typically, this first step is repeated multiple times with a few spiders and rings (a spider/ring margin 54, FIG. 3) left between each of the multiple triangular voids 53 created. The second step of the ruching technique, shown in FIGS. 3-4, is the use of a banding-piece 12 that is attached to the spider/ring margins 54 (between adjacent concave voids 53), while the spiders and rings of the void ring- spider borders 57 remain unattached.

[0047] In more detail, as seen in FIG. 1, a first triangular wedge 35 of mesh material is removed from a pre-determined edge 25 of a mesh portion 56. (Only a small, enlarged section of mesh portion 56 is shown in FIG. 1.) The pre-determined edge 25 may be the actual peripheral edge of a mesh portion (as seen in FIGS. 6, 9, 11) or may be a created edge. A created edge is made in a preparation step (before beginning the first step) by selecting a chain connection column 31 where spiders 20 and rings 30 meet and generating a pre-determined edge 25 by disconnecting spider legs 21 and rings 30 along one side of a chain connection column 31 to establish a non peripheral, unattached or open edge row of spiders 20 and rings 30.

[0048] In the first step, the first triangular wedge 35 of mesh material is removed by disconnecting spiders 20 from rings 30. The various disconnections 17 between the rings 30 and the legs 21 of the spiders 20 are shown by the dot-dash lines. For example, a first leg 21 of spider 20A is disconnected at disconnection line 17 from ring 30A; another leg 21 of spider 20A is disconnected from ring 30B; a first leg 21 of spider 20B is disconnected at a disconnection line 17 from ring 30B; another leg 21 of spider 20B is disconnected from ring 30C, and so on and so forth. This is continued to disconnect the first side of the triangular wedge 35, which leaves a void ring-spider border 57 defining a first side of the angled-sided, concave void 53. The same process of disconnecting spiders 20 from rings 30 is repeated on the next side of the triangular wedge 35; to disconnect the second side of the triangular wedge 35. The remaining spiders and rings (which were previously attached to the rings and spiders of the triangular wedge) form a second void ring-spider border 57, which defines a second side of the concave void 53. The two void ring-spider borders 57 meet at an angle to define two sides of the concave void 53. The opening between the outermost spider or ring of the two void ring-spider borders 57 defines the third side of the triangular-shaped, concave void 53.

[0049] With the first and second sides of the triangular wedge 35 being disconnected, and with the third side being part of the pre-determined edge, so no further spiders and rings need be disconnected. This frees the triangular wedge 35 from the mesh portion; it may be discarded or saved as a scrap.

[0050] The concave void 53 that is shown in FIG. 1 is not deep or wide for clarity of discussion, but, depending upon the article and the design, the concave void 53 may be from only a very few spiders and rings deep (such as three or four, as shown) to many spiders and rings deep. The size of the triangular wedge 35 that is removed, and thus the size of the concave void 53 produced, is based on factors such as the size of the mesh, the size of the article (for example, a large room divider could have deeper ruches, compared to necessarily shallower ruches on a purse), aesthetic considerations, and the design plan of the design originator. The triangular wedge 35 has at least two equal sides, so is an isosceles triangle (and may at times be an isosceles right triangle or equilateral triangle).

[0051] If more than one ruche 10 is desired, as is typical, this first step is repeated over and over (one time for every ruche 10) along the length of the pre-determined edge 25 that is to be ruched. The removal of triangular wedges 35 in preparation for the second step of the ruching may be performed along one or more than one of the to-be-ruched pre-determined edges 25. An example of removal of multiple triangular wedges 35 along opposing pre-determined edges 25 is seen in FIG. 2. The first step in ruching has been performed on two opposing sides of a bodice by the removal of triangular wedges 35 along the two opposing to-be-ruched pre-determined edges 25. The first step of the ruching has been completed in the to-be-ruched area 13A of FIG. 2. The ruching will be completed during step two of the ruching method.

