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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
MOVEABLE STEREO SOUND SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1991/015420
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A moveable stereo sound system (14) for use in a room (10) having a ceiling (12), the system (14) is supported by a track (30) or a cable (80, 90, 100) coupling the sound system (14) to the ceiling (12) for movement with respect to the ceiling (12). A drive motor (78, 104) is coupled to the track or cable for causing the system (14) to move with respect to the ceiling (12) either horizontally and/or vertically. Control switches (82, 98) are coupled to the drive motor (78, 104) for selectively causing the sound system (14) to move with respect to the ceiling (12) to position the sound system (14) at a desired location in the room (10). A power source is coupled to the driving motor (78, 104), to the control switch (82, 98) and to the sound system (14) to operate them.

Inventors:
BENJELLOUN KAMAL (US)
Application Number:
PCT/US1991/002455
Publication Date:
October 17, 1991
Filing Date:
April 05, 1991
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
BENJELLOUN KAMAL (US)
International Classes:
A47B81/06; E01B25/22; F16M11/18; F16M11/42; H04R1/02; (IPC1-7): B66B9/00
Foreign References:
US2821146A1958-01-28
US3681542A1972-08-01
US4243147A1981-01-06
US4393785A1983-07-19
US4570543A1986-02-18
US3263627A1966-08-02
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS
1. A moveable stereo sound system for use in a room having a ceiling, said system comprising: means coupling said stereo sound system to said ceiling for movement with respect to said ceiling; drive means coupled to said coupling means for causing said system to move with respect to said ceiling; control means coupled to said drive means for selectively causing said sound system to move with respect "to said ceiling to position said sound system at a desired location in said room; and a power source coupled to said driving means, said control means and said sound system.
2. A system as in Claim 1 wherein said means for coupling said system to said ceiling comprises: a steel cable coupling said system to said ceiling for holding the weight of said system; and electrical cables coupling said power source to said sound system.
3. A system as in Claim 2 further comprising means for attaching said cable to said system for rotation about a vertical axis to enable said sound system to be faced in any desired direction in azimuth in said room.
4. A system as in Claim 2 further comprising: a rotatable drum for receiving said steel cable; and motor means coupled to said drum as said drive means for selectively rotating said drum in either direction to raise or lower said sound system to a desired height.
5. A system as in Claim 4 wherein said motor means is located adjacent said ceiling.
6. A system as in Claim 4 further comprising: a housing for said sound system; and said motor means being located in said sound system housing.
7. A system as in Claim 2 further comprising: a support track mounted in said ceiling; electrical conductors mounted in an insulated relationship on said tracks; means coupling said power source to said electrical conductors; and coupling said conductors to said sound system in any desired position of said sound system along said track for operating said sound system.
8. A system as in Claim 7 further comprising: a carrier system depending from said track for horizontal movement along said track; and means coupling said sound system cable to said carrier system such that said sound system is moveable with said . carrier system along said track.
9. A system as in Claim 8 further comprising: motive means coupled to said carrier system and associated with said track; first motor means coupled to said motive means as said drive means for driving said carrier system along said track; and said control means being coupled to said first motor means for selectively moving said sound system in a horizontal direction along said track to position said sound system in a desired location.
10. A system as in Claim 9 further including: a rotatable drum for receiving said steel cable; and second motor means coupled to said drum for selectively rotating said drum in either direction to raise or lower said sound system to a desired height.
11. A method of positioning a stero sound system in a room with a ceiling comprising the steps of: coupling the stero sound system to the ceiling for movement with respect to the ceiling; coupling drive means between said stero sound system and said ceiling for moving said system with respect to said ceiling; selectively causing said drive means to move said system with respect to said ceiling to position said sound system at a desired location in said room; and coupling a power source to said sound system for operating said system.
Description:
MOVEAB E STEREO SOUND SYSTEM

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to sound systems and specifically relates to a stero sound system that may be mounted to and depend from a room ceiling such that it can be moved vertically with respect to the ceiling or horizontally along a track attached to the ceiling such that the sound system may be positioned in the room in a desired location.

