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Title:
IMPROVED TOILET FLUSHING SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2021/026389
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A toilet flushing system comprising a cylindrical receiver into which flush water is received through a fill valve; a float operating within a float chamber that is fluidly connected to said cylindrical receiver to open and close said fill valve according to the water level in said cylindrical receiver; and a displacer rotatably attached to an axis inside said cylindrical receiver to displace any required fraction of water from said cylindrical receiver into a bowl relative to the angle of rotation.

Inventors:
PRASAD HARI (US)
Application Number:
PCT/US2020/045277
Publication Date:
February 11, 2021
Filing Date:
August 06, 2020
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
PRASAD HARI (US)
International Classes:
E03D1/30; E03D1/24
Foreign References:
US20180135285A12018-05-17
US20190071857A12019-03-07
US20170086628A12017-03-30
US20140245532A12014-09-04
US20020063227A12002-05-30
US4230145A1980-10-28
US3922729A1975-12-02
Download PDF:
Claims:
What is claimed is

1. A toilet flushing system comprising a cylindrical receiver into which flush water is received through a fill valve; a float operating within a float chamber that is fluidly connected to said cylindrical receiver to open and close said fill valve according to the water level in said cylindrical receiver; and a displacer rotatably attached to an axis inside said cylindrical receiver to displace any required fraction of water from said cylindrical receiver into a bowl relative to the angle of rotation.

2. A toilet flushing system comprising a cylindrical receiver into which flush water is received through a fill valve; a float operating within a float chamber that is fluidly connected to said cylindrical receiver to open and close said fill valve according to water level in said cylindrical receiver; a displacer rotatably attached to an axis inside said cylindrical receiver to displace any required fraction of water from said cylindrical receiver into a bowl relative to the angle of rotation; a master valve connected upstream and in series to said fill valve; and a float operating in a leak chamber into which leak water is collected to open or close said master valve.

3. A toilet flushing system comprising a cylindrical receiver into which flush water is received through a fill valve; a float operating inside a float chamber that is fluidly connected to said cylindrical receiver to open and close said fill valve according to the water level in said cylindrical receiver; a displacer rotatably attached to an axis inside said cylindrical receiver to displace any required fraction of water from said cylindrical receiver into a bowl relative to the angle of rotation; a master valve connected upstream and in series to said fill valve; and a master float operating in a leak chamber into which leak water is collected to open or close said master valve. and an alert-reset bar attached to said float raises up to alert the closing of said master valve.

4. A toilet flushing system comprising a container installed over a bowl; a receiver rotatably installed inside said container into which flush water is received; a normally open fill valve closed by the movement of said trough receiver; a master valve connected upstream and in series with said fill valve; a tilt tray to collect leak water to close master valve during a leak; and an alert-reset bar attached to tilt tray to alert a leak and to temporarily open master valve when depressed.

Description:
TITLE

Improved toilet flushing system.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to toilet or urinal flushing systems.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Today’s most commonly used toilet flushing systems have the following short comings that need to be solved:

• Toilets are prone to leak.

• Small water leaks from the tank into the bowl or urinal goes unidentified unless close attention is paid.

• No visible or audible alerts when water from the flush tank leaks into the bowl;

• Identified water leaks often get ignored due to apathy or financial restraints of the user resulting in water wastage;

• Only two choices exist regarding the quantity of flush water dispensed into the bowl, half or full;

• Due to government mandated water restrictions reduced water usage per flush the efficiency of flushing is diminished;

• Condensation (sweating) occurs on the toilet tank due to the temperature difference between the tank and the surrounding whereby the condensate drains onto the floor resulting in water damage;

• It is generally expensive to replace failed components due to the cost of components and or the cost of professional labor.

• Flush handle is subject to contamination when activated by unclean fingers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention is based on the “Failure Mode and Effects Analysis” abbreviated as FMEA, a tool used in the design and manufacturing industry. According to this the components of a commonly used toilet flushing system are analyzed. The toilet flushing system commonly used today consists of a reservoir, a flush valve operated by a lever and a water fill valve controlled by a float.

Failure mode and effects analysis is performed on the components the failure of which result in water wastage.

Flush valve: A valve that is normally located at the bottom of the tank with a flapper and seat. Due to deterioration of materials or physical deformation or entrapment of foreign object between the sealing surface, flapper valves leak.