[0052] As seen in FIG. 3, the first step of the ruching (the removal of triangular wedges 35) has created concave voids 53 with sides defined by the two angled void ring-spider borders 57 meeting at an angle center 33. Since multiple ruches are being formed, after removal of one triangular wedge 35, the adjacent triangular wedge 35 was removed. [0053] The adjacent triangle wedges 35 are not removed contiguously. A portion of the pre determined edge 25 is left remaining intact between the adjacent concave voids 53; this intact portion is a spider/ring margin 54. The spider/ring margin 54 is at least one spider 20 and one ring 30 long and is preferably at least four spiders and rings long (a spider 20, a ring 30, a second spider 20, and a second ring 30), as shown in FIG. 3. For a looser ruching, the spider/ring margin 54 may be left longer. For example, a looser ruching may be desired at the top of a curtain or room divider. In summary, removing two adjacent triangular wedges 35 not only creates two concave voids 53, it also leaves a residual portion of the pre-determined edge 25 between the two concave voids 53, which is the spider/ring margin 54.

[0054] In step two, after completion of step one along the area to be ruched, a banding-piece 12 is used. In overview, the banding-piece 12 is connected to the spider(s) 20 and ring(s) 30 of the multiple spider/ring margins 54 while leaving the spiders and rings in the concave void 53 unattached. This creates a ruche 10 (FIG. 4), which is a pleating or gathering effect in the mesh material. This gives a similar appearance to ruching or ruffling in a traditional woven, knitted, or non-woven fabric. However, the ruched mesh material provides a texture and support that is not provided by ruched traditional fabric.

[0055] As can be seen in FIG. 2, the banding-piece 12 of mesh material used in this second step of the ruching method the banding-piece 12 is much shorter than the section 13A for which only the first step of the ruching has been completed. For example, the banding-piece 12 may be less than half the length of the to-be-ruched section 13A.

[0056] The banding-piece 12 may be formed as part of the mesh portion 56 (as shown in FIG. 2) or may be formed as a separate piece and attached to the mesh portion 56. In the example shown in FIG. 2, the banding-piece 12 is created when the bulk mesh material 55 is formed into the shaped mesh portion 56 of mesh material. However, this is not necessary. Any strip of mesh 55 may be used as the banding-piece 12. For example, because the banding-piece 12 is typically narrow, scraps from the preparation and shaping of the mesh portion 56 may be used.

[0057] In FIG. 3, the first step of the ruching technique has been completed, and the second step is ready to begin. In the second step, the spiders 20 of the mesh banding-piece 12 are to be interconnected with the rings 30 of the spider/ring margin 54, and the spiders 20 of the spider/ring margin 54 are to be interconnected with the rings 30 of the banding-piece 12. In the example of FIG. 3, the spider/ring margin 54 is two spiders 20 and two rings 30 long. Thus, in this example, the two spiders 20 of the banding-piece 12 are interconnected with the two rings 30 of the spider/ring margin 54, and two spiders of the spider/ring margin 54 are interconnected with two rings 30 of the banding-piece 12. In another design, the niching may be less dense, and the spider/ring margin 54 would be longer than two spiders 20 and two rings 30, so more than two spiders 20 and two rings 30 of the spider/ring margin 54 would be connected to the banding- piece 12. Each spider 20 and each ring 30 of the spider/ring margin 54 can be connected to corresponding rings 30 and spiders 20 or (particularly if the spider/ring margin 54 is longer) only a portion of the spiders 20 and rings 30 of the spider/ring margin 54 may be connected. The spiders 20 and rings 30 of the void ring-spider border 57 remain unattached.

[0058] In FIG. 3, the connection line 11A shows that ring 30A is to be connected to spider 20A. The connection line 11B shows that spider 20B is to be connected to ring 30B. The connection line llC shows that ring 30C is to be connected to spider 20C. The connection line 11D shows that spider 20D is to be connected to ring 30D. When these connections are made and the second step is completed, as seen in FIG. 4, the void edges (void ring-spider borders 57) are pulled together to obscure the concave void 53, though they are not connected. This constructs a completed first ruche 10 of the gathered or ruched portion 13 (FIG. 5) of the mesh.