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Stereo sound systems including discs, magnetic tapes and the like are in great demand in this and other countries. Such systems are housed in many different types of housings some of which are portable and may be moved from one position in a room to another to suit the convenience of the user. However, in most cases, the units are not moveable at all or must be disassembled, moved and reassembled in a new location.

The present invention overcomes these disadvantages by providing a moveable stereo sound system that depends from the ceiling of a room and which can be moved with respect to the ceiling to a position that is satisfactory to the viewer. In one embodiment of the invention, the sound system is encased in a housing depending from the ceiling in some well-known fashion as by a steel cable and which is moveable by hand in a direction closer to or further removed from the ceiling and which is rotatable with respect to the ceiling about a vertical axis so that the viewer can adjust both the height and the azimuth of view of the system.

In the preferred embodiment, the encased sound system depends from a track attached to the ceiling having means associated therewith for not only moving the housing horizontally along the track to a different location within the room but also for enabling the housing to be moved vertically

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

3 with respect to the ceiling so that the height can be adjusted. In this embodiment, a motor unit may be attached either within the ceiling or within the housing encasing the sound system and may have a drum attached thereto carrying the support cable as well as the electrical power cords as the unit is moved towards or away from the ceiling. .

Thus it is an object of the present invention to provide a moveable stereo sound system for use in a room having a ceiling and having means coupling the stereo sound system to the ceiling for movement with respect to the ceiling. The coupling means may be a continuous or noncontinuous track, a steel cable or other type of support cable, or a counterbalanced weight to enable the sound system to be moved vertically manually with respect to the ceiling. it is also an object of the present invention to provide a drive means coupled through the track or the cable for causing the system to move horizontally and/or vertically with respect to the ceiling.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide control means coupled to the drive motor for selectively causing the sound system to move either vertically or horizontally with respect to the ceiling to position the sound system at a desired location in the room.

SUBSTITUTESHEET

O 91/15420

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Thus, the present invention relates to a moveable stereo sound system for use in a room with a ceiling and comprising means such as a continuous or noncontinuous track or cable coupling the stereo sound system to the ceiling for movement with respect to the ceiling, drive means such as a motor coupled to the track or cable for causing the system to move with respect to the ceiling, control means such as up-down and right-left switches coupled to the drive means for selectively causing the sound system to move with respect to the ceiling to position the sound system at a desired location in the room and a power source coupled to the driving means, the control means and the sound system.

The invention also relates to a method of positioning a stereo sound system in a room with a ceiling comprising the steps of coupling the stereo sound system to the ceiling with a track or cable for movement with respect to the ceiling, coupling drive means such as an electric motor between the stereo sound system and the ceiling for moving the system with respect to the ceiling, selectively causing the drive means to move the system with respect to the ceiling to position the sound system at a desired location in the room and coupling a power source to the drive means and the sound system for operating the system.

SUBSTITUTESHEET

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other objects of the present invention will be more clearly understood in connection with the accompanying detailed description of the attached drawings in which:

FIGURE 1A is a diagrammatic representation of one method for attaching the sound system to the ceiling;

FIGURE IB is a diagrammatic representation of how a counterbalance system may be used with the device illustrated in FIGURE 1A;

FIGURE 2A is a schematic representation of the preferred second embodiment of the present invention that utilizes a continuous or noncontinuous track formed in the ceiling which not only supports the sound system but enables it to be moved both horizontally and vertically with respect to the ceiling;

FIGURE 2B is a partial cross-sectional view of the track utilized in FIGURE 2A to support the sound unit;

FIGURE 2C is a partial cross-sec ional view of the mounting bracket of FIGURE 2B illustrating the manner in which the sound system is attached thereto;

FIGURE 2D is a partial cross-sectional side view of the support system shown in FIGURES 2B and 2C and illustrating a chain drive mounted to and forming part of the mounting system to enable the sound unit to be moved in a horizontal direction with respect to the ceiling;

