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Title:
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING ELECTROPHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS OF PHOTOGRAPHIC NEGATIVES
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1990/011552
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A selected finish is applied to an electrophotographic print of a photographic negative at a fusing station (90). One of a plurality of finishing rollers (92, 92a, 92b, 92c) is moved into operative engagement with a fusing roller (95) to provide the desired finish.

Inventors:
PATTON DAVID LYNN (US)
Application Number:
PCT/US1990/001361
Publication Date:
October 04, 1990
Filing Date:
March 14, 1990
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
EASTMAN KODAK CO (US)
International Classes:
G03G13/20; G03G15/20; G03G21/00; (IPC1-7): G03G15/20
Foreign References:
US4791447A1988-12-13
US4639405A1987-01-27
Other References:
Research Disclosure, No. 161, September 1977, W.A. STRYJEWSKI: "Compound Roller Contact Fuser Concepts", see page 7, disclosure No. 16122
PATENT ABSTRACTS OF JAPAN, Volume 11, No. 68 (P-553)(2515), 28 February 1987; & JP-A-61230181 (Mitsubishi Electric Corp.) 14 October 1986
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Claims:
Claims :
1. A method of finishing a print of a photographic negative having a surface layer which can have a desired finish imparted to it, such print being produced by an electrophotographic copier in which the print is passed through a fusing station having a rotatable fusing roller; said method comprising the steps of: (a) electrophotographically forming a toner image of a photographic negative on a print; (b) passing the print through a fusing station to permanently fuse the toner image to the print; (c) applying a heat—finishing treatment to the print, said method being characterized in that said finishing treatment is applied by: (i) selecting a finishing roller from a plurality of rollers each of which can provide a different finish to the print surface; and (ii) moving such selected roller into operative relation with a rotatable lower roller to provide a desired finish to a print which passes through the nip formed by such cooperating rollers, said nip being provided with heat.
2. A method of finishing a print according to claim 1 characterized in that said lower roller is a fusing roller, said step (b) and said step (c) being merged, so that the fusing and finishing are realized by the same two rollers.
3. The method of claim 1 or 2 wherein the desired finish is a glossy, matte or textured finish.
4. An electrophotographic copier which produces a print of a photographic negative having a desired finish, comprising: (a) a fusing station comprised of two rollers; (b) a heatfinishing station to apply a finishing treatment to the print; said copier being characterized in that said heat finishing station comprises: (i) a plurality of finishing rollers, each of such finishing rollers having a surface selected to impart a different finish to a print; (ii) means for moving a selected one of such finishing rollers into operative engagement with lower roller to provide a nip; and (iii) means for providing heat to the nip so that when a print passes through the hip the desired finish is imparted to the print surface.
5. An electrophotographic copier according to claim 4 characterized in that said lower roller is a fusing roller, said fusing station being merged into said finishing station, so that the fusing and finishing are realized by the same two rollers.
6. The apparatus of claim 4 or 5 wherein there are three finishing rollers which respectively impart glossy, matte, and textured finishes to the surface of the print.
Description:
_ι_

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING ELECTROPHOTOGRAPHIC

PRINTS OF PHOTOGRAPHIC NEGATIVES Technical Field

This invention relates to method and apparatus for making prints from photographic negatives by fixing toner images to a support by means of heat and pressure. Background Art

In an electrostatographic process, an image formed by fusible toner particles is transferred to a support such as a copy sheet. This toner image is permanently fixed to the support by passing the support through a fuser.

Fused toner images normally exhibit a dull surface. In certain types of images, particularly colored toner images, it is desirable for the image to have a surface gloss. One example of apparatus for providing colored images with a surface gloss is shown in U.S. Patent No. 4,639,405. In this patent, there is disclosed fusing apparatus for fixing toner images to copy substrates comprising a first pair of rolls, one of which is provided with a conformable outer surface, and a second pair of rolls, one of which has a rigid outer surface. Copy sheets are passed sequentially through the first and second pairs of rolls, the first pair serving as a fuser means and the second pair as a glossing means.

In a photofinishing operation it is desirable to produce prints of negatives which have different surface finishes such as glossy, matte, and textured. In one arrangement, a roll of paper has a desired surface finish already on the surface of the paper used in a photofinisher. When a different surface is desired, the operator must shutdown the device producing the prints and change the paper sheets or roll to the one having the desired surface.

Disclosure of the Invention

It is an object of the present invention to overcome the above—described problem in the prior art and to provide a method and apparatus for making toner images of a negative and for fixing such toner images to produce a high-quality print with a desired surface finish.

In accordance with the present invention, there is disclosed a method of finishing a print of a photographic negative having a surface layer which can have a desired finish imparted to it, such print being produced by an electrophotographic copier in which the print is passed through a fusing station having a rotatable fusing roller, comprising the steps of electrophotographically forming a toner image of a photographic negative on a print, selecting a finishing roller from a plurality of rollers each of which can provide a different finish to the print surface, and moving such selected roller into operative relation with the rotatable fusing roller to provide a desired finish to the print which passes through the nip formed by such cooperating rollers .

In accordance with a disclosed embodiment of the invention, there is three rollers which respectively provide, glossy, matte and textured finishes.

In a electrophotographic copier which produces a print of a photographic negative having a desired finish, finishing apparatus comprises a fusing roller, a plurality of finishing rollers, each of such finishing rollers having a surface selected to impart a different finish to a print, means for moving a selected one of such finishing rollers into operative engagement with the fusing roller to provide a nip, and means for providing heat to the nip so that when a print passes through the nip the desired finish is imparted to the print surface.

An important feature of the present invention is that the fusing and finishing by the same two rollers without any deleterious effects such as paper curl or blister in. The disclosed method and apparatus can be used to fix toner images on copy sheets in a simplex mode (image on one side of the sheet) and in a duplex mode (image on both sides of the sheet). Brief Description of the Drawings FIG. 1 is a schematic in accordance with the invention of an electrophotographic apparatus for producing prints of photographic negatives; and

FIG. 2 is a cross section of two rollers in the fusing station of FIG. 1. Mode of Carrying Out the Invention

The present invention is adapted to be used in electrophotographic apparatus such as that shown and described in commonly-assigned U.S. Patent No. 4,025,186 issued May 24, 1977. As disclosed therein, a photoconductive member is moved past a series of work stations. At the start of the copy cycle, the photoconductive member receives an electrostatic charge at a charging station. A light image of a negative is then projected onto the charged photoconductive member at an exposure station to form a latent electrostatic image. The electrostatic image is developed with toner and a receiver brought into contact with the photoconductive member at a transfer station after the toner image is transferred to the receiver, it will be referred to as the print. The print carrying the unfused toner image is separated from the conductive member and passed through a fusing station comprised of a plurality of two rollers to permanently fuse the toner image to the print. The term "gloss, matte, textured" in the present application refers to the external finish of the print surface.

ith reference to FIG. 1, there is shown an apparatus for feeding a receiver 12 in direction 15 from a paper supply 20 in sheet form 21a or continuous web form from a paper roll 21b onto a transfer station 30, where the receiver 12 is brought into intimate contact with a photoconductive member 40 controlled by a logic and control unit 70. An operator provides an input via a keyboard 72 to the logic and control unit 70. The photoconductive member 40 shown as a rotatable drum receives an electrostatic charge from the charging station 50. Cyan, magenta, and yellow images of a photographic negative 60 are sequentially exposed by a flash lamp in a housing 75. The flash lamp is actuated by exposure central circuit 76 which is controlled by logic and control unit 70.

The light image of the negative passes through a lens 80 and is directed in direction 85 onto the photoconductive member 40. As the photoconductive member 40 rotates light images sequentially create cyan, magenta and yellow electrostatic latent image on the surface of the photoconductive member 40. The cyan, magenta and yellow electrostatic latent images are sequentially developed with toner from toner station 91 comprised of cyan toner station 91a, magenta toner station 91b and yellow toner station 91c. The developed colored toner images are then sequentially transferred to a receiver 12 brought into contact with the photoconductive member 40 at the transfer station 30. The receiver 12 carrying the three unfused toner images are separated from the conductive member and passed through a fusing station 90.

The fusing station 90 includes a plurality of individual selectable upper rollers, each with its own surface finish: roller 92 (without finish), glossy roller 92a, matte roller 92b and textured roller 92c. These rollers are capable of imparting the desired

finish to the receiver surface 12 while the receiver 12 passes betwe ι the selected upper rollers 92 and the lower fusing roller 95, a motor drive unit 140 and the logic and control unit 70 are capable of moving the selected upper roller into a cooperative position with a roller 95 to form a nip 115.

As the receiver 12 passes through the nip 115 formed by cooperating roller 92 and 95, the surface of the top fusing roller is imparted onto the receiver surface 12 providing respectively the glossy, matte and textured print surfaces. From the fusing station 90, the receivers 12 which will be now referred to as prints, are delivered to a receiver tray 120 and stacked in order. Reference can be made to commonly assigned U.S. Patent No. 4,639,405 which describes in detail the construction of fusing rollers.

The lower fusing roller 95 is continuously rotated by a motor (not shown) and provides the force for translating a receiver 12 in the nip 115 and for rotating the upper roller which has been disposed at the nip by a motor drive unit 140.

In operation, an operator using the keyboard 72 selects a desired finish for a print. The logic and control unit 70 controls the motor drive unit 140 which rotates the assembly 142 which positions the selected fusing roller in operative engagement with the drive roller 95. As the lower roller 95 is rotated, a receiver is driven through the nip 115 and the toner image is fused and has a desired finish imparted to the print surface.

Turning briefly to FIG. 2, there is shown a receiver 12a in the nip 115 between bottom roller 95 and a selected top roller 92b. Roller 92b has a matte surface finish. Roller 92b and lower roller 95 are identical in the preferred embodiment except for their surface finish and thus, only roller 92b will be described. Roller 92b comprises an inner cylinder 126

which is made from a conductive metal, and an elastomeric coating 128 formed on the cylinder 126. Although not shown, the coating 128 has its surface textured to impart a matte finish to a print. A infrared lamp 130, located generally at the center of roller 92b provides heat for such roller. Roller 92b can be, for example, approximately three inches in diameter and lamp 130 can be a 1,250 watt lamp. Rollers 92b and 95 are biased toward each other as is well known. In this example, both the upper and lower rollers have integral heat sources. However, it will be understood that only the bottom roller 95 could be provided with a heat source.

Returning now to FIG. 1, the motor drive unit 140 selectively moves one of the upper rollers into operative engagement with the lower fusing roller 95. The motor drive unit 140 includes a drive stepper motor is controlled by the logic and control unit 70. The stepper motor is connected to a rotatably mounted assembly 142. The stepper motor rotates assembly 142 in a clockwise direction until a selected roller is disposed in cooperative relation with roller 95. The assembly 142 includes a plurality of bifurcated arms 144, bearings and necessary mounting bracketry (not shown). The bifurcated arms (only one of which is shown) rotatably mount the upper rollers so that the selected roller can rotate as receiver 12 passes through the roller nip 115. Industrial Applicability and Advantages This invention is useful in apparatus which makes electrophotographic prints of negatives.

An important feature of the present invention is that the fusing and finishing by the same two rollers without any deleterious effects such as paper curl or blister in. The disclosed method and apparatus can be used to fix toner images on copy sheets in a simplex mode (image on one side of the

sheet) and in a duplex mode (image on both sides of the sheet).