[0059] FIG. 4 shows the stage in which the first ruche 10 has been completed and the first step of the second ruche 10 has been completed. As described in relation to FIG. 3, to complete the second step of the second ruche 10, the spiders 20 and rings 30 of the spider/ring margin 54 (seen in FIG. 3, but not seen in FIG. 4) will be joined to the spiders 20 and rings 30 of the banding-piece 12 adjacent to where the spider/ring margin 54 of the first ruche have been joined to the banding-piece 12.

[0060] Any number of ruches 10 can be created in this manner. The number created may be based on the design of the item or garment to be created.

[0061] When one ruche 10 is to be created without a near or adjacent ruche 10, the remaining portion of pre-determined edge 25 adjacent to the outermost ring or spider of the void ring-spider border 57 at the first side of the concave void 53 and the remaining portion of pre-determined edge 25 adjacent to the outermost ring or spider of the void ring-spider border 57 at the second side of the concave void 53 serve as the spider/ring margins 54. These spider/ring margins 54 are connected in the second step of the ruching technique to the banding-piece 12, just as in the above example, which described multiple ruches 10.

[0062] The designer of the ruching can, when desired, create a tighter tension or a looser tension in the ruching. The tighter tension is created by removing one row of the spider/ring margin 54. Then, instead of the outer row of the spider/ring margin 54 being used to connect to the banding- piece 12, the second, inner row is used as the revised spider/ring margin 54 to be connected. This creates greater tension. To lessen the tension, an outer, additional row of spiders and rings is added to the created row of the spider/ring margin 54. For example, if the created spider/ring margin 54 is two rings and two spiders long, as shown in FIG. 3, a new row of three to four rings and spiders can be added to outside of the created spider/ring margin 54 and can be used as the revised spider/ring margin 54. This creates less tension and more drape.

[0063] FIG. 5 shows a completed garment with over twenty ruchings 10 on opposite sides of the dress bodice. This particular aspect of the invention creates a cowl neck 14 (formed from the pre cowl neck area 14A of FIG. 2) and a front bodice drape that provides bosom support in an elegant manner. This innovative support is inherent in the ruching placement and design, and it is not provided by typical fabrics.

[0064] The second garment construction technique, a method to gather a mesh material to reduce the length of the mesh row, is shown in FIGS. 6, 8-11. This gathering construction technique can be used on garments and other items, but it is illustrated as applied to a garment design. Three aspects of the mesh gathering technique are provided. In the first aspect, an edge gathering technique is disclosed. In the second aspect, a two-way stretch gathering technique is disclosed. In the third aspect, a four-way stretch gathering technique is disclosed.

[0065] When using typical fabrics, such as woven, knitted, or non-woven, it is easy to gather the fabric edge by basting along the edge and shortening the thread within the fabric to slightly bunch the fabric evenly, thereby creating a gather. However, mesh material cannot be sewn like typical fabrics. Therefore, it has previously not been possible to gather the mesh edge. The first aspect of the gathering technique is presented to address this problem.

[0066] In an example shown in FIG. 7, an unmodified mesh top edge 19 of the back of the skirt portion 18 of the dress is shown. This top edge 19 has an undesirably low valley formed at the lowest point of the back edge 19 of the skirt 18. (The longer than desired length of the top edge 19 of the mesh material may occur due to the need to use a length of mesh to fit the wearer’s hips.) To alleviate this problem and to provide a better fit for the wearer, the length of the mesh top edge 19 can be reduced by using the first aspect of the gathering technique.

[0067] In the first aspect of the gathering technique, as seen in the bottom view of an enlarged section of mesh FIG. 6, a filament 45 is run through the edge chain connection column 31, which is the holes within the leg channel 27 formed within each of the closed legs 21 of the outermost row of spiders 20 of the mesh. The length of the filament 45 may be similar to the length of the top edge 19. A portion of the filament 45 (termed the “excess length”) is then drawn out of the holes within the legs 21 of the spiders 20. This results in the legs 21 being pulled toward one another, thereby reducing the edge length by creating a gathering 40, as seen at the top edge 19 in FIG. 8. The degree that the reduction in the length of the edge 19 can be varied ranges from no reduction (where the length of the filament 45 matches the length of the top edge 19) to a small amount of reduction with the spiders pulled slightly together and bunched evenly to a larger amount of reduction in which the spiders are forced more tightly together (where the excess length of the filament 45 is significantly shorter than the length of the top edge 19)