SUBSTITUTESHEET

h

FIGURE 2E is a schematic representation of the manner in which the electrical power is coupled to the sound system as the sound system is moved along the track of FIGURE 2B;

FIGURE 3 is a schematic representation of another embodiment of the present invention in which the motor for controlling the vertical position of the sound system is mounted adjacent the ceiling with the electrical control thereof depending from the ceiling;

FIGURE 4 is a schematic representation of another embodiment of the present invention in which the motor for positioning the sound system vertically with respect to the ceiling is mounted within the housing encasing the sound system with the electrical controls depending from the sound system; and FIGURE 5 is a schematic representation of still another embodiment of the present invention in which the motor controlling the vertical position of the sound system is mounted adjacent the ceiling with the controls for operating the motor forming part of the sound system itself.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIGURE 1A is a partial schematic view of a room generally designated by the numeral 10. The room 10 has a ceiling 12 from which depends a device such as a moveable stereo sound system 14 by means of a conduit or pipe 16. This unit can be adjusted manually to move it towards or away from the ceiling to adjust the height for the particular viewer who may be located at seat 18, for instance. It may also be rotated about the vertical axis in either direction to change the azimuth angle of view. FIGURE IB is a partial schematic representation of the manner in which the unit 14 could be attached to the ceiling. As can be seen in FIGURE IB, a housing or pipe 16 surrounds a lift cable 18 which may be, for example, a steel cable passing over pulleys 20 and 22 to a counterweight 24. The electrical cord 26 passes freely through the conduit 16 to the stereo unit 14 and is coupled at the other end to any convenient power source. Thus, as can be seen in FIGURE IB, to adjust the unit 14 in elevation, one may need merely to lift up or pull down on the unit and it will easily adjust to the desired position. If desired, a flange 28 can surround the conduit 16 above the ceiling 12 so as to provide stability to conduit 16 and maintain the unit in a vertical plane. Further, the cable 18 may be pivotally attached to unit 14 at connection joint 19 in

any well-known manner as by a swivel, for example, to enable unit 14 to be rotated about the vertical axis to change the azimuth angle of view and face in any desired direction.

FIGURE 2A illustrates an alternate and preferred embodiment of. the present invention in which the ceiling 12 of room 10 has a track 30 attached thereto in any well-known manner. The track may be either continuous or noncontinuous. Attached to the track 30 by a cable 31 is a sound system 14. The sound system 14 may have within its own housing a motor and drum coupled to cable 31 (as shown in FIGURE 4) to raise and lower the system 14 in a vertical plane with respect to the ceiling. In addition, a motor (not shown) above ceiling 12 may be connected to a gear 32 that engages a chain drive (illustrated in FIGURE 2D) attached to and forming a part of track 30 and operated by a single pole, double throw switch 34 on the wall of room 10 in order to move the unit 14 in either direction along track 30. Thus, the unit in FIGURE 2A can be positioned both horizontally and vertically with respect to the viewer.

One version of the track system 30 is illustrated in FIGURE 2B. It comprises a T-shaped frame 36 extending through ceiling

12 and attached to a ceiling joist 38 by means of bolts 40 and

42 or attached in some other well-known manner. Electrical conductors 44 and 46 are attached to the frame 36 in an insulated manner to prevent any electrical contact between the

O 91 1 y conductors and the frame 36. Preferably, the frame 36 is made of heavy duty metal such as steel or high impact plastic.

Therefore, the conductors 44 and 46, which normall .will be copper, have insulators associated therewith that electrically insulate them from the steel frame 36 in a well-known manner.

FIGURE 2C and FIGURE 2D are partial cross-sectional views" of the frame 36 and a carrier unit 48 attached thereto and from which is suspended the stereo sound system. As can be seen in

FIGURE 2C, the carrier system has first and second rollers 50 and 52 which ride on the top and either side of the horizontal portion of the T-shaped frame 36. Arms 54 and 56 extend from each of the rollers 50 and 52 and form a generally U-shaped portion which has a cable or other connecting device 58 extending from the bottom portion thereof and to which the sound system 14 is attached. A third roller wheel 60 is mounted on the underside of the T-shaped -frame 36 to prevent vertical movement of the carrier system 48 with respect to the T-shaped frame 36.

FIGURE 2D is a side view of the carrier system illustrated in FIGURE 2C and illustrates a second roller wheel 62 on the bottom side of the T-shaped frame 36 to prevent a suspended unit 14 from swinging in a vertical plane parallel to the longitudinal axis of the track. Further, as can be seen in

FIGURE 2D, the chain drive 64 is attached along the edges of

the lower horizontal portion of the T-shaped support or frame 36 in any well-known manner. The chain 64 can be also attached to the carrier assembly 48 in any particular manner desired such as, for example, to arm 54. FIGURE 2E is a partial cross sectional view of the novel carrier system illustrating the manner in which the power on conductors 44 and 46 is coupled through resilient conductive fingers 68 and 70 and conductors 72 and 74 to the stereo system for use thereby. It will be realized that the conductive fingers 68 and 70 are for example only and other alternatives, such as the use of slip rings, could be utilized to couple the power to the stereo sound system. The conductors 72 and 74 are shown passing through the inside of the frame 66 which is attached to frame 58, but obviously the wires could be on the outside of the frame and extend to the stereo unit in that manner.

FIGURE 3 is a schematic representation of an alternate embodiment of the present invention in which the stereo sound system 14 is suspended by a cable 80 from a housing unit 76 attached to ceiling 12 in any well-known manner. Within housing unit 76 is a motor 78 controlled by switches 82 connected to motor 78 through conduit 84. Thus, switches 82 may be a wall unit that can be utilized to move the system 14 vertically by causing motor 78 to hoist or lower the sound

system 14 as desired. Motor 78 has a drum for reeling the cable 80 and a drum for reeling the electrical wire 86 that extend alongside cable 80. Such motors are well known in the art and are commercially available and thus will not be described in detail here. Depending from stereo unit 14 are cables 88 which may be earphones or control switches that control various features of the stereo sound system 14.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIGURE 4, the motor 94 is housed in the sound system 14 itself and receives power from a source by conductors extending from ceiling contacts along cable 90, not shown in FIGURE 4 but illustrated in FIGURE 2E. The motor 94 may cause the unit 14 to change its vertical position closer to or further away from the ceiling 12. The control 98 is coupled through a conduit 96 to operate the motor 94.

In the alternate embodiment disclosed in FIGURE 5, the system 14 is coupled through cable 100 to a motor 104 found in a housing 102 attached to the ceiling 12. Again, the motor 104 raises and lowers the unit 14 with respect to the ceiling 12. The controls for operating the motor 104 to raise and lower unit 14 may be found in the control panel 106 of the stereo sound system 14 itself.

In FIGURE 2A, of course, the housing in which unit 14 is enclosed may be of the type shown in FIGURE 4 thus enabling

unit 14 to 'move both horizontally and vertically with respect to the ceiling 12.

Thus, there has been disclosed a novel moveable stereo sound system for use in a room having a ceiling. A device such as a continuous or noncontinuous track, telescoping pipe, or cable couples the stereo sound system to the ceiling for movement with respect to the ceiling. The movement may be either vertically or horizontally. A drive motor is coupled to the cable or track to cause the system to move vertically with respect to the ceiling. Control switches in the form of up/down or right/left switches are coupled to drive motors for selectively causing the sound system to move vertically and horizontally with respect to the ceiling to adjust the position of the sound system at a desired location in the room. The drive motor may have a rotatable drum for receiving both the steel cable and the electrical cable to move the unit vertically with respect to the ceiling. A track mounted on the ceiling may have a chain drive attached thereto and driven by a motor to move the unit horizontally in either direction about the room along the track.

While the invention has been described in connection with a preferred embodiment, it is not intended to limit the scope of the invention to the particular form set forth, but, on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.