Water fill valve: leak due to deterioration of seal or engagement.

In this invention a backup valve located upstream of the fill valve closes the water supply in case the fill valve continues to allow water passage after being fully closed. Float: It is the user’s responsibility to install the float. Any error in installation or bending of the float rod will result in overflow of the reservoir in to the bowl. It is likely the overflow of the reservoir is unnoticed.

This invention provides a toilet flushing system that solves the problems listed above.

This invention; eliminates the flapper seal between the tank and the bowl that are prone to leak; uses the leaking water to prevent further leaks; alert when leakage occurs; allows the user to reset the system to fill the reservoir for every flush after the system’s water flow is shut off; urges early action by the user in case of water leakage due to the inconvenience of resetting each flush; can be added into existing conventional toilet flushing systems; eliminates condensation on the water tank surface occurring in existing systems; can be mounted at a higher elevation than that of a ceramic tank that is mounted right on top of the bowl. Water from higher elevation increases the velocity in which water enters the bowl resulting in better flushing of bowl surface. This is especially true when the quantity of the flushing water is restricted; allows the use of more than one reservoir to eliminate wait time between flushes or if additional water is required for a flush; allows full flush or partial flush of any fractional quantity compared to half or full flush capability of currently existing flushing system; can be operated by an electronic control system including touch free operation.

Prior art

Today’s toilet flushing systems do not provide a comprehensive solution.

Only a dual flush mode is available to conserve water is available. This invention allows the use of any quantity desired as against the half or full dispensing offered by the dual flush. The dual flush option requires a separate system whereas this invention does not. The patents that teach the art of shutting down the water flow in case of a leak puts a user in a predicament of not being able to flush since they do not teach methods to intermittently override the disablement of the flushing system.

No toilet flushing system that eliminates all failure modes in a simplistic arrangement of systems that is cost effective is available today.

A toilet flushing system that does not use the flapper valve system is siphoning the flush water into the bowl.

In summary, there is no commonly known toilet flushing system is totally leak proof. Brief description of the drawings

Fig.l is a prismatic view of an embodiment of flushing system and bowl.

Fig.2 is an exploded prismatic view of flushing system of Fig.l.

Fig.3 is a top view of receiver in Fig. 2 ready for being filled.

Fig.4 is a top view of receiver in Fig. 2 partially flushed.

Fig.5 is a top view of receiver in Fig. 2 fully flushed.

Fig.6. is an elevation view of the receiver in Fig. 2 showing water levels.

Fig 6A is an elevation view of the receiver in Fig.2 showing alert-reset bar.

Fig.7 is a prismatic view of another embodiment of flushing system and bowl.

Fig.8 is an exploded prismatic view of flushing system of Fig.7.

Fig.9 is an elevation view of the receiver in Fig. 8 showing water levels.

Fig.10 is an elevation view of the displacer in Fig.8 moving up.

Fig.11 is an elevation view of the displacer in Fig.8 moving down.

Fig.12 is a prismatic view of another embodiment of flushing system and bowl. Fig.13 is an exploded prismatic view of flushing system of Fig.12.

Fig.14 is an elevation view of the flushing system shown in Fig.12.

Fig.15 is a perspective view of the solenoid valves in Fig.13.

Fig.16 is a perspective view of displacer pad shown in Fig.13.

Fig.17 is a perspective view of an electronic control system shown in Fig.13.

Fig.18 is a prismatic view of yet another embodiment of flushing system and bowl. Fig.19 is an exploded prismatic view of flushing system of Fig.18.

Fig.20 is a perspective view of flow control system of Fig.l 8.

Fig.21 is a perspective view of flow control system of Fig.20.

Fig.20 is a perspective partial view of flow control system of Fig.17.

Fig.21 is a perspective partial view of flow control system of Fig.17. Fig.22 is a perspective view of flow control system shown in Fig.20.

Fig.23 is a perspective view of flow control system shown in Fig.20.

Fig.24 is the end view of receiver in Fig.20.

Fig.23 is the end view of receiver in Fig.20.

Fig.24 is the end view of flow control system in Fig.20.

Fig.25 is the end view of flow control system in Fig.20.

Fig.26 is the end view of flushing system in Fig.20.

Fig.27 is the end view of flushing system in Fig.20.

Fig.28 is the end view of the reservoir and flow control system in Fig.20.

Fig.29 is the end view of the reservoir and flow control system in Fig.20.

Fig.30 is the end view of the reservoir and flow control system in Fig.20.

Fig.31 is a schematic of electrical valve control.

Fig.32 is a schematic of electronic control system for flush handle motor.

Fig.33 is a schematic of electrical circuit for alert and reset after solenoid master control valve. Fig.34 is a control logic for operation of flushing system.

Fig.35 is a schematic of variations in means of fill valve closing for any embodiment.

Fig.36 is a schematic of variations in means of master valve closing for any embodiment.

Fig.37 is a schematic of variations in means of alert activation for any embodiment.

Fig.38 is a schematic of variations in means of master valve reset after alert activation.

Fig. 39 is a schematic of variations in means of flush valve activation. Detailed description of the invention.

The components used in this invention include a receiver, displacer, master valve, fill valve, leak arrest system and alert -reset. These components can be assembled in numerous combinations. The difference the types of each component and the method in which they are linked contribute to the variations in the multitude of embodiments.

The following are the variations in the components in the system.

The receivers and displacers can be of different shapes and sizes.

The methods of displacing water from the receiver for flushing such as tilting the receiver or using a displacer. The actuation mechanisms of flushing using a handle, or a motor operated by a switch or an electronic control system. The electronic control system with inputs including push buttons, touch screen, voice, light, radio signals, blue tooth, etc.

Valve types include plug valve, diaphragm valve, globe valve, gate valve that are operated mechanically or electromechanically.

The means of actuating valves. As an example, when the receiver is filled to set water level the fill valve can be closed directly by the receiver’s movement or through a float or through electrical means such as switches or through sensors, trans-receivers or through computer controls, through wires or wireless means.

Alert of a leaking system include visual and or audio or wireless communication.

Expected functional requirements in combinations that include fractional flushing, leak arrest, leak alert and reset, hands free operation, condensation prevention, and water conservation.

The embodiments of the invention described herein are not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to precise forms disclosed. Rather, the embodiments selected for description have been chosen to enable one skilled in the art to practice the invention.

Fig.34 is a logic control diagram that explains the operation of the embodiments with leak alert and reset.

Fig.35 shows the means of closing the fill valve after the set amount of water is added to the receiver.

Fig.36 shows the means of activation of the master valve when leak occurs.

Fig.37 shows the means of activation of alert when a leak occurs.

Fig.38 shows the means of closing the master valve during a reset.

Fig 39 shows the means of flushing In one embodiment

Fig. l is a perspective view of the cylindrical receiver flushing system 20 installed in a fluidly communicative manner above the toilet bowl 10.

Fig.2 is an exploded view of the cylindrical receiver flushing system 20. A water source for the flushing system is established through a connector 21 attached to a master valve 22 which is normally open. A fill valve 23 which is normally open is connected down stream of master valve 22. The fill valve 23 discharges water into fill chamber 24 that is fluidly connected to a cylindrical receiver 25 through an opening passage 26. The fill valve 23 discharges a small stream of water into the bowl 10 through a branch tube, not shown in figure, during the filling operation. It is obvious the cylindrical receiver 25 and fill chamber 24 maintain same water level during the filling operation. A fill valve float 27 is attached to the fill valve 23 in a manner to open and close it. The fill valve float 27 moves up and down in the fill chamber 24 according to the water level in fill chamber 24. When the water in the fill chamber 24 reaches a set level the fill valve float 27 completely closes the fill valve 23. The connection between the fill valve float 27 and the fill valve 23 can be adjusted to establish the fill level to desired limit. Now the system is ready for flushing operation. During flushing operation water from the cylindrical receiver 25 is expelled and guided into the bowl 10 through a flush water discharge 31.

An axis rod 28 inside of cylindrical receiver 25 supports a displacer pad 29. The displacer pad 29 rotates on the axis rod 28. The bottom end of the displacer pad 29 sweeps the bottom of the cylindrical receiver 25 floor. The side edge of the displacer pad 29 sweeps the cylindrical wall of the cylindrical receiver 25. The bottom edge of a fixed pad 30 is at the floor of the cylindrical receiver 25 and one of its vertical edge is attached to the cylindrical wall of the cylindrical receiver 25. The other vertical edge of the fixed pad 30 is at a very close proximity of the axis portion of the displacer pad 29. The orientation of the fixed pad 30 and displacer pad 29 within the cylindrical receiver 25 and the flushing operation is shown in fig.3, fig.4 and fig· 5.

Fig.3 shows the water flowing through the valves into the fill chamber 24 and into the cylindrical receiver 25 via the passage 26. When the water flow stops when the set level of water is reached. In Fig.l a torsion spring 32, one end of which is attached to the lid 33 and the other end is attached to the displacer pad 29.

Fig.3 also represents the system ready for flushing operation as the displacer pad 29 oriented in its home position by the torsion spring 32. The flushing operation is carried out by rotating the displacer pad 29 from its home position. The volumetric space confined by fixed pad 30 and displacer pad 29 and cylindrical wall in the within section of angle a is defined as space a and similarly the space occupied in the angle b is identified as space b. Fig.4 shows the displacer pad 29 rotated thereby increasing the space a and decreasing space b. The increase in space decreases the water level in the space and the decrease in space increases the water level in the spaces. When space b decreases during the rotation of the displacer pad 29 water overflows into the discharge 31. It is imperative a small quantity of water seeps into space a through the gap between the pads and walls. No water flows between spaces over the top edge of the fixed and displacer pads.

Fig 5 shows the displacer pad 29 is rotated very near to end position where angle a is very low and angle b is as high as possible. Most of the water in space b has overflowed into the bowl. After this stage the displacer pad 29 is brought back to the home position, as described earlier, by the torsion spring 32.

Partial flushing: An advantage of this flushing arrangement is the capability to flush out any fraction of the water in space b. In Fig.1 a flush handle 34 attached to the displacer pad 29 hovers over a graduated guide 35 on the lid 33. The user, guided by the graduated guide 35 , can turn the flush handle 34 to dispense the required amount. This promotes water conservation as it avoids the excessive water usage for small flush requirements.

Leak prevention: A leak is defined as any water that flows uncontrolled into the receiver. The leak could occur due to many reasons including improper setting of the fill level, leakage in connections of the valves, failure of the fill valve to completely close, fill float movement obstruction, etc. In Fig.1 a leak chamber 36 is established below the master valve 22 and is separated from the fill chamber 24 by a partition 37. A master float 38 is attached to the master valve 22 moves up and down to close or open the master valve 22 respectively. Leak water flows into the leak chamber 36 from a leak directly above the leak chamber 36 and over the top edge of the partition 36. Increasing water level in the leak chamber 36 lifts the master float 38 up and fully closes the master valve 22. The water to the system is shut off and system is deprived of water. Once the leak is rectified, the leak chamber can be emptied and the master valve 22 opens for regular operation. In Fig.6 the fill level for the receiver 90, overflow level 91 across the partition 37 and flush water discharge level 92 over the cylindrical receiver 25 are shown. It is to be noted that the discharge level 92 is reached only in space b shown in Fig.3, 4 and 5 which is isolated from the fill chamber 24. This is to ensure the flush water does not enter leak chamber 36.

Alert and temporary reset: In Fig.1 an alert-reset bar 39, attached to the master float 38, moves up along the float. In Fig 6A when the master float 38 rises and shuts the master valve 22, not shown in figure for clarity, the upper end of the alert-reset bar rises above the lid 33 by a height h and provides a visual alert. Depressing the tip of the alert -reset bar 39 in turn pushes the master float 38 down and opens the master valve 22 and establishes water flow through it. But, when the tip of the alert-reset bar 39 is let go it no longer keeps the master float 38 down and the master valve 22 is closed. This arrangement is a temporary relief until the leak is attended to.

Detailed description of another embodiment

Fig.7 is a perspective view of the vertical displacer flushing system 50 installed in a fluidly communicative manner above the toilet bowl 10.

Fig.8 is an exploded view of the vertical displacer flushing system 50. A water source for the flushing system is established through a connector 51 attached to a master valve 52 which is normally open. A fill valve 53 which is normally open is connected down stream of master valve 52. The fill valve 53 discharges water into fill chamber 54 that is fluidly connected to a receiver 55 through an opening passage 56. The fill valve 53 discharges a small stream of water into the bowl 10 through a branch tube, not shown in figure, during the filling operation. It is obvious the receiver 55 and fill chamber 54 maintain same water level during the filling operation. A fill valve float 57 is attached to the fill valve 53 in a manner to open and close it. The fill valve float 57 moves up and down in the fill chamber 54 according to the water level in fill chamber 54. When the water in the fill chamber 54 reaches a set level the fill valve float 57 completely closes the fill valve 53. The connection between the fill valve float 57 and the fill valve 53 can be adjusted to establish the fill level to desired limit. Now the system is ready for flushing operation. During flushing operation water from the receiver 55 is expelled and guided into the bowl 10 through a flush water discharge 61.

A displacer pad 59, is oriented horizontally, with its edges matching the cross section of the receiver 55. These edges sweep the walls of the receiver 55. The displacer pad 59 is moves up and down by a flexible cable 60, one end of it is attached to the displacer pad 59 and the other end is attached to a flush handle 64. The flush handle rides inside a graduated guide channel 65 attached to the lid 63. The cable 60 is rides over a pulley 68 for easy operation.

The system is ready for flushing when the receiver is filled to set level of water. By moving the flush handle 64 along the graduated guide 65, the displacer pad is moved up and down by the cable 60. The downward movement of the displacer pad 59 is enabled by its weight or by additional forces such as springs, not shown in the figures.

During upward movement of the displacer pad the water above the pad is overflows into the bowl 10 guided by a discharge 61. The partial vacuum created below the displacer pad 59 is compensated by flow of water from fill chamber 54 under the displacer pad 59 through the passage 56. To enhance a faster downward movement of the displacer pad 59 check pads 67 are provided on the top surface that open during the downward movement and close during upward movement. Fig 9 shows a check pad 67 fully closed during upward movement and Fig.10 shows the check pad 67 lifted to allow the water flow through the displacer pad 59. The tabs under the check pad 67 prevent the tab from disengaging from the displacer pad 59.

Partial flushing: An advantage of this flushing arrangement is the capability to flush out any fraction of the water above the pad by moving the flush handle 64 only as required.

Leak prevention: A leak is defined as any water that flows uncontrolled into the receiver. The leak could occur due to many reasons including improper setting of the fill level, leakage in connections of the valves, failure of the fill valve to completely close, fill float movement obstruction, etc. In Fig.8 a leak chamber 66 is established below the master valve 52 and is separated from the fill chamber 54 by a partition 67. A master float 58 is attached to the master valve 52 moves up and down to close or open the master valve 52 respectively. Leak water flows into the leak chamber 66 from a leak directly above the leak chamber 66 and over the top edge of the partition 67. Increasing water level in the leak chamber 66 lifts the master float 68 up and fully closes the master valve 52. The water to the system is shut off and system is deprived of water. Once the leak is rectified, the leak chamber can be emptied and the master valve 52 opens for regular operation. In Fig.9 the fill level for the receiver 190, overflow level 191 across the partition 67 and flush water discharge level 192 over the receiver 55 are shown. It is to be noted that the discharge level 92 is reached only in space above the displacer pad 59 which is isolated from the fill chamber 54. This is to ensure the flush water does not enter leak chamber 66.

Alert and temporary reset: In Fig.8 an alert-reset bar 69, attached to the master float 58, moves up along the float. When the master float 58 rises and shuts the master valve 52, not shown in figure for clarity, the upper end of the alert-reset bar rises above the lid 63 by a height h, and provides a visual alert similar to the set up shown in Fig.6A with the only difference in the receiver style. Depressing the tip of the alert-reset bar 69 in turn pushes the master float 58 down and opens the master valve 52 and establishes water flow through it. But, when the tip of the alert-reset bar 69 is let go it no longer keeps the master float 58 down and the master valve 52 is closed. This arrangement is a temporary relief until the leak is attended to.

Detailed description of yet another embodiment

Fig.12 is a perspective view of the trough receiver flushing system 70 installed in a fluidly communicative manner above the toilet bowl 10. Fig 12A is another perspective view of the trough receiver flushing system.

Fig.13 is an exploded view of the trough receiver flushing system 70. A water source for the flushing system is established through a connector 71 attached to a master solenoid valve 72 which is normally open. A fill solenoid valve 73 which is normally open is connected down stream of master solenoid valve 72. The fill solenoid valve 73 discharges water into fill chamber 74 that is fluidly connected to a trough receiver 75 through an opening passage 76. The opening passage is provided with a check flap 293, in Fig.14, that will prevent water flow from the trough receiver 75 to the fill chamber 74. The bottom of the trough receiver is circular. The fill solenoid valve 73 discharges a small stream of water into the bowl 10 through a branch tube, not shown in figure, during the filling operation. The trough receiver 75 and fill chamber 74 maintain same water level during the filling operation. A fill solenoid valve switch 77 is attached to the fill solenoid valve 73 in a manner to open and close it.

The fill solenoid valve float switch 77 moves up to electrically close a circuit providing a voltage to the solenoid of the fill valve and moves down to open the circuit and deenergize the solenoid valve is in the fill chamber 74 according to the water level in fill chamber 74.

When the water in the fill chamber 74 reaches a set level the fill solenoid valve float switch 77 energizes the fill solenoid valve 73. The range of movement of the fill valve switch can be adjusted to establish the fill level to desired limit.

When the trough receiver 75 is filled to set level, the system is ready for flushing operation. During flushing operation water from the trough receiver 75 is expelled and guided into the bowl 10 through an enclosure 81.

A displacer pad 79 used in this embodiment is of a rectangular shape with four edges. One edge is attached to a shaft supported across the trough receiver 75 concentric to the cylindrical axis of the trough. The other 3 edges sweep the vertical walls and cylindrical wall of the trough. When the displacer pad 79 is rotated on its axis it displaces the water from the trough.

The system is ready for flushing when the trough receiver is filled to set level of water. A flush handle 84 is attached to the displacer pad’s 79 shaft end. By rotating the flush handle 84 hovering over a graduated guide 85 on the enclosure 81, the displacer pad 79 is also rotated. One edge of the trough receiver 75 on the cylindrical face determines the discharge level of the trough and the rotation of the discharge pad 79 towards it expels water at that edge. The displacer pad’s 79 home position is established for a maximum quantity of water and the pad is returned to home position by a torsion spring 82. One free end of the torsion spring 82 is attached to the receiver 75 and the other end is attached to the flush handle 84. The torsion spring 82 is biased towards the home position. The rotation of the displacer pad within the trough section is limited by two limit bars 88 installed across the trough receiver 75.

In Fig. 16 a flexible check strip 90 is attached to cover an opening in the displacer pad 79. During the rotation of the displacer pad 79 towards the discharge end of the trough the check strip swings to close the opening and swings to close during the reverse rotation. This enables the expulsion of water, if any, remaining in the trough during motion towards home position.

Partial flushing: An advantage of this flushing arrangement is the capability to flush out any fraction of the water in the trough by measured rotation of the displacer pad 79.

Leak prevention: A leak is defined as any water that flows uncontrolled into the trough receiver. The leak could occur due to many reasons including improper setting of the fill level, leakage in connections of the solenoid valves, failure of the fill solenoid valve to completely close, fill float switch movement obstruction, etc. In Fig.13 a leak chamber 86 is located below the master solenoid valve 72 and is separated from the fill chamber 74 by a partition 87. In Fig.15 a master float switch 78, shown, is attached to the master solenoid valve 72 moves up and down to close or open the electrical circuit that energizes the master solenoid valve 72 respectively. Leak water flows into the leak chamber 86 from a leak directly above the leak chamber 86 and over the top edge of the partition 87. Increasing water level in the leak chamber 86 lifts the master float switch 88 up and closes an electrical circuit to energize the master solenoid valve 52. The water to the system is shut off and system is deprived of water. Once the leak is rectified, the leak chamber can be emptied and the master solenoid valve 52 opens for regular operation. In Fig.14 the fill level for the trough receiver 290, overflow level 291 across the partition 67 and flush water discharge level 292 over the trough receiver 75 are shown. It is to be noted that the discharge level 292 is reached only in space above the displacer pad 79 which is isolated from the fill chamber 74. The water level in the fill chamber 74 drops during the flushing operation. This is to ensure the flush water does not enter leak chamber 86.

Alert and reset in the event of master solenoid valve activation:

A bulb 103 is wired in parallel to the master valve solenoid lights up when the master solenoid valve 72 is energized thus alerting the shutting down of the flushing system. To override the shutting down of the system a push button switch that opens the circuit that powers the master solenoid valve 72 is pressed. The master valve solenoid is deenergized thereby opening the valve until the push button is released.

Electronic control system applicable to this embodiment

A programmable electronic control system is used in conjunction with the manual operation of the flush handle to make the system smart and touch free activation. The electronic control system 101 comprises a power source, a computer control board with inputs including touch pad, microphone, switch, etc. This control system is programmed to operate a controllable motor, such as a stepper motor, based on input to the control system. The feedback from the motor, such as load current, input from position sensor, etc. are also used to control the motor. The motor is bidirectional so that the displacer pad can be rotated in either direction. This control system installed on the lid 83 and wired to the solenoid valves, not shown in figures for clarity. A drive belt 107 connects the motor 106 shaft and the displacer pad 79 shaft. The tension on the drive belt 107 is optimized so that the flush handle 84 can be used to flush while the electronic control system 101 is active. The programmable controller is can be programmed to respond to commands through microphone 105 for voice activation, or touch pad 102 for touch control.

Fig.31 is a schematic diagram of circuit to activate the solenoid valve in which a voltage source V actuates a solenoid valve SVNO which is normally open and is closed when energized by closing the circuit with switch SW.

Fig.32 is a schematic diagram of a circuit to activate a motor M used in flushing controlled by an electronic control system powered by a voltage source V.

Fig.33 is a schematic diagram of a circuit to alert and reset a leak. A normally open solenoid valve SVNO is powered by a voltage source V. A light bulb L, wired in parallel to the solenoid valve SVNO, is lit up when the switch SWNO is closed because of a leak. A manual push button switch SWNC opens the circuit for reset operation.

Detailed description of yet another embodiment

Fig.18 is a perspective view of the rolling receiver flushing system 20 placed in a fluidly communicative manner above the toilet bowl 10.

Fig.19 is an exploded view of rolling receiver flushing system 120 shown in fig.18. A rolling receiver support 121 that provides support for rolling receiver 122 to smoothly roll on an axis. A flush water channel 123 is attached to the rolling receiver support 121. The purpose of this channel is to provide a path for the flush water dispensed from the rolling receiver 122 into the bowl. Below the rolling receiver 122 is a rolling receiver flow control system 124 that controls the flow of water into rolling receiver 122. A flush handle 401 is attached to the rolling receiver 122 for rolling it on its axis. The flush handle hovers over a graduated decal 402 to guide the user regarding the extent of flushing.

A rolling receiver support 121 showing receiver axis support 131, a support feature for the rolling receiver 122 and rolling receiver leak water tray support 132, a support feature for rolling receiver leak water tray axis pin 146.

Filling operation of rolling receiver 122.

Fig.20 is a perspective view of the rolling receiver flow control system 124 that shows the flow of water through the system and water is delivered to rolling receiver 122 and flush water channel 123 (not shown in this figure). The water trap in some types of toilet bowls may need supplemental water to keep the trap functional. Therefore, water is added directly into the bowl during the filling of the container. The rolling receiver flow control system 124 is attached to rolling receiver support 121, not shown in figures.

Fig.21 is a perspective view of the rolling receiver flow control system 124. Water source connector 140 is connected to rolling receiver master valve 141 which is normally open and controls the flow to rolling receiver fill valve 142 which is also normally open. The valve is closed when the pin is depressed. These are typical diaphragm valves used as fill valves in commercially available and are operated by pin projecting from the valve body. A rolling receiver fill tube 143 delivers water to the rolling receiver 122 and flush water discharge 123 if needed as shown in fig.20. A rolling receiver leak tray 144 is rotatably located below the valves and connectors to the rolling receiver support 121 by rolling receiver leak water tray axis pins 146. Water from any leak or overflow is collected by the rolling receiver leak water tray 144.

Fig. 22 is a perspective view of rolling receiver fill valve 142 and rolling receiver 122. The rolling receiver 122, supported by rolling receiver axis 122X, rolls in the direction to close rolling receiver fill valve 142 as it is being filled. In this embodiment rolling receiver fill valve 142 is activated by rolling receiver 122 by mechanical link. Fig.23 is a perspective view showing the rolling receiver 22 has received the set amount of water and closed rolling receiver fill valve 42 thereby stopping the water flow to rolling receiver 22.

Fig.33 is a side view of rolling receiver 122 that shows the receiver is unfilled. The receiver is designed in such a way that the center of gravity 320 is located between rolling receiver axis 122X and the discharge side of rolling receiver flushing system 120. The design of rolling receiver flushing system 120 ensures the location of center of gravity 320 by adapting means including properly locating the rolling receiver axis 122X, adding springs and mass across it.

When more water is added to the receiver the center of gravity 320 moves away from the discharge side of rolling receiver flushing system 120 and passes the rolling receiver axis 122X. When the required amount of water is received the rolling receiver 122 rolls into the position to close rolling receiver fill valve 142 as shown in Fig.23. The required amount is defined as the maximum amount of water that can be expelled from the receiver per flushing operation. The water level 390 in Fig.25 is designed to be the level that triggers the closure of rolling receiver fill valve 142. If the water continues to flow for any reason including a binding of rolling receiver axis 122X and not reaching the set location, rolling receiver fill valve 142 not closing completely the water level keeps rising to 391and flows out of the receiver through 125. The overflowing water is collected by the rolling receiver leak tray 144 shown in Fig.26.

Flushing operation

Fig.28 is a side view of the rolling receiver 122 in which the set amount of flush water is filled to water level 390. The receiver is ready to be rolled in the direction of the flush water channel 123.

Fig.29 is a side view of the rolling receiver 122 in which a portion of the water in the receiver is discharged into the flush water channel 123 by manually rolling the receiver on its rolling receiver axis 122X.

Fig.30 is a side view of the rolling receiver flushing system 120 in which the rolling receiver 122 is completely emptied into the flush water channel 123 and further rolling of the receiver is restricted. During the flushing operation all the water released from the receiver is discharged only into flush water channel 123. The design of the system ensures that there is no spillage of flush water into the leak water tray. As soon as the flushing operation starts by rolling the receiver the rolling receiver fill valve 142 is open and water is being added to the receiver and the filling operation as described before takes place.

Leak stoppage: Fig.26 is an elevation view showing the rolling receiver leak tray 144 without any leak water. The center of gravity 320 of the tray is between the rolling receiver leak water tray axis pin 146 and the rolling receiver master valve 141 attachment end. In this position the rolling receiver master valve 141 remains open allowing the water from the water source connector 140 pass through it.

Fig.27 is an elevation view showing the rolling receiver leak tray 144 has collected any and all the leaked water causing the center of gravity 320 to shift between the rolling receiver leak water tray axis pin 146 and the free end of the tray. This shift has caused the rolling receiver leak tray 144 to tilt from its normal position and to close rolling receiver master valve 141 through mechanical links. The amount of water collected in rolling receiver leak tray 144 that closes rolling receiver master valve 141 completely is ensured by the proper balancing of rolling receiver leak tray 144 and the force required by mechanical linkage between rolling receiver leak tray 144 and rolling receiver master valve 141 by means including mass adjustment across the rolling receiver leak water tray axis pin 146. Improper adjustment will prevent rolling receiver master valve 141 to close completely and water will overflow from rolling receiver leak tray 144 and starts collecting in the support. The flushing system is considered leak proof because of the very low probability of rolling receiver master valve 141 and rolling receiver fill valve 142 failing at the same time is very low if the system if designed and set correctly. The means of balancing the rolling receiver 122 and the rolling receiver leak tray 144 which includes adding mass at strategic locations, spring, counterbalance, etc. is not shown in the figures for simplicity reasons.

Leak alert and reset

Fig.26 shows the rolling receiver alert reset bar 145 is attached rotatably to leak water tray 144.

In fig.27 the leak water tray is tilted around leak water tray axis pin 146 and the rolling receiver alert reset bar 145 is raised up by a height h. The raised portion serves as a visible alert to the user. The means of support of the rolling receiver alert reset bar 145 at its top is not shown in figure.

To over-ride the closing of the rolling receiver master valve 141 and fill an empty receiver for flushing, the tip of the rolling receiver alert reset bar 145 is pressed and held down. This brings the tray to the pre-alert position and the rolling receiver master valve 141 is opened. When the receiver fills to the set amount of water the rolling receiver alert reset bar 145 is released and the rolling receiver leak water tray 144 returns to the alert position and the rolling receiver master valve 141 is closed again. This process can be repeated until the source of the leak is identified and corrected unless the leak in the system does not overflow the leak tray during filling operation.