[0068] In one preferred aspect of the invention, the user can adjust the edge length to create a tighter or looser gathering 40. In this aspect, the user can self-create a lower or higher valley at the top edge 19 by reducing the length of the filament 45 that is running through the spider legs 21 and supporting the mesh. In this aspect, at least one connection is supplied (preferably within the interior of the dress) to receive the excess portion of the filament 45. In an example, one end of the filament 45 is fixedly attached to a small clasp 49 (FIG. 8), such as a jewelry snap hook, spring clasp, or hook clasp. The interior of the garment is configured with multiple eyelets, eyes, loops, or other clasp-receiving elements 39, which are shown in FIG. 12 as being attached to or formed within the lining 93 of the dress. The clasp-receiving elements 39 are spaced vertically at different heights. When the small clasp 49 is engaged with a vertically higher clasp-receiving element 39, the length of the top edge 19 is reduced, which raises the valley, as seen in FIG. 8. [0069] In one aspect, the filament 45 is configured with one secured end and one loose end for adjustment. In this aspect the secured end is fixedly attached to the dress, and the loose end includes a fixedly attached clasp 49 for engagement with one of the clasp-receiving elements 39. [0070] In another aspect the filament 45 is loose on both ends. The wearer has the ability to adjust the length of the edge 19 by connecting a connector (such as clasp 49) on one or both ends of the filament 45 to a clasp-receiving element 39 in a manner that maintains the excess filament in a hidden position within the dress.

[0071] In a further aspect, both ends of the filament 45 are fixedly attached by the manufacturer. In this aspect, only the manufacturer is provided with the ability to adjust the length of edge 19. [0072] The filament 45 comprises a long, thin, and flexible fiber, filament, single strand, multi strand, cord, or the like. The filament 45 may be made of natural or synthetic material. In one aspect of the invention, the filament 45 comprises a synthetic monofilament similar to a fishing line having a tensile strength sufficient to gather and secure the edge 19, as well as to bear the weight of the mesh and the stretching that may occur during wearing. In the preferred aspect of the invention, the filament 45 is transparent or translucent, but in another aspect the filament 45 is colored. The transparent or translucent filament 45 is more discreet, which is appropriate for some applications, but the colored filament 45 may be incorporated into some designs to provide contrast or to add interest based on aesthetic and design considerations.

[0073] Thus, the first aspect of the gathering method of the second construction technique provides inconspicuous gathering 40 that adjusts the length of edge 19 without sewing.

[0074] The second aspect of the gathering technique, as seen in FIG. 9, addresses the lack of stretch of a typical mesh garment or article. In this second aspect of the gathering technique, a two-way stretch mesh 42 is created by running the flexible filament 45 through the legs 21 of multiple chain connection columns 31. This is shown in FIG. 9 as a vertical lacing or threading of the filament 45 through chain connection columns 31, with each column of lacing running through spider legs 21 from a first row of spiders and through spider legs 21 from an adjacent row of spiders.

[0075] Variations of the lacing of the filament 45 through multiple chain connection columns 31 are shown in FIG. 9. The multiple chain connection columns 31 may include an edge chain connection column 31, as in the first aspect of the gathering technique, and as is shown on the far right in FIG. 9 as laced with filament 45a. The lacing of multiple chain connection columns 31 may include adjacent rows, shown in FIG. 9 as laced with filaments 45a, 45b, 45c, and 45d. The lacing of multiple chain connection columns 31 may skip one or more rows of spider legs 21 thus allowing one or more intermediate non-laced columns 41 of spider legs 21 to remain unlaced (no filament used). An intermediate non-laced column 41 is shown as the second row of spider legs 21 from the left of FIG. 9. In another variation, the lacing may be run through each and every row of chain connection columns 31. It is noted that the edge chain connection column 31includes only legs of the exterior row of spiders, while an inner chain connection column 31 includes legs of the spider row to the right and legs of the spider row to the left. Thus, the interior chain connection columns 31 have the possibility of lacing twice as many spider legs 21. Though it is preferred that the interior chain connection columns 31 may be laced through each and every spider leg 21 of both the left and right row of spiders, optionally the interior chain connection columns 31 may be laced through less than every spider leg 21.

[0076] The length of the filament 45 may be equal to the length of the chain connection column 31 when initially installed in the fully extended mesh material; but the length of the filament 45 is reduced in length at least slightly when compared to the length of the fully extended mesh to create the stretch mesh. This allows the mesh to be slightly contracted with the spiders and rings somewhat closer together than in the fully extended mesh material. The slightly contracted mesh 42 (along with the length and the flexibility of the filament 45) permit the mesh fabric to be stretched. It is substantially stretchable in the direction that the filament 45 is run, thus providing a two-way stretch mesh material 42 when the filament 45 is laced in parallel chain connection columns 31 only running vertically or horizontally.

[0077] The third aspect of the gathering technique provides a stretch mesh material 42 having a four-way stretch by running one or multiple segments of filament 45 both vertically and horizontally through multiple chain connection columns 31.

[0078] As in the second aspect, the multiple laced chain connection columns 31 may include the edge chain connection column 31, may include adjacent chain connection columns 31, may include some non-adjacent rows (with one or more intermediate non-laced columns 41), or may include each and every chain connection columns 31. The laced spiders of the multiple chain connection columns 31 are brought nearer each other to form a slightly contracted mesh.

Portions of filament 45 running both horizontally and vertically allow the slightly contracted mesh 42 to stretch both horizontally and vertically.

[0079] As seen in FIG. 11, the filament 45 may be used in segments, designated 44a-f, with each segment ending at or near the edge. Alternatively or additionally, the filament 45 may be looped through multiple rows of spider legs 21, as shown in the exemplary filament 45g. Similarly (though not illustrated in FIG. 9), the filaments of the two-way stretch may also be looped by running through one row of spider legs 21 and then turning at an end and running through another row of spider legs 21, as shown by filament 45g.

[0080] The ends of the filaments 45 used in the gathering technique may be secured in various ways, such as by tying a filament to a ring. A preferred method of securing the ends is shown in FIG. 11, which uses a crimp bead 48 to interlock two segments of filament to each other or to lock one filament around a ring. [0081] The two-way or four-way mesh 42 is shown in an application to a garment in FIG. 10.

The stretch mesh may be more contracted as is the mesh 42a in the upper portion of the dress. Or the stretch mesh may be less contracted as is the mesh 42b at the lower portion of the dress. In other designs, the stretch mesh 42 may be only in a portion of the garment, such as the bodice and waist of the dress and may join an unlaced portion of mesh, such as at the skirt of the dress illustrated in FIG. 7. As also seen in FIG. 10, the non-laced columns 41 (which may be vertical or horizontal columns) may be used to create interest or texture in a mostly stretchable mesh material.

[0082] The third garment construction technique is shown in FIGS. 12-19. Because mesh material cannot be sewn with a sewing machine, typical strap adjustment techniques, such as buttons used with buttonholes, cannot be sewn into mesh material. Additionally, since mesh material is typically used for upscale designs, hiding elements of length adjustments (such as strap length adjustments) is highly desirable. Three aspects of the adjustable strap attachment system 70 of the third garment construction technique of the present invention are presented. They are usable with mesh material 55 to provide a convenient and easy way to adjust strap 90 lengths, to adjust other lengths, and to make other adjustable closures (such as belts and purse closures). Though particularly applicable to mesh material, the strap adjustment technique can be used with other fashion fabrics besides mesh material.

[0083] In this length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 of the third garment construction technique, the adjustable strap 90 has an outer fashion fabric (which may be mesh material, as illustrated, or fabric material) and an inner lining 93. When there are multiple straps, the length- adjustable strap attachment system 70 may be duplicated on one or more of the multiple straps. [0084] The length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 is used on a strap 90 with at least one end of the strap not fixedly attached to the article carrying the strap or straps. In the example shown in FIG. 12, the garment strap has a fixedly connected strap end 91 and an opposing strap adjustment end 99. The connected strap end 91 is fixedly attached to or formed integrally with the garment. The opposing strap adjustment end 99 connects via the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 of the present invention.

[0085] The length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 for each strap 90 comprises a G-clasp 60, a tether 80, a tether fastening component 85, strap fastening components 95 corresponding to the tether fastening component 85, and a receiving channel 75 fixedly attached to the garment to receive a portion of the G-clasp 60.). In the three aspects disclosed, the tether G-clasp end is engaged with said outer bar. In the first and third aspects, the G-clasp end is fixedly attached to the closed outer bar. In the second aspect, the tether G-clasp end is threaded behind the closed outer bar by being run through the closed area 64; when the tether fastening component 85 attaches to one of the strap fastening components 95 the G-clasp is positioned to achieve a shorter or longer strap.

[0086] In the first aspect of the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 shown in FIGS. 12- 16, the strap fastening components 95 may comprise a set of eyes (FIG. 14) to receive a tether fastening component 85, which comprises a hook (FIG. 14).

[0087] In the second aspect of the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 shown in FIG. 17, the strap fastening components 95 may comprise a set of buttons that are engageable with a tether fastening component 85, which comprises a loop carried by a piece of fabric.

[0088] In the third aspect of the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 shown in FIGS. 18-19, the strap fastening components 95 may comprise a set of buttons that are engageable with a tether fastening component 85, which comprises a buttonhole carried by a swatch of fabric attached to the G-clasp 60.

[0089] In the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70, a receiving channel 75 is fixedly attached to the garment (or other article). The receiving channel 75 has an interior tube-like opening that accommodates and receives an open outer bar 69 of the G-clasp 60. The receiving channel 75 may be formed substantially of fabric, metal, or plastic material. In a preferred example, shown in FIGS. 7, 12, 13, the receiving channel 75 is fashioned as a fabric tube sewn onto the top edge 19 of the back of the dress.

[0090] Best seen in FIG. 15, the G-clasp 60 includes a closed area 64 and an open area 68. The closed area 64 is defined by the closed outer bar 61, the middle bar 65, a side bar 63, and an upper (in the orientation of FIG. 15) portion of the connecting bar 62. The open portion 68 is defined by the lower portion of the connecting bar 62, the open outer bar 69, and a small securing projection 67 affixed at a generally right angle to the open outer bar 69. The securing projection 67 does not extend fully to the middle bar 65 but leaves an opening 66 that allows the fabric of the receiving channel 75 to slip into the open area 68 of the G-clasp 60, yet the perpendicularly projecting securing projection 67 reduces the chance that the receiving channel 75 will inadvertently be extracted from the open area 68.

[0091] The tether 80 preferably comprises a piece of fabric that has a width less than the width of the strap 90, so as to remain hidden behind the strap 90 when in use. The edges of the tether 80 are preferably finished or the tether 80 may be formed as a flat tubular structure with the unfinished edges turned inside the tubular structure. [0092] As shown in FIGS. 12-14, 16-19, one end of the tether 80, (the G-clasp tether end 87, which is adjacent to the G-clasp) is engaged with the closed outer bar 61 of the G-clasp 60, such as by wrapping the fabric around the outer bar 61 and sewing it with seam 86 (FIGS. 11, 19) or looping it around the outer bar 61 (FIG. 17). The opposite end of the tether, the fastener tether end 89, is preferably finished and is configured with a tether fastening component 85 that corresponds with complementary strap fastening components 95.

[0093] In the first aspect of the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70, as shown in FIGS. 12-14, the tether fastening component 85 may be a hook and the strap fastening components 95 may be a set of eyes, eyelets, or grommets that accommodate receipt of the hook. The strap fastening components 95 are spaced at different distances from the end 99 of the strap and disposed on or within the strap lining 93 to facilitate the length adjustment. The corresponding fastening components are used to adjust the tether to lengthen or shorten the strap depending upon the disposition of the particular one of the fastening components 95 to which the tether fastening component 85 is engaged. In the example shown in FIG. 13, if the tether fastening component 85 is engaged with a higher fastening component 95, the strap will be shortened.

[0094] In the second aspect of the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 shown in FIG. 17, multiple strap fastening component 95 buttons may be sewn to the lining 93 at different distances from the end 99 of the strap. A proximal end 82 of a piece of fabric forming the tether 80 is sewn to the interior lining 93 and looped toward the strap end 99, inserted under the closed outer bar 61, pushed through the closed area 64, and then turned to double back on the outside of the closed outer bar 61. A loop (serving as the tether fastening component 85) is sewn onto the distal end 81 of the tether 80. The tether 80is no wider than the strap and is preferably narrower than the strap, under which it lies when in use. The loop is formed of a flexible or stretchable material, such as elastic cord, braid, or band, which can easily slip over one of the buttons. The button disposed at the correct position to achieve the strap length desired is selected, and the loop is engaged with this selected button of the button set. The loop engaging with the selected button pulls the G-clasp upward or releases the G-clasp downward to lengthen or shorten the strap. The position at which the G-clasp is held is dependent upon the button chosen. In this second aspect, the tether is attached to the G-clasp by being looped through the closed area 64, but it is not fixedly attached to the G-clasp as in the first and third aspects of the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70. [0095] In the third aspect of the length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 shown in FIGS. 18-19, as in the second aspect, multiple strap fastening component 95 (buttons) may be sewn to the lining 93 at different distances from the end 99 of the strap. In this third aspect, as in the first aspect the G-clasp tether end 87 is fixedly attached to the closed outer bar 61 of the G- clasp 60, such as by wrapping the fabric around the outer bar 61 and sewing it with seam 86. The opposite end of the tether is preferably finished. In contrast to the first two aspects, a buttonhole (serving as a tether fastening component 85) is sewn into the middle of the tether 80. The buttonhole corresponds in size to the buttons 95. The buttonhole is engaged with a button at the desired height, thus serving to lengthen or shorten the strap by moving the position of the G- clasp, which is dependent upon the selected button of the button set chosen to engage with the buttonhole.

[0096] The lining 93 and the tether 80 may be formed of any woven, knitted, or non-woven fabric that can be configured with the strap fastening components 95 and the tether fastening component 85, respectively.

[0097] To attach the strap 90 to the dress, the open outer bar 69 of the G-clasp is run through the receiving channel 75 with the edge of the receiving channel 75 entering opening 66. When the channel 75 is fully inserted into the G-clasp 60, the top of the receiving channel 75 falls into the bottom of the open portion 68 and is restrained from exiting the G-clasp 60 by the perpendicularly attached securing projection 67. The G-clasp 60 (with the tether 80) is then held firmly to the receiving channel 75, but the end 99 of the strap 90 can be freely moved to adjust the length of the strap 60. When the desired length is determined, the tether fastening component 85 is engaged with the proper one of the strap fastening components 95 (disposed on the interior lining 93 of the strap) to hold the strap 90 in place at the desired length. In the example shown in FIG. 16, an eye defined by eye edges 96 serves as the strap fastening component 95.

[0098] In the example shown in FIG. 13, the tether 80 is engaged with the G-clasp closed outer bar 61, and the G-clasp open outer bar 69 is fastened to receiving channel 75. The strap 90, which is outside the tether 80, is run from in front of the tether 80, then through the G-clasp closed portion 64 between the closed outer bar 61 and the middle bar 65, then behind the middle bar 65 and the receiving channel 75, and into the interior of the dress.

[0099] Though the garment construction techniques have been disclosed separately for ease of discussion, multiple ones are usable together, as is illustrated in FIG. 8, which shows a gathering technique and a length-adjustable strap attachment system 70 utilized in the same garment. [0100] The use of these garment construction techniques will allow mesh material to be used more widely and will allow the creation of more interesting designs using mesh material. Through the use of these garment construction techniques, ruching is created to allow the mesh to adapt to the shapes of the human body; gathering is usable for ruffling or to increase drape or created stretchable mesh; and the length adjustable attachment, disconnection, and reattachment of portions of a garment is enabled.

[0101] Since many modifications, variations, and changes in detail can be made to the described preferred embodiments of the invention, it is intended that all matters in the foregoing description and shown in the accompanying drawings be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense. Thus, the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents.