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Title:
MODULAR INFRARED SPACE HEATER DEVICE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1981/002964
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A modular infrared space heater device (10) includes a housing (12) having an air inlet (24) and an air exhaust (50). An enclosure (27) is spaced within housing (12) and forms a heating chamber (30) having an inlet (28) communicating with the housing inlet (24) and a plurality of outlet openings (48) communicating with the exhaust (50). A plurality of open-ended ferrous metal conduits (44) are supported at one end from a ferrous metal sheet (42) in the chamber (30) between the outlet openings (48) and a plurality of infrared lamps (34). Each conduit (44) extends through a different one of the outlet openings (48) with sufficient clearance to provide an air flow passage between the conduit (44) and the boundary of the opening (48). A refractive lens plate (39) having a plurality of convex focussing surfaces (40) is provided between the lamps (34) and conduits (44) to focus infrared radiation on the supported ends of the conduits (44). A fan (22) circulates room air to be heated through inlet (24) into the heating chamber (30) and over the lamps (34), metal sheet (42) and conduits (44) therein, through conduits (44) and openings (48) and out air exhaust (50).

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Inventors:
JONES J (US)
Application Number:
PCT/US1980/000384
Publication Date:
October 15, 1981
Filing Date:
April 08, 1980
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
JONES J (US)
International Classes:
E04B2/74; A47B47/00; A47B47/04; A47B63/00; A47B73/00; A47B96/20; E04B2/32; F16B12/10; F16B12/44; F24H3/02; F24H3/04; F24H3/08; H05B3/00; H05B3/10; E04B2/02; F24H; H05B; (IPC1-7): H05B1/00; F24H3/02
Foreign References:
US4197447A1980-04-08
US1417427A1922-05-23
US1531518A1925-03-31
US1651890A1927-12-06
US1705812A1929-03-19
US1875752A1932-09-06
US2379705A1945-07-03
US2391207A1945-12-18
US2863980A1958-12-09
US2888007A1959-05-26
US2919338A1959-12-29
US3180972A1965-04-27
US2165523A1939-07-11
DE919040C1954-10-11
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. An infrared heater comprising: an enclosure means having an air inlet and and air exhaust; infrared radiation source means positioned within said enclosure means; a plurality of openended ferrous metal conduits positioned within said enclosure means betv/een said infrared radiation source means and said air exhaust and in proximity to said infrared radiation source to be irradiated thereby, said metal conduits being mounted on a ferrous metal sheet at one end of said conduits and being otherwise unsupported; refractive lens means positioned within said enclosure means between said infrared radiation source means and said metal conduits, said refractive lens means being a glass plate having a plurality of convex surfaces, each associated with a different metal conduit such that the center of each convex surface is aligned with the axial center of its associated metal conduit to thereby concentrate radiation from the infrared source means onto its associated metal conduit; and fan means, for circulating air through said enclosure means from said air inlet to said air exhaust such that the air circulating through said enclosure means flows through and around said metal conduits to absorb heat therefrom.
2. The infrared heater as in claim 1 wherein said metal conduits are constructed to have a' round cross section.
3. The infrared heater as in claim 1 wherein said infrared radiation source means is comprised of at least one infrared lamp.
4. The infrared heater as in claim 1 v/herεin the other end of said metal conduits extend from inside said enclosure means to outside of the walls of said enclosure means through said air exhaust without being in direct contact with said enclosure means.
5. The infrared heater as in claim 1 wherein said ferrous ^UREΛ iT OMP metal sheet has fenestrations defined therein, said sh being positioned between said refractive lens means an said metal conduits, with said metal conduits each hav said one end thereof mounted to said sheet with said mounted end of each of said conduits registering with of said fenestrations in said sheet.
6. An infrared heater comprising: enclosure means hav an air inlet and an air exhaust; infrared radiation so means positioned within said enclosure means; a plural of openended ferrous metal conduits positioned within said enclosure means between said infrared radiation source means and said air exhaust and in proximity to infrared radiation source means to be irradiated there said metal conduits being mounted on a ferrous metal s at one end of said metal conduits and being otherwise unsupported; refractive lens means positioned within s enclosure means between said infrared radiation source, means and said metal conduits, said refractive lens me being a glass plate having a plurality of convex surfa on the surface thereof facing said infrared radiation source means for concentrating radiation from said infrared radiation source means onto said metal condui said metal conduits and said convex surface being equa number and positioned such that the center of each con surface is associated and aligned with the axis line o the end of a different one of said metal conduits where the radiation from said infrared radiation source means passing through an individual one of said convex surfac is directed upon an associated one of said metal condui and fan means for circulating air through said enclosu means from said air inlet to said air exhaust such tha the air circulating through said enclosure means flows through and around said metal conduits to absorb heat therefrom.
7. The infrared heater as in claim β v/herein said r.eta conduits are constructed to have a round cross section.
8. The infrared heater as in claim 6 wherein said infrared radiation source means is comprised of at least one infrared lamp.
9. The infrared heater as in claim 6 wherein the other end of said metal conduits extend from inside said enclosure means to outside of the walls of said enclosure means through said air exhaust without being in direct contact with said enclosure means.
10. The infrared heater as in claim 6 wherein said ferrous metal sheet has fenestrations defined therein, said sheet being positioned betv/een said refractive lens means and said metal conduits, with said metal conduits each having said one end thereof mounted to said sheet with said mounted end of each of said conduit registering with one of said fenestrations in said sheet.
Description:
MODULARINFRARED SPACEHEATERDEVICE

Infrared heaters have been known for years but a continuing problem therewith has been the inefficiency thereof. The prior art includes Patent No. 3,180,972 issued to D. . Covault which depicts an end table heater including a fan, lamps, plate and conductor rocs over which air is circulated. Patent No. 3,575,582 shows an electric furnace with lamps, fan assembly, metal cylinder housed in cabinet structure wherein air. is circulated by fan through and around cylinder to absorb heat generated by lamps and concentrated in the galvanized metal- unit to provide heated air which exits through grills at the top of heating device. Other items of the prior art include the following U. S. Patent :o. 2,520,830 issued to

Borzner; No. 2,938,101 issued to Borzner; No. 3,104,307 issued to Garofalow et al; V.o . 1,534,571 issued to Conning; No. 2,527,013 issued to Kjelgaard; No. 2,919,338 issued to Covault et al; No. 1,694,351 issued to Long; and No. 2,888,007 issued to Tabor and showing solar radiation admitting windows. The present invention is designed to improve the efficiency over any of the above noted systems.

An object of the present invention is to ^ provide an unique and highly efficient electric heater.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a simply but highly efficient infrared space heater.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a electric heater wherein air is circulated over and around lamps and over and through ferrous conduits.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a electric space heater having an enclosure with infrared lamps, reflector, fan, refractive lens and ferrous metal conduits enclosed therein, with air being circulated through said enclosure by said fan.

A further object of this invention is to provide a modula electric space heater having an enclosure with a fan, infrared lamps, reflector, refractive lens, ferrous conduits in proximity to said lens, with air being drawn into the enclosure by the fan and circulated past the lamps around the lens and through and around the conduits and exhausted from the enclosure as heated air, with said enclosure adaptable for mounting ini furniture pieces such as end tables, occasional tables and other household furniture.

A further object of this invention is to provide a modula space heater providing a path for circulating air therethrough which maximizes the heat transfer to the circulating air.

A further object of this invention is to provide a modula infrared space heater providing a path for circulating ai therethrough which maximizes the heat transfer to the circulating air.

A further object of this invention is to provide an infrared space heater which employs a fan, infrared lamps refractive lens and ferrous conduits which may be employe in housings capable of being stacked one on top of the other to provide additional heating.

Figure 1 is a horizontal sectional view along line 1-1 of

Figure 2 of the subject modular heating device.

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view taken along the lines of 2-2 in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the subject modular heating device.

Figure 4 is an enlarged portion of a sectional view along the lines of 4-4 in Figure 1.

Figure 5 is an enlarged portion of a sectional view along the lines v of 5-5 in Figure 1.

Figure 6 is an enlarged portion of a sectional view taken along the lines of 6-6 in Figure 1.

Figure 7 is a view of the exhaust end of the modular heater.

Figure 8 is a diagram of the circuit employed with the modular heater.

Figure 9 is a portion of a sectional viev/ taken along 9-9 in

Figure 6.

Referring to the drawings wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, numeral 10 generally refers to the modular heating system of the invention. The heating system is enclosed in a metal rectangular solid shaped housing 12 as shown in perspective in Figure 3 and which by way of example and not of limitation may be one foot (30.48 cm) in height, two feet (60.96 cm) in length and fifteen inches (38.10 cr:) in width. The size of housing*.12 may, of course, be increased or decreased without departing fro— the spirit or concept of the invention. Housing 12 has located there- wit in at one end as shown in Figures 1 and 2 an electric motor 22a driven enclosed fan 22 of the squirrel cage variety

commercially available such as manufactured " by Fasco

Industries of Ozark, Missouri, or Emerson Electric Compan of St. Louis, Missouri. Typically the electric motor of fan unit will be of the fractional horsepower variety and the fan will have a capacity in the range of 120 C.F.M. unit 22 is located between one end of housing 12 and meta sheet 26 as seen in Figures 1 and 2. Sheet 26 is one end a rectangular-box shaped enclosure 27 forming a heating chamber 30 which has top 14, bottom 15, sides 18 and opposite end 16; the enclosure 27 being fully within oute housing 12 and being suspended with at least one inch (2. cm) clearance on all sides from housing 12 for safety purposes. The heating chamber 30 formed by enclosure 27, suspended relative to outer housing 12 by struts therebetween (not shown). Fan unit 22 is mounted on meta sheet 26 in such manner that it exhausts through opening in 26 into heating chamber 30. In heating chamber 30, th are located electric- lamp sockets or holders 32 which are mounted on sheet 26 on either side of opening 28. Lamp sockets 32 are of the commercially available variety havin a threaded interior to facilitate reception of the threade bases of infrared lamps 34. Lamps 34 are commercially available from the Sylvania, General Electric or estinghouse companies and are preferably of 250 or 375 v/attage although other wattage lamps could be used without departing from the scope of this invention. Positioned across heating chamber 30 is reflector 36 in such manner that it is in continuous contact with bottom 15 and sides of the chamber 30 but is separated from top 14 as seen in Figure 2, to allow air to pass thereover. Reflector 36 ha openings therethrough at 38 through whic lamps 34 are inserted preparatory to insertion into iarvp holders 32.

As seen in Figures 1 and 2, a heat-tempered refracting lens generally referred to as 39 is positioned in continuous contact with and in perpendicular relationship to sides 18 and top 14 of heat chamber ΞC. Lens 39 is positioned in spaced relationship to heat chamber

15 as seen in Figure 2 to permit air passage thereunder.

As best seen in Figure 4, lens 39 has series of circular bubble or convex shaped surfaces 40 projecting toward lamps 34. Lens 39 is, as noted above, a heat-tempered refracting lens made of commercially available glass and by way of example and not of limitation may be made from

Corning Glass No. 7760. Lens 39 serves to concentrate infrared radiation from lamps 34 on ferrous sheet 42 and - ferrous conduits 44 hereinafter described.

Positioned in continuous contact v/ith and in perpendicular relationship to sides 18 and bottom 15 is ferrous metal sheet 42 which is mounted in a spaced apart relationship to top 14 to permit air passage thereover. Welded or otherwise solely mounted on and in perpendicular relationship to sheet 42 are series of ferrous metal conduits 44. The number of conduits 44 is matched to the number of "bubbles" 40 in lens 39 and aligned therewith such that the radiation transmitted through each "bubble" in lens 39 is concentrated on the closest end 'of its associated conduit 44. Sheet 42 contains round fenestrations 46 as shown in Figure 5 equal in number to the number of "bubbles" 40 in lens 39 and equal to the number of conduits 44. Each fenestration registers on one side of sheet 42 with the opening of the associated conduit 44. Thus, each conduit is welded or otherwise attached at one end around the periphery of its associated fenestration in such a manner as to channel air passing through the fenestrations 46 of sheet 42 directly into the associated conduits 44.

The unsupported ends of conduits 44 extend through fenestrations 48 as shown in Figure 6 in sheet 16 to exhaust just short of a screen 50 in the" end wall of housing 12. The fenestrations 48 in sheet 16 are somewhat larger than the outside diameter of the conduits 44; thus the conduits 44 extend therethrough v/ithout touching 16 and v.-ith sufficient clearance to allow air to pass through

the fenestrations 48 in 16 around the outside of conduit 44. Conduits 44 are shown as angled to increase the hea exchange surface area over which and through which air flows but, of course, conduits 44 could be straight or otherwise increased in length if desired.

Adjacent fan unit 22 is a louvered opening 24 as seen in

Figure 3 through v/hich air is drawn in as seen in Figure

1 and- 2.

The circuit diagram' for the invention is seen in Figure wherein a conventional a.c. source 60 is series connecte to a conventional thermostat 66 and relay coil 62 having associated contacts 64. Connected across source 60 when contacts 64 are closed are fan motor 22a and lamps 34.

Series connected to the parallel combination of lamps an fan motor are one commercially available 140°F resettabl breaker 68 such as Model L 140-2 of Texas Instruments an one one time burn out 160°F breaker 70 such as that manufactured by Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, Model RD 070-002.

The voltage requirements of thermostat 66 may be provide by a step down transformer not shown from source 60 or b another power supply.

Since housings 12 are designed to be stacked one on the other v/hile in operation to facilitate greater heating capacity when required, there is provided an opening (no shown) in 12 and one of the sides 18 to facilitate replacement of lamps 34.

Obviously the size of the unit may be varied to include

«« more or less lamps, fans, lenses and conduits without departing from the scope of this invention.

The size of the conduits can, of course, vary but in practice ferrous conduits of the σuarter inch size have

been found satisfactory. While as elsewhere herein noted, conduits 44 are shown as angled, they could be looped, formed in a coil fashion- or angled as a series of 's to increase heat transfer surface area and yet be within the scope of this invention.

Housing 12 may be altered in shape as, for example, it may be cylindrical in shape or in the shape of a cube and may be mounted within furniture pieces such as in end tables, occasional tables, within chests of drawers or any other furniture piece large enough to accommodate the physical and thermal requirements. Further, or course, the housing 12 may be mounted in walls, ceilings or floors provided adequate air flow and insulation requirements are met.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Modifications other than those noted herein will be apparent to those skilled in the art; thus it. is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and/or operation shown in the figures and described in this specification. Rather, all equivalents and modifications that may be resorted to fall within the scope of the claimed invention.

hen thermostatic switch 66 closes upon the temperature at the situs of employment dropping to a predetermined temperature, coil 62 is energized closing contacts 64. Upon closure of the latter, lamps 34 are energized and fan motor 22a is energized. Fan unit 22, upon energization, draws air through louvered intake 24 into housing 12. Air then is drawn into the axial intake of 22 as shown by arrows in Figure 1 and is exhausted through opening 28 into heating chamber 30. In chamber 30 the air is

'. circulated up past the bases and necks of lamps 34 and over the top of reflector 36 as seen in Figure 2. The air is then circulated down over the bulb ends of lamps 34 then under lens 39 toward ferrous metal sheet 42. A portion of the air then goes through the fenestrations 46

OMPI

of sheet 42 and enters conduits 44. Some air is circulated ove the top of sheet 42 (between the top edg of sheet 42 and top 14) and some air may be allowed to enter the space between 42 and 16 through an adjustable opening 43 in 42 near bottom 15 to regulate air flowing over the outsides of conduits 44 and through fenestratio 48 in 16. The air is heated as it passes through and ov conduits 44 and is exhausted through screen 50 in housin 12 to the room in which the unit is employed. When the room temperature rises sufficiently to open thermostat 66 thus deenergizing relay 62 and opening contacts 64, the lamps 34 and fan motor 22a will be deenergized. The process would then be repeated ' as room temperature lowers where the unit is employed.- The refractive lens 39 serve to maximize heating of the air in chamber 30 by concεntratng the infrared rays of lamps 34 on sheet 42 an the ends of conduits 44 closest to lens 39. As the infrared field heats the ferrous conduits and sheet 42, the air circulated ther.eover absorbs the heat and carries it through duct 50 into the room. Of course, the circulating air will absorb some heat from ferrous sheets 26', 18, 15, 14 and 16 in addition to that from 42 and 44